mvc view pdf : How to enter text in pdf Library application class asp.net azure html ajax 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN43-part1381

(option 3). In this case, there is a risk of breaking privacy laws since the consent of the e-
mail recipient may not be freely given. Usually only a single follow-up e-mail by the
brand is permitted. So you should check with the lawyers if considering this.
5 Web-link viral. But online viral isn’t just limited to e-mail. Links in discussion group
postings or blogs which are from an individual are also in this category. Either way,
it’s important when seeding the campaign to try and get as many targeted online and
offline mentions of the viral agent as you can.
In addition to ensuring promotion on other sites to attract an audience to a site, com-
munications plans should consider how to convert visitors to action and to encourage
repeat visits, as we noted in the section on conversion marketing in Chapter 2. Online
media sites will aim to deploy content to maximise the length of visits. Approaches for
increasing conversion of customers include:
relevant incentive or option, clearly explained;
clear call-to-action using a prominent banner ad or text heading;
 
position of call-to-action in a prime location on screen, e.g. top left or top right.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
402
Figure 8.21 Viral marketing example – Subservient Chicken 
(www
.subservient
chick
en.c
om
On-site promotional techniques
How to enter text in pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf file; adding text to a pdf in reader
How to enter text in pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text to a pdf in preview
To achieve this a variety of devices can be used, both to increase the length of site
visit, and to make users return. A measure of a site’s ability to retain visitors has been
referred to as ‘site stickiness’ since a ‘sticky’ site is difficult to drag oneself away from.
Activity 8.1 is intended to highlight some of the methods that can be used to achieve
the objective of repeat visits.
The promotion element of an Internet marketing plan requires four important decisions
about investment for the online promotion or the online communications mix.
1 Investment in promotion compared to site creation and maintenance
Since there is a fixed budget for site creation, maintenance and promotion, the e-mar-
keting plan should specify the budget for each to ensure there is a sensible balance and
the promotion of the site is not underfunded. The amount spent on maintenance for
each major revision of a web site is generally thought to be between a quarter and a
third of the original investment. The relatively large cost of maintenance is to be
expected, given the need to keep updating information in order that customers return to
a web site. Figure 8.22 shows two alternatives for balancing these three variables. Figure
8.22(a) indicates a budget where traffic-building expenditure exceeds service and design.
This is more typical for a dot-com company that needs to promote its brand. Figure
8.22(b) is a budget where traffic-building expenditure is less than service and design.
This is more typical for a traditional bricks-and-mortar company that already has a
brand recognition and an established customer base.
SELECTING THE OPTIMAL COMMUNICATIONS MIX
403
Activity 8.1
Methods for enhancing site stickiness and generating repeat visits
This activity is intended to highlight methods of on-site promotion which may cause people to
visit a web site, stay for longer than one click and then return. For each of the following
techniques, discuss:
1 how the incentives should be used;
2 why these incentives will increase the length of site visits and the likelihood of return to
the site;
3 the type of company for which these techniques might work best.
Techniques
Sponsorship of an event, team or sports personality.
A treasure hunt on different pages of the site, with a prize.
A screensaver.
A site-related quiz.
Monthly product discount on an e-commerce site.
Regularly updated information indicated by the current date or the date new content is
added.
Note that as well as ‘up-front’ incentives there are some simple techniques that make a site
‘fresh’, which can be used to generate repeat visits. These include:
daily or weekly update of pages with a date on the web site to highlight that it is updated
regularly;
regular publication of industry- or product-specific news;
the use of e-mails to existing customers to highlight new promotions.
Selecting the optimal communications mix
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Open Web Matrix, click “New” and select “App Gallery”. Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
add text fields to pdf; how to add text boxes to pdf
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can be copied Click to convert PDF document to Word (.docx
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; how to enter text in pdf form
Analysis by Kemmler et al. (2001) of US and European e-commerce sites provided a cross-
industry average of the spend on different components of Internet marketing. The top
performers achieved an average operating profit of 18%. Costs were made up as follows:
cost of goods sold (44%);
maintenance costs (24%);
marketing costs (14%).
2 Investment in online promotion techniques in comparison to offline
promotion
A balance must be struck between these techniques. Figure 8.23 summarises the tactical
options that companies have. Which do you think would be the best option for an
established company as compared to a dot-com company? It seems that in both cases,
offline promotion investment often exceeds that for online promotion investment. For
existing companies, traditional media such as print are used to advertise the sites, while
print and TV will also be widely used by dot-com companies to drive traffic to their sites.
3 Investment in different online promotion techniques
Varianini and Vaturi (2000) have suggested that many online marketing failures have
resulted from poor control of media spending. The communications mix should be opti-
mised to minimise the cost of acquisition. If an online intermediary has a cost acquisition
of £100 per customer while it is gaining an average commission on each sale of £5 then,
clearly, the company will not be profitable unless it can achieve a large number of repeat
orders from the customer.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
404
Figure 8.22 Alternatives for balance between different expenditure on Internet 
marketing
Maintenance %
(a)
(b)
Site creation %
Promotion %
Site creation %
Maintenance %
Promotion %
Figure 8.23 Options for the online vs offline communications mix: (a) online > offline,
(b) similar online and offline, (c) offline > online
(a)
(b)
(c)
Offline
Online
Key
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
add text pdf reader; adding text to pdf document
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
imaging DLLs used for scanning multiple pages into one PDF/TIFF document true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit
how to add text box to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
We have reviewed a wide range of techniques that can be used to build traffic to web
sites. Agrawal et al. (2001) suggest that e-commerce sites should focus on narrow seg-
ments that have demonstrated their attraction to a business model. They believe that
promotion techniques such as affiliate deals with narrowly targeted sites and e-mail
campaigns targeted at segments grouped by purchase histories and demographic traits
are 10 to 15 times more likely than banner ads on generic portals to attract prospects
who click through to purchase. Alternatively, pay-per-click ads on Google may have a
higher success rate.
4 Investment in digital media and digital creative
As with traditional media, there is a tension between spend on the advertising creative
and the media space purchased to run the executions. There is a danger that if spend on
media is too high, then the quality of the execution and the volume of digital assets pro-
duced will be too low.
Marketing managers have to work with agencies to agree the balance and timing of all
these methods. Perhaps the easiest way to start budget allocation is to look at those
activities that need to take place all year. These include search engine registration, link
building, affiliate campaigns and long-term sponsorships. These are often now out-
sourced to third-party companies because of the overhead of retaining specialist skills
in-house.
Other promotional activities will follow the pattern of traditional media-buying with
spending supporting specific campaigns which may be associated with new product
launches or sales promotions: for example how much to pay for banner advertising as
against online PR about online presence and how much to pay for search engine regis-
tration. Such investment decisions will be based on the strengths and weaknesses of the
different promotion online. Table 8.5 presents a summary of the different techniques.
Deciding on the optimal expenditure on different communication techniques will be
an iterative approach since past results should be analysed and adjusted accordingly. A
useful analytical approach to help determine overall patterns of media buying is pre-
sented in Table 8.6. Marketers can analyse the proportion of the promotional budget
that is spent on different channels and then compare this with the contribution from
customers who purchase that originated using the original channel. This type of analy-
sis, reported by Hoffman and Novak (2000), requires two different types of marketing
research. First, tagging of customers can be used. We can monitor, using cookies, the
numbers of customers who are referred to a web site through a particular online tech-
nique such as search engines, affiliate or banner ads, and then track the money they
spend on purchases. Secondly, for other promotional techniques, tagging will not be
practical. For word-of-mouth referrals, we would have to extrapolate the amount of
spend for these customers through traditional market research techniques such as ques-
tionnaires. The use of tagging enables much better feedback on the effectiveness of
promotional techniques than is possible in traditional media, but it requires a large
investment in tracking software to achieve it.
SELECTING THE OPTIMAL COMMUNICATIONS MIX
405
Tagging
Tracking of origin of
customers and their
spending patterns.
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
image rotation API (which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add text to pdf reader; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
add text to pdf file online; adding text to pdf in preview
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
406
Table 8.5 Summary of the strengths and weaknesses of different communications tools for promoting an
online presence
Promotion technique
Main strengths
Main weaknesses
1a Search engine
Highly targeted, relatively low cost cf PPC.
Intense competition, may compromise look
optimisation (SEO)
High traffic volumes if effective
of site. Changes to ranking algorithm
1b Pay-per-click (PPC) 
Highly targeted with controlled cost 
Relatively costly in competitive sectors and 
marketing
of acquisition
low volume compared with SEO
1c  Trusted feed
Update readily to reflect changes
Relatively costly, mainly relevant for
in product lines and prices
e-retailers
2
Online PR
Relatively low cost and good targeting. 
Setting up a large number of links can be 
Can control links-in
time-consuming. Need to monitor 
comments on third-party sites
3a Affiliate marketing
Payment is by results (e.g. 10% of sale or 
Costs of payments to affiliate networks
leads goes to referring site)
for set-up and management fees. Changes 
to ranking algorithm may affect volume 
from affiliates
3b Online sponsorship
Most effective if low-cost, long-term 
May increase awareness, but does not 
co-branding arrangement with
necessarily lead directly to sales
synergistic site
4
Interactive advertising
Main intention to achieve visit, i.e. direct 
Response rates have declined historically
response model. Useful role in branding 
because of banner blindness
also
5
E-mail marketing
Push medium – can’t be ignored in user’s 
Requires opt-in for effectiveness. Better 
inbox. Can be used for direct response 
for customer retention than for acquisition? 
link to web site
Inbox cut-through – message diluted 
amongst other e-mails. Limits on 
deliverability
6
Viral marketing
With effective creative possible to reach 
Difficult to create powerful viral concepts 
a large number at relatively low cost
and control targeting. Risks damaging
brand since unsolicited messages may 
be received
Traditional offline
Larger reach than most online techniques.
Targeting arguably less easy than online.
advertising (TV, 
Greater creativity possible, leading to
Typically high cost of acquisition
print, etc.)
greater impact
Table 8.6 Relative effectiveness of different forms of marketing communications for a
B2C company
Medium
Budget %
Contribution %
Effectiveness
Print (off)
20%
10%
0.5
TV (off)
25%
10%
0.25
Radio (off)
10%
5%
0.5
PR (off)
5%
15%
3
Word of mouth (off)
0%
25%
Infinite
Banners (on)
20%
20%
1
Affiliate (on)
20%
10%
0.5
Links (on)
0%
3%
Infinite
Search engine registration (on)
0%
2%
Infinite
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
adding text to pdf in reader; how to add text to pdf
5 Setting overall expenditure levels
We can use traditional approaches such as those suggested by Kotler et al. (2001). For
example:
Affordable method – the communications budget is set after subtracting fixed and vari-
able costs from anticipated revenues.
Percentage-of-sales methods – the communications budget is set as a percentage of fore-
cast sales revenues.
Competitive parity methods – expenditure is based on estimates of competitor expendi-
ture. For example, e-marketing spend is typically 10–15% of the marketing budget.
Objective and task method – this is a logical approach where budget is built up from all
the tasks required to achieve the objectives in the communications plan.
CASE STUDY 8
Activity 8.2
Selecting the best promotion techniques
Suggest the best mix of promotion techniques to build traffic for the following applications:
1 well-established B2C brand with high brand awareness;
2 dot-com start-up;
3 small business aiming to export;
4 common B2C product, e.g. household insurance;
5 specialist B2B product.
Making FMCG brands sizzle online
Case Study 8
Context
Large fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) organisations
such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble or Masterfoods face
many challenges when exploiting interactive communica-
tions. This case illustrates some of the following challenges:
The case for interactive spend is less clear than for
companies with a transactional online presence since
typically no sales can be directly generated online.
Instead, these companies have to assess the role of
their interactive communications in generating aware-
ness, brand favourability and purchase intent.
 
Assessing the optimal amount of investment in digital
media on the company web site and third-party web
sites relative to offline media is difficult.
 
Creative executions which work well in TV and print
may work less well online. Creative variants may need
to be devised to make best use of the digital media.
 
Some online marketing communications tools such as
search engine marketing and affiliate marketing that work
well for higher-involvement products are less relevant.
 
Many of the brands are marketed internationally, so
some consistency of messaging across countries is
required, but also with a degree of localisation.
We will look at these challenges, and some of the oppor-
tunities through looking at different examples of how varied
Unilever brands have exploited digital media in different
campaigns. Unilever has products in three main areas:
foods, personal care and home care. In 1998 there were no
digital media, but in line with the dot-com boom many sites
were built over the next five years for different products.
More recently, digital marketing is managed centrally, but
elements  are  included  in  many  campaigns  as  part  of
Unilever communications channel planning for its different
brands. Response by e-mail, SMS or interactive TV is used
to build the database about consumer preferences.
Birdseye develops brand positioning – ‘We don’t
play with your food’
If you visit the Birdseye UK site (www
.bir
dseye.co.uk
),
you will see that the site explains to visitors its core brand
proposition through the messaging: ‘We don’t play with
your food: Free from artificial flavours and quick frozen to
keep nature’s goodness locked in.’
The site also appeals to an audience who are particu-
larly concerned about food and nutrition – the ‘Health and
Nutrition’ section is one of the most popular on the site
with content for people dieting, diabetics and vegetarians.
407
Interactive tools such  as a ‘healthy eating calculator’
which calculates body mass index have proved popular.
Such content is also effective at drawing visitors to the
site  through  search  engine  marketing  when  they  are
searching for health and nutrition advice.
Permission marketing as Birdseye asks ‘Are you a
Salad Boy or a Wrap Girl?’
One example of this approach was a campaign to pro-
mote chicken fillet strips; offline print creative (100,000
leaflets) encouraged users to text in on 2 shortcode mes-
sages for the chance to win a trip to Mount Everest.
Similar prizes were also offered via online partner sites
and radio stations to extend the reach of the campaign
further. The creative encouraged mobile phone owners to
‘Text  and  Win’ because of the  immediacy  and wider
access to mobile phones. However, entry was also avail-
able via a web site.
Food brand Peperami has also been actively marketed
online, with agency AKQA creating a ‘too hot for TV’
microsite that generated 20,000 orders for a trial within
the first ten days and the ad was spread virally to over
100,000 online.
Lynx says: ‘Spray more, get more’
Unilever-owned male bodycare brand Lynx has been an
enthusiastic adopter of digital. In 2004, it won the New
Media Age advertising effectiveness award in the online
advertising category. The online Lynx Pulse campaign was
created to support a TV ad, which featured a ‘geeky guy’
dancing in a bar with two attractive girls to the soundtrack
‘Make Luv’, which was later released and reached number
one in the UK charts. The online creative used a series of
dots to animate the dancer and featured the same music.
The online creative ran as banner advertising and over-
lays, a 30-second screensaver on the microsite and as a
viral e-mail. 
The target audience for the campaign was 16–25-year-
old men, and web site advertising placements included
NME, MTV, The Sun, Kiss, Ministry of Sound, FHM and
Student UK. The imagery was so popular that it was
inserted into the end frame of the TV ad. It was also used
in offline promotion activity across Europe.
The online campaign specifically aimed to raise brand
awareness, offer brand interaction, promote trial and drive
traffic to the Pulse microsite. It reached over 1.4m unique
users online with average clickthrough rates on banners
as  high as  23%. According to dynamic logic figures,
online advertising awareness rose by 326% after the cam-
paign. The judges described it as ‘a clever campaign with
strong creative’. They also commented on the high pro-
duction quality, which really stood out compared to other
entrants, and said the site backed up well what the brand
was doing offline. 
In 2005, as part of an £11m ‘Spray more, get more’
marketing  campaign,  Lynx  again  created  a  microsite
‘lynxladspad.com’ with digital assets such as videos of
the ads and screensavers. It also encouraged them to
spray (or vote for) objects within the pad to collect ‘spray
points’ for a chance to win prizes, including five lads’ pad
weekenders in Ibiza. This approach appears to be an evo-
lution of the campaign-specific microsite which needs to
be revised for each campaign. Using a more permanent
site such as lynxladspad.com can be used as a holding
site which is updated for each campaign. Associated
microsites may still be used, for example in 2005 a viral
campaign ‘lynxgirlslive.com’, which was a spoof adult
video webcam game in which users can interact with
two scantily clad females by typing in actions they want
to  see  the girls  do,  such  as  dance,  pillow  fight  and
strip.  The  viral  was  seeded  on  viral  and  lads’  sites,
including Contraband.co.uk, Milkandcookies.com and
various chatrooms. 
Persil – making detergent fun online?
You may not have visited a detergent site recently, but
Persil has shown that through developing the right propo-
sition, this is possible. The typical target user is what
Persil refers to as ‘progressive mums’ – busy working
mothers with children aged under 10, who have Internet
access both at home and work. 
Persil  has used  interactive communications  to  get
closer to its audience by creating an experience of inter-
acting with the brand. Ounal Bailey, Persil brand activation
manager, talking to Revolution (2003), explains the pur-
pose of their on-site communications as follows: ‘We
wanted to create a real identity online, making persil.com
a hub of information and an online brand experience. At
this time, the site moved from a focus on product informa-
tion to two main sections: Time-In or Product-related
information and Time-Out which is about lifestyle and was
divided into time for Mum such as relaxation, looking after
skin and diet and time with the kids.’
One campaign which was customer-centric rather than
product-centric was ‘Get Creative’ which encouraged the
artisitic tendencies of children. Persil ran a £20 million
integrated campaign that included press,  direct  mail,
radio, online and PR. The Persil 'Big Mummy' challenge
saw 15,000 children submit drawings of their parents. To
drive  entries,  Persil  used  expandable  banners  and
Tangozebra’s Overlayz – a dhtml format that allows highly
animated creative to float across the screen. Six sites
were used to place the ads, including MSN.co.uk, Yahoo!
UK & Ireland and AOL UK. Expandable banners appeared
on MSN.co.uk’s Learning channel and Women’s channel,
with the Overlayz ad, featuring a ‘little monster’ from
Persil’s above-the-line work, appearing on the Women’s
channel. The clickthrough rate for the online ads was 8.33
per cent on MSN, though lower on other sites.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
408
Another feature of the site which helps build relation-
ships with consumers, is the monthly e-newsletter, then
known as ‘Messing About’. In 2003, there were about
75,000 subscribers. The e-mail contains content from
publisher partners such as IPC’s Family Circle magazine
and a ‘make and do’ feature at the bottom; for example, a
pair of glasses to cut out and colour in. Revolution (2003)
reported  that  around  17  per  cent  of  recipients  click
through to the Persil site, with figures rising as high as 24
per cent for some segments. Users who click through to
the site spent 15 to 20 minutes there, although the e-mails
are designed so that customers don’t have to visit if they
don’t want to. 
A branded ‘Messing about’ application was set up on
partner sites such as Schoolsnet (www
.schoolsnet.com
)
and femail.co.uk. Users could register for the e-mail and
use the activity finder application. There are also ‘stain
solver’ applications, which let users get advice on the
removal of a range of stains. Bailey explains the impor-
tance of partner sites: ‘We've created applications that
we’ve distributed to places where we would expect our
consumers to go, so we're not expecting them to just visit
our site. We’re not kidding ourselves – we are a detergent
brand. The aim is for people to have the experience of
Persil wherever they are. So there is a variety of places
such as Tesco.com, iVillage, Schoolsnet and femail, where
Persil now has a presence.’
Another approach is sampling – sub-brands, such as
Persil Capsules, Persil Silk & Wool, Persil Aloe Vera have
been used to gain trial and to explain more about the
product. For example, when Persil Aloe Vera launched
46,000 asked for samples online – a third of the total.
Bailey explains: ‘Persil Aloe Vera was a big launch. People
see the ad on TV and wonder what else the product does,
and they can't get much information from a 30-second ad.
But they can get it online.’
A final approach Persil uses to communicate with its
audience is to use it to connect with the online ‘directed
information seekers’ – for example, people look for advice
on ‘stain removal’ via the search engines and detergent
brands can gain visitors and ‘time with brand’ through SEO
and PPC search engine marketing. Bailey says: ‘Washing
your clothes sounds really simple, but you’d be surprised
what people don’t know about getting their clothes clean
and how many people use the site for that reason.’
The role of the corporate site
Although Unilever owns many brands, the corporate web
site is still important. New Media Age (2005c) reported that
Unilever is using the Internet to unify its brand worldwide,
by re-launching its corporate site and 25 localised country
web sites. The sites have been redesigned to reflect the
company’s mission statement: to meet everyday nutrition,
hygiene and personal care needs through its products.
The new online image is also intended to make con-
sumers aware that the sub-brands they buy all fall under
the Unilever umbrella. The sites will present a clearer mes-
sage that brands such as Dove, Knorr and Domestos
originate from Unilever and will provide links to them.
Unilever online communications manager, Tim Godbehere,
who oversees its web strategy, explained to New Media
Age: ‘Everyone knows Hellmanns and Knorr, but not many
are aware that Unilever is behind them. But only 10% of
visitors to Unilever’s corporate site were made up of the
media and investors, even though it was designed to reach
this audience. The rest were consumers. The Web sites are
about getting consumers to make that connection and
bringing Unilever to the forefront.’
Sources: New Media Age(2005c), Revolution (2003)
Questions
1 Summarise how Unilever and its agencies have
used the marketing communications characteristics
of digital media to support their brands.
2 Explain how Unilever can use specific online com-
munications tools to reach different target
audiences and achieve different objectives. 
3 Select a Unilever brand not represented in the case
and identify appropriate communications tech-
niques to reach its audience.
SUMMARY
Summary
409
1
Online promotion techniques include:
Search engine marketing – search engine optimisation (SEO) improves position in
the natural listings and pay-per-click marketing features a company in the spon-
sored listings.
 
Online PR – including techniques such as link-building, blogging, RSS and reputa-
tion management.
 
Online partnerships – including affiliate marketing (commission-based referral), co-
branding and sponsorship.
 
Online advertising – using a range of formats including banners, skyscrapers and
rich media such as overlays.
 
E-mail marketing – including rented lists, co-branded e-mails, event-triggered e-
mails and ads in third-party e-newsletters for acquisition and e-newsletters and
campaign e-mails to house lists.
 
Viral marketing – developing great creative concepts which are transmitted by
online word-of-mouth.
2
Offline promotion involves promoting the web site address, highlighting the value
proposition of the web site and achieving web response through traditional media
advertisements in print, or on television.
3
Interactive marketing communications must be developed as part of integrated mar-
keting communications for maximum cost-effectiveness.
4
Key characteristics of interactive communications are the combination of push and
pull media, user-submitted content, personalisation, flexibility and of course interac-
tivity to create a dialogue with consumers.
5
Objectives for interactive communications include direct sales for transactional sites,
but they also indirectly support brand awareness, favourability and purchase intent.
6
Important decisions in the communications mix introduced by digital media include:
 
The balance between spend on media and creative for digital assets and ad executions
 
The balance between spend in traditional and offline communications
 
The balance between investment in continuous and campaign-based digital activity
 
The balance of investment in different interactive communications tools.
CHAPTER 8 · INTERACTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Exercises
Self-assessment exercises
1
Briefly explain and give examples of online promotion and offline promotion techniques.
2
Explain the different types of payment model for banner advertising.
3
Which factors are important in governing a successful online banner advertising campaign?
4
How can a company promote itself through a search engine web site?
5
Explain the value of co-branding.
6
Explain how an online loyalty scheme may work.
7
How should web sites be promoted offline?
8
What do you think the relative importance of these Internet-based advertising techniques
would be for an international chemical manufacturer?
(a) Banner advertising.
(b) Reciprocal links.
(c) E-mail.
410
REFERENCES
411
Essay and discussion questions
1
Discuss the analogy of Berthon et al. (1998) that effective Internet promotion is similar to a
company exhibiting at an industry trade show attracting visitors to its stand.
2
Discuss the merits of the different models of paying for banner advertisements on the Internet
for both media owners and companies placing advertisements.
3
‘Online promotion must be integrated with offline promotion.’ Discuss.
4
Compare the effectiveness of different methods of online advertising including banner
advertisements, e-mail inserts, site co-branding and sponsorship.
Examination questions
1
Give three examples of online promotion and briefly explain how they function.
2
Describe four different types of site on which online banner advertising for a car manufacturer’s
site could be placed.
3
Clickthrough is one measure of the effectiveness of banner advertising. Answer the following:
(a) What is clickthrough?
(b) Which factors are important in determining the clickthrough rate of a banner
advertisement?
(c) Is clickthrough a good measure of the effectiveness of banner advertising?
4
What is meant by co-branding? Explain the significance of co-branding.
5
What are ‘meta-tags’? How important are they in ensuring a web site is listed in a search
engine?
6
Name three ways in which e-mail can be used for promotion of a particular web site page
containing a special offer.
7
Give an example of an online loyalty scheme and briefly evaluate its strengths and
weaknesses.
8
Which techniques can be used to promote a web site in offline media?
References
Agrawal, V., Arjona, V. and Lemmens, R. (2001) E-performance: the path to rational exuber-
ance, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 1, 31–43.
Atlas DMT (2004) The Atlas Rank Report: How Search Engine Rank Impacts Traffic [not
dated]. Atlas DMT Research (www
.atlassolutions.com
).
Berthon, P., Lane, N., Pitt, L. and Watson, R. (1998) The World Wide Web as an industrial
marketing communications tool: models for the identification and assessment of opportu-
nities, Journal of Marketing Management, 14, 691–704.
Berthon, P., Pitt, L. and Watson, R. (1996) Resurfing W3: research perspectives on marketing
communication and buyer behaviour on the World Wide Web, International Journal of
Advertising, 15, 287–301.
Bicknell, D. (2002) Banking on customer service, e.Businessreview, January, 21–2.
BrandNewWorld (2004) AOL research published at www
.aolbrandnewworld.co.uk
.
Branthwaite, A., Wood, K. and Schilling, M. (2000) The medium is part of the message – the
role of media for shaping the image of a brand. ARF/ESOMAR Conference, Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, 12–14 November.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested