mvc show pdf in div : Add text to pdf in preview software application project winforms html wpf UWP 06112-part139

Table4:Parametervaluesforthebenchmarkmodeleconomy
Preferences
Time discount factor
β
0.930
Curvature of consumption
σ
1
1.500
Curvature of leisure
σ
2
1.119
Relative share of consumption and leisure
χ
1.050
Endowment of discretionary time
3.200
Technology
Capital income share
θ
0.376
Capital depreciation rate
δ
0.050
Age and endowment process
Probability of retiring
p
e
0.022
Probability of dying
1− p

0.056
Life cycle earnings profile
φ
1
1.000
Intergenerational persistence of earnings
φ
2
0.733
Fiscal policy
Government consumption
G
0.369
Retirement pensions
ω
0.800
Capital income tax function
a
1
0.146
Payroll tax function
a
2
1.262
a
3
0.076
Household income tax function
a
4
0.258
a
5
0.768
a
6
0.456
Estate tax function
a
7
16.179
a
8
0.246
Consumption tax function
a
9
0.099
19
Add text to pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text box to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document
Add text to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text box in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
5 Findings: The flat tax reforms
We study two fundamental, revenue neutral, tax reforms that are related to the classical
reform proposed by Hall and Rabushka (1995). These reforms replace the current personal
income tax with a flat tax on all labor income above a large tax-exempt level and the current
corporate income taxes with an integrated flat tax on business income. The labor income
tax function, τ
l
(y
a
), is
τ
l
(y
a
)=
0
for y
a
<a
10
a
11
(y
a
−a
10
)
otherwise
(24)
where the tax base is labor income net of social security taxes paid by firms, y
a
=y
l
−τ
sf
(y
l
),
a
10
is the tax-exempt, and a
11
is the flat-tax rate. The business income tax is identical to the
capital income tax defined in expression (19) above. Since capital and labor income are taxed
at the same marginal tax rate, we make a
1
=a
10
.In this class of reforms, the progressivity of
direct taxes arises from the fixed deduction on labor income, while capital income taxes are
not progressive. Another defining feature of this class of reforms is that they eliminates the
double taxation of capital income. Finally, in this article we do not allow firms to expense
new investment when calculating the base of the capital income tax.
To find the values of the tax parameters of our reformed model economies, we do the
following: first we choose the values for the labor income tax-exemptions. In model economy
E
1
this value is a
10
= 0.3236 which corresponds to 20 percent of the benchmark model
economy per household output or, approximately, $16,000. In model economy E
2
it is a
10
=
0.6472 which corresponds to 40 percent of the benchmark model economy per household
output or, approximately, $32,000.
26
Next we search for the flat tax rates that make the
reforms revenue neutral. These tax rates turn out to be a
1
=a
10
=21.5 percent in model
economy E
1
and a
1
=a
10
=29.2 percent in model economy E
2
.Henceforth we refer to model
economy E
1
as the less progressive model economy and to model economy E
2
as the more
progressive model economy.
5.1 Taxes, taxes, taxes
Taxes in the U.S. interact in interesting and perhaps somewhat surprising ways. The current
personal income tax, τ
y
,is progressive in the classical sense since both its marginal and its
average tax rates are increasing in income. In contrast, the current payroll tax is not progres-
sive. In 1997 the marginal payroll tax on labor incomes below $62,700 was constant and equal
26
Ventura (1999) makes the same choices for the values of the tax-exemptions.
20
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
adding text to pdf reader; add text box in pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text in pdf file online
Figure 1: Tax rates on labor income in the benchmark and in the reformed
model economies (E
0
,E
1
and E
2
)
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
Panel A: Marginal tax rates in E
0
Panel B: Average tax rates in E
0
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
Panel C: Marginal tax rates in E
1
Panel D: Average tax rates in E
1
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
W10
W50
W90
Panel E: Marginal tax rates in E
2
Panel F: Average tax rates in E
2
21
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
how to add text to pdf file with reader; how to add text to pdf file
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding text to a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
to 15.3 percent, and the marginal payroll tax rate on labor incomes above this threshold was
zero. Since in our model economies households give up leisure for consumption, and since
retirement pensions are independent from contributions, the households are concerned with
total effective income taxes considered together, and not in the specific amounts collected
with the various taxes separately.
To illustrate the interactions between the current payroll and personal income taxes, in
Figure 1 we represent the total effective taxes on labor income in our three model economies.
Since the current personal income tax rates depend on both capital and labor income, in each
graph we plot the tax rates paid by households whose net worths are $0, $9,370, and $454,120
which puts them in the first, the fifth, and the ninth deciles of the wealth distribution.
27
Acareful inspection of Figure 1 reveals various features of the current U.S. tax system
that we have found both surprising and interesting. First, in the benchmark model economy
the shape of the effective marginal labor income tax function faced by different households in
the bottom half of the wealth distribution is almost the same. In the flat-tax economies this
is obviously the case because marginal tax rates are flat for everyone by design. Therefore,
the current tax system is not not too different from the flat tax system that we propose, at
least as far as its progressivity with respect to wealth is concerned.
Second, ifwe add together the payroll and the personal income taxes, it turns out that the
current labor income taxation, far from being progressive, actually becomes unquestionably
regressive.
28
Specifically, Panel A of Figure 1 shows that the marginal tax rate on labor in-
come faced by wealth-poor households starts at about 15 percent and it reaches its maximum
value of approximately 30 percent when labor income reaches $62,700. At this income level,
the marginal payroll tax rate drops to zero and the total marginal tax on labor income drops
back to approximately 15% which is the marginal tax rate paid by households with zero labor
income. In the case of very wealthy households, the regressivity of marginal labor income
tax rates is even more remarkable: the marginal tax on labor income paid by households who
earn $62,700 is 17%, which is only two-thirds of the 25% paid by equally wealthy households
27
We have transformed the model economy units into U.S. dollars to give the reader a better sense of the
magnitudes involved.
28
In this article we use the adjectives “progressive”, “proportional”, and “regressive” because they give us
an intuitive description of the shape of the tax functions, but we do not use them to imply any normative
judgement about fairness. We do this for two reasons. First, because to evaluate the fairness of a tax
instrument,we should evaluateitsconsequences for thedistributionof welfare or,atleast,for the distribution
of after-taxincome;and secondbecause to measurethefairness of a taxinstrument,we should use thelifetime
tax burden and the lifetime taxable income, and not the tax burden and the taxable income of any single
period.
22
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to enter text into a pdf form
Figure 2: Tax rates on labor income paid by the first decile, the median and the
ninth decile of the wealth distribution (W10, W50 and W90)
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W10
E1-W10
E2-W10
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W10
E1-W10
E2-W10
Panel A: Marginal tax rates (W10)
Panel B: Average tax rates (W10)
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W50
E1-W50
E2-W50
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W50
E1-W50
E2-W50
Panel C: Marginal tax rates (W50)
Panel D: Average tax rates (W50)
0
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,4
0,5
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W90
E1-W90
E2-W90
0
0,05
0,1
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
E0-W90
E1-W90
E2-W90
Panel E: Marginal tax rates (W90)
Panel F: Average tax rates (W90)
23
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf document online; how to add text boxes to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
following. C# DLLs: Preview Excel Document without Microsoft Office Installed. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf document
who earn zero labor income.
29
This interaction between payroll taxes and labor income taxes is also present in the flat
tax economies, albeit in a smaller degree (see Panels C and E of Figure 1). In both cases,
the marginal income tax rates are step functions, and in both cases the middle labor incomes
pay the highest marginal taxes. But, unlike the current system, in both flat tax reforms, the
labor income rich pay higher marginal labor income taxes than the labor income poor.
As far as average labor income taxes are concerned, we find that they are progressive
only in model economy E
2
(see Panels B, D and F of Figure 1). In the benchmark model
economy and in model economy E
1
average taxes peak at the payroll tax income cap and they
decrease for higher labor income levels. In contrast, in model economy E
2
,once the payroll
tax income cap is reached, the average tax rate increases asymptotically to that economy’s
flat tax rate.
30
To compare the labor income taxes before and after the reform, in Figure 2 we plot the
marginal and average tax rates of the three model economies in the same graphs for the
three values of wealth mentioned above. We find that, when compared with the current tax
system, flat taxes favor the labor income poorest at the expense of all other labor income
earners for the three levels of wealth that we consider.
As Figure 3 illustrates, the comparison of capital income taxes is very different. In
Panels A and B of that figure we plot the marginal and the average tax rates paid on capital
income by the households in the first, fifth and ninth deciles of the income distribution in
the benchmark model economy when we consider together the capital income tax and the
personal income tax. In this case, since the capital income tax is proportional and uncapped
and the personal income tax is progressive, the total average and marginal taxes on capital
income are also progressive.
Panels C and D of that same figure illustrate the large role played by the double taxation
of capital in the current tax system. Even though the marginal rates of the capital income
tax are higher in the two reformed economies (21.5 and 29.2 percent) than in the benchmark
model economy (14.6 percent), when weaccount for thedoubletaxation ofcapital incomethis
result is reversed. With the exception of low incomes, panel C illustrates that the effective
marginal taxes on capital income are higher in the benchmark model economy than in the
29
Notice that the shape of the current payroll tax creates serious technical difficulties when solving the
households’ decision problem because it implies that the returns to working are increasing in hours at certain
points, and therefore the household decision problem becomes non-convex. See Section B of the Appendix
for details about this issue.
30
This is the case because in model economy E
2
the flat tax rate is higher than the average tax at the
payroll tax cap.
24
Figure 3: Tax rates on capital income in the benchmark and in the reformed
model economies (E
0
,E
1
and E
2
)
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0,4
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
E0-Y00
E0-Y50
E0-Y90
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0,4
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
E0-Y00
E0-Y50
E0-Y90
Panel A: Marginal tax rates in E
0
Panel B: Average tax rates in E
0
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0,4
0
1
2
3
4
5
E0-YL0
E1-YL0
E2-YL0
0,15
0,2
0,25
0,3
0,35
0,4
0
1
2
3
4
5
E0-YL0
E1-YL0
E2-YL0
Panel C: Marginal tax rates (E
i
)
Panel D: Average tax rates (E
i
)
25
two reformed economies. Panel D shows that the total average tax rates on capital income
display a similar behavior. As we discuss below, these changes in the taxation of capital
bring about large changes in the steady-state capital stocks of the model economies.
Table 5: Production, inputs and input ratios in the model economies
Y
K
L
a
H
b
K/L L/H
Y/H
E
0
1.62
5.76
0.75 33.70
7.64
2.24
4.80
E
1
1.66
6.16
0.75 33.46
8.19
2.25
4.95
E
2
1.58
5.43
0.75 33.26
7.26
2.25
4.74
E
1
/E
0
(%)
2.44
6.93 –0.16 –0.69
7.10
0.53
3.15
E
2
/E
0
(%) –2.64 –5.72 –0.73 –1.30 –5.03
0.58 –1.35
a
Variable L denotes the aggregate labor input.
b
Variable H denotes the average percentage of the endowment of time allocated to the market.
5.2 Macroeconomic aggregates and ratios
In Tables 5 and 6 we report the main macroeconomic aggregates and ratios of our model
economies. We find that the steady-state aggregate consequences of the two flat tax reforms
turn out to be very different. While the less progressive reform is expansionary (output
increases by 2.4 percent and labor productivity by 3.15 percent), the more progressive reform
is contractionary (output decreases by –2.6 percent and labor productivity by –1.4 percent).
The expansion in model economy E
1
output is brought about by an increase in the
aggregate capital and a reduction in the aggregate labor input (6.9 percent and slightly less
than −0.2 percent). In contrast, the contraction in model economy E
2
is brought about by
a reduction both in the aggregate capital and in the aggregate labor input (−5.7 percent
−0.7 percent). Since the capital to labor ratio increases in model economy E
1
and decreases
in model economy E
2
,in model economy E
1
the steady-state interest rate is lower and the
wage rate is higher than in the benchmark economy, and the opposite is true for economy
E
2
.We also find out that the changes in labor productivity are the result of large changes in
the capital to labor ratio, K/L, which dwarf the changes in the average efficiency of labor,
L/H. (see the last two columns of Table 5).
The reasons that justify these results are the following: first, the flat tax reforms reduce
the marginal capital income tax rates faced by the wealthy and by the income rich, but they
increase the marginal capital incomes tax rates faced by the wealth poor; second, flat tax
26
Table 6: The values of the targeted ratios and aggregates in the U.S. and in the benchmark
model economies
C/Y (%) I/Y(%) G/Y (%) K/Y
H
a
/(%) (cv
c
/cv
l
)
b
e
40/20
ρ(f,s)
U.S.
54.2
22.5
23.3
3.58
33.3
3.5
1.30
0.40
E
0
59.2
18.0
22.8
3.56
33.7
3.3
1.23
0.14
E
1
59.0
18.8
22.3
3.71
33.5
3.6
1.24
0.15
E
2
59.2
17.4
23.4
3.45
33.3
3.5
1.23
0.16
E
0
59.2
18.0
22.8
3.56
E
1
/Y
0
60.4
19.2
22.8
3.81
E
2
/Y
0
57.6
17.0
22.8
3.35
aThisratiodenotestheaverageshareofdisposabletimeallocatedtothemarket.
b
This statistic is the ratio of the coefficients of variation of consumption and of hours worked.
reforms increase the marginal taxes on labor income paid by every household except the
labor income poor. Since the reforms distort every margin and affect different households in
different ways, their overall effects can vary significantly from one reform to another. Overall,
we find that the flat tax reforms that we consider are expansionary as long as the integrated
flat rate is small enough, and that they become contractionary as we increase the labor
income tax-exemption.
Both the size and the sign of our results contrast sharply with the findings by Ventura
(1999) and Altig, Auerbach, Kotlikoff, Smetters, and Walliser (2001). Like we do, Ventura
(1999) considers two flat tax reforms with labor income tax exemptions equal to 20 and 40
percent of per household income in his benchmark economy. Unlike us, he finds both reforms
to be expansionary, with steady state output gains in the order of 10 percent.
31
There are
important differences between his model economy and ours. First, Ventura (1999)’s capital
income tax allows for the full expensing of investment. Therefore, in his reformed economies
capital accumulation is not taxed in the margin and this brings about very large increases in
aggregate capital (the capital to labor ratio increases by approximately 20 percent in his two
reforms). Second, Ventura (1999) uses the statutory income brackets and tax rates to proxy
for the effective personal income tax rates. Therefore, in his benchmark model economy the
marginal taxes rates of the personal income tax are higher than ours and the flat tax reforms
bring about efficiency gains that are larger. Finally, Ventura (1999) largely understates the
31
In his reforms the revenue neutral marginal tax rates are 19.1 and 25.2 percent respectively. These tax
rates are somewhat lower than our 21.5 and 29.2 percent rates.
27
concentration of the earnings, income and wealth distribution and this distorts his findings.
32
The comparison of our findings to those of Altig, Auerbach, Kotlikoff, Smetters, and Wal-
liser (2001) is less direct. Altig, Auerbach, Kotlikoff, Smetters, and Walliser (2001) study
asequence of reforms. First, they look at a purely proportional tax on all income; second,
they allow for full expensing of new investment, which makes their income tax equivalent
to a consumption tax; and third, they add a labor income tax exemption.
33
They find that
these three reforms increase aggregate output in the long run. A strictly proportional income
tax increases output by 5 percent, allowing for the expensing of new investment expensing
increases output by an additional 4 percent and adding a fixed deduction to labor income
requires a higher marginal tax rate that brings the output increase back to 4.5 percent. Our
model economy differs from Altig, Auerbach, Kotlikoff, Smetters, and Walliser (2001)’s in
several importantdimensions. First, weallow forearningsand wealth mobility.
34
This feature
of our model economy should reduce the impact of the reforms because our income process is
mean reverting, at least at the dynastic level. Second, we consider uninsurable labor market
uncertainty. Third, earnings, income and wealth are more concentrated in our model econ-
omy than in theirs. Finally, our households are altruistic towards their descendants and our
model economy displays some of the intergenerational correlation of earnings observed in the
data. We think that this feature is important because the bequest motive is arguably one of
the main determinants of wealth accumulation (see De Nardi (2004), for example). Mean-
ingful evaluations of the distributional consequences of tax reforms require realistic wealth
distributions, but this realism should also be achieved through the appropriate margins.
In Table 6 we report additional aggregate statistics of the benchmark and the flat-tax
economies. Overall, we find that the changes brought about by the flat-tax reforms are rather
small. Not surprisingly, the most noteworthy changes are those in the investment to output
ratio which is 18.0 in the benchmark model economy, 18.8 in model economy E
1
and 17.4 in
economy in model economy E
2
.
5.3 Fiscal Policy Ratios
In Table 7 we report the main fiscal policy ratios of the model economies. In model economy
E
1
the tax revenue to output ratio is smaller than in the benchmark economy, and its govern-
ment expenditures to output ratio and its transfers to output ratio are reduced accordingly.
32
The benchmark economy in Ventura (1999) displays a gini index for the earnings distribution equal to
0.47 and a gini index for the wealth distribution equal to 0.60.
33
They consider two additional reforms with different tax reliefs for capital holders during the transition.
34
Ventura (1999) also models this feature.
28
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested