mvc show pdf in div : How to insert text into a pdf file Library control API .net web page asp.net sharepoint 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN33-part1370

Developing the capability to create and maintain an effective online presence through a
web site is a key part of Internet marketing. ‘Effective’ means that the web site and
related communications must deliver relevance to its audience, whether this be through
news content for a portal, product and service information for a business-to-business site
or relevant products and offers for an e-commerce site. At the same time, ‘effective’
means the web site must deliver results for the company.
However, delivering relevant content for the audience is only part of the story.
Interacting with web content is not a static experience, it is an interactive experience. So
Internet marketers also have to work hard to develop consumer trust and deliver a great
experience for their audience. In their book Managing the Customer Experience, Shaun
Smith and Joe Wheeler (2002) suggest that companies should ask afresh ‘what experi-
ence must we provide to meet the needs and expectations of customers’. They note that
some companies use online channels to replicate existing services, whereas others have
extended the experience online. In Chapter 5, in the section on the contribution of
branding as part of the Product element of the mix, we explained how it is important to
provide a promise of what the online representation of the brand will deliver to cus-
tomers. The concept of online brand promise is closely related to that of delivering
online customer experience. In this chapter, we will explore different practical actions
that companies can take to create and maintain satisfactory online experiences. An indi-
cation of the effort required to produce a customer-centric online presence is given by
Alison Lancaster, head of marketing and catalogues at John Lewis Direct, who says:
A good site should always begin with the user. Understand who the customer is, how they
use the channel to shop, and understand how the marketplace works in that category. This
includes understanding who your competitors are and how they operate online. You need
continuous research, feedback and usability testing to continue to monitor and evolve the
customer experience online. Customers want convenience and ease of ordering. They
want a site that is quick to download, well-structured and easy to navigate.
You can see that creating effective online experiences is a challenge since there are many
practical issues to consider which we present in Figure 7.1. This is based on a diagram by de
Chernatony (2001) who suggested that delivering the online experience promised by a
brand requires delivering rational values, emotional values and promised experience (based
on rational and emotional values). The diagram also highlights the importance of deliver-
ing service quality online, as has been indicated by Trocchia and Janda (2003).
The factors that influence the online customer experience can be presented in a pyra-
mid form of success factors as is shown in Figure 7.1 (the different success factors reflect
current best-practice and differ from those of de Chernatony). The diagram incorporates
many of the factors that are relevant for a transactional e-retail site, but you can see that
many of the rational and emotional values are important to any web site. Some of the
terms such as ‘usability’ and ‘accessibility’ (which are delivered through an effective web
site design) you may not be familiar with, but these will all be explained later in this
chapter. 
In the figure these factors are all associated with using the web site, but the online
customer experience extends beyond this, and Internet marketing should also consider
these issues:
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
302
Introduction
Online customer
experience
The combination of
rational and emotional
factors of using a
company’s online
services that influences
customers’ perceptions
of a brand online.
How to insert text into a pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf in reader; how to add text box to pdf document
How to insert text into a pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text into a pdf; add text pdf file acrobat
Ease of locating the site through search engines (Chapter 8);
Services provided by partners online on other web sites;
Quality of outbound communications such as e-newsletters;
Quality of processing inbound e-mail communications from customers;
Integration with offline communications.
We start the chapter by considering how we create the web site to deliver appropriate
rational and emotional values since web site design is a core part of creating the online
customer experience. We also look at the stages in managing a project to improve the
customer experience. Our coverage on web site design is integrated with consideration
of researching online buyer behaviour since an appropriate experience can only be deliv-
ered if it is consistent with customer behaviour, needs and wants. We then go on to
review delivery of service quality online. This includes aspects such as speed and avail-
ability of the site itself which support the rational values and also fulfilment and support
which are a core part of the promised experience.
INTRODUCTION
303
Figure 7.1 The online customer experience pyramid – success factors
Content
and search
Rational
values
Relevance
Customisation
Speed
Performance
Availability
Trust
Reassurance
Credibility
Visual
Design
Design
Style
Tone
Usability
Ease of use
Accessibility
and standards
Customer
journey fit
Interactivity
Flow and
data entry
Fulfilment
Service
Support
Price/
Promotions
Product
Range
Emotional
values
Promised
experience
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy & mature APIs for developers to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing PDF document file.
adding text to a pdf form; how to insert text into a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET
add text pdf reader; add text to pdf using preview
In the past, it has been a common mistake amongst those creating a new web site for the
first time to ‘dive in’ and start creating web pages without sufficient forward planning.
Planning is necessary since design of a site must occur before creation of web pages – to
ensure a good-quality site that does not need reworking at a later stage. The design
process (Figure 7.2) involves analysing the needs of owners and users of a site and then
deciding upon the best way to build the site to fulfil these needs. Without a structured
plan and careful design, costly reworking is inevitable, as the first version of a site will
not achieve the needs of the end-users or the business.
Of the stages shown in Figure 7.2, those of market research and design are described
in most detail in this chapter since the nature of the web site content is, of course, vital
in providing a satisfactory experience for the customer which leads to repeat visits.
Testing and promotion of the web site are described in subsequent chapters. An alterna-
tive model can be found in a practical ‘Internet marketing framework’ presented by Ong
(1995) and summarised by Morgan (1996).
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
304
Planning web site design and build
Figure 7.2 Summary of process of web site development
Main site development activities
Marketing
objectives
Prepare
brief
Select
agency
Market
research
Prototype
design
Develop
content
Test and
revise
Launch
site
Communications
plan
Start
promotion
Main
promotion
Key support activities
I
n
i
t
i
a
t
i
o
n
p
r
o
c
e
s
s
e
s
D
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
p
r
o
c
e
s
s
e
s
Register
domain
Select
ISP
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
add text to pdf file; add text field pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
add text pdf professional; adding text to pdf document
The process of web site development summarised in Figure 7.2 is idealised, since, for
efficiency, many of these activities have to occur in parallel. Figure 7.3 gives an indica-
tion of the relationship between these tasks, and how long they may take, for a typical
web site project. We will explain some of the specialist design terminology later in this
chapter. The content planning and development stages overlap in that HTML and
graphics development are necessary to produce the prototypes. As a consequence, some
development has to occur while analysis and design are under way. The main develop-
ment tasks which need to be scheduled as part of the planning process are as follows:
1 Pre-development tasks. For a new site, these include domain name registration and
deciding on the company (ISP) to host the web site. They also include preparing a brief
PLANNING WEB SITE DESIGN AND BUILD
305
Figure 7.3 Example of web site development 
ID
1
Task Name
Phase 1 - Scoping and planning
Duration
7  days
Start
01 October
01 November
01 December
01 January
01 February
01 Mar
26/09
10/10
24/10
07/11
21/11
05/12
19/12
02/01
16/01
30/01
13/02
27/02
Fri 10/10/05
2
Review documentation
2  days
Fri 14/10/05
3
Meet to agree requirements
1  day
Wed 19/10/05
4
Define and agree page template 
2  days
Thu 20/10/05
5
Agree page template requirements
0  days
Mon 24/10/05
6
Phase 2 - Persona development
9  days
Thu 20/10/05
7
Set objectives and develop persona
6  days
Thu 20/10/05
8
Feedback and sign off
3  days
Fri 28/10/05
9
Agreed personas and scenarios
0  days
Tue 01/11/05
10 Phase 3 - Brand design
23  days Thu 20/10/05
11
Initial brand design
10  days Thu 20/10/05
12
Usability brand design
10  days Tue 01/11/05
13
Revise brand design
5  days
Tue 15/11/05
14
Agreed brand design
0  days
Mon 21/11/05
15 Phase 4 - Page layout/detailed design
64  days Thu 03/11/05
16
Refine wireframes
0  days
Thu 03/11/05
17
Usability wireframes
4  days
Fri 11/11/05
18
Create/revise page design
40  days Thu 17/11/05
19
Agreed page design - Brand 1
0  days
Mon 28/11/05
20
Agreed page design - Brand 2
0  days
Wed 14/12/05
21
Agreed page design - Brand 3
0  days
Mon 16/01/06
22
Agreed page design - Brand 4
0  days
Wed 01/02/06
23 Phase 5 - Page creation and delivery
58  days Tue 29/11/05
24
Brand 1 - Page creation and delivery 12  days Tue 29/11/05
25
Brand 2 - Page creation and delivery 12  days Wed 14/12/05
26
Brand 3 - Page creation and delivery 12  days Mon 16/01/06
27
Brand 4 - Page creation and delivery
Project: Project Plan
Date: Fri 30/09/05
Task
Split
Progress
Milestone
Summary
Project Summary
External Tasks
01/02
16/01
External Milestones
Deadline
12  days Wed 01/02/06
Page 1
14/12
28/11
21/11
01/11
24/10
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf without acrobat
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF;
add text box to pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
setting out the aims and objectives of the site, and then – if it is intended to outsource
the site – presenting the brief to rival agencies to bid for and pitch their offering.
2 Analysis and design. This is the detailed analysis and design of the site, and includes
clarification of business objectives, market research to identify the audience and typi-
cal customer personas and user journeys and their needs, defining the information
architecture of different content types and prototyping different functional and visual
designs to support the brand.
3 Content development and testing. Writing the HTML pages, producing the graphics,
database integration, usability and performance testing.
4 Publishing or launching the site. This is a relatively short stage.
5 Pre-launch promotion or communications. Search engine registration and optimisation is
most important for new sites. Although search engines can readily index a new site,
some place a penalty on a new site (sometimes known as ‘the Google sandbox effect’),
where the site is effectively on trial until is established. Briefing the PR company to
publicise the launch is another example of pre-launch promotion.
6 Ongoing promotion. The schedule should also allow for promotion after site launch.
This might involve structured discount promotions on the site or competitions which
are planned in advance. Many now consider search engine optimisation and pay-per-
click marketing (Chapter 8) as a continuous process, and will often employ a third
party to help achieve this.
Who is involved in a web site project?
The success of a web site is dependent on the range of people involved in its develop-
ment, and how well they work as a team. Typical profiles of team members follow:
Site sponsors. These will be senior managers who will effectively be paying for the
system. They will understand the strategic benefits of the system and will be keen
that the site is implemented successfully to achieve the objectives they have set.
Sponsors will also aim to encourage staff by means of their own enthusiasm and will
stress why the introduction of the system is important to the business and its workers.
This will help overcome any barriers to introduction of the web site.
Site owner. ‘Ownership’ will typically be the responsibility of a marketing manager or
e-commerce manager, who may be devoted full-time to overseeing the site in a large
company; it may be part of a marketing manager’s remit in a smaller company. 
Project manager. This person is responsible for the planning and coordination of the
web site project. He or she will aim to ensure the site is developed within the budget
and time constraints that have been agreed at the start of the project, and that the
site delivers the planned-for benefits for the company and its customers. 
Site designer. The site designer will define the ‘look and feel’ of the site, including its
layout and how company brand values are transferred to the web.
Content developer. The content developer will write the copy for the web site and con-
vert it to a form suitable for the site. In medium or large companies this role may be
split between marketing staff or staff from elsewhere in the organisation who write
the copy and a technical member of staff who converts it to the graphics and HTML
documents forming the web page and does the programming for interactive content.
Webmaster. This is a technical role. The webmaster is responsible for ensuring the
quality of the site. This means achieving suitable availability, speed, working links
between pages and connections to company databases. In small companies the web-
master may take on graphic design and content developer roles also.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
306
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in VB.NET application.
add text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
add text boxes to a pdf; add text fields to pdf
Stakeholders. The impact of the web site on other members of the organisation should
not be underestimated. Internal staff may need to refer to some of the information on
the web site or use its services.
While the site sponsor and site owner will work within the company, many organisa-
tions outsource the other resources since full-time staff cannot be justified in these roles.
There are a range of different choices for outsourcing which are summarised in Activity 7.1.
We are seeing a gradual blurring between these different types of supplier as they recruit
expertise so as to deliver a ‘one-stop shop’ or ‘full-service agency’, but they still tend to be
strongest in particular areas. Companies need to decide whether to partner with the best
of breed in each, or to perhaps compromise and choose the one-stop shop that gives the
best balance and is most likely to achieve integration across different marketing activities –
this would arguably be the new media agency or perhaps a traditional marketing agency
that has an established new media division. Which approach do you think is best?
Observation of the practice of outsourcing suggests that two conflicting patterns
are evident:
1 Outside-in. A company starts an e-business initiative by outsourcing some activities
where there is insufficient in-house expertise. These may be areas such as strategy or
online promotion. The company then builds up skills internally to manage these
areas as e-business becomes an important contributor to the business. The company
initially partnered with a new media agency to offer online services, but once the
online contribution to sales exceeded 20% the management of e-commerce was taken
inside. The new media agency was, however, retained for strategy guidance. An out-
PLANNING WEB SITE DESIGN AND BUILD
307
Activity 7.1
Options for outsourcing different e-marketing activities
Purpose
To highlight the outsourcing available for e-business implementation and to gain an
appreciation of how to choose suppliers.
Activity
A B2C company is trying to decide which of its e-business activities it should outsource.
Select a single supplier that you think can best deliver each of these services indicated in
Table 7.1. Justify your decision.
Table 7.1 Options for outsourcing different e-business activities
E-marketing function
Traditional Digital
ISP or
Management
marketing
marketing
traditional
consultants
agency
agency
IT supplier
1 Strategy
2 Design
3 Content and service development
4 Online promotion
5 Offline promotion
6 Infrastructure
side-in approach will probably be driven by the need to reduce the costs of outsourc-
ing, poor delivery of services by the supplier or simply a need to concentrate a
strategic core resource in-house.
2 Inside-out. A company starts to implement e-business using existing resources within
the IT department and marketing department in conjunction with recruitment of
new media staff. They may then find that there are problems in developing a site that
meets customers’ needs or in building traffic to the site. At this point they may turn
to outsourcing to solve the problems.
These approaches are not mutually exclusive, and an outside-in approach may be
used for some e-commerce functions such as content development while an inside-out
approach is used for other functions such as site promotion. It can also be suggested that
these approaches are not planned – they are simply a response to prevailing conditions.
However, in order to cost e-business and manage it as a strategic asset it can be argued
that the e-business manager should have a long-term picture of which functions to out-
source and when to bring them in-house.
Web site prototyping
Prototypesare trial versions of a web site that are gradually refined through an iterative
process to become closer to the final version. Initial prototypes may simply be paper
prototypes, perhaps of a ‘wireframe’ or screen layout. These may then be extended to
include some visuals of key static pages using a tool such as Adobe Photoshop. Finally,
working prototypes will be produced as HTML code is developed. The idea is that the
design agency or development team and the marketing staff who commissioned the
work can review and comment on prototypes, and changes can then be made to the site
to incorporate these comments. Prototyping should result in a more effective final site
which can be developed more rapidly than a more traditional approach with a long
period of requirements determination. 
Each iteration of the prototype typically passes through the stages shown in Figure 7.4,
which are:
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
308
Prototype
A preliminary version of
part or a framework of
all of a web site, which
can be reviewed by its
target audience or the
marketing team.
Prototyping is an
iterative process in
which web site users
suggest modifications
before further
prototypes and the final
version of the site are
developed.
Figure 7.4 Four stages of web site prototyping
Prototype
produced
Start
Test and
review
Analysis
Design
Develop
1 Analysis. Understanding the requirements of the audience of the site and the require-
ments of the business, defined by business and marketing strategy (and comments
input from previous prototypes). 
2 Design. Specifying different features of the site that will fulfil the requirements of the
users and the business as identified during analysis.
3 Develop. The creation of the web pages and the dynamic content of the web site.
4 Test and review. Structured checks are conducted to ensure that different aspects of the
site meet the original requirements and work correctly.
When using the prototyping approach for a web site, a company has to decide whether
to implement the complete version of the web site before making it available to its target
audience (hard launch) or to make available a more limited version of the site (soft
launch). If it is necessary to establish a presence rapidly, the second approach could be
used. This also has the benefit that feedback can be solicited from users and incorpo-
rated into later versions.
Before the analysis, design and creation of the web site, all major projects will have an
initial phase in which the aims and objectives of the web site are reviewed, to assess
whether it is worthwhile investing in the web site, and to decide on the amount to
invest. This is part of the strategic planning process described in Chapters 4 and 5. This
provides a framework for the project that ensures:
(a) there is management and staff commitment to the project;
(b) objectives are clearly defined;
(c) the costs and benefits are reviewed in order that the appropriate amount of invest-
ment in the site occurs;
(d) the project will follow a structured path, with clearly identified responsibilities for
different aspects such as project management, analysis, promotion and maintenance;
(e) the implementation phase will ensure that important aspects of the project such as
testing and promotion are not skimped.
Domain name registration 
If the project involves a new site rather than an upgrade, it will be necessary to register a
new domain name, more usually referred to as a ‘web address’ or ‘uniform (or universal)
resource locator (URL)’.
Domain names are registered using an ISP or direct with one of the domain name
services, such as:
1 InterNIC(www
.inter
nic.net
). Registration for the .com, .org and .net domains.
2 Nominet (www
.nominet.or
g.uk
). Registration for the .co.uk domain. All country-
specific domains such as .fr (France) or .de (Germany) have their own domain regis-
tration authority.
3 Nomination (www
.nomination.uk.com
). An alternative registration service for the UK,
allowing registration in the (uk.com) pseudo-domain.
The following guidelines should be borne in mind when registering domain names:
INITIATION OF THE WEB SITE PROJECT
309
Hard launch
A site is launched once
fully complete with full
promotional effort.
Soft launch
A trial version of a site
is launched with limited
publicity.
Initiation of the web site project 
Initiation of the web
site project
This phase of the
project should involve a
structured review of the
costs and benefits of
developing a web site
(or making a major
revision to an existing
web site). A successful
outcome to initiation
will be a decision to
proceed with the site
development phase,
with an agreed 
budget and target
completion date.
Domain name
registration
The process of
reserving a unique web
address that can be
used to refer to the
company web site, in
the form of
www
.<companyname
>.com
or
www
.<companyname
>.co.uk
.
1 Register the domain name as early as possible. This is necessary since the precedent in
the emerging law is that the first company to register the name is the one that takes
ownership if it has a valid claim to ownership.
2 Register multiple domain names if this helps the potential audience to find the site. For
example, British Midland may register its name as www
.britishmidland.com
and
www
.britishmidland.co.uk
.
3 Use the potential of non-company brand namesto help promote a product. For example, a
1998 traditional media campaign for British Midland used www
.iflybritishmidland.com
as a memorable address to help users find its site.
Selecting an Internet service provider (ISP)
Selecting the right partner to host a web site is an important decision since the quality of
service provided will directly impact on the quality of service delivered to a company’s
customers. The partner that hosts the content will usually be an Internet service provider
(or ISP ) for the majority of small and medium companies, but for larger companies the
web server used to host the content may be inside the company and managed by the
company’s IT department. 
The quality of service of hosted content is essentially dependent on two factors: the
performance of the web site and its availability.
The performance of the web site
The important measure in relation to performance is the speed with which a web page is
delivered to users from the time when it is requested by clicking on a hyperlink (see
Table 7.2 for examples). The length of time is dependent on a number of factors, some of
which cannot be controlled (such as the number of users accessing the Internet), but pri-
marily depends on the bandwidth of the ISP’s connection to the Internet and the
performance of the web server hardware and software. It also depends on the ‘page
weight’ of the site’s pages measured in kilobytes (which is dependent on the number
and complexity of images and animations). Table 7.2 shows that the top 5 sites with the
lowest download speeds tend to have a much smaller page size compared with the
slower sites from 95 to 100. However, viewing these slower sites over a broadband con-
nection shows that this is perhaps less of an issue than in the days when the majority,
rather than the minority, were dial-up Internet users.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
310
Internet service
provider (ISP)
Company that provides
home or business
users with a connection
to access the Internet.
It can also host web
sites or provide a link
from web servers to
allow other companies
and consumers access
to a corporate web site.
Bandwidth
Indicates the speed at
which data are
transferred using a
particular network
medium. It is measured
in bits per second (bps).
Table 7.2 Variation in download speed (across a 56.6 kbps modem) and page size for the
top 5 and bottom 6 UK sites week starting 6 October 2005
Web site
Avg. download speed
Page size
1
Thomas Cook
4.65 sec
18.46 kb
2
British Airways
5.15 sec
23.46 kb
3
Next On-Line Shopping
5.64 sec
26.90 kb
4
EasyJet
6.09 sec
27.88 kb
5
NTL
6.66 sec
29.77 kb
95
Nokia UK
37.60 sec
180.98 kb
96
The Salvation Army
37.68 sec
171.07 kb
97
Rail Track
38.14 sec
111.00 kb
98
workthing.com
38.77 sec
187.35 kb
99
Orange
40.01 sec
194.16 kb
100
FT.com
44.39 sec
211.55 kb
Source: Site Confidence (www
.siteconfidence.co.uk
)
A major factor for a company to consider when choosing an ISP is whether the server
is dedicated to one company or whether content from several companies is located on
the same server. A dedicated server is best, but it will attract a premium price.
The availability of the web site
The availability of a web site is an indication of how easy it is for a user to connect to it.
In theory this figure should be 100 per cent, but sometimes, for technical reasons such
as failures in the server hardware or upgrades to software, the figure can drop substan-
tially below this.
The extent of the problem of e-commerce service levels was indicated by The Register
(2004) in an article titled ‘Wobbly shopping carts blight UK e-commerce’. The research
showed that failure of transactions once customers have decided to buy is often a prob-
lem. As the article said, ‘UK E-commerce sites are slapping customers in the face, rather
than shaking them by the hand. Turning consumers away once they have made a deci-
sion to buy is commercial suicide’. The research showed this level of problems:
20% of shopping carts did not function for 12 hours a month or more.
75% failed the standard service level availability of 99.9% uptime.
80% performed inconsistently with widely varying response times, time-outs and
errors – leaving customers at best wondering what to do next and at worst unable to
complete their purchases. 
Similarly, SciVisum, a web testing specialist found that three-quarters of Internet mar-
keting campaigns are impacted by web site failures, with 14 per cent of failures so severe
that they prevented the campaign meeting its objectives. The company surveyed mar-
keting professionals from 100 UK-based organisations across the retail, financial, travel
and online gaming sectors. More than a third of failures were rated as ‘serious to severe’,
with many customers complaining or unable to complete web transactions. These are
often seen by marketers as technology issues which are owned by others in the business,
but marketers need to ask the right questions. The SciVisum (2005) research showed that
nearly two-thirds of marketing professionals did not know how many users making
transactions their web sites could support, despite an average transaction value of £50 to
£100, so they were not able to factor this into campaign plans. Thirty-seven per cent
could not put a monetary value on losses caused by customers abandoning web transac-
tions. A quarter of organisations experienced web site overloads and crashes as a direct
result of a lack of communication between the two departments.
SciVisum recommends that companies do the following:
1 Define the peak visitor throughput requirements for each customer journey on the
site. For example, the site should be able to support at the same time: approximately
ten checkout journeys per second, 30 add-to-basket journeys per second, five registra-
tion journeys per second, two check-my-order-status journeys per second.
2 Service-level agreement. More detailed technical requirements need to be agreed for
each of the transactions stages. Home-page delivery time and server uptime are insuf-
ficiently detailed.
3 Set up a monitoring programme that measures and reports on the agreed journeys
24/7.
INITIATION OF THE WEB SITE PROJECT
311
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested