mvc view pdf : Add text field to pdf application Library tool html asp.net wpf online 06113-part140

Table7:FiscalpolicyratiosinU.S.andinthemodeleconomies(%)
G/Y Z/Y T/Y
T
y
/Y T
l
/Y T
k
/Y T
s
/Y T
c
/Y T
e
/Y
T
L
/Y T
K
/Y T
Y
/Y
U.S.
22.3
5.2
27.5
11.0
2.6
6.6
7.1
0.24
E
0
22.8
4.5
27.2
11.6
2.9
5.9
6.5
0.37
7.9
5.1
14.5
E
1
22.3
4.3
26.6
9.9
4.1
5.8
6.5
0.46
9.9
4.1
14.0
E
2
23.4
4.6
28.0
9.3
5.9
5.9
6.5
0.43
9.3
5.9
15.2
E
0
22.8
4.5
27.2
11.6
2.9
5.9
6.5
0.37
7.9
5.1
14.5
E
1
/Y
0
22.8
4.5
27.3
– 10.1
4.2
5.9
6.6
0.47
10.1
4.2
14.3
E
2
/Y
0
22.8
4.5
27.3
9.0
5.7
5.8
6.3
0.41
9.1
5.7
14.8
The opposite is the case in model economy E
2
.These results arise because both reforms are
revenue neutral, and while aggregate output in model economy E
1
is somewhat larger than
in the benchmark economy, in model economy E
2
it is somewhat smaller.
As Hall and Rabushka (1995) had guessed, we find that the labor income tax of the
reformed economies collects less revenues than the personal income tax of the benchmark
model economy, and these revenue losses are compensated by the higher revenues collected
by the capital income tax. Moreover, in our three model economies the revenues collected by
the payroll and consumption taxes, and the combined revenues of the total taxes on labor
and capital income are very similar.
To make the tax collections of the three model economies comparable, we decompose
the personal income taxes of the benchmark model economy into two shares, the share
attributable to labor income, which we label T
L
,and the share attributable to capital income
taxes, which we label T
K
.
35
In the last three columns of Table 7 we report these two shares
and the sum of the labor and capital income taxes which we label T
Y
.We find that the two
flat-tax reforms bring about increases in the average tax burden on labor income (from 7.9
percent in economy E
0
to 10.1 and 9.1 percent in economies E
1
and E
2
). In contrast, the
average tax burden on capital income decreases in economy E
1
and increases in economy E
2
(from 5.1 percent to 4.2 and 5.7 percent). If we compare the two reformed economies, we
find that economy E
1
places a higher tax burden on labor income and a lower tax burden
on capital income than economy E
2
. This is because the higher flat-tax rate of economy
E
2
affects both labor and capital income, while the larger tax exemption affects only labor
income.
35ThisdecompositionofhouseholdincometaxesissimilartotheoneusedbyMendoza,Razin,andTesar
(1994).
29
Add text field to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add editable text box to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
Add text field to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add text pdf
5.4 Earnings, income and wealth inequality
In Table 8 we describe the earnings, income and wealth inequality in the U.S. and in the
model economies. Since the three economies have identical processes on the endowments of
efficiency labor units, it is not surprising that the changes in the distribution of earnings are
very small. In contrast, before-tax income and, especially, wealth become more unequally
distributed under both reforms. This is not surprising since the marginal tax on capital
income for the wealthy is lower in the reformed economies than in the benchmark economy.
More interestingly, the implications of the reforms for the distribution of after-tax income
differ significantly: while after-tax income inequality increases in the less progressive tax
reform, it decreases sizably in the more progressive tax reform. It is along this dimension that
policymakers truly face the classical trade-off: the gains in efficiency of the less progressive
flat tax reforms are obtained at the expense of greater after-tax income inequality.
In particular, in the second panel of Table 8 we report the Gini indexes and some points
of the Lorenz curves of the wealth distributions. The flat tax reforms bring about large
increases of the Gini index of wealth (from 0.813 in the benchmark economy to 0.839 and
0.845 in the two flat-tax economies) and in the shares of wealth owned by the top quintiles
and the top percentile (2.3 and 3.4 percentage points, and 3.2 and 4.9 percentage points).
In the last two panels of Table 8 we report the Gini indexes and the Lorenz curves of the
income distributions. We find that the changes in before-tax income are rather small. The
Gini indexes increase from 0.533 to 0.541 under both reforms, and the changes in the shares
earned by the quintiles are minor (less than half a percentage point in every case).
Most of the distributional consequences of the flat-tax reforms occur in the after tax
income distribution. In the lessprogressive reform the Gini index of after-taxincome increases
form 0.510 to 0.524 and the shares of after-tax income earned by the households in the top
quintile and in the top percentile increase by 1.4 and 1.6 percentage points. In contrast, under
the more progressive tax reform the Gini index of after-tax income decreases to 0.497 and
the share earned by the bottom 60 percent of the distribution increases by 1.2 percentage
points. However, in spite of the large progressivity of this reform, the share of after-tax
income earned by the income richest still increases by one percentage point.
5.5 The distribution of the tax burden
In Table 9 we rank the households according to their income before taxes and after transfers
and we report the distribution of the tax burden in our model economies along this dimension.
30
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
add text to pdf document in preview; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. with this sample VB.NET code to add an image PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to insert pdf into email text
Table 8: The distributions of earnings, wealth and income in the U.S. and in the model
economies
The earnings distributions
Gini
Quintiles (%)
Top groups (%)
Economy
1st 2nd 3rd
4th
5th
90–95 95–99 99–100
U.S.
0.611
–0.4 3.2 12.5 23.3 61.4
12.4
16.4
14.8
E
0
0.613
0.0
4.2 14.4 18.8 62.5
11.8
16.7
15.2
E
1
0.615
0.0
4.2 14.2 18.7 62.9
12.0
16.8
15.0
E
2
0.610
0.0
5.2 13.8 18.2 62.8
11.7
16.9
15.4
The wealth distributions
Gini
Quintiles (%)
Top Groups (%)
Economy
1st 2nd 3rd
4th
5th
90–95 95–99 99–100
U.S.
0.803
–0.4 1.7
5.7 13.4 79.5
12.6
24.0
29.6
E
0
0.818
0.0
0.3
1.5 15.9 82.2
12.6
19.8
34.7
E
1
0.839
0.0
0.1
1.0 14.4 84.5
12.5
20.4
37.9
E
2
0.845
0.0
0.1
1.2 13.0 85.6
12.3
20.7
39.6
The income distributions (before all taxes and after transfers)
Gini
Quintiles (%)
Top Groups (%)
Economy
1st 2nd 3rd
4th
5th
90–95 95–99 99–100
U.S.
0.550
2.4
7.2 12.5 20.0 58.0
10.3
15.3
17.5
E
0
0.533
3.7
8.9 10.9 17.2 59.3
10.1
16.6
16.0
E
1
0.541
3.6
8.5 10.8 17.1 60.0
10.3
16.8
16.2
E
2
0.541
3.7
8.9 10.3 16.9 60.2
10.1
17.0
17.0
The income distributions (after all income taxes and transfers)
Gini
Quintiles (%)
Top Groups (%)
Economy
1st 2nd 3rd
4th
5th
90–95 95–99 99–100
E
0
0.510
4.6
9.3 11.0 17.2 57.9
10.1
16.3
14.9
E
1
0.524
4.7
8.9 10.4 16.7 59.3
10.1
16.7
16.5
E
2
0.497
4.9
9.8 11.4 17.1 56.7
9.5
15.9
15.9
31
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf form
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text pdf professional; add text block to pdf
Figure 4: Labor income, capital income, and transfer income in the benchmark model econ-
omy
0
5
10
15
20
25
0-1
1-5
5-10 10-20 20-30 30-40 40-50 50-60 60-70 70-80 80-90 90-95 95-99 99-100 ALL
yz
yk
yl
The tax burden under the current tax system. We find that the current distribution
of the tax burden almost proportional, in spite of the fact that the personal income tax code
is designed to make the current tax system progressive. It is true that the average personal
income tax collections are clearly progressive (see the first row of Panel 1 of Table 9). But,
with the exception of the average taxes paid by the households in the first quintile and the
last percentile, this progressivity all but disappears when we add all income taxes together or
when we consider the entire tax system (see the first rows of Panels 6 and 7). The average tax
collections of both the capital income taxes and of all taxes on labor income added together
(see Panels 2 and 5) display interesting see-saw patterns. The peculiarities of the interaction
between the payroll tax and the personal income tax discussed above are some of the reasons
that justify this pattern. Other reasons can be found in Figure 4 where we plot the sources
of household income for the deciles of the income distribution. As Figure 4 illustrates, the
shares of capital income also display the see-saw pattern, since the households in the second
quintile, many of them rich retirees, own a disproportionally large share of total capital.
The tax burden in the flat-tax economies. When we compare the distribution of the
tax burden before and after the reforms we find the following: first, the income poorest house-
holds pay significantly less income taxes in the reformed economies than in the benchmark
model economy (see Panel 6 of Table 9); second, in model economy E
1
,the income rich pay
32
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text field pdf; how to add text to a pdf in reader
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert a text box in pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
Table 9: Average taxes paid by the quantiles of the distribution of income before taxes and
after transfers (%)
All
Quintiles
Top Quantiles
0–100
1st 2nd
3rd
4th
5th
90–95 95–99 99–100
Panel 1: Personal income taxes (τ
y
)
E
0
8.5
4.5
6.7
7.7
9.1 14.6
14.1
17.6
19.5
Panel 2: Capital income taxes (τ
k
yk
)
E
0
3.6
0.4
7.0
0.2
4.7
5.6
3.1
8.5
13.9
E
1
2.9
0.3
6.5
0.1
3.8
3.8
2.0
5.6
9.7
E
2
3.8
0.3
7.2
0.3
6.1
5.3
3.0
7.8
13.9
Panel 3: Labor income taxes (τ
l
yl
)
E
0
6.0
0.0
3.5
7.6
7.0 11.7
12.6
13.0
11.6
E
1
7.7
0.0
3.4 10.7
9.8 14.6
16.2
14.4
11.1
E
2
3.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.1 16.1
17.9
17.7
13.8
Panel 4: Consumption taxes (τ
c
)
E
0
9.1
10.1 12.5
7.7
8.5
6.5
5.8
6.7
6.5
E
1
9.1
10.4 12.9
7.4
8.4
6.5
5.6
6.8
7.1
E
2
9.2
10.3 11.8
8.4
9.3
6.2
5.5
6.2
6.6
Panel 5: All labor income taxes (τ
l
yl
s
)
E
0
14.1
0.0 10.9 22.7 18.4 18.4
19.7
16.3
13.1
E
1
15.9
0.0 11.1 25.9 21.2 21.2
23.1
17.6
12.5
E
2
12.1
0.0
8.4 15.2 14.1 23.0
25.2
20.9
15.1
Panel 6: All income taxes (τ
k
l
y
s
)
E
0
18.8
4.8 19.0 22.9 23.2 24.0
22.8
24.8
27.0
E
1
18.8
0.3 17.7 26.0 25.0 25.0
25.2
23.2
22.2
E
2
16.0
0.3 15.6 15.4 20.3 28.3
28.2
28.8
28.9
Panel 7: All Taxes (τ
k
l
y
s
c
e
)
E
0
27.9
14.9 31.5 30.6 31.9 30.7
28.8
31.6
35.5
E
1
28.0
10.6 30.5 33.4 33.8 31.6
30.9
30.1
32.0
E
2
25.3
10.6 27.4 23.9 29.8 34.7
33.9
35.1
38.1
33
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
By using RaterEdge .NET PDF package, you can add form fields to existing pdf files, delete or remove form field in PDF page and update PDF field in VB.NET
how to enter text in pdf file; add text box to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
adding text to a pdf; how to insert text into a pdf
less taxes than the households in the third and fourth income quintiles who foot the largest
shares of the tax bill (see Panel 7); third, in model economy E
2
the tax burden is distributed
more progressively than in the benchmark economy: the households in the bottom four quin-
tiles bear smaller shares of the total tax burden and the households in the top quintile bear
alarger share (see Panel 7); fourth, in both flat tax economies capital income taxes replicate
the see-saw pattern of the benchmark economy and average capital income taxes are higher
in economy E
2
than in economy E
0
,while in economy E
1
they are lower;
36
and fifth the large
labor income tax exemption of model economy E
2
generates a very unequal distribution of
average labor income tax rates. If we exclude payroll taxes, the bottom 60 percent of the
income distribution of model economy E
2
pays no labor income taxes, whereas the average
tax rates paid by the households in the top quintile are 4.4 percentage points higher than in
the benchmark economy, and 1.5 percentage points higher than in model economy E
1
(see
the Panel 3 of Table 9).
5.6 Welfare
In model economy E
1
,the less progressive flat-tax economy, aggregate output, consumption,
productivity and leisure are all higher than in model economy E
0
. In contrast, in model
economy E
2
, the more progressive flat-tax economy, aggregate output, consumption and
productivity are lower, and only aggregate leisure is higher than in model economy E
0
.
These results are consistent with the idea that high tax rates and small tax bases are more
distortionary than low tax rates and big tax bases, at least on aggregate.
However, it is also true that the after-tax income distribution in model economy E
1
is
significantly more unequal than in model economy E
2
.Therefore, a policymaker who had to
choose between these two reforms would face the classical trade-off between efficiency and
equality. Which economy should she choose: the more efficient but less egalitarian model
economy E
1
,or the less efficient but more egalitarian model economy E
2
? In this section we
use a Benthamite social social welfare function to quantify the trade-off between efficiency
and equality and to answer this question.
37
To carry out the welfare comparisons, we define v
0
(a,s,∆) as the equilibrium value
function of a household of type (a,s) in model economy E
0
whose equilibrium consumption
36
This finding is consistent with the fact that in model economy E
1
there is more aggregate capital than
in model economy E
0
,while in model economy E
2
there is less aggregate capital.
37
Benthamite social welfare functions give identical weights to every household in the economy. Conse-
quently, with concave utility functions, equal sharing is the welfare maximizing allocation. Also notice that
in this section we compare the welfare of steady-state allocations and we remain conspicuously silent about
the transitions between these steady-states.
34
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
how to add a text box to a pdf; adding text box to pdf
allocation is changed by a fraction ∆ every period and whose leisure remains unchanged.
Formally,
v
0
(a,s,∆) = u(c
0
(a,s)(1 +∆), − h
0
(a,s))+ β
s∈S
Γ
ss
v(z
0
(a,s),s
,∆)
(25)
where c
0
(a,s), h
0
(a,s) and z
0
(a,s) are the optimal decision rules that solve the household
decision problem defined in expressions (3–7). Next, we define the welfare gain of living
in the steady-state of flat-tax economy E
i
(where i = 1,2), as the fraction of additional
consumption, ∆
i
,that we must give to or take away from the households of the benchmark
model economy so that they attain the steady-state welfare of the households in model
economy Formally, ∆
i
is the solution to the equation
v
0
(a,s,∆
i
)dx
0
=
v
i
(a,s)dx
i
(26)
where v
i
and x
i
are the equilibrium value function and the equilibrium stationary distribution
of households in the flat-tax model economy E
i
.
We find that the equivalent variation in consumption for the less progressive flat-tax
reform is ∆
1
= −0.0017, and that the equivalent variation in consumption for the more
progressive flat-tax reform is ∆
2
= 0.0045. This means that, from a Benthamite point of
view, the flat-tax reform with a low tax rate and a small labor income tax exemption results
in an aggregate welfare loss that is equivalent to –0.17 percent of consumption, and that
the flat-tax reform with a high tax rate and a big labor income tax exemption results in an
aggregate welfare gain that is equivalent to 0.45 percent of consumption. This leads us to
conclude that, in Benthamite welfare terms, equality wins the trade-off and that, given the
choice, a Benthamite social planner would choose the more progressive flat-tax reform. This
result is consistent with the findings by Conesa and Krueger (2005), who show that a purely
proportional income tax reduces social welfare in spite of increasing aggregate output and
consumption by almost nine percent.
Flat-tax reforms are fundamental tax reforms that change every margin of the households’
and the firms’ decision problems. These changes in the individual behavior of households
and firms translate into changes in aggregate allocations and prices, which result in further
changes in the individual decisions. Moreover, the solutions to these fundamentally different
decision problems generate equilibrium distributions of households that are also fundamen-
tally different. To improve our intuitive understanding of our welfare findings, it is useful
to decompose the equivalent variation in consumption discussed above into different compo-
nents.
35
To this purpose, we define two auxiliary measures of the equivalent variations in con-
sumption for each reform. First, we compute the equivalent variation in consumption that
makes the households indifferent between the benchmark model economy E
0
and the flat-tax
economy E
i
ignoring the changes in the equilibrium distribution of households. We denote
this variation by ∆
a
i
,and we define it as follows:
v
0
(a,s,∆
a
i
;r
0
,w
0
)dx
0
=
v
i
(a,s;r
i
,w
i
)dx
0
(27)
Notice that in this expression we calculate the aggregate welfare of the flat-tax economy
using its equilibrium price vector, (r
i
,w
i
), and the equilibrium stationary distribution of the
benchmark model economy.
Second, we compute the equivalent variation in consumption that makes the households
indifferent between the benchmark model economy E
0
and the flat-tax economy E
i
ignoring
both the changes in the equilibrium distribution of households and the changes in the size of
the economy. We denote this variation by ∆
b
i
,and we define it as follows:
v
0
a,s,∆
b
i
;r
0
,w
0
dx
0
=
v
i
(a,s;r
0
,w
0
)dx
0
(28)
Notice that now we calculate the aggregate welfare of the flat-tax economy using both the
equilibrium stationary distribution and the equilibrium price vector of the benchmark model
economy.
These two equivalent variations allow us to decompose the total equivalent variation that
we have defined in expression (26) above as follows:
i
=∆
b
i
+
a
i
−∆
b
i
+(∆
i
−∆
a
i
)
(29)
The first term of expression (29) measures the welfare changes that are due to the reshuffling
of resources between different households and ignoring the general equilibrium effects and
the changes in the distribution of households. The second term measures the welfare changes
that are due to the general equilibrium effects only. And the third term measures the welfare
gains that are due to the changes in the distribution of households.
In Table 10 we report this decomposition for the two reforms that we study in this article.
We find that, when we abstract from the distributional and general equilibrium changes, the
less progressive flat-tax reform results in a welfare loss that is equivalent to −0.27 percent
of consumption. In contrast, the more progressive flat-tax reform results in a welfare gain
that is equivalent to 3.64 percent of consumption. These welfare changes are the direct
consequence of the redistribution of the tax burden, and of the new individual allocations
of consumption and leisure that the flat-tax systems generate. This result confirms Domeij
36
Table 10: Decomposing the aggregate welfare changes
Equivalent variations in consumption (%)
Economy
b
i
a
i
−∆
b
i
(∆
i
−∆
a
i
)
i
E
1
−0.27
0.75
−0.65
−0.17
E
2
3.64
−0.58
−2.62
0.45
and Heathcote (2004)’s findings who show that shifting the tax burden from labor to capital
income brings about sizeable welfare gains because it implies a transfer of resources from the
wealth-rich households to the wealth-poor households. This transfer brings about large gains
in Benthamite welfare. As we have discussed above, in flat-tax economy E
2
capital income
tax collections are higher than in flat-tax economy E
1
and labor income tax collections are
lower. Hence, if all other things were to remain equal, the more progressive flat-tax reform
would have been significantly better than the less progressive flat-tax reform.
When we consider the general equilibrium effects brought about by the change in prices
the sign of the welfare changes is reversed. The less progressive flat-tax reform results in a
welfare gain that is equivalent to 0.75 percent of consumption, and the more progressive tax
reform results in a welfare loss that is equivalent to −0.58 percent of consumption. These
welfare changes are the consequence of the efficiency gains and losses that result form the
new aggregate values of consumption and leisure in the flat-tax economies.
Finally, the new equilibrium distributions of the flat-tax model economies result in welfare
losses that are equivalent to −0.65 percent of consumption in the less progressive flat-tax
reform, and to −2.62 percent of consumption in the more progressive flat-tax reform. These
welfare losses arise because both reforms put more households in points in the state space
that have a lower utility.
Welfare comparisons between steady-states can be misleading because they ignore the
welfare changes that take place during the transitions between the steady-states. These
welfare changes may be large and they might even reverse the signs of the steady-state
comparisons. However, there are some exceptions to this general rule and this case may very
well be one of these exceptions. As we have discussed above, the steady-state aggregate stock
of capital is almost seven percent larger in the flat-tax economy E
1
than in the benchmark
economy E
0
.Therefore, during the transition from E
0
to E
1
the households will pay the cost
of accumulating capital and will, consequently, enjoy less consumption. This implies that
accounting for the transition would make the less progressive flat-tax reform even more costly
37
in welfare terms. In contrast, the steady-state capital stock is almost six percent smaller in
flat-tax economy E
2
than economy E
0
. In this case the transition from E
0
to E
2
should be
quite a pleasant affair since it allows the households to enjoy more consumption while they
are reducing their capital stock. Therefore, we conjecture that accounting for the transition
would make the welfare gains of the more progressive flat-tax reform even larger. If these
two conjectures are correct, accounting for the transitions would increase the steady-state
welfare differences between the two flat-tax reforms.
Finally, we compute the individual welfare changes brought about by the reforms for the
various types of households individually. Formally, for each household type (a,s) ∈ A × S ,
we compute the equivalent variation ∆
i
(a,s) as follows:
v
0
(a,s,∆
i
(a,s);r
0
,w
0
)= v
i
(a,s;r
i
,w
i
)
(30)
This welfare measure is the fraction of additional consumption that we mustgive to or take
away from each household-type of the steady state of the benchmark model economy to make
it indifferent between staying in the benchmark model economy forever or being dropped in
the steady-state of the flat-tax economy keeping its assets and its household-specific shock.
These household-specific welfare measures take into account the general equilibrium effects
but they ignore the changes in the equilibrium distributions by construction.
Table 11: Welfare inequality
Equivalent variation of consumption (%)
Economy
d
1
d
2
d
3
d
4
d
5
d
6
d
7
d
8
d
9
d
10
E
1
0.3 3.0 2.7 0.5 −0.2 −0.5 −0.5 −0.9 −1.1
0.0
E
2
2.4 4.7 4.5 2.2
4.1
5.1
5.1 −0.4 −2.9 −3.3
Once we have computed the welfare changes for each household-type, we aggregate them
over the deciles of the before-tax income distribution of the benchmark model economy. We
report these statistics in Table 11. The table shows that both flat-tax reforms bring about
sizable boons for the income-poor. More specifically, it turns our that the households in the
bottom 40 percent of the income distribution of the benchmark model economy would be
happier in the steady-state of the less progressive flat-tax model economy (the households in
the top decile would also be marginally happier), and that this percentage of happier income-
poor households increases to an impressive 70 percent in the more progressive flat-tax model
economy. On the other hand, the remaining households, who happen to be the income-rich,
would be happier under the current tax system.
38
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested