mvc show pdf in div : How to add a text box to a pdf application software tool html azure web page online 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN34-part1371

Analysisinvolves using different marketing research techniques to find out the needs of
the site audience. These needs can then be used to drive the design and content of the
web site.
It is not a ‘one-off’ exercise, but is likely to be repeated for each iteration of the proto-
type. Although analysis and design are separate activities, there tends to be considerable
overlap between the two phases. In analysis we are seeking to answer the following types
of ‘who, what, why, how’ questions:
Who are the key audiences for the site?
Why should they use the site (what will appeal to them)?
What should the content of site be? Which services will be provided?
How will the content of the site be structured (information architecture)?
How will navigation around the site occur?
What are the main marketing outcomes we want the site to deliver (registrations,
leads, sales)?
To help answer these questions, web designers commonly use an approach known as
user-centred designwhich uses a range of techniques to ensure the site meets user
needs. Within this design process, usability and accessibility are goals which we will now
study further. It is now generally agreed that web site designers also need to add persua-
sion marketinginto the design mix; to create a design that is not only easy to use, but
also delivers results for the business. This approach is essential since usability which will
often lead to giving the user choice, may conflict with using a web site to meet business
objectives which will often need to persuade customers to register or buy a product.
Most web sites should not give total business choice in which sections they use, but, as
with any marketing communication, should influence the recipient of the communica-
tion to encourage them to take particular actions or follow particular paths. You can see
that this concept of user-centred design is similar to the concept of customer orientation
or customer-centricity which we have covered in preceding chapters.
Consultant Bryan Eisenberg of Future Now (www
.futur
enowinc.com
) is an advocate of
persuasion marketing alongside other design principles such as usability and accessibility.
He says:
during the wireframe and storyboard phase we ask three critical questions of every page a
visitor will see:
1 What action needs to be taken?
2 Who needs to take that action?
3 How do we persuade that person to take the action we desire?
Usability
Usabilityis a concept that can be applied to the analysis and design for a range of prod-
ucts which defines how easy they are to use. The British Standard/ISO Standard: Human
Centred design processes for interactive systems defines usability as the:
extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with
effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use. 
(BSI,1999)
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
312
Researching site users’ requirements
Analysis phase
The identification of the
requirements of a web
site. Techniques to
achieve this may
include focus groups,
questionnaires sent to
existing customers or
interviews with key
accounts.
User-centred
design
A design approach
which is based on
research of user
characteristics and
needs.
Persuasion
marketing
Using design elements
such as layout, copy
and typography
together with
promotional messages
to encourage site users
to follow particular
paths and specific
actions rather than
giving them complete
choice in their
navigation
Usability
An approach to web site
design intended to
enable the completion
of user tasks.
How to add a text box to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to add text box to pdf
How to add a text box to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text box in pdf document
You can see how the concept can be readily applied to web site design – web visitors
often have defined goals such as finding particular information or completing an action
such as booking a flight or viewing an account balance. 
In Jakob Nielsen’s classic book Designing Web Usability (Nielsen, 2000b), he describes
usability as follows.
An engineering approach to website design to ensure the user interface of the site is
learnable, memorable, error free, efficient and gives user satisfaction. It incorporates test-
ing and evaluation to ensure the best use of navigation and links to access information in
the shortest possible time. A companion process to information architecture.
In practice, usability involves two key project activities. Expert reviews are often per-
formed at the beginning of a redesign project as a way of identifying problems with a
previous design. Usability testinginvolves:
1 Identifying representative users of the site (see, for example, Table 7.3) and identify-
ing typical tasks;
Asking them to perform specific tasks such as finding a product or completing an order;
3 Observing what they do and how they succeed.
For a site to be successful, the user tasks or actions need to be completed:
Effectively – web usability specialists measure task completion, for example, only 3
out of 10 visitors to a web site may be able to find a telephone number or other piece
of information.
Efficiently – web usability specialists also measure how long it takes to complete a task
on-site, or the number of clicks it takes.
Jakob  Nielsen  explains  the  imperative  for  usability  best  in  his  ‘Usability  101’
(www
.useit.com/aler
tbox/20030825.html
). He says: 
On the Web, usability is a necessary condition for survival. If a website is difficult to use,
people leave. If the homepage fails to clearly state what a company offers and what users can
do on the site, people leave. If users get lost on a website, they leave. If a website’s informa-
tion is hard to read or doesn’t answer users’ key questions, they leave. Note a pattern here?
For these reasons, Nielsen suggests that around 10% of a design project budget should be
spent on usability, but often actual spend is significantly less.
Some would also extend usability to include testing of the visual or brand design of a
site in focus groups, to assess how consumers perceive it reflects the brand. Often, alter-
native visual designs are developed to identify those which are most appropriate.
RESEARCHING SITE USERS’ REQUIREMENTS
313
Expert reviews
An analysis of an
existing site or
prototype, by an
experienced usability
expert who will identify
deficiencies and
improvements to a site
based on their
knowledge of web
design principles and
best practice.
Usability/user
testing
Representative users
are observed
performing
representative tasks
using a system.
Table 7.3 Different potential audiences for a web site
Customers vary by
Staff
Third parties
New or existing prospects
Size of prospect companies 
(e.g. small, medium or large)
Market type (e.g. different 
vertical markets)
Location (by country)
Members of buying process 
(decision makers, influencers, buyers)
Familiarity (with using the web, the 
company, its products and services or 
its web site)
New or existing
Different departments
Sales staff for different markets
Location (by country)
New or existing
Suppliers
Distributors
Investors
Media
Students
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Add Text Box. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Add Text Box. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET.
how to add text field to pdf form; add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
adding text pdf; adding a text field to a pdf
Additional web site design research activities include the use of personas and scenario-
based design as introduced in Chapter 2.
Web accessibility
Web accessibilityis another core requirement for web sites. It is about allowing all users
of a web site to interact with it regardless of disabilities they may have or the web
browser or platform they are using to access the site. The visually impaired are the main
audience that designing an accessible web site can help. However, increased usage of
mobile or wireless access devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and GPRS or
3G phones also make consideration of accessibility important.
The following quote shows the importance of accessibility to a visually impaired user
who uses a screen-reader which reads out the navigation options and content on a web site.
For me being online is everything. It’s my hi-fi, it’s my source of income, it’s my super-
market, it’s my telephone. It’s my way in.
(Lynn Holdsworth, screen-reader user, web developer and programmer)
Source: RNIB
Remember that many countries now have specific accessibility legislation to which
web site owners are subject. This is often contained within disability and discrimination
acts. In the UK, the relevant act is the Disability and Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995.
Recent amendments to the DDA make it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people
in the way in which a company recruits and employs people, provides services, or pro-
vides education. Providing services is the part of the law that applies to web site design.
Providing  accessible  web  sites  is  a  requirement  of  Part  II  of  the  Disability  and
Discrimination Act published in 1999 and required by law from 2002. In the 2002 code of
practice there is a legal requirement for web sites to be accessible. This is most important
for sites which provide a service; for example, the code of practice gives this example: 
An airline company provides a flight reservation and booking service to the public on its
website. This is a provision of a service and is subject to the Act.
Although there is a moral imperative for accessibility, there is also a business impera-
tive to encourage companies to make their web sites accessible. The main arguments in
favour of accessibility are:
1 Number of visually impaired people. In many countries there are millions of visually
impaired people varying from ‘colour blind’ to partially sighted to blind.
2 Number of users of less popular browsers or variation in screen display resolution. Microsoft
Internet  Explorer is now the dominant  browser,  but  there are  less  well-known
browsers which have a loyal following amongst the visually impaired (for example,
screen-readers  and  Lynx, a text-only  browser) and  early-adopters  (for  example,
Mozilla Firefox,  Safari and  Opera). If  a  web  site does  not display well  in  these
browsers, then you may lose these audiences. Complete Activity 7.2 to review how
much access has varied since this book was first published.
3 More visitors from natural listings of search engines. Many of the techniques used to
make sites more usable also assist in search engine optimisation. For example, clearer
navigation, text alternatives for images and site maps can all help improve a site’s
position in the search engine rankings.
4 Legal requirements. In many countries it is a legal requirement to make web sites acces-
sible. For example, the UK has a Disability Discrimination Act that requires this.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
314
Accessibility
An approach to site
design intended to
accommodate site
usage using different
browsers and settings
particularly required by
the visually impaired.
General Packet
Radio Services
(GPRS)
A standard offering
mobile data transfer
and WAP access
approximately 5 to 10
times faster than
traditional GSM access.
Accessibility
legislation
Legislation intended to
protect users of web
sites with disabilities
including visual
disability.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding text field to pdf; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; add text to pdf acrobat
Guidelines for creating accessible web sites are produced by the governments of differ-
ent countries and non-government organisations such as charities. Internet standards
organisations such as the World Wide Web Consortium have been active in promoting
guidelines  for  web  accessibility  through  the  Website  Accessibility  Initiative  (see
www
.w3.or
g/W
AI
). This describes common accessibility problems such as:
images without alternative text; lack of alternative text for imagemap hot-spots; misleading
use of structural elements on pages; uncaptioned audio or undescribed video; lack of
alternative information for users who cannot access frames or scripts; tables that are diffi-
cult to decipher when linearized; or sites with poor color contrast.
A fuller checklist for acessibility compliance for web site design and coding using
HTML is available from the World Wide Web Consortium (www
.w3.or
g/TR/WCAG10/ 
full-checklist.html
).
There are three different priority levels which it describes as follows: 
• Priority 1 (Level A). A web content developer must satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise,
one or more groups will find it impossible to access information in the document.
Satisfying this checkpoint is a basic requirement for some groups to be able to use
web documents. 
• Priority  2  (Level  AA).  A  web  content  developer  should  satisfy  this  checkpoint.
Otherwise, one or more groups will find it difficult to access information in the docu-
ment. Satisfying this checkpoint will remove significant barriers to accessing web
documents.
• Priority  3  (Level  AAA).  A  web  content  developer  may  address  this  checkpoint.
Otherwise, one or more groups will find it somewhat difficult to access information
in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will improve access to web documents.
RESEARCHING SITE USERS’ REQUIREMENTS
315
Activity 7.2
Allowing for the range in access devices
One of the benefits of accessibility requirements is that they help web site owners and web
agencies consider the variation in platforms used to access web sites. 
Questions
1 Update the compilation in Table 7.4 to the latest values using Onestat.com or other data
from web analytics providers.
2 Explain the variations. Which browsers and screen resolutions do you think should be
supported?
Table 7.4 Summarises the range in browsers and screen resolutions used at the
time of writing
Web browser popularity
Screen resolution popularity
1 Microsoft IE 
86.63 %
1 1024  768 
57.38%
2 Mozilla Firefox 
8.69 %
2 800  600 
18.23%
3 Apple Safari 
1.26 %
3 1280  1024 
14.18%
4 Netscape 
1.08 %
4 1152  864 
4.95%
5 Opera 
1.03 %
5 1600  1200 
1.67%
Source: Onestat press releases (www
.onestat.com
)
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to insert text into a pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text to a pdf file; add text block to pdf
So, for many companies the standard is to meet Priority 1 and Priority 2 or 3 where practical. 
Some of the most important Priority 1 elements are indicated by these ‘Quick Tips’
from the WAI:
Images and animations: use alt tags to describe the function of each visual.
Image maps: use the client-side map and text for hotspots.
Multimedia: provide captioning and transcripts of audio, and descriptions of video.
Hypertext links: use text that makes sense when read out of context, for example
avoid ‘click here’.
Page organisation: use headings, lists, and consistent structure. Use CSS for layout and
style where possible.
Graphs and charts: summarise or use the longdesc attribute.
Scripts, applets and plug-ins: provide alternative content in case active features are
inaccessible or unsupported.
Frames: use the noframes element and meaningful titles.
Tables: make line-by-line reading sensible. Summarise.
Check your work. Validate: Use tools, checklist, and guidelines at www
.w3.or
g/TR/WCAG
.
Figure 7.5 is an example of an accessible site which still meets brand and business
objectives while supporting accessibility through resizing of screen resolution, text resiz-
ing and alternative image text.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
316
Alt tags
Alt tags appear after an
image tag and contain a
phrase associated with
that image. For
example: ‹img
src=”logo.gif”
alt=”Company name,
company products”/›
Figure 7.5 HSBC Global home page (www
.hsbc.c
om
)
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf file reader; how to insert text in pdf using preview
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Drawing. Add Sticky Note. Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with Other SDKs. Barcode Read. Barcode
how to input text in a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
Localisation
A further aspect of customer-centricity for web site design is the decision whether to
include specific content for particular countries. This is referred to as ‘localisation ’. A site
may need to support customers from a range of countries with:
different product needs;
language differences;
cultural differences.
Localisation will address all these issues. It may be that products will be similar in dif-
ferent countries and localisation will simply involve converting the web site to suit
another country. However, in order to be effective, this often needs more than transla-
tion, since different promotion concepts may be needed for different countries. 
Reviewing competitors’ web sites
Benchmarking of competitors’ web sites is vital in positioning your web site to compete
effectively with competitors that already have web sites. Given the importance of this
activity, criteria for performing benchmarking have been described in Chapters 2 and 4.
Benchmarking should not only be based on the obvious tangible features of a web site
such as its ease of use and the impact of its design. Benchmarking criteria should include
those that define the companies’ marketing performance in the industry and those that
are specific to web marketing as follows:
Financial performance (available from About Us, investor relations and electronic copies
of company reports) – this information is also available from intermediary sites such as
finance information or share dealing sites such as Interactive Trader International
(www
.iii.com
) or Bloomberg (www
.bloomber
g.com
) for major quoted companies.
Marketplace performance – market share and sales trends and, significantly, the propor-
tion of sales achieved through the Internet. This may not be available directly on the
web site, but may need the use of other online sources. For example, new entrant to
European aviation easyJet (www
.easyjet.com
) achieved over two-thirds of its sales via
the web site and competitors needed to respond to this.
Business and revenue models (see Chapter 6) – do these differ from other marketplace
players?
Marketing communications techniques – is the customer value proposition of the site
clear? Does the site support all stages of the buying decision from customers who are
unfamiliar with the company through to existing customers? Are special promotions
used on a monthly or periodic basis? Beyond the competitor’s site, how do they make
use of intermediary sites to promote and deliver their services?
Services offered – what is offered beyond brochureware? Is online purchase possible? What
is the level of online customer support and how much technical information is available?
Implementation of services – these are the practical features of site design that are
described in this chapter, such as aesthetics, ease of use, personalisation, navigation,
availability and speed.
A review of corporate web sites suggests that, for most companies, the type of infor-
mation that can be included on a web site will be fairly similar. Many commentators
such as Sterne (2001) make the point that some sites miss out the basic information that
someone who is unfamiliar with a company may want to know, such as:
RESEARCHING SITE USERS’ REQUIREMENTS
317
Localisation
Tailoring of web site
information for
individual countries.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
installed. Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
Who are you? ‘About Us’ is now a standard menu option.
What do you do? What products or services are available?
Where do you do it? Are the products and services available internationally?
Designing the information architecture
Rosenfeld and Morville (2002) emphasise the importance of information architecture to
an effective web site design. They say:
It is important to recognize that every information system, be it a book or an intranet, has
an information architecture. ‘Well developed’ is the key here, as most sites don’t have a
planned information architecture at all. They are analogous to buildings that weren’t archi-
tected in advance. Design decisions reflect the personal biases of designers, the space
doesn’t scale over time, technologies drive the design and not the other way around.
In their book, Rosenfeld and Morville give alternative definitions of an information
architecture. They say it is:
1 The combination of organization, labelling, and navigation schemes within an information
system.
2 The structural design of an information space to facilitate task completion and intuitive
access to content.
3 The art and science of structuring and classifying web sites and intranets to help
people find and manage information.
4 An emerging discipline and community of practice focused on bringing principles of
design and architecture to the digital landscape.
Rosenfeld and Morville (2002)
Essentially, in practice, creation of an information architecture involves creating a
plan to group information logically – it involves creating a site structure which is often
represented as a site map. Note, though, that whole books have been written on infor-
mation architecture, so this is necessarily a simplification! A well-developed information
architecture is very important to usability since it determines navigation options. It is
also important to search engine optimisation (Chapter 8), since it determines how differ-
ent types of content that users may search for are labelled and grouped.
A planned information architecture is essential to large-scale web sites such as trans-
actional e-commerce sites, media owner sites and relationship-building sites that include
a large volume of product or support documentation. Information architectures are less
important to small-scale web sites and brand sites, but even here, the principles can be
readily applied and can help make the site more visible to search engines and usable.
The benefits of creating an information architecture include:
A defined structure and categorisation of information will support user and organisa-
tion goals, i.e. it is a vital aspect of usability.
It helps increase ‘flow’ on the site – a user’s mental model of where to find content
should mirror that of the content on the web site. 
Search engine optimisation – a higher listing in the search rankings can often be used
through structuring and labelling information in a structured way.
Applicable for integrating offline communications – offline communications such as
ads or direct mail can link to a product or campaign landing page to help achieve
direct response,  sometimes known as ‘web response’. A sound  URL strategy,  as
explained in Chapter 8, can help this.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
318
Information
architecture
The combination of
organisation, labelling
and navigation
schemes constituting
an information system.
Site map
A graphical or text
depiction of the
relationship between
different groups of
content on a web site.
Related content can be grouped to measure the effectiveness of a web site as part of
design for analysis, which is also explained below.
Card sorting
Using card sorting is a way in which users can become actively involved in the develop-
ment process of information architecture. 
Card sorting is a useful approach since web sites are frequently designed from the per-
spective of the designer rather than the information user, leading to labels, subject
grouping and categories that are not intuitive to the user. Card sorting or web classifica-
tionshould categorise web objects (e.g documents) in order to facilitate information task
completion or information goals the user has set.
Robertson (2003) explains an approach to card sorting which identifies the following
questions when using card sorting to aid the process of modelling web classification systems:
Do the users want to see the information grouped by: subject, task, business or cus-
tomer groupings, or type of information? 
What are the most important items to put on the main menu? 
How many menu items should there be, and how deep should it go? 
How similar or different are the needs of the users throughout the organisation?
Selected groups of users or representatives will be given index cards with the following
written on them, depending on the aim of the card sorting process. 
Types of documents
Organisational key words and concepts
Document titles
Descriptions of documents
Navigation labels.
The user groups may then be asked to:
Group together cards that they feel relate to each other;
Select cards that accurately reflect a given topic or area;
Organise cards in terms of hierarchy – high-level terms (broad) to low-level terms.
At the end of the session the analyst must take the cards away and map the results into a
spreadsheet to find out the most popular terms, descriptions and relationships. If two or
more different groups are used the results should be compared and reasons for differ-
ences should be analysed. 
Blueprints
According to Rosenfeld and Morville (2002), blueprints:
Show the relationships between pages and other content components, and can be used
to portray organization, navigation and labelling systems.
They are often thought of, and referred to, as ‘site maps’ or ‘site structure diagrams’ and
have much in common with these, except that they are used as a design device clearly
showing grouping of information and linkages between pages, rather than a page on the
web site to assist navigation. 
Refer to Figure 7.6 for an example of a site structure diagram for a toy manufacturer
web site which shows the groupings of content and an indication of the process of task
completion also.
RESEARCHING SITE USERS’ REQUIREMENTS
319
Card sorting or web
classification
The process of
arranging a way of
organising objects on
the web site in a
consistent manner.
Blueprints
Show the relationships
between pages and
other content
components, and can
be used to portray
organisation,
navigation and labelling
systems
Wireframes
A related technique to blueprints is the wireframeswhich are used by web designers to
indicate the eventual layout of a web page. Figure 7.7 shows that the wireframe is so
called because it just consists of an outline of the page with the ‘wires’ of content sepa-
rating different areas of content or navigation shown by white space.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
320
Figure 7.6 Site structure diagram (blueprint) showing layout and relationship between pages
Site search
Membership benefits
Registration form
Conformation (email sent to user)
Members’ Homepage
Member login
On successful login
Home
12–18 months
18–24 months
2–3 years
3–5 years
6–12 months
3–6 months
0–3 months
Overview and article listing
Email page to a friend
Post a comment (members only)
Printer friendly version
View related videos (members only)
Article
Either a description of a specific play activity or an editorial article
Contains list of related articles and related toys
‘Sign up to
receive similar
articles by
email’
‘Become a member
to receive product
updates’
‘Become a member
to redeem vouchers’
About play for this age range
List of articles grouped
by topic
List of activities for this
age range
Play by age
Forum
News
Ask the experts
Science of play
Toys
Browse toys by age range
Browse toys by type
Retailers
Research & Development
Testing
Psychology
View answer
Post question
Offers
Product listing
Postcode search results
Online retailer list
Product details
Email page
to a friend
Printer
friendly version
Wireframe
Also known as
‘schematics’, a way of
illustrating the layout
of an individual web
page.
Wodtke (2002) describes a wireframe (sometimes known as a ‘schematic’) as: 
a basic outline of an individual page, drawn to indicate the elements of a page, their rela-
tionships, and their relative importance.
A wireframe will be created for all types of similar page groups, identified at the blue-
print (site map) stage of creating the information architecture.
Blueprints illustrate how the content of a web site is related and navigated while a
wireframe focuses on individual pages; with a wireframe the navigation focus becomes
where it will be placed on the page. Wireframes are useful for agencies and clients to dis-
cuss the way a web site will be laid out without getting distracted by colour, style or
messaging issues which should be covered separately as a creative planning activity.
The process  of reviewing wireframes is  sometimes referred to as storyboarding,
although the term is often applied to reviewing creative ideas rather than formal design
alternative. Early designs are drawn on large pieces of paper, or mock-ups are produced
using a drawing or paint program.
At the wireframe stage, emphasis is not placed on use of colour or graphics, which
will be developed in conjunction with branding or marketing teams and graphic designers
and integrated into the site after the wireframe process. 
RESEARCHING SITE USERS’ REQUIREMENTS
321
Figure 7.7 Example wireframe for a children’s toy site
12–18
months
Popular articles
Become a member
Featured toys
Site search
Home
Toys
News
Forum
Science of play
Member login
Ask the experts
Play by age
Types of play
Development
Topics from our forum
6–12
months
3–6
months
0–3
months
18–24
months
2–3
years
3–5
years
Storyboarding
The use of static
drawings or
screenshots of the
different parts of a
web site to review the
design concept with
user groups. It can be
used to develop the
structure – an overall
‘map’ with individual
pages shown
separately. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested