mvc show pdf in div : How to add text to a pdf file in reader software SDK dll windows wpf .net web forms 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN36-part1373

6 Number of options
Psychologists recommend having a limited number of choices within each menu. If a
menu has more than seven, it is probably necessary to add another level to the hierarchy
to accommodate the extra choices.
Page design
The page design involves creating an appropriate layout for each page. The main ele-
ments of a particular page layout are the title, navigation and content. Standard content
such as copyright information may be added to every page as a footer. Issues in page
design include:
Page elements. We have to consider the proportion of page devoted to content com-
pared to all other material such as headers, footers and navigation elements. The
location of these elements also needs to be considered. It is conventional for the main
menu to be at the top or on the left. The use of a menu system at the top of the
browser window allows more space for content below.
The use of frames. This is generally discouraged since it makes search engine registra-
tion more difficult and makes printing and bookmarking more difficult for visitors.
Resizing. A good page layout design should allow for the user to change the size of text
or work with different monitor resolutions.
Consistency. Page layout should be similar for all areas of the site unless more space is
required, for example for a discussion forum or product demonstration. Standards of
colour and typography can be enforced through cascading style sheets.
Printing. Layout should allow for printing or provide an alternative printing format.
Content design
The home page is particularly important in achieving marketing actions – if the cus-
tomers do not understand or do not buy into the proposition of the site, then they will
leave. Gleisser (2001) states that it is important to clarify what he refers to as ‘the essen-
tials’ of: who we are, what we offer, what is inside and how to contact us.
A study of the advertising impact of web site content design has been conducted by
Pak (1999). She reviewed the techniques on web sites used to communicate the message
to the customer in terms of existing advertising theory. The study considered the creative
strategy used, in terms of the rational and emotional appeals contained within the visuals
and the text. As would be expected intuitively, the appeal of the graphics was more emo-
tional than that for the text; the latter used a more rational appeal. The study also
considered the information content of the advertisements using classification schemes
such as that of Resnik and Stern (1977). The information cues are still relevant to modern
web site design. Some of the main information cues, in order of frequency of use, were:
performance (what does the product do?);
components/content (what is the product made up of?);
price/value;
implicit comparison;
availability;
quality;
special offers;
explicit comparisons.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
332
How to add text to a pdf file in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text in pdf file; add text boxes to pdf
How to add text to a pdf file in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf in preview; how to insert text box on pdf
Aaker and Norris (1982) devised a framework in which the strategy for creative appeal
is based on emotion and feeling, and that for rational and cognitive appeal is based on
facts and logic.
Copywriting for the web is an evolving art form, but many of the rules for good copy-
writing are as for any media. Common errors we see on web sites are:
too much knowledge assumed of the visitor about the company, its products and
services;
using internal jargon about products, services or departments – using undecipherable
acronyms.
Web copywriters also need to take account of the user reading the content on-screen.
Approaches  to  dealing  with  the  limitations  imposed  by  the  customer  using  a 
monitor include:
writing more concisely than in brochures;
chunking, or breaking text into units of 5–6 lines at most, which allows users to scan
rather than read information on web pages;
use of lists with headline text in larger font;
never including too much on a single page, except when presenting lengthy informa-
tion such as a report which may be easier to read on a single page;
using hyperlinks to decrease page sizes or help achieve flow within copy, either by
linking to sections further down a page or linking to another page.
Smith and Chaffey (2005) summarise the essentials of good copywriting for the web
under the mnemonic ‘CRABS’, which stands for chunking, relevance, accuracy, brevity
and scannability.
Hofacker (2000) describes five stages of human information processing when a web
site is being used. These can be applied to both page design and content design to
improve usability and help companies get their message across to consumers. Each of
the five stages summarised in Table 7.5 acts as a hurdle, since if the site design or con-
tent is too difficult to process, the customer cannot progress to the next stage. It is useful
to consider the stages in order to minimise these difficulties.
DESIGNING THE USER EXPERIENCE
333
Table 7.5 A summary of the characteristics of the five stages of information processing
described by Hofacker (2000)
Stage
Description
Applications
1 Exposure
Content must be present for long
Content on banner ads may not be on 
enough to be processed
screen long enough for processing
and cognition
2 Attention
UserÕs eyes will be drawn towards 
Emphasis and accurate labelling of 
headings and content, not graphics 
headings is vital to gain a user’s 
and moving items on a web page 
attention. Evidence suggests that users 
(Nielsen, 2000b)
do not notice banner adverts, suffering
from ‘banner blindness’
3 Comprehension The user’s interpretation of content
Designs that use common standards 
and perception
and metaphors and are kept simple will
be more readily comprehended
4 Yielding and
Is information (copy) presented 
Copy should refer to credible sources 
acceptance
accepted by customers?
and present counter-arguments as
necessary
5 Retention
As for traditional advertising, this 
An unusual style or high degree of 
describes the extent to which the 
interaction leading to flow and user 
information is remembered
satisfaction is more likely to be recalled
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
acrobat add text to pdf; how to insert a text box in pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
adding text to a pdf document; adding text pdf file
Gleisser (2001) surveyed web site designers to identify consensus on what were success
factors in web site design. The results of this research are used to summarise this section:
The home page essentials. Segmentation, targeting and positioning play a key role in
informing design. The essentials are: who we are, what we offer, what is inside and
how to contact us.
Cater for the needs of anticipated users. Web sites should be quick to download and easy
to navigate. The users may not be able to incorporate the latest technical capabilities,
such as plug-ins, so these should be used with care.
Update the web site frequently. This is to encourage repeat visitors and keep customers
informed of new products and offers.
Gathering customer information. The web site should be used as part of a ‘push’ market-
ing strategy which includes gathering customer information and better targeting of
direct marketing using a range of media.
It is not practical to provide details of the methods of developing content – for two rea-
sons. First, to describe all the facilities available in web browsers for laying out and
formatting text, and for developing interactivity, would require several books! Second,
the programming standards and tools used are constantly evolving, so material is soon
out-of-date.
Testing content
Marketing managers responsible for web sites need to have a basic awareness of web site
developmentand testing. We have already discussed the importance of usability testing
with typical users of the system. In brief, other necessary testing steps include:
test content displays correctly on different types and versions of web browsers;
test plug-ins;
test all interactive facilities and integration with company databases;
test spelling and grammar;
test adherence to corporate image standards;
test to ensure all links to external sites are valid.
Testing often occurs on a separate test web server (or directory) or test environment, with
access to the test or prototype version being restricted to the development team. When
complete the web site is released or published to the main web server or live environment.
Tools for web site development and testing
A variety of software programs are available to help developers of web sites. Some of
these tools are listed below to illustrate the range of skills a web site designer will need;
an advanced web site may be built using tools from each of these categories since even
the most advanced tools may not have the flexibility of the basic tools.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
334
Development and testing of content
Development phase
‘Development’ is the
term used to describe
the creation of a web
site by programmers. It
involves writing the
HTML content, creating
graphics, and writing
any necessary software
code such as
JavaScript or ActiveX
(programming).
Testing phase
Testing involves
different aspects of the
content such as
spelling, validity of
links, formatting on
different web browsers
and dynamic features
such as form filling or
database queries.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text pdf file acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text pdf file; add text to pdf
Basic text editors
Text editors are used to edit HTML tags. For example, ‘<B>Products</B>’ will make the
enclosed text display bold within the web browser. Such tools are often available at low
cost or free – including the Notepad editor included with Windows. They are very flexi-
ble, and all web site developers will need to use them at some stage in developing
content since more automated tools may not provide this flexibility and may not sup-
port the latest standard commands. Entire sites can be built using these tools, but it is
more efficient to use the more advanced tools described below, and use the editors for
‘tweaking’ content.
Specialised HTML and graphics editors
Specialised HTML and graphics editing tools provide facilities for adding HTML tags
automatically. For example, adding the Bold text tag <B> </B> to the HTML document
will happen when the user clicks the bold tag. Some of these editors are WYSIWYG.
Examples of standard tools include Microsoft FrontPage Express (www
.micr
osoft.com
)
and the more sophisticated and widely used tool Dreamweaver (www
.macr
omedia.com
).
More advanced tools include content management systems which are today essential for
any site which is frequently updated to support marketing. This topic is discussed fur-
ther in Chapter 9. They provide advanced content editing facilities, but also provide
tools to help manage and test the site, including graphic layouts of the structure of the
site – making it easy to find, modify and re-publish the page. Style templates can be
applied to produce a consistent ‘look and feel’ across the site. Tools are also available to
create and manage menu options.
Examples of graphics tools include:
Adobe Photoshop (extensively used by graphic designers, www
.adobe.com
);
Macromedia  Flash  and  Director-Shockwave  (used  for  graphical  animations,
www
.macr
omedia.com
).
Promotion of a site is a significant topic that will be part of the strategy of developing a web
site. It will follow the initial development of a site and is described in detail in Chapter 8.
Delivering service quality in e-commerce can be assessed through reviewing existing mar-
keting frameworks for determining levels of service quality. Those most frequently used
are based on the concept of a ‘service-quality gap’ that exists between the customer’s
expected level of service (from previous experience and word-of-mouth communication)
and their perception of the actual level of service delivery. We can apply the elements of
service quality on which Parasuraman et al. (1985) suggest that consumers judge compa-
nies. Note that there has been heated dispute about the validity of this SERVQUAL
instrument framework in determining service quality, see for example Cronin and Taylor
SERVICE QUALITY
335
Promote site
Service quality
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text fields to pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
how to insert a text box in pdf; how to add text field to pdf form
(1992). Despite this it is still instructive to apply these dimensions of service quality to
customer service on the web (see for example Chaffey and Edgar (2000), Kolesar and
Galbraith (2000), Zeithaml et al. (2002) and Trocchia and Janda (2003)):
tangibles – the physical appearance of facilities and communications;
reliability – the ability to perform the service dependably and accurately;
responsiveness – a willingness to help customers and provide prompt service;
assurance – the knowledge and courtesy of employees and their ability to convey trust
and confidence;
empathy – providing caring, individualised attention.
Online marketers should assess what customers’ expectations are in each of these areas,
and identify where there is an online service-quality gap between the customer expecta-
tions and what is currently delivered.
Research across industry sectors suggests that the quality of service is a key determi-
nant of loyalty. Feinberg et al. (2000) report that when reasons why customers leave a
company are considered, over 68% leave because of ‘poor service experience’, with other
factors such as price (10%) and product issues (17%) less significant. Poor service experi-
ence was subdivided as follows:
poor access to the right person (41%);
unaccommodating (26%);
rude employees (20%);
slow to respond (13%).
This survey was conducted for traditional business contacts, but it is instructive since these
reasons given for poor customer service have their equivalents online through e-mail
communications and delivery of services on-site.
We will now examine how the five determinants of online service quality apply online.
Tangibles
It can be suggested that the tangibles dimension is influenced by ease of use and visual
appeal based on the structural and graphic design of the site. Design factors that influ-
ence this variable are described later in this chapter. The importance customers attach to
these different aspects of service quality is indicated by the compilation in Table 7.6
which considers the reasons why customers return to a site.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
336
Online service-
quality gap
The mismatch between
what is expected and
delivered by an online
presence.
Table 7.6 Ten key reasons for returning to site
Reason to return
Percentage of respondents
1 High-quality content
75
2 Ease of use
66
3 Quick to download
58
4 Updated frequently
54
5 Coupons and incentives
14
6 Favourite brands
13
7 Cutting-edge technology
12
8 Games
12
9 Purchasing capabilities
11
10 Customisable content
10
Source: Forrester Research poll of 8600 online households, 1998
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
add text pdf file; add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to pdf in reader; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
Reliability
The reliability dimension is dependent on the availability of the web site or, in other
words, how easy it is to connect to the web site as a user. Many companies fail to achieve
100% availability and potential customers may be lost for ever, if they attempt to use the
site when it is unavailable.
Reliability of e-mail response is also a key issue, Chaffey and Edgar (2000) reported on
a survey of 361 UK web sites across different sectors. Of those in the sample, 331 (or 92
per cent) were accessible at the time of the survey and, of these, 299 provided an e-mail
contact point. E-mail enquiries were sent to all of these 299 web sites; of these, 9 unde-
liverable mail messages were received. It can be seen that at the time of the survey,
service availability was certainly not universal. Surprisingly, more recent surveys suggest
some improvement, but still indicate a poor quality of service overall. Transversal
(2005), the provider of the MetaFAQ software to answer customers’ responses online
found the following reliability of response:
Average number of questions answered:
– Travel 1.2 out of 10
– Telecoms 1 out of 10
– Average all companies 2.1 out of 10
Percentage of companies that responded to e-mail:
– Travel 40 per cent
– Telecoms 70 per cent
– Average 56 per cent
Average e-mail response time:
– Travel 42 hours
– Telecoms 32 hours
– Average 33 hours.
Responsiveness
The same survey showed that responsiveness was poor overall: of the 290 successfully
delivered e-mails, a 62 per cent response rate occurred within a 28-day period. For over a
third of companies there was zero response!
Of the companies that did respond, there was a difference in responsiveness (exclud-
ing immediately delivered automated responses) from 8 minutes to over 19 working
days! Whilst the mean overall was 2 working days, 5 hours and 11 minutes, the median
across all sectors (on the basis of the fastest 50 per cent of responses received) was 1
working day and 34 minutes. The median result suggests that response within one work-
ing day represents best practice and could form the basis for consumer expectations.
Responsiveness is also indicated by the performance of the web site: the time it takes
for a page request to be delivered to the user’s browser as a page impression. Data from
monitoring services such as Keynote (www
.keynote.com
) indicate that there is a wide
variability in the delivery of information and hence service quality from web servers
hosted at ISPs, and companies should be careful to monitor this and specify levels of
quality with suppliers in service-level agreements (SLAs). Table 7.2 shows the standard
set by the best-performing sites and the difference from the worst-performing sites. 
SERVICE QUALITY
337
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
how to insert text in pdf reader; add text to pdf using preview
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
add text pdf reader; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Assurance
In an e-mail context, assurance can best be considered as the quality of response. In the
survey reported by Chaffey and Edgar (2000), of 180 responses received, 91 per cent deliv-
ered a personalised human response, with 9 per cent delivering an automated response
which did not address the individual enquiry; 40 per cent of responses answered or
referred to all three questions, with 10 per cent answering two questions and 22 per cent
one. Overall, 38 per cent did not answer any of the specific questions posed!
A further assurance concern of e-commerce web sites is the privacy and security of
customer information (see Chapter 3). A company that adheres to the UK Internet
Shopping Is Safe (ISIS) (www
.imr
g.or
g/isis
) or TRUSTe principles (www
.tr
uste.or
g
) will
provide better assurance than one that does not. Smith and Chaffey (2005) suggest that
the following actions can be used to achieve assurance in an e-commerce site:
1 provide clear and effective privacy statements;
2 follow privacy and consumer protection guidelines in all local markets;
3 make security of customer data a priority;
4 use independent certification bodies;
5 emphasise the excellence of service quality in all communications.
Empathy
Although it might be considered that empathy requires personal human contact, it can
still be achieved, to an extent, through e-mail. Chaffey and Edgar (2000) report that of
the responses received, 91 per cent delivered a personalised human response, with 29
per cent passing on the enquiry within their organisation. Of these 53, 23 further
responses were received within the 28-day period; 30 (or 57 per cent) of passed-on
queries were not responded to further.
Provision of personalisation facilities is also an indication of the empathy provided by
the web site, but more research is needed as to customers’ perception of the value of web
pages that are dynamically created to meet a customer’s information needs.
An alternative framework  for considering  how  service  quality  can be delivered
through e-commerce is to consider how the site provides customer service at the differ-
ent stages of the buying decision discussed in Chapter 2 in the section on online buyer
behaviour. Thus, quality service is not only dependent on how well the purchase itself is
facilitated, but also on how easy it is for customers to select products, and on after-sales
service, including fulfilment quality. The Epson UK site (www
.epson.co.uk
) illustrates
how the site can be used to help in all stages of the buying process. Interactive tools are
available to help users select a particular printer, and diagnose and solve faults, and tech-
nical brochures can be downloaded. Feedback is solicited on how well these services
meet customers’ needs.
It  can  be  suggested  that  for  managers  wishing  to  apply  a  framework  such  as
SERVQUAL in an e-commerce context there are three stages appropriate to managing
the process:
1 Understanding expectations. Customer expectations for the e-commerce environment
in a particular market sector must be understood. The SERVQUAL framework can be
used with market research and benchmarking of other sites to understand require-
ments such as responsiveness and empathy. Scenarios can also be used to identify the
customer expectations of using services on a site.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
338
2 Setting and communicating the service promise. Once expectations are understood, mar-
keting communications can be used to inform the customers of the level of service.
This can be achieved through customer service guarantees or promises. It is better to
under-promise than over-promise. A book retailer that delivers the book in 2 days
when 3 days were promised will earn the customer’s loyalty better than the retailer
that promises 1 day, but delivers in 2! The enlightened company may also explain
what it will do if it doesn’t meet its promises – will the customer be recompensed?
The service promise must also be communicated internally and combined with train-
ing to ensure that the service is delivered.
3 Delivering the service promise. Finally, commitments must be delivered through on-site
service, support from employees and physical fulfilment. Otherwise, online credibil-
ity is destroyed and a customer may never return.
Tables 7.7 and 7.8 summarise the main concerns of online consumers for each of the ele-
ments of service quality. Table 7.7 summarises the main factors in the context of SERVQUAL
and Table 7.8 presents the requirements from an e-commerce site that must be met for
excellent customer service.
The relationship between service quality, customer satisfaction 
and loyalty
Figure 6.16 highlights the importance of online service quality. If customer expectations
are not met, customer satisfaction will be poor and repeat site visits will not occur,
SERVICE QUALITY
339
Table 7.7 Online elements of service quality
Tangibles
Reliability
Responsiveness
Assurance and empathy
Ease of use
Availability
Download speed
Contacts with call centre
Content quality
Reliability
E-mail response
Personalisation
Price
E-mail replies
Callback
Privacy
Fulfilment
Security
Table 7.8 Summary of requirements for online service quality
E-mail response requirements
Web site requirements
Defined response times and named individual 
Support for customer-preferred channel of 
responsible for replies 
communication in response to enquiries 
Use of autoresponders to confirm query is
(e-mail, phone, postal mail or in person)
being processed
Clearly indicated contact points for enquiries 
Personalised e-mail where appropriate
via e-mail mailto: and forms
Accurate response to inbound e-mail by 
Company internal targets for site availability 
customer-preferred channel: outbound e-mail 
and performance
or phone callback
Testing of site usability and efficiency of links, 
Opt-in and opt-out options must be provided 
HTML, plug-ins and browsers to maximise 
for promotional e-mail with a suitable offer in
availability
exchange for a customer’s provision of 
Appropriate graphic and structural site design 
information
to achieve ease of use and relevant content 
Clear layout, named individual and privacy 
with visual appeal
statements in e-mail
Personalisation option for customers
Specific tools to help a user answer specific
queries such as interactive support databases
and frequently asked questions (FAQ)
Source: Chaffey and Edgar (2000)
which makes it difficult to build online relationships. Note, however, that online service
quality is also dependent on other aspects of the service experience including the offline
component of the service such as fulfilment and the core and extended product offer
including pricing. If the customer experience is satisfactory, it can be suggested that cus-
tomer loyalty will develop. 
Reichheld and Schefter (2000) suggest that it is key for organisations to understand,
not only what determines service quality and customer satisfaction, but loyalty or repeat
purchases. From their research, they suggest five ‘primary determinants of loyalty’ online:
1 quality customer support;
2 on-time delivery;
3 compelling product presentations;
4 convenient and reasonably priced shipping and handling;
5 clear trustworthy privacy policies.
Figure 7.13 shows a more recent compilation of consumers’ opinions of the impor-
tance of these loyalty drivers in the online context. It can be seen that it is the after-sales
support and service which are considered to be most important – the ease of use and
navigation are relatively unimportant.
Of course, the precise nature of the loyalty drivers will differ between companies.
Reichheld and Schefter (2000) reported that Dell Computer has created a customer expe-
rience council that has researched key loyalty drivers, identified measures to track these
and put in place an action plan to improve loyalty. The loyalty drivers and their sum-
mary metrics were:
1 Driver: order fulfilment. Metrics: ship to target – percentage that ship on time exactly
as the customer specified.
2 Driver: product performance. Metrics: initial field incident rate – the frequency of prob-
lems experienced by customers.
CHAPTER 7 · DELIVERING THE ONLINE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
340
Figure 7.13 Customer ratings of importance of attributes of online experience
Source: J.P. Morgan report on e-tailing 2000
20
Price
Selection
Navigation
Product info
Ease of ordering
Privacy policies
Product content
Fulfilment
Support
70
60
50
40
30
10
0
% who care about attribute
Driver: post-sale service and support. Metrics: on-time, first-time fix – the percentage
of problems  fixed  on the first visit  by a  service  representative  who  arrives  at the
time promised.
Rigby et al. (2000) assessed repeat-purchase drivers in grocery, clothing and consumer
electronics e-tail. It was found that key loyalty drivers were similar to those of Dell,
including correct delivery of order, but other factors such as price, ease of use and cus-
tomer support were more important.
To summarise this section and in order to more fully understand the online expecta-
tions of service quality, complete Activity 7.3.
CASE STUDY 7
Activity 7.3
An example of factors determining online service quality
Purpose
To understand the elements of online service quality.
Activity
Think back to your experience of purchasing a book or CD online. Alternatively, visit a site and
go through the different stages. Write down your expectations of service quality from when
you first arrive on the web site until the product is delivered. There should be around ten
different stages.
visit the
w.w.w.
Refining the online customer experience at 
dabs.com
Case Study 7
This case study highlights the importance placed on web
site design as part of the customer experience by dabs.com
which is one of the UK’s leading Internet retailers of IT and
technology products from manufacturers such as Sony,
Hewlett-Packard, Toshiba and Microsoft.
Company background and history
Dabs.com was originally created by entrepreneur David
Atherton in partnership with writer Bruce Smith (the name
‘dabs’ comes from  the  combined  initials of  their  two
names). Their first venture, Dabs Press was a publisher of
technology books. Although David and Bruce remain firm
friends, Dabs has been 100% owned by David since 1990.
Dabs Direct was launched in 1990, as a mail-order firm
which mainly promoted itself through ads in home tech-
nology magazines such as Personal Computer World and
Computer Shopper.
Dabs.com was launched in 1999 at the height of the dot-
com boom, but unlike many dot-com start-up businesses,
dabs.com was based on an existing offline business.
In its first year, dabs.com was loss-making with £1.2 mil-
lion lost in 2000–1; this was partly due to including free
delivery as part of the proposition to acquire new customers. 
In 2003,  the  company  opened  its  first  ‘bricks and
mortar’ store at Liverpool John Lennon Airport and it has
also opened an operation in France (www
.dabs.fr
). The
French site remains, but the retail strategy has now ended
since margins were too low, despite a positive effect in
building awareness of the brand in retail locations.
Strategy
The importance that dabs.com owners place on customer
experience and usability is suggested by their mission
statement, which places customer experience at its core
together with choice and price. Dabs.com’s mission is:
to provide customers with a quick  and easy way of
buying the products they want, at the most competitive
prices around, delivered directly to their door.
Growth has been conservatively managed, since as a
privately held company dabs.com has to grow profitably
rather than take on debts. Dabs.com has reviewed the
potential of other European countries for distribution and
may select a country where broadband access is high such
as Sweden or the Netherlands. Countries such as Italy
where consumers traditionally prefer face-to-face sales
would not be early candidates to target for an opening.
In terms of products, dabs.com has focused on comput-
ers and related products, but is considering expanding into
new categories or even ranges. Initially these will be related
to what computer users need while they are working.
341
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested