mvc show pdf in div : Adding text fields to a pdf SDK control project wpf azure web page UWP 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN31-part1368

Sense, respond, adjust – delivering relevant e-communications through
monitoring customer behaviour
To be able to identify customers in the categories of value, growth, responsiveness or
defection risk we need to characterise them using information about them which indi-
cates their purchase and campaign-response behaviour. This is because the past and
current actual behaviour is often the best predictor of future behaviour. We can then
seek to influence this future behaviour.
Digital marketing enables marketers to create a cycle of:
Monitoring customer actions or behaviours and then …
Reacting with appropriate messages and offers to encourage desired behaviours
Monitoring response to these messages and continuing with additional communica-
tions and monitoring.
Or if you prefer, simply:
Sense  Respond  Adjust
The sensing is done through using technology to monitor visits to particular content
on a web site or clicking on particular links in an e-mail. Purchase history can also be
monitored, but since purchase information is often stored in a legacy sales system it is
important to integrate this with systems used for communicating with customers. The
response can be done through messages on-site, or in e-mail and then adjustment occurs
through further sensing and responding.
This ‘sense and respond’ technique has traditionally been completed by catalogue
retailers such as Argos or Littlewoods Index using a technique known as ‘RFM analysis’.
This technique tends to be little known outside retail circles, but e-CRM gives great
potential to apply it in a range of techniques since we can use it not only to analyse pur-
chase history, but also visit or log-in frequency to a site or online service and response
rates to e-mail communications.
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
282
F Discount rate – since the value of money held at a point in time will decrease due to
inflation, a discount rate is applied to calculate the value of future returns in terms of
current day value.
G NPV contribution – this is the profitability after taking the discount factor into account to
give net present value in future years. This is calculated by multiplying row E by row F.
H Cumulative NPV contribution – this adds the previous year’s NPV for each year.
I Lifetime value at net present value – this is a value per customer calculated by dividing row
H by the initial number of donors in Year 1.
Based on preliminary tests with improved targeting, it is estimated that with the new system
retention rates will increase from 50% to 51% in the first year, increasing by 5% per year as
currently. It is estimated that in Year 1 donations per annum will increase from £100 per annum
to £102 per annum, increasing by £20 per year as currently.
Question
Using the example of the lifetime value for the current donor base with the current system,
calculate the LTV with the new system.
Adding text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add text to pdf using preview
Adding text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text to pdf document in preview
Recency Frequency Monetary value (RFM) analysis
RFM is sometimes known as FRAC, which stands for: Frequency, Recency, Amount,
(obviously equivalent to monetary value), Category (types of product purchased – not
included within RFM). We will now give an overview of how RFM approaches can be
applied, with special reference to online marketing. We will also look at the related con-
cepts of latency and hurdle rates.
Recency
This is the Recency of customer action, e.g. purchase, site visit, account access, e-mail
response, e.g. 3 months ago. Novo (2003) stresses the importance of recency when he says:
Recency, or the number of days that have gone by since a customer completed an action
(purchase, log-in, download, etc.) is the most powerful predictor of the customer repeat-
ing an action … Recency is why you receive another catalogue from the company shortly
after you make your first purchase from them.
Online applications of analysis of recency include: monitoring through time to identify
vulnerable customers, scoring customers to preferentially target more responsive cus-
tomers for cost savings.
Frequency
Frequency is the number of times an action is completed in a period of a customer
action, e.g. purchase, visit, e-mail response, e.g. 5 purchases per year, 5 visits per month,
5 log-ins per week, 5 e-mail opens per month, 5 e-mail clicks per year. Online applica-
tions of this analysis include combining with recency for ‘RF targeting’.
Monetary value
The Monetary value of purchase(s) can be measured in different ways, e.g. average order
value of £50, total annual purchase value of £5,000. Generally, customers with higher
monetary values tend to have a higher loyalty and potential future value since they have
purchased more items historically. One example application would be to exclude these
customers from special promotions if their RF scores suggested they were actively pur-
chasing. Frequency is often a proxy for monetary value per year since the more products
purchased, the higher the overall monetary value. It is possible, then, to simplify analy-
sis by just using Recency and Frequency. Monetary value can also skew the analysis with
high-value initial purchases.
Latency
Latency is related to Frequency – it is the average time between customer events in the
customer lifecycle. Examples include the average time between web site visits, second
and third purchase and e-mail clickthroughs. Online applications of latency include put-
ting in place triggers that alert companies to customer behaviour outside the norm, for
example increased interest or disinterest, and then to manage this behaviour using e-
communications  or  traditional  communications.  For  example,  if  a  B2B  or  B2C
organisation with a long interval between purchases would find that the average latency
increased for a particular customer, then they may be investigating an additional pur-
chase (their recency and frequency would likely increase also). E-mails, phone calls or
direct mail could then be used to target this person with relevant offers according to
what they were searching for.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
283
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text field pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
Hurdle rate
According to Novo (2003), ‘hurdle rate’ refers to the percentage of customers in a group
(such as in a segment or on a list) who have completed an action. It is a useful concept,
although the terminology doesn’t really describe its application. Its value is that it can
be used to compare the engagement of different groups or to set targets to increase
engagement with online channels as the examples below show:
20% of customers have visited in past 6 months
5% of customers have made 3 or more purchases in year
 
60% of registrants have logged on to system in year
 
30% have clicked through on e-mail in year.
Grouping customers into different RFM categories 
In the examples above, each division for Recency, Frequency and Monetary value is
placed in an arbitrary position to place a roughly equal number of customers in each
group. This approach is also useful since the marketer can set thresholds of value rele-
vant to their understanding of their customers.
RFM analysis involves two techniques for grouping customers
1 Statistical RFM analysis
This involves placing an equal number of customers in each RFM category using quin-
tiles of 20% (10 deciles can also be used for larger databases) as shown in Figure 6.12.
The figure also shows one application of RFM with a view to using communications
channels more effectively. Lower-cost e-communications can be used to correspond with
customers who use only services more frequently since they prefer these channels while
more expensive offline communications can be used for customers who seem to prefer
traditional channels.
2 Arbitrary divisions of customer database
This approach is also useful since the marketer can set thresholds of value relevant to
their understanding of their customers.
For example, RFM analysis can be applied for targeting using e-mail according to how
a customer interacts with an e-commerce site. Values could be assigned to each customer
as follows:
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
284
Figure 6.12 RFM analysis
Frequency
5
Highest
Each R quintile contains
20% of all customers
R = 5, F = 5 contains
10% of customers
Lowest
Note here boundaries are arbitrary in order to place an equal number into each group
4
3
Direct mail
Phone
E-mail/web
only
2
1
Monetary
5
4
3
2
1
Recency
5
4
3
2
1
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add editable text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
adding text to pdf online; add text to pdf file
Recency:
1 – Over 12 months
2 – Within last 12 months
3 – Within last 6 months
4 – Within last 3 months
5 – Within last 1 month
Frequency:
1 – More than once every 6 months
2 – Every 6 months
3 – Every 3 months
4 – Every 2 months
5 – Monthly
Monetary value:
1 – Less than £10
2 – £10–£50
3 – £50–£100
4 – £100–£200
5 – More than £200
Simplified versions of this analysis can be created to make it more manageable, for
example a theatre group uses these nine categories for its direct marketing:
Oncers (attended theatre once)
Recent oncer
attended <12 months
Rusty oncer
attended >12 <36 months
Very rusty oncer
attended in 36+ months
Twicers:
Recent twicer
attended < 12 months
Rusty twicer
attended >12, < 36 months
Very rusty twicer
attended in 36+ months
2+ subscribers:
Current subscribers
booked 2+ events in current season
Recent
booked 2+ last season
Very rusty
booked 2+ more than a season ago
Another example, with real-world data is shown in Figure 6.13. You can see that plot-
ting  customer  numbers  against  recency  and  frequency  in  this  way  for  an online
company gives a great visual indication of the health of the business and groups that
can be targeted to encourage greater repeat purchases. 
Product recommendations and propensity modelling
‘Propensity modelling’ is one name given to the approach of evaluating customer charac-
teristics and behaviour, in particular previous products or services purchased, and then
making recommendations for the next suitable product. However, it is best known as
recommending the ‘Next Best Product’ to existing customers. 
A related acquisition approach is to target potential customers with similar character-
istics through renting direct mail or e-mail lists or advertising online in similar locations.
The following recommendations are based on those in van Duyne et al. (2003).
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
285
Propensity
modelling
A name given to the
approach of evaluating
customer
characteristics and
behaviour and then
making
recommendations for
future products.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text fields to pdf; how to add text to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text box to pdf; add text box in pdf document
1 Create automatic product relationships [i.e. Next Best Product]. A low-tech approach to
this is, for each product, to group together products, previously purchased together.
Then for each product rank product by number of times purchased together to find
relationships.
2 Cordon off and minimise the ‘real estate’ devoted to related products. An area of screen
should be reserved for ‘Next-best product prompts’ for up-selling and cross-selling.
However, if these can be made part of the current product they may be more effective.
3 Use familiar ‘trigger words’. That is, familiar from using other sites such as Amazon.
Such  phrases  include:  ‘Related  products’,  ‘Your  recommendations’,  ‘Similar’,
‘Customers who bought …’, ‘Top 3 related products’.
4 Editorialise about related products. That is, within copy about a product.
5 Allow quick purchase of related products.
6 Sell-related product during checkout. And also on post-transaction pages, i.e. after one
item has been added to basket or purchased.
Note that techniques do not necessarily require an expensive recommendations
engine except for very large sites. 
An example of a site that has simple rules to show related products is UK dot-com
Firebox (www
.fir
ebox.com
), shown in Figure 6.14.
An example of an e-retailer that uses many of the techniques described in this section
is Debenhams (see Case Study 6).
Loyalty schemes
Loyalty schemes are often used to encourage customer extension and retention. You will
be familiar with schemes run by retailers such as the Tesco Clubcard or Nectar schemes
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
286
Figure 6.13 Example of RF analysis
Source: Patron (2004)
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
5
4
3
2
1
5x
4x
3x
2x
1x
N
o
.
o
f
c
u
s
t
o
m
e
r
s
Recency
Frequency
Scoring
Recency:
Low
1 = > 24 months
2 = 19–24 months
3 = 13–18 months
4 = 7–12 months
5 = 0–6 months
High
Frequency:
Low
1 = One purchase
2 = Two purchases
3 = Three
4 = Four
5 = Five
High
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
how to insert text box in pdf; adding text pdf file
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text boxes to pdf
or those of airlines and hotel chains. Such schemes are often used for e-CRM purposes as
follows:
Initial bonus points for sign-up to online services or initial registration;
 
Points for customer development or extension – more points awarded to encourage
second or third online purchase;
 
Additional points to encourage reactivation of online services;
 
Popular products are offered for a relatively low number of points to encourage repeat
purchases.
If customers have lapsed in using online services, it is often necessary to contact them
by direct mail or phone to make these offers.
As well as loyalty schemes operated by retailers and their partners, there are also some
online-specific loyalty schemes which are operated independently. While early attempts
at developing the online currency Beenz (www
.beenz.com
) failed, others such as iPoints
(www
.ipoints.co.uk
) have survived. New ones are still being launched, for example, Pigs
Back  has  worked  well  in  Ireland  and  was  launched  in  the  UK  in  2005
(www
.pigsback.co.uk
).
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
287
Figure 6.14 Firebox.com
Virtual communities
Virtual communities also provide opportunities for some companies to develop relation-
ships with their customers. Since the publication of the article by Armstrong and Hagel
in 1996 entitled ‘The real value of online communities’ and John Hagel’s subsequent
book (Hagel, 1997) there has been much discussion about the suitability of the web for
virtual communities. 
The power of the virtual communities, according to Hagel (1997), is that they exhibit
a number of positive-feedback loops (or ‘virtuous circles’). Focused content attracts new
members, who in turn contribute to the quantity and quality of the community’s
pooled knowledge. Member loyalty grows as the community grows and evolves. The
purchasing power of the community grows and thus the community attracts more ven-
dors. The growing revenue potential attracts yet more vendors, providing more choice
and attracting more members. As the size and sophistication of the community grow
(while it still remains tightly focused) its data gathering and profiling capabilities
increase – thus enabling better targeted marketing and attracting more vendors . . . and
so on. In such positive-feedback loops there is an initial start-up period of slow and
uneven growth until critical mass in members, content, vendors and transactions is
reached. The potential for growth is then exponential – until the limits of the focus of
the community as it defines itself are reached.
From this description of virtual communities it can be seen that they provide many of
the attributes for effective relationship marketing – they can be used to learn about cus-
tomers and provide information and offers to a group of customers.
When deciding on a strategic approach to virtual communities, companies have two
basic choices if they decide to use them as part of their efforts in relationship building.
First, they can provide community facilities on the site, or they  can monitor and
become involved in relevant communities set up by other organisations.
If a company sets up a community facility on its site, it has the advantage that it can
improve its brand by adding value to its products. Sterne (1999) suggests that minimal
intrusion should occur, but it may be necessary for the company to seed discussion and
moderate out some negative comments. It may also be instrumental in increasing word-
of-mouth promotion of the site. The community will provide customer feedback on the
company and its products as part of the learning relationship. However, the brand may
be damaged if customers criticise products. The company may also be unable to get suf-
ficient people to contribute to a company-hosted community. An example where this
approach has been used successfully is shown in Figure 6.15. Communities are best
suited to high-involvement brands such as a professional body like CIPD or those related
to sports and hobbies and business-to-business. 
What is the reality behind Hagel and Armstrong’s original vision of communities?
How can companies deliver the promise of community? The key to a successful commu-
nity is customer-centred communication. It is a customer-to-customer (C2C) interaction
(Chapter 1). Consumers, not businesses, generate the content of the site, e-mail list or
bulletin board. 
According to Durlacher (1999), depending on market sector, an organisation has a
choice of developing different types of community: communities of purpose, position
and interest for B2C, and of profession for B2B.
Purpose– people who are going through the same process or trying to achieve a particu-
lar  objective.  Examples  include  those  researching  cars,  e.g.  at  Autotrader
(www
.autotrader
.co.uk
) or stocks online, e.g. at the Motley Fool (www
.motleyfool.co.uk
).
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
288
Virtual community
An Internet-based
forum for special-
interest groups to
communicate.
Price or product comparison services such as Bizrate (www
.bizrate.com
) are also in
this category.
2 Position – people who are in a certain circumstance such as a health disorder or in a
certain stage of life, such as communities set up specifically for young people or old
people. Examples are teenage chat site Habbo Hotel (www
.habbohotel.com
), Cennet,
www
.cennet.co.uk
‘New horizons for the over 50s’ and parenting sites such as Baby
Center (www
.babycenter
.com
).
3 Interest. This community is for people who share an interest or passion such as sport
(www
.football365.com
), music (www
.pepsi.com
) or leisure (www
.walkingworld.com
).
4 Profession. These are important for companies promoting B2B services. 
A further classification of communities is that of Armstrong and Hagel (1996) which
is arguably less useful and identifies communities of transaction, communities of inter-
est, communities of fantasy and communities of relationship.
What tactics can organisations use to foster community? Despite the hype and poten-
tial,  many  communities  fail  to  generate  activity,  and  a silent  community  isn’t  a
community. Parker (2000) suggests eight questions organisations should ask when con-
sidering how to create a customer community:
1 What interests, needs or passions do many of your customers have in common?
2 What topics or concerns might your customers like to share with each other?
3 What information is likely to appeal to your customers’ friends or colleagues?
What other types of business in your area appeal to buyers of your products and services?
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
289
Figure 6.15 CIPD forums – a forum operated by a company to keep closer to its 
customers
5 How can you create packages or offers based on combining offers from two or more
affinity partners?
6 What price, delivery, financing or incentives can you afford to offer to friends (or col-
leagues) that your current customers recommend?
7 What types of incentives or rewards can you afford to provide customers who recom-
mend friends (or colleagues) who make a purchase?
8 How can you best track purchases resulting from word-of-mouth recommendations
from friends?
Customer experience – the missing element required for 
customer loyalty
We have in this chapter shown how delivering relevant timely communications as part
of permission marketing is important to developing loyalty. However, even the most rel-
evant communications will fail if another key factor is not taken into account – this is
the customer experience. If a first-time or repeat customer experience is poor due to a
slow-to-download difficult-to-use site, then it is unlikely loyalty from the online cus-
tomer will develop. The relationship between the drivers of customer satisfaction and
loyalty is shown in Figure 6.16. In the next chapter we review techniques used to help
develop this experience. 
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
Figure 6.16 The relationship between service quality, customer satisfaction 
and loyalty
Online
service quality
Core and extended
product
offer
Offline
service quality
Expectations met
Customer
loyalty
Communications enhancing brand
and prompting repeat purchases
Service and offer
quality maintained
Customer
satisfaction
Customer
satisfaction
drivers
Customer
loyalty
drivers
Customer expectations of service
Customer experience of service
Quality of
customer
experience
290
1
The high street retailer Boots launched its Advantage loy-
alty card in 1997. Today, there are over 15 million card
holders of which 10 million are active. Boots describes the
benefits for its card-holders as follows: 
The scheme offers the most generous base reward rate
of all UK retailers of 4 points per £1 spent on products,
with average card holders receiving 6.5 points per £1
when taking into account all other tactical points offers.
There are 23 analysts in the Customer Insight team run by
Helen James who mine the data available about card users
and their transactional behaviour. They use tools including
MicroStrategy’s DSS Agent and Andyne’s GQL which are
used for the majority of queries. IBM's Intelligent Miner for
Data is used for more advanced data mining such as seg-
mentation  and  predictive  modelling.  Helen  James
describes the benefits of data mining as follows:
From our traditional Electronic Point-of-sale data we
knew  what  was  being  sold,  but  now  [through
data mining] we can determine what different groups of
customers  are  buying and  monitor  their behaviour
over time.
The IBM case study gives these examples of the applica-
tions of data mining:
What interests the analysts most is the behaviour of
groups of customers. They are interested, for example,
in the effect of Boots’ marketing activity on customers –
such as the impact of promotional offers on buying pat-
terns over time. They can make a valuable input to
decisions about layout, ranging and promotions by
using market basket analysis to provide insight into the
product purchasing repertoires of different groups of
customers.
Like others, Boots has made a feature of multi-buy pro-
motional schemes in recent years with numerous ‘three
for the price of two’ and even ‘two for the price of one’
offers. Using the card data the Insight team has now been
able to identify four groups of promotion buyers:
the deal seekers who only ever buy promotional lines;
the stockpilers who buy in bulk when goods are on
offer and then don't visit the store for weeks; 
the loyalists – existing buyers who will buy a little more
of a line when it is on offer but soon revert to their usual
buying patterns; 
the new market – customers who start buying items
when on promotion and then continue to purchase the
same product once it reverts to normal price. 
‘This sort of analysis helps marketeers to understand what
they are achieving via their promotions, rather than just
identifying the uplift. They  can  see whether  they are
attracting new long term business or just generating short
term uplift and also the extent to which they are cannibal-
ising existing lines,’ says Helen. Analysing market basket
trends by shopper over time is also providing Boots with
a new view of its  traditional  product  categories  and
departmental  spanides.  Customers  buying  skin-care
products, for example, often buy hair-care products as
well so this is a good link to use in promotions, direct mail
and in-store activity.
Other linkings which emerge from the data – as Helen
says, quite obvious when one thinks about them – include
films and suntan lotion; sensitive skin products – be they
washing up gloves, cosmetics or skincare; and films and
photograph frames with new baby products. ‘Like many
large retailers we are still organised along product cate-
gory lines,’ she says, ‘so it would never really occur to the
baby products buyers to create a special offer linked to
picture frames – yet these are the very thing which new
parents are likely to want.’
‘We’re also able to see how much shoppers participate
in a particular range,’ says Helen. ‘They may buy tooth-
brushes, but do  they  also buy  toothpaste  and dental
floss?’ It may well be more profitable to encourage exist-
ing customers to buy deeper in the range than to attract
new ones.
Monitoring purchases over time is also helping to iden-
tify buying patterns which fuel further marketing effort.
Disposable nappy purchases, for example, are generally
limited by the number of packs a customer can carry. A
shopper visiting Boots once a fortnight and buying nap-
pies is probably buying from a number of supply sources
whereas one calling at the store twice a week probably
gets  most  of  her  baby’s  nappy  needs  from  Boots.
Encouraging the first shopper to visit more would proba-
bly also increase nappy sales. Boots combines its basic
customer demographic data (data such as age, gender,
number of children and postcode) with externally available
data. However, according to Helen ‘the real power comes
from being able to combine this with detailed purchase
behaviour data – and this is now being used to fuel busi-
ness decisions outside of the marketing arena.’
An analysis of how Boots customers shop a group of
stores in a particular geographical area has led to a greatly
improved understanding of the role different stores play
within that area and the repertoire of goods that should be
offered across the stores. For example, Boots stores have
typically been grouped and merchandised according to
CASE STUDY 6
291
Boots mine diamonds in their customer data
Case Study 6
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested