mvc show pdf in div : How to add text field to pdf form Library control class asp.net azure web page ajax 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN38-part1375

Hoffman and Novak (1997) believe that this change is significant enough to represent
a new model for marketing or a new ‘marketing paradigm’. They suggest that the facili-
ties of the Internet including the web represent a computer-mediated environment in
which the interactions are not between the sender and receiver of information, but with
the medium itself. They say:
consumers can interact with the medium, firms can provide content to the medium, and in
the most radical departure from traditional marketing environments, consumers can pro-
vide commercially-oriented content to the media.
This situation is shown in Figure 8.2(c). This potential has not yet been fully devel-
oped since many companies  are still using the Internet to  provide standardised
information to a general audience.
Despite the reference to a new paradigm, it is still important to apply tried and tested
marketing communications concepts such as hierarchy of response and buying process
to the Internet environment as described in the online customer behaviour section in
Chapter 2. However, some opportunities will be missed if the Internet is merely treated
as another medium similar to existing media.
4 From one-to-many to many-to-many communications
New media also enable many-to-many communications. Hoffman and Novak (1996)
noted that new media are many-to-many media. Here customers can interact with other
customers via a web site, in independent communities or on their personal web sites and
blogs. We will see in the section on online PR that the implications of many-to-many
communications are a loss of control of communications requiring monitoring of infor-
mation sources.
5 From ‘lean-back’ to ‘lean-forward’
Digital media are also intense media – they are lean-forward media in which the web site
usually has the visitor’s undivided attention. This intensity means that the customer
wants to be in control and wants to experience flow and responsiveness to their needs.
First impressions are important. If the visitor to your site does not find what they are
looking for immediately, whether through poor design or slow speed, they will move on,
probably never to return.
6 The medium changes the nature of standard marketing communications
tools such as advertising
In addition to offering the opportunity for one-to-one marketing, the Internet can be,
and still is widely, used for one-to-many advertising. On the Internet the brand essence
and key concepts from the advertiser arguably becomes less important, and typically it is
detailed information and independent opinions the user is seeking. The web site itself
can be considered as similar in function to an advertisement (since it can inform, per-
suade and remind customers about the offering, although it is not paid for in the same
way as a traditional advertisement). Berthon et al. (1996) consider a web site as a mix
between advertising and direct selling since it can also be used to engage the visitor in a
dialogue. Constraints on advertising in traditional mass media such as paying for time
or space become less important. Consumers are looking for information online all the
time, so advertising in search engines in short campaign-based bursts is inappropriate for
most companies – continuous representation is needed.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
352
How to add text field to pdf form - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
How to add text field to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding a text field to a pdf; how to insert text in pdf using preview
Peters (1998) suggests that communication via the new medium is differentiated from
communication using traditional media in four different ways. First, communication style
is changed, with immediate, or synchronous transfer of information through online cus-
tomer service being possible. Asynchronous communication, where there is a time delay
between sending and receiving information as through e-mail, also occurs. Second,
social presence or the feeling that a communications exchange is sociable, warm, personal
and active may be lower if a standard web page is delivered, but can be enhanced, per-
haps by personalisation. Third, the consumer has more control of contact, and finally the
user has control of content, for example through personalisation facilities.
Although Hoffman and Novak (1996) point out that with the Internet the main rela-
tionships are not directly between sender and receiver of information, but with the
web-based environment, the classic communications model of Schramm (1955) can still
be used to help understand the effectiveness of marketing communication using the
Internet. Figure 8.3 shows the model applied to the Internet. Four of the elements of the
model that can constrain the effectiveness of Internet marketing are:
encoding – this is the design and development of the site content or e-mail that aims
to convey the message of the company, and is dependent on understanding of the
target audience;
 
noise – this is the external influence that affects the quality of the message; in an
Internet context this can be slow download times, the use of plug-ins that the user
cannot use or confusion caused by too much information on-screen;
 
decoding – this is the process of interpreting the message, and is dependent on the
cognitive ability of the receiver, which is partly influenced by the length of time they
have used the Internet;
 
feedback – this occurs through online forms and through monitoring of on-site behav-
iour through log files (Chapter 9).
7 Increase in communications intermediaries
If we consider advertising and PR, with traditional media, this increase occurs through a
potentially large number of media owners such as TV and radio channel owners and the
owners of newspaper and print publications such as magazines. In the Internet era there
is a vastly increased range of media owners or publishers through which marketers can
promote their services and specifically gain links to their web site. Traditional radio
channels, newspapers and print titles have migrated online, but in addition there are a
THE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
353
Figure 8.3 The communications model of Schramm (1955) applied to the Internet
Site content or e-mail
Feedback (web analytics)
N
O
I
S
E


Message decoding


Message encoding
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
for a full-featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as DLLs: Read and Extract Field Data in VB.NET. Add necessary references:
how to enter text in pdf; add text to pdf without acrobat
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as C#.NET Project DLLs: Read and Extract Field Data in C#. Add necessary references:
how to insert text box in pdf file; add text box in pdf
vast number of online-only publishers including horizontal portals (Chapter 2) such as
search engines and vertical portals such as industry-specific sites. The concept of the
long tail (Chapter 5) also applies to web sites in any sector. There are a handful of key
sites, but many others can also be used to reach customers. The online marketer needs to
select the most appropriate of this plethora of sites which customers visit to drive traffic
to their web site.
8 Integration
Although new media have distinct characteristics compared to traditional media, it does
not follow that we should concentrate our communications solely on digital media.
Rather we should combine and integrate traditional and digital media according to their
strengths. We can then achieve synergy – the sum being greater than the parts. Most of
us still spend most of our time in the real world rather than the virtual world and multi-
channel  customers’  journeys  involve  both  media,  so  offline  promotion  of  the
proposition of a web site is important. It is also important to support mixed-mode
buying. For example, a customer wanting to buy a computer may see a TV ad for a cer-
tain brand which raises awareness of the brand and then see a print advert that directs
them across to the web site for further information. However, the customer does not
want to buy online, preferring the phone, but the site allows for this by prompting with
a phone number at the right time. Here all the different communications channels are
mutually supporting each other.
Similarly inbound communications to a company need to be managed and are crucial
to the health of a brand, as indicated by Schultz and Schultz (2004). Consider if the cus-
tomer needs support for an error with their system. They may start by using the on-site
diagnostics, which do not solve the problem. They then ring customer support. This
process will be much more effective if support staff can access the details of the problem
as previously typed in by the customer to the diagnostics package.
Evans and Wurster (1999) have also suggested an alternative framework for how the
balance of marketing communications may be disrupted by the Internet which we con-
sidered in Chapter 5 in the section on Place. They consider three aspects of consumer
navigation that they refer to as ‘reach, affiliation and richness’. 
Differences in advertising between traditional and digital media
Evaluation of the differences between traditional and new media for advertising is neces-
sary in order to select the best media for promoting the online presence. Janal (1998)
considered how Internet advertising differs from traditional advertising in a number of
key areas. These are summarised in Table 8.1.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
354
Table 8.1 Key concepts of advertising in the traditional and digital media
Traditional media
Digital media
Space
Expensive commodity
Cheap, unlimited
Time
Expensive commodity for marketers
Expensive commodity for users
Image creation
Image most important
Information most important
Information is secondary
Image is secondary
Communication
Push, one-way
Pull, interactive
Call to action
Incentives
Information (incentives)
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
By using RaterEdge .NET PDF package, you can add form fields to existing pdf files, delete or remove form field in PDF page and update PDF field in VB.NET
how to insert text into a pdf; adding text pdf files
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET. Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class.
how to insert text in pdf file; adding text to pdf file
We can extend this analysis by considering the effectiveness of offline media in com-
parison with online media. We can make the following observations:
1 Reach of media. We saw in Chapters 2 and 3, that access to the Internet has exceeded
50% in many developed countries. While this indicates that the Internet is now a
mass medium, there are a significant minority that don’t have access and cannot be
reached via this medium. As we saw in Chapter 2, reach varies markedly by age and
social group, so the Internet is innappropriate for reaching some groups.
2 Media consumption. Most customers spend more of their time in the real world than
the virtual world so it follows that digital media may not be the best method to reach
them. However, a counter-argument to this is that the intensity and depth of online
interactions are greater and they often involve specific customer journeys related to
product research or purchase.
Involvement. Use of the Internet has been described as a ‘lean-forward’ experience, sug-
gesting high involvement based on the interactivity and control exerted by web users.
This means that the user is receptive to content on a site. However, there is evidence that
certain forms of graphic advertising such as banner adverts are filtered out when infor-
mational content is sought. A study of online newspaper readers (Poynter, 2000) found
that text and captions were read first, with readers then later returning to graphics.
4 Building awareness. It can be argued that because of the form of their creative, some
forms of offline advertising such as TV are more effective at explaining concepts and
creating retention (Branthwaite et al., 2000).
We conclude this section with a review of how consumers perceive the Internet in
comparison to traditional media. Refer to Mini Case Study 8.1 for the summary of the
results of a qualitative survey.
THE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
355
Branthwaite et al. (2000) conducted a global qualitative project covering 14 countries, across North and
South America, East and West Europe, Asia and Australia to investigate consumer perceptions of the
Internet and other media. In order to reflect changing media habits and anticipate future trends, a young,
dynamic sample were selected in the 18–35 age range, with access to the Internet, and regular users of
all four media. Consumers’ perceptions of the Internet, when asked to explain how they felt about the
Internet in relation to different animals, were as follows:
The dominant sense here was of something exciting, but also inherently malevolent, dangerous and
frightening in the Internet.
The positive aspect was expressed mainly through images of a bird but also a cheetah or dolphin. These
captured the spirit of freedom, opening horizons, versatility, agility, effortlessness and efficiency. Even
though these impressions were relative to alternative ways of accomplishing goals, they were sometimes
naive or idealistic. However, there was more scepticism about these features with substantial experience
or great naivety.
Despite their idealism and enthusiasm for the Internet, these users found a prevalent and deep-rooted
suspicion of the way it operated. The malevolent undertones of the Internet came through symbols of
snakes or foxes predominantly, which were associated with cunning, slyness and unreliability. While
these symbols embodied similar suspicions, the snake was menacing, intimidating, treacherous and eva-
sive, while the fox was actively deceptive, predatory, surreptitious, plotting and persistent. For many
Mini Case Study 8.1
Consumer perceptions of the Internet and
different media
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
how to insert text box on pdf; add text field to pdf
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Following C# sample code can help you have a quick evaluation of it. C#.NET Demo Code: Auto Fill-in Field Data to PDF in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
add text pdf professional; how to add text field to pdf
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
356
consumers, the Internet was felt to have a will of its own, in the form of the creators of the sites (the
ghosts in the machine). A snake traps you and then tightens its grip. A fox is mischievous.
In comparison with other media, the Internet was described as follows:
The Internet seemed less like a medium of communication than the others, and more like a reservoir of
information.
This distinction was based on differences in the mode of operating: other media communicated to you
whereas with the Internet the user had to actively seek and extract information for themselves. In this
sense, the Internet is a recessive medium that sits waiting to be interrogated, whereas other media are
actively trying to target their communications to the consumer.
This meant that these users (who were not addicted or high Internet users) were usually task-
orientated and focused on manipulating their way around (tunnel vision). The more inexperienced you
were, the more concentration was needed, but irritation or frustration was never far away for most people.
Everywhere, regardless of experience and availability, the Internet was seen as a huge resource, with
futuristic values, that indicated the way the world was going to be. It was respected for its convenience
and usefulness. Through the Internet you could learn, solve problems, achieve goals, travel the world
without leaving your desk, and enter otherwise inaccessible spaces. It gave choice and control, but also
feelings of isolation and inadequacy. There was an onus on people wherever possible to experience this
medium and use it for learning and communicating.
The most positive attitudes were in North America. Slick and well-structured web sites made a posi-
tive impression and were a valuable means of securing information through the links to other sites and to
carry out e-commerce. However, even here there was frustration at slow downloading and some unco-
operative sites. In other countries, there was concern at the irresponsibility of the medium, lack of
seriousness and dependability. There was desire for supervisory and controlling bodies (which are
common for print and TV). Banner ads were resented as contributing to the distractions and irritations.
Sometimes they seemed deliberately hostile by distracting you and then getting you lost. Internet adver-
tising had the lowest respect and status, being regarded as peripheral and trivial. 
In the least economically advanced countries, the Internet was considered a divisive medium which
excluded those without the resources, expertise or special knowledge.
Table 8.2 and Figure 8.4 present the final evaluation of the Internet against other media.
Table 8.2 Comparison of the properties of different media
TV
Outdoor
Print
Internet
Intrusiveness
High
High
Low
Low
Control/selectivity
Passive
Passive
Active, selective
Active, selective
of consumption
Episode
Long
Short
Long
Restless, 
attention span
fragmented
Active processing
Low
Low
High
High
Mood
Relaxed, seeking 
Bored, under- 
Relaxed, seeking 
Goal-orientated
emotional gratification
stimulated
interest, stimulation  Needs-related
Modality
Audio/visual
Visual
Visual
Visual (auditory 
increasing)
Processing
Episodic, superficial
Episodic/semantic
Semantic, deep
Semantic, deep
Context
As individual in
Solitary (in public
Individual 
Alone, private
interpersonal setting
space)
Personal
Source: Branthwaite et al. (2000)
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
how to add text to a pdf document; adding text pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. with this sample VB.NET code to add an image PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to enter text in a pdf document; add text block to pdf
In common with other communications media, the Internet will be most effective when
it is deployed as part of an integrated marketing communications approach. Kotler et al.
(2001) describe integrated marketing communications as:
the concept under which a company carefully integrates and co-ordinates its many com-
munications channels to deliver a clear, consistent message about the organisation and its
products.
The characteristics of integrated marketing communications have been summarised
by Pickton and Broderick (2001) as the 4 Cs of:
Coherence – different communications are logically connected.
 
Consistency – multiple messages support and reinforce, and are not contradictory.
 
Continuity – communications are connected and consistent through time.
 
Complementary – synergistic, or the sum of the parts is greater than the whole!
The 4 Cs also act as guidelines for how communications should be integrated.
Further guidelines on integrated marketing communications from Pickton and
Broderick (2001) that can be usefully applied to Internet marketing are the following.
1 Communications planning is based on clearly identified marketing communications
objectives (see later section).
2 Internet marketing involves the full range of target audiences (see the section on devel-
oping customer-oriented content in Chapter 7). The full range of target audiences is
the customer segments plus employees, shareholders and suppliers.
3 Internet marketing should involve management of all forms of contact, which includes
management of both outbound communications such as banner advertising or direct
e-mail and inbound communications such as e-mail enquiries.
INTEGRATED INTERNET MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
357
Figure 8.4 Summary of the different characteristics of media
Source: Millward Brown Qualitative
Entertainment
Information
Intrusive
Recessive
Cinema
Radio
Magazines
Internet
Newspapers
Internet
TV
Outdoor
Integrated Internet marketing communications
Integrated
marketing
communications
The coordination of
communications
channels to deliver a
clear, consistent
message.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
add text box to pdf file; add text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. PDFDocument
add text boxes to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
4 Internet marketing should utilise a range of promotional tools. These are the promo-
tional tools illustrated in Figure 8.1.
5 A range of media should be used to deliver the message about the web site. Marketing
managers need to consider the most effective mix of media to drive traffic to their
web site. The different techniques can be characterised as traditional offline market-
ing communications or new online communications. The objective of employing
these techniques is to acquire new traffic on an e-commerce site using the techniques
summarised in Figure 8.1. Many of these techniques can also be used to drive cus-
tomers to a site for retention.
6 The communications plan should involve careful selection of most effective promo-
tional and media mix. This is discussed at the end of the chapter.
Additionally, we can say that integrated marketing communications should be used
to support customers through the entire buying process, across different media. 
Planning integrated marketing communications
The Account Planning Group (www
.apg.or
g.uk
), in its definition of media planning
highlights the importance of the role of media planning when they say that the planner:
needs to understand the customer and the brand to unearth a key insight for the commu-
nication/solution [Relevance].
As media channels have mushroomed and communication channels have multiplied, it
has become increasingly important for communication to cut through the cynicism and
connect with its audience[Distinctiveness]. 
…the planner can provide the edge needed to ensure the solution reaches out through
the clutter to its intended audience [Targeted reach]. 
…needs  to  demonstrate how  and  why  the  communication  has  performed
[Effectiveness].
More specifically, Pickton and Broderick (2001) state that the aim of marketing commu-
nications media planning as part of integrated marketing communications should be to:
Reach the target audience 
 
Determine the appropriate Frequency for messaging
 
Achieve Impact through the creative for each media.
Media-neutral planning (MNP)
The concept of media-neutral planning (MNP) has been used to describe an approach to
planning integrated marketing campaigns including online elements. Since it is a rela-
tively new concept, it is difficult to describe absolutely. To read a review of the different
interpretations see Tapp (2005) who notes that there are three different aspects of plan-
ning often encompassed with media-neutral planning:
 
Channel planning, i.e. which route to market shall we take: retail, direct, sales part-
ners, etc. (we would say this emphasis is rare);
 
Communications-mix planning, i.e. how do we split our budget between advertising,
direct marketing, sales promotions and PR;
 
Media planning, i.e. spending money on TV, press, direct mail, and so on.
In our view, MNP is most usually applied to the second and third elements and the
approach is based on reaching consumers across a range of media to maximise response.
For example, Crawshaw (2004) says:
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
358
Media-neutral
planning (MNP)
An approach to
planning ad campaigns
to maximise response
across different media
according to consumer
usage of these media.
The simple reason we would want media-neutral communications is so that we can con-
nect the right message with our target audience, at the right time and place to persuade
them to do what we want. This will lead to powerful, effective, value for money communi-
cations that solve clients’ business challenges. 
A customer-centric media-planning approach is key to this process, Anthony Clifton,
Planning Director at WWAV Rapp Collins Media Group is quoted by the Account
Planning Group as saying (quoted in Crawshaw, 2004): 
real consumer insight has to be positioned at the core of the integrated planning process
and the planner must glean a complete understanding of the client’s stake holders, who
they are, their mindset, media consumption patterns and relationship with the business –
are they ‘life-time’ consumers or have they purchased once, are they high value or low
value customers etc. This requires lifting the bonnet of the database, segmentation and
market evaluation.
Online marketers also need to remind themselves that many customers prefer to com-
municate via traditional media, so we should support them in this. The need for
marketers to still support a range of communications channels is suggested in Mini Case
Study 8.2 ‘Disasters Emergency Committee uses a range of media to gain donations’.
INTEGRATED INTERNET MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
359
There are few people who did not see the images of the human and physical devastation caused by the
earthquake on the ocean floor near Sumatra, Indonesia and subsequent tsunami on 26 December 2004.
These images and reports were the catalyst for unprecedented levels of individual and corporate philan-
thropy. From a communications perspective, it is a useful indication of channel preferences. Over £350
million was donated to the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) Tsunami Earthquake Appeal through a
range of channels shown in Figure 8.5. While the Internet was a source of many donations, it is perhaps
Mini Case Study 8.2
Disasters Emergency Committee uses a range of
media to raise funds
Figure 8.5 Source of donations to the 2004–5 Asian Tsunami appeal
Source: Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) (www
.dec.or
g.uk
)
Gift Aid tax reclaim 
From DEC member agencies 
Post Office 
Web site
Corporates, trusts and other
Postal donations 
Banks 
Telephone 
10 
20 
30 
40 
£millions 
How donations were received 
50 
60 
70 
80 
Integration through time
For integrated communications to be successful, the different techniques should be suc-
cessfully integrated through time as part of a campaign or campaigns.
Figure 8.6 shows how communications can be planned around a particular event. (SE
denotes ‘search engine’; C1 and C2 are campaigns 1 and 2.) Here we have chosen the launch
of a new version of a web site, but other alternatives include a new product launch or a key
seminar. This planning will help provide a continuous message to customers. It also ensures
a maximum number of customers are reached using different media over the period.
In keeping with planning for other media, Pincott (2000) suggests there are two key
strategies in planning integrated Internet marketing communications. First, there should
be a media strategy which will mainly be determined by how to reach the target audi-
ence. This will define the online promotion techniques described in this chapter and
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
360
surprising that the volume of online donations is not higher and it shows the continued popularity of
traditional communications channels. The popularity of the web in comparison to e-mail and SMS is also
striking as indicated by these details of donations:
Telephone: Over £75 million was donated through the DEC appeal telephone line. Overall the appeal
received a total of 1.7 million calls via the automated system at peak times and over 100 volunteers
answered 12,500 live calls.
Online: On New Year’s Eve, with the help of major Internet service providers, the world record for
online donations was broken with over £10 million donated in 24 hours. Overall £44 million was
donated online by over half a million web users.
Text messaging: Major UK mobile phone operators raised £1 million by joining forces and offering a
free donation mechanism – enabling people to text their gifts.
Interactive TV: The Community Channel raised over £0.5 million from donors using the ‘red button’ on
interactive TV.
Figure 8.6 Integration of different communications tools through time
Jan 2002
Dec 2002
Link building/affiliates
Seminars
SE optimisation
Relaunch
Jun 2002
Print ads
Banner ads
SE registration
Press release
Press release
E-catalogue
Postcard
E-mail C1
E-mail C2
Direct mail
E-newsletter
Key
where to advertise online. Second, there is the creative strategy. Pincott says that ‘the
dominant online marketing paradigm is one of direct response’. However, he goes on to
suggest that all site promotion will also influence perceptions of the brand.
It follows that brands do not have to drive visitors to their own site; through advertis-
ing and creating interactive microsites on third-party sites, they can potentially be more
effective in reaching their audience who are more likely to spend their time on online
media sites than on destination brand sites.
INTEGRATED INTERNET MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
361
Consider the options for online promotion of a fast-moving consumer goods brand (FMCG) such as
coffee (e.g. Nescafe, www
.nescafe.co.uk
), tomato ketchup (e.g., Heinz, www
.heinzketchup.com
), or toi-
letries (e.g., Andrex, www
.andr
expuppy
.co.uk
). The challenge is obvious – it is difficult to reach a large
audience similar to using mass media such as TV, magazines or outdoor. Such destination sites will only
attract a limited number of visitors, such as brand loyalists (who it is important to engage since these are
often key advocates of these products) or students researching the brands! Another approach which can
drive more volume is to use on-pack promotions or direct response TV and print campaigns that encour-
age consumers to enter competitions and engage into e-mail or text message dialogue in keeping with
their profile. The 2005 Walkers Crisps (www
.walkers.co.uk
) ‘Win With Walkers’ competition is a good
example of this. Walkers gave away an iPod Mini every five minutes (8,700 in total) to texters who
responded to messages on 600 million packets of crisps. The campaign was supported by a £1.5 million
advertising push, featuring ex-footballer Gary Lineker. In September alone, 5% of the UK population
entered, which must explain why I didn’t win when I texted in at four in the morning! 
The final approach, which is required to achieve reach volume is to advertise on third party sites. Figure
8.7 show the options with the analogy made to the different groups of planets in the solar system and the
arrows indicate which approach is selected to achieve reach or traffic building. Typically the smaller the
site, the more accurate targeting is possible, but demographic targeting is possible on large portals. For
example, McDonalds advertises on MSN Hotmail based on the profile of the user and Ford uses AOL to
reach family-oriented purchasers.
Mini Case Study 8.3
Which planet are you on?
Figure 8.7 An analogy between different web sites and the planets
Google
Giant
Planets
(horizontal
portals)
Small Planets
(vertical
portals)
Lesser
Minor
(‘destination
sites’)
Newspaper
site
Gender
interest
sites
Special
interest
sites
+ large
retailers
‘Traffic building’
?
Comparison
interest sites
MSN
Yahoo!
ISPs
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested