mvc view pdf : Add text to pdf file online SDK control API wpf web page asp.net sharepoint 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN46-part1384

A Encouraging participation. Techniques that can be used are:
interruption on entry – a common approach where every 100th customer is prompted;
continuous, for example click on the button to complete survey;
on registration on site the customer can be profiled;
after an activity such as sale or customer support the customer can be prompted for
their opinion about the service;
incentives and promotions (this can also be executed on independent sites);
by e-mail (an e-mail prompt to visit a web site to fill in a survey or a simple e-mail
survey).
B Stages in execution. It can be suggested that there are five stages to a successful ques-
tionnaire survey:
1 attract (button, pop-up, e-mail as above);
2 incentivise (prize or offer consistent with required sample and audience);
3 reassure (why the company is doing it – to learn, not too long and that confiden-
tiality is protected);
4 design and execute (brevity, relevance, position);
5 follow-up (feedback).
C Design. Grossnickle and Raskin (2001) suggest the following approach to structuring
questionnaires:
easy, interesting questions first;
cluster questions on same topic;
flow topic from general to specific;
flow topic from easier behavioural to more difficult attitudinal questions;
easy questions last, e.g. demographics or offputting questions.
Typical questions that can be asked for determining the effectiveness of Internet mar-
keting are:
1 Who is visiting the site? For example, role in buying decision? Online experience?
Access location and speed? Demographics segment?
2 Why are they visiting? How often do they visit? Which information or service? Did
they find it? Actions taken? (Can be determined through web analytics.)
3 What do they think? Overall opinion? Key areas of satisfaction? Specific likes or
dislikes? What was missing that was expected?
Focus groups
Malhotra (1999) notes that the advantage of online focus groups is that they can be used
to reach segments that are difficult to access, such as doctors, lawyers and professional
people. These authors also suggest that costs are lower, they can be arranged more rap-
idly and can bridge the distance gap when recruiting respondents. Traditional focus
groups can be conducted, where customers are brought together in a room and assess a
web site; this will typically occur pre-launch as part of the prototyping activity. Testing
can take the form of random use of the site, or more usefully the users will be given dif-
ferent scenarios to follow. It is important that focus groups use a range of familiarities
(Chapter 8). Focus groups tend to be relatively expensive and time-consuming, since
rather than simply viewing an advertisement, the customers need to actually interact
with the web site. Conducting real-world focus groups has the benefit that the reactions
of site users can be monitored; the scratch of the head and the fist hitting the desk
cannot be monitored in the virtual world!
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
432
Add text to pdf file online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf form; add text to pdf reader
Add text to pdf file online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text to pdf in preview
Mystery shoppers
Real-world measurement is also important since the Internet channel does not exist in
isolation. It must work in unison with real-world customer service and fulfilment. Chris
Russell of eMysteryShopper (www
.emyster
yshopper
.com
), a company that has completed
online customer service surveys for major UK retailers and travel companies, says ‘we also
needed to make sure the bricks-and-mortar customer service support was actually support-
ing what the clicks-and-mortar side was promising. There is no doubt that an e-commerce
site has to be a complete customer service fulfilment picture, it can’t just be one bit work-
ing online that is not supported offline’. An eMysteryShopper survey involves shoppers
not only commenting on site usability, but also on the service quality of e-mail and phone
responses together with product fulfilment. Mystery shoppers test these areas:
site usability;
e-commerce fulfilment;
e-mail and phone response (time, accuracy);
impact on brand.
To conclude this section of the chapter, Table 9.4 summarises key offline measures of
Internet marketing effectiveness.
As part of the process of continuous improvement in online marketing, it is important
to have a clearly defined process for making changes to the content of a web site. This
process should be understood by all staff contributing content to the site, with their
responsibilities clearly identified in their job descriptions. To understand the process,
consider the main stages involved in publishing a page. A simple model of the work
involved in maintenance is shown in Figure 9.9. It is assumed that the needs of the users
and design features of the site have already been defined when the site was originally
THE MAINTENANCE PROCESS
433
Table 9.4 Some offline measures of Internet marketing effectiveness
Measure
Measured through
Enquiries or leads (subdivided into new 
Number of online e-mails
customers and existing customers) 
Phone calls mentioning web site
Faxed enquiries mentioning web site
Sales
Online sales or sales in which customers state
they found out about the product on the web site.
Sales received on a phone number only publi-
cised on a web site
Conversion rate
Can be calculated separately for customers who
are registered online and those who are not
Retention rates
Is the ‘churn’ of customers using the web site
lower?
Customer satisfaction
Focus groups, questionnaires and interviews
Mystery shoppers
Brand enhancement (brand awareness,
Online controlled surveys
favourability and purchase intent)
The maintenance process
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to add text to pdf file; how to add text to pdf file with reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file
add text boxes to pdf; adding text to a pdf in reader
created, as described in Chapter 7. The model only applies to minor updates to copy, or
perhaps updating product or company information. The different tasks involved in the
maintenance process are as follows:
Write. This stage involves writing the marketing copy and, if necessary, designing the
layout of copy and associated images.
2 Review. An independent review of the copy is necessary to check for errors before a
document is published. Depending on the size of organisation, review may be neces-
sary by one person or several people covering different aspects of content quality such
as corporate image, copy-editing text to identify grammatical errors, marketing copy,
branding and legality.
Correct. This stage is straightforward, and involves updates necessary as a result of stage 2.
4 Publish (to test environment). The publication stage involves putting the corrected copy
on a web page that can be checked further. This will be in a test environment that can
only be viewed from inside a company.
5 Test. Before the completed web page is made available over the World Wide Web a
final test will be required for technical issues such as whether the page loads success-
fully on different browsers.
6 Publish (to live environment). Once the material has been reviewed and tested and is
signed off as satisfactory it will be published to the main web site and will be accessi-
ble by customers.
How often should material be updated?
Web site content needs to be up-to-date, in line with customer expectations. The web is
perceived as a dynamic medium, and customers are likely to expect new information to
be posted to a site straight away. If material is inaccurate or ‘stale’ then the customer
may not return to the site.
After a time, the information on a web page naturally becomes outdated and will need to
be updated or replaced. It is important to have a mechanism defining what triggers this
update process and leads to the cycle of Figure 9.9. The need for material to be updated has
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
434
Figure 9.9 A web document review and update process
H
o
w
?
Write
Review
Correct
Publish
Publish
W
h
e
n
,
w
h
o
?
H
o
w
,
w
h
o
,
w
h
a
t
?
H
o
w
?
H
o
w
,
w
h
o
,
w
h
a
t
?
Test
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to insert text box in pdf; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to enter text in pdf form; acrobat add text to pdf
several facets. For the information on the site to be accurate it clearly needs to be up-to-date.
Trigger procedures should be developed such that when price changes or product specifica-
tions are updated in promotional leaflets or catalogues, these changes are also reflected on
the web site. Without procedures of this type, it is easy for there to be errors on the web site.
This may sound obvious, but the reality is that the people contributing the updates to the
site will have many other tasks to complete, and the web site could be a low priority.
A further reason for updating the site is to encourage repeat visits. For example, a cus-
tomer could be encouraged to return to a business-to-business site if there is some
industry news on the site. This type of content needs to be updated regularly according
to the type of business, from daily, weekly to monthly. Again, a person has to be in place
to collate such news and update the site frequently. Some companies such as RS
Components have monthly promotions, which may encourage repeat visits to the site.
It is useful to emphasise to the customer that the information is updated frequently. This
is possible through simple devices such as putting the date on the home page, or per-
haps just the month and year for a site that is updated less frequently.
As part of defining a web site update process, and standards, a company may want to
issue guidelines that suggest how often content is updated. This may specify that con-
tent is updated as follows:
within two days of a factual error being identified;
a new ‘news’ item is added at least once a month;
when product information has been static for two months.
Maintenance is easy in a small company with a single person updating the web site. That
person is able to ensure that the style of the whole site remains consistent. For a slightly
larger site, with perhaps two people involved with updating, the problem more than dou-
bles since communication is required to keep things consistent. For a large organisation
with many different departments and offices in different countries, site maintenance
becomes very difficult, and production of a quality site is only possible when there is
strong control to establish a team who all follow the same standards. Sterne (2001) suggests
that the essence of successful maintenance is to have clearly identified responsibilities for
different aspects of updating the web site. The questions to ask are:
Who owns the process?
Who owns the content?
Who owns the format?
Who owns the technology?
We will now consider these in more detail, reviewing the standards required to pro-
duce a good-quality web site and the different types of responsibilities involved.
Who owns the process?
One of the first areas to be defined should be the overall process for updating the site.
But who agrees this process? For the large company it will be necessary to bring together
all the interested parties such as those within the marketing department and the site
developers – who may be an external agency or the IT department. Within these group-
ings there may be many people with an interest such as the marketing manager, the
RESPONSIBILITIES IN WEB SITE MAINTENANCE
435
Responsibilities in web site maintenance
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf online; adding text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to add text fields to pdf
person with responsibility for Internet or new-media marketing, a communications
manager who places above-the-line advertising, and product managers who manage the
promotion of individual products and services. All of these people should have an input
in deciding on the process for updating the web site. This is not simply a matter of
updating the web site; there are more fundamental issues to consider, such as how com-
munications to the customer are made consistent between the different media. Some
companies such as Orange (www
.orange.co.uk
) and Ford (www
.for
d.co.uk
) manage this
process well, and the content of the web site is always consistent with other media cam-
paigns in newspapers and on television. In Ford this has been achieved by breaking
down the barriers between traditional-media account managers and the Internet devel-
opment team, and both groups work closely together. In other organisations, a structure
is adopted in which there is a person or group responsible for customer communica-
tions, and they then ensure that the message conveyed by different functions such as
the web site developers and the advertisement placers is consistent. Options for structur-
ing an organisation to integrate new and old media are given in Parsons et al. (1996).
What, then, is this process? The process will basically specify responsibilities for different
aspects of site management and detail the sequence in which tasks occur for updating the
site. A typical update process is outlined in Figure 9.9. If we take a specific example we can
illustrate the need for a well-defined process. Imagine that a large organisation is launching
a new product, promotional literature is to be distributed to customers, the media are
already available, and the company wants to add information about this product to the
web site. A recently recruited graduate is charged with putting the information on the site.
How will this process actually occur? The following process stages need to occur:
Graduate reviews promotional literature and rewrites copy on a word processor and mod-
ifies graphical elements as appropriate for the web site. This is the write stage in Figure 9.9.
2 Product and/or marketing manager reviews the revised web-based copy. This is part of
the review stage in Figure 9.9.
3 Corporate communications manager reviews the copy for suitability. This is also part
of the review stage in Figure 9.9.
4 Legal adviser reviews copy. This is also part of the review stage in Figure 9.9.
5 Copy revised and corrected and then re-reviewed as necessary. This is the correct stage
in Figure 9.9.
6 Copy converted to web and then published. This will be performed by a technical
person such as a site developer, who will insert a new menu option to help users navi-
gate to the new product. This person will add the HTML formatting and then upload
the file using FTP to the test web site. This is the first publish stage in Figure 9.9.
The new copy on the site will be reviewed by the graduate for accuracy, and needs to be
tested on different web browsers and screen resolutions if it uses a graphical design differ-
ent from the standard site template. This type of technical testing will need to be carried
out by the webmaster. The new version could also be reviewed on the site by the commu-
nications manager or legal adviser at this point. This is part of the test stage in Figure 9.9.
8 Once all interested parties agree the new copy is suitable, the pages on the test web
site can be transferred to the live web site and are then available for customers to
view. This is the second publish stage in Figure 9.9.
Note that, in this scenario, review of the copy at stages 2 to 4 happens before the copy
is actually put on to the test site at stage 6. This is efficient in that it saves the technical
person or webmaster having to update the page until the copy is agreed. An alternative
would be for the graduate to write the copy at stage 1 and then the webmaster publishes
the material before it is reviewed by the various parties. Each approach is equally valid.
It is apparent that this process is quite involved, so the process needs to be clearly under-
stood within the company or otherwise web pages may be published that do not conform
to the look and feel for the site, have not been checked for legal compliance, or may not
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
436
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references
add text to pdf in acrobat; add text boxes to a pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text pdf file acrobat; how to add text fields in a pdf
work. The only way such a process can be detailed is if it is written down and its impor-
tance communicated to all the participants. It will also help if technology facilitates the
process. In particular, a workflow system should be set up that enables each of the reviewers
to comment on the copy as soon as possible and authorise it. Content management sys-
tems are now commonly used to help achieve this. The copy can be automatically e-mailed
to all reviewers and then the comments received by e-mail can be collated.
The detailed standards for performing a site update will vary according to the extent
of the update. For correcting a spelling mistake, for example, not so many people will
need to review the change! A site re-design that involves changing the look and feel of
the site will require the full range of people to be involved.
Once the process has been established, the marketing department, as the owners of
the web site, will insist that the process be followed for every change that is made to the
web site.
To conclude this section refer to Activity 9.1 which shows a typical web site update
process and considers possible improvements.
RESPONSIBILITIES IN WEB SITE MAINTENANCE
437
Activity 9.1
Optimising a content review process
Purpose
Assess how quality control and efficiency can be balanced for revisions to web content.
Activity
The extract below and Figure 9.10 illustrate a problem of updating encountered by this
company. How can they solve this problem?
Problem description
From when the brand manager identifies a need to update copy for their product, the update
might happen as follows: brand manager writes copy (half a day), one day later the web manager
reviews copy, three days later the marketing manager checks the copy, seven days later the legal
department checks the copy, two days later the revised copy is implemented on the test site, two
days later the brand manager reviews the test site, the next day the web manager reviews the
web site, followed by updating and final review before the copy is added to the live site two days
later and over a fortnight from when a relatively minor change to the site was identified!
Figure 9.10 An example of a content update review process
Brand manager
writes copy (1)
Web manager
reviews copy (2)
Marketing manager
reviews copy (2)
Legal dept
reviews copy (2)
Copy implemented
on test site (3,4)
Brand manager
reviews test site (5)
Web manager
reviews test site (5)
Copy updated
on test site (6)
New copy
live (6)
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
add text pdf reader; how to add a text box to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to insert a text box in pdf
Who owns the content?
For a medium-to-large site where the content is updated regularly, as it should be, it will
soon become impossible for one person to be able to update all the content. It is logical
and practical to distribute the responsibility for owning and developing different sec-
tions of the site to the people in an organisation who have the best skills and knowledge
to develop that content. For example, in a large financial services company, the part of
the business responsible for a certain product area should update the copy referring to
their products. One person will update copy for each of savings accounts, mortgages,
travel insurance, health insurance and investments. For a PC supplier, different content
developers will be required for the product information, financing, delivery information
and customer service facilities. Once the ownership of content is distributed throughout
an organisation, it becomes crucial to develop guidelines and standards that help ensure
that the site has a coherent ‘feel’ and appearance. The nature of these guidelines is
described in the sections that follow.
Who owns the format?
The format refers to different aspects of the design and layout of the site commonly
referred to as its ‘look and feel’. The key aim is consistency of format across the whole
web site. For a large corporate site, with different staff working on different parts of the
site, there is a risk that the different areas of the site will not be consistent. Defining a
clear format or site design template for the site means that the quality of the site and
customer experience will be better since:
the site will be easier to use – a customer who has become familiar with using one area
of the site will be able to confidently use another part of the site;
the design elements of the site will be similar – a user will feel more at home with the site
if different parts look similar;
the corporate image and branding will be consistent with real-world branding (if this is an
objective) and similar across the entire site.
To achieve a site of this quality it is necessary for written standards to be developed.
These may include different standards such as those shown in Table 9.5. The standards
adopted will vary according to the size of the web site and company. Typically, larger
sites, with more individual content developers, will require more detailed standards.
Note that it will be much easier to apply these quality standards across the site if the
degree of scope for individual content developers to make changes to graphics or naviga-
tion is limited and they concentrate on changing text copy. To help achieve consistency,
the software used to build the web site should allow templates to be designed that spec-
ify the menu structure and graphical design of the site. The content developers are then
simply adding text- and graphics-based pages to specific documents and do not have to
worry about the site design.
Who owns the technology?
The technology used to publish the web site is important if a company is to utilise fully
the power of the Internet. Many standards such as those in Table 9.5 need to be man-
aged in addition to the technology. The technology decision becomes more significant
when a company wants to make its product catalogue available for queries or to take
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
438
Content developer
A person responsible
for updating web pages
within part of an
organisation.
Site design
template
A standard page layout
format which is applied
to each page of a web
site.
orders online. As these facilities are added the web site changes from an isolated system
to one that must be integrated with other technologies such as the customer database,
stock control and sales order processing systems. Given this integration with corporate
IS, the IT department (or the company to which IT has been outsourced) will need to be
involved in the development of the site and its strategy.
As well as issues of integrating systems, there are detailed technical issues for which
the technical staff in the company need to be made responsible. These include:
availability and performance of web site server;
checking HTML for validity and correcting broken links;
managing different versions of web pages in the test and live environments and con-
tent management.
RESPONSIBILITIES IN WEB SITE MAINTENANCE
439
Table 9.5 Web site standards
Standard
Details
Applies to
Site structure
Will specify the main areas of the site, for 
Content developers
example products, customer service, press 
releases, how to place content and who is 
responsible for each area.
Navigation
May specify, for instance, that the main menu  Web site designer/webmaster usually 
must always be on the left of the screen with 
achieves these through site templates
nested (sub-) menus at the foot of the screen.
The home button should be accessible from 
every screen at the top left corner of the 
screen. See Lynch and Horton (1999) for 
guidelines on navigation and site design.
Copy style and
General guidelines, for example reminding 
Individual content developers
page structure
those writing copy that web copy needs to be 
briefer than its paper equivalent. Where detail 
is required, perhaps with product 
specifications, it should be broken up into 
chunks that are digestible on-screen.
Copy and page structure should also be 
written for search engine optimisation to 
keyphrases (Chapter 8).
Testing standards
Check site functions for:
Web site designer/webmaster
different browser types and versions
plug-ins
invalid links
speed of download of graphics
spellcheck each page
See text for details.
Corporate branding
Specifies the appearance of company logos 
Web site designer/webmaster
and graphic design
and the colours and typefaces used to convey 
the brand message.
Process
The sequence of events for publishing a new 
All
web page or updating an existing page. Who 
is responsible for reviewing and updating?
Performance
Availability and download speed figures.
Staff managing the server
Content management
Content management refers to when software tools (usually browser-based software run-
ning on a server) permit business users to contribute web content while an administrator
keeps control of the format and style of the web site and the approval process. These tools
are used to organise, manage, retrieve and archive information content throughout the
life of the site.
Content management systems (CMS) provide these facilities:
structure authoring: the design and maintenance of content structure (sub-compo-
nents, templates, etc.), web page structure and web site structure;
link management: the maintenance of internal and external links through content
change and the elimination of dead links;
search engine visibility: the content within the search engine must be stored and linked
such that it can be indexed by search engine robots to add it to their index – this was
not possible with some first-generation content management systems, but is typical
of more recent content management systems;
input and syndication: the loading (spidering) of externally originating content and the
aggregation and dissemination of content from a variety of sources;
versioning: the crucial task of controlling which edition of a page, page element or the
whole site is published. Typically this will be the most recent, but previous editions
should be archived and it should be possible to roll back to a previous version at the
page, page element or site level;
security and access control: different permissions can be assigned to different roles of
users and some content may only be available through log-in details. In these cases,
the CMS maintains a list of users. This facility is useful when a company needs to use
the same CMS for an intranet, extranet or public Internet site which may have differ-
ent levels of permission;
publication workflow: content destined for a web site needs to pass through a publica-
tion process to move it from the management environment to the live delivery
environment. The process may involve tasks such as format conversion (e.g. to PDF,
or to WAP), rendering to HTML, editorial authorisation and the construction of com-
posite documents in real time (personalisation and selective dissemination);
tracking and monitoring: providing logs and statistical analysis of use to provide perform-
ance measures, tune the content according to demand and protect against misuse;
navigation and visualisation: providing an intuitive, clear and attractive representation
of the nature and location of content using colour, texture, 3D rendering or even
virtual reality.
From this list of features you can see that modern CMSs are complex and many CMSs
are expensive investments. Some open-source CMSs are available without the need to
purchase a licence fee which have many of the features explained in this section. One
example is Plone (www
.plone.or
g
) which is used by large organisations’ web sites such as
NASA. Dave Chaffey uses Plone to manage the contents for updates to this book which
readers can find on his web site (www
.davechaf
fey
.com
). 
Initiatives to keep content fresh
It is often said that up-to-date content is crucial to site ‘stickiness’, but fresh content will
not happen by accident, so companies have to consider approaches that can be used to
control the quality of information. Generic approaches that we have seen which can
work well are:
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
440
Content
management
Software tools for
managing additions
and amendment to web
site content.
Assign responsibility for particular content types of site sections;
Make the quality of web content produced part of employee’s performance appraisal;
Produce a target schedule for publication of content;
Identify events which trigger the publication of new content, e.g. a new product
launch, price change or a press release;
Identify stages and responsibilities in updating – who specifies, who creates, who
reviews, who checks, who publishes;
Measure the usage of content through web analytics or get feedback from site users;
Audit and publish content to show which is up-to-date.
CASE STUDY 9
Learning from Amazon’s culture of metrics
Case Study 9
Context
Why a case study on Amazon? Surely everyone knows
about who Amazon are and what they do? Yes, well, that’s
maybe true, but this case goes beyond the surface to
review some of the ‘insider secrets’ of Amazon’s success.
Like eBay, Amazon.com was born in 1995. The name
reflected the vision of Jeff Bezos, to produce a large-scale
phenomenon like the Amazon river. This ambition has proved
justified since just 8 years later, Amazon passed the $5 billion
sales mark – it took Wal-Mart 20 years to achieve this. 
By 2005 Amazon was a global brand with over 41 mil-
lion active customers accounts and order fulfilment to
more than 200 countries. Despite this volume of sales, at
31 December  2004 Amazon employed  approximately
9000 full-time and part-time employees. 
Vision and strategy
In their 2005 SEC filing, Amazon describe the vision of
their business as to:
Relentlessly focus on customer experience by offering
our customers low prices, convenience, and a wide
selection of merchandise.
The vision is to offer Earth’s biggest selection and to be
Earth’s most customer-centric company. Consider how
these core marketing messages summarising the Amazon
online value proposition are communicated both on-site
and through offline communications.
Of course, achieving customer loyalty and repeat pur-
chases has been key to Amazon’s success. Many dot-coms
failed because they succeeded in achieving awareness, but
not loyalty. Amazon achieved both. In their SEC filing they
stress how they seek to achieve this. They say:
We work to earn repeat purchases by providing easy-to-
use  functionality,  fast  and  reliable fulfillment, timely
customer service, feature rich content, and a trusted
transaction environment. Key features of our websites
include editorial and customer reviews; manufacturer
product information; Web pages tailored to individual
preferences, such as recommendations and notifica-
tions; 1-Click® technology; secure payment systems;
image uploads; searching on our websites as well as the
Internet; browsing; and the ability to view selected inte-
rior pages and citations, and search the entire contents
of many of the books we offer with our ‘Look Inside the
Book’ and ‘Search Inside the Book’ features. Our com-
munity of online customers also creates feature-rich
content, including product reviews, online recommenda-
tion lists, wish lists, buying guides, and wedding and
baby registries.
In practice, as is the practice for many online retailers,
the lowest prices are for the most popular products, with
less popular products commanding higher prices and a
greater margin for Amazon. Free shipping offers are used
to encourage increase in basket size since customers
have to spend over a certain amount to receive free ship-
ping. The level at which free shipping is set is critical to
profitability and Amazon has changed it as competition
has changed and for promotional reasons.
Amazon communicate the fulfilment promise in several
ways including presentation of latest inventory availability
information,  delivery  date  estimates,  and  options  for
expedited delivery, as well as delivery shipment notifica-
tions and update facilities. 
This focus on customer has translated to excellence in
service with the 2004 American Customer Satisfaction
Index giving Amazon.com a score of 88 which was at the
time, the highest customer satisfaction score ever recorded
in any service industry, online or offline. 
Round (2004) notes that Amazon focuses on customer
satisfaction metrics. Each site is closely monitored with
standard  service  availability  monitoring  (for  example,
using Keynote or Mercury Interactive) site availability and
download speed. Interestingly it also monitors per-minute
441
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested