mvc view pdf : Add text to pdf document online Library software component asp.net wpf html mvc 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN47-part1385

site revenue upper/lower bounds – Round describes an
alarm system rather like a power plant where if revenue on
a site falls below $10,000 per minute, alarms go off! There
are also internal performance service-level agreements for
web services where T% of the time, different pages must
return in X seconds.
Competition
In its SEC (2005) filing Amazon describes the environment
for its products and services as ‘intensely competitive’. It
views its main current and potential competitors as: (1)
physical-world retailers, catalogue retailers, publishers,
vendors, distributors and manufacturers of its products,
many of which possess significant brand awareness, sales
volume, and customer bases, and some of which currently
sell, or may sell, products or services through the Internet,
mail order, or direct marketing; (2) other online e-com-
merce sites; (3) a number of indirect competitors, including
media companies, web portals, comparison shopping web
sites, and web search engines, either directly or in collabo-
ration with other retailers; and (4) companies that provide
e-commerce services, including web site development;
third-party fulfilment and customer service. 
Amazon believes the main competitive factors in its
market segments include ‘selection, price, availability, con-
venience,  information,  discovery,  brand  recognition,
personalized services, accessibility, customer service, relia-
bility, speed of fulfillment, ease of use, and ability to adapt
to changing conditions, as well as our customers’ overall
experience and trust in transactions with us and facilitated
by us on behalf of third-party sellers’. 
For services offered to business and individual sellers,
additional competitive factors include the quality of their
services and tools, their ability to generate sales for third
parties they serve, and the speed of  performance for
their services.
From auctions to marketplaces
Amazon auctions (known as ‘zShops’) were launched in
March 1999, in large part as a response to the success of
eBay. They were promoted heavily from the home page,
category pages and individual product pages. Despite
this, a year after its launch it had only achieved a 3.2%
share of the online auction compared to 58% for eBay
and it only declined from this point.
Today, competitive prices of products are available
through third-party sellers in the ‘Amazon Marketplace’
which are integrated within the standard product listings.
The strategy to offer such an auction facility was initially
driven by the need to compete with eBay, but now the
strategy has been adjusted such that Amazon describe it
as part of the approach of low pricing. 
Although it might be thought that Amazon would lose
out on enabling its merchants to sell products at lower
prices, in fact Amazon makes greater margin on these
sales since merchants are charged a commission on each
sale and it is the merchant who bears the cost of storing
inventory and fulfilling the product to customers. As with
eBay, Amazon is just facilitating the exchange of bits and
bytes between buyers and sellers without the need to dis-
tribute physical products.
How ‘the culture of metrics’ started
A common theme in Amazon’s development is the drive to
use a measured approach to all aspects of the business,
beyond the finance. Marcus (2004) describes an occasion
at a corporate ‘boot-camp’ in January 1997 when Amazon
CEO Jeff Bezos ‘saw the light’. ‘At Amazon, we will have a
Culture of Metrics’, he said while addressing his senior
staff. He went on to explain how web-based business
gave Amazon an ‘amazing window into human behavior’.
Marcus says: 
Gone were the fuzzy approximations of focus groups,
the anecdotal fudging and smoke blowing from the mar-
keting department. A company like Amazon could (and
did) record every move a visitor made, every last click
and twitch of the mouse. As the data piled up into virtual
heaps, hummocks and mountain ranges, you could draw
all sorts of conclusions about their chimerical nature, the
consumer. In this sense, Amazon was not merely a store,
but an immense repository of facts. All we needed were
the right equations to plug into them.
James Marcus then goes  on  to give  a  fascinating
insight into a breakout group discussion of how Amazon
could better use measures to improve its performance.
Marcus was in the Bezos group, brainstorming customer-
centric metrics. Marcus (2004) summarises the dialogue,
led by Bezos:
‘First, we figure out which things we’d like to measure
on the site’, he said. ‘For example, let’s say we want a
metric for customer enjoyment. How could we calcu-
late that?’
There was silence. Then somebody ventured: ‘How
much time each customer spends on the site?’
‘Not specific enough’, Jeff said.
‘How about the average number of minutes each cus-
tomer spends on the site per session’, someone else
suggested. ‘If that goes up, they’re having a blast.’
‘But how do we factor in purchase?’ I [Marcus] said
feeling proud of myself. ‘Is that a measure of enjoyment?’
‘I think we need to consider frequency of visits, too’,
said a dark-haired woman I didn’t recognise. ‘Lot of
folks are still accessing the web with those creepy-
crawly modems. Four short visits from them might be
just as good as one visit from a guy with a T-1. Maybe
better.’
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
442
Add text to pdf document online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text box in pdf file; adding text to pdf online
Add text to pdf document online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text box to pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
‘Good point’, Jeff said. ‘And anyway, enjoyment is
just the start. In the end, we should be measuring cus-
tomer ecstasy.’
It is interesting that Amazon was having this debate
about the elements of RFM analysis (described in Chapter
6) in 1997, after already having achieved $16 million of
revenue in the previous year. Of course, this is a minus-
cule amount compared with today’s billions of dollars
turnover. The important point was that this was the start of
a  focus  on  metrics  which  can  be  seen  through  the
description of Matt Round’s work later in this case study.
From human to software-based recommendations
Amazon has  developed internal  tools  to  support  this
‘Culture of Metrics’. Marcus (2004) describes how the
‘Creator Metrics’ tool shows content creators how well
their product listings and product copy are working. For
each  content  editor  such  as  Marcus,  it  retrieves  all
recently posted documents including articles, interviews,
booklists and features. For each one it then gives a con-
version rate to sale plus the number of page views, adds
(added to basket) and repels (content requested, but the
back button then used). In time, the work of editorial
reviewers  such  as  Marcus  was  marginalised  since
Amazon found that the majority of visitors used the search
tools rather than read editorial and they responded to the
personalised recommendations as the matching technol-
ogy  improved  (Marcus  likens  early  recommendations
techniques to ‘going shopping with the village idiot’).
Experimentation and testing at Amazon
The ‘Culture of Metrics’ also led to a test-driven approach
to improving results at Amazon. Matt Round, speaking at
E-metrics 2004 when he was director of personalisation at
Amazon,  describes  the  philosophy  as  ‘Data  Trumps
Intuitions’. He explained how Amazon used to have a lot
of arguments about which content and promotion should
go on the all-important home page or category pages. He
described how every category VP wanted top-centre and
how  the  Friday  meetings  about  placements  for  next
week  were  getting  ‘too  long,  too  loud,  and  lacked
performance data’.
But today ‘automation replaces intuitions’ and real-
time experimentation tests are always run to answer these
questions since actual consumer behaviour is the best
way to decide upon tactics. 
Marcus (2004) also notes that Amazon has a culture of
experiments of  which A/B  tests  are  key  components.
Examples where A/B tests are used include new home
page design, moving features around the page, different
algorithms for recommendations, changing search rele-
vance rankings. These involve testing a new treatment
against a previous control for a limited time of a few days
or a week. The system will randomly show one or more
treatments to visitors and measure a range of parameters
such as units sold and revenue by category (and total),
session time, and session length. The new features will
usually be launched if the desired metrics are statistically
significantly better. Statistical tests are a challenge though
as distributions are not normal (they have a large mass at
zero for example of no purchase). There are other chal-
lenges since multiple A/B tests are running every day and
A/B tests may overlap and so conflict. There are also
longer-term effects where some features are ‘cool’ for the
first two weeks and the opposite effect where changing
navigation may degrade performance temporarily. Amazon
also finds that as its users evolve in their online experience
the way they act online has changed. This means that
Amazon has to constantly test and evolve its features.
Technology
It follows that the Amazon technology infrastructure must
readily support this culture of experimentation and this can
be difficult to achieve with standardised content manage-
ment.  Amazon  has  achieved  its  competitive  advantage
through developing its technology internally and with a signif-
icant investment in this which may not be available to other
organisations without the right focus on the online channels. 
As Amazon explains in SEC (2005), 
using primarily our own proprietary technologies, as well
as  technology  licensed  from  third  parties, we  have
implemented numerous features and functionality that
simplify and improve the customer shopping experience,
enable third parties to sell on our platform, and facilitate
our fulfillment and customer service operations. Our cur-
rent strategy is to focus our development efforts on
continuous innovation by creating and enhancing the
specialized, proprietary software that is unique to our
business, and to license or acquire commercially-devel-
oped technology for other applications where available
and appropriate. We continually invest in several areas of
technology, including our seller platform; A9.com, our
wholly-owned subsidiary focused on search technology
on www.A9.com and other Amazon sites; web services;
and digital initiatives.
Round (2004) describes the technology approach as
‘distributed development and deployment’. Pages such as
the home page have a number of content ‘pods’ or ‘slots’
which call web services for features. This makes it rela-
tively easy to change the content in these pods and even
change the location of the pods on-screen. Amazon uses
a flowable or fluid page design, unlike many sites, which
enables it to make the most of real-estate on-screen.
Technology also supports more standard e-retail facili-
ties. SEC (2005) states: 
443
CASE STUDY 9
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to input text in a pdf; adding text to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text pdf files
We use a set of applications for accepting and validat-
ing customer orders, placing and tracking orders with
suppliers, managing and assigning inventory to cus-
tomer  orders,  and  ensuring  proper  shipment  of
products to customers. Our transaction-processing
systems handle millions of items, a number of different
status  inquiries,  multiple  shipping  addresses,  gift-
wrapping requests, and multiple shipment methods.
These systems allow the customer to choose whether
to receive single or several shipments based on avail-
ability and to track the progress of each order. These
applications also manage the process of accepting,
authorizing, and charging customer credit cards.
Data-driven automation
Round (2004) said that ‘Data is king at Amazon’. He gave
many examples of data-driven automation including cus-
tomer channel preferences, managing the way content is
displayed to different user types such as new releases
and  top-sellers,  merchandising  and  recommendation
(showing  related  products  and  promotions)  and  also
advertising through paid search (automatic ad generation
and bidding).
The automated search advertising and bidding system
for  paid  search  has  had  a  big  impact  at  Amazon.
Sponsored links were initially done by humans, but this was
unsustainable due to the range of products at Amazon. The
automated program generates keywords, writes ad cre-
ative,  determines  best  landing  page,  manages  bids,
measures conversion rates, profit per converted visitor and
updates bids. Again the problem of volume is there: Matt
Round described how the book How to Make Love like a
Porn Star by Jenna Jameson received tens of thousands of
clicks from pornography-related searches, but few actually
purchased the book. So the update cycle must be quick to
avoid large losses.
There is also an automated e-mail measurement and
optimisation system. The campaign calendar used to be
manually managed with relatively weak measurement and
it was costly to schedule and use. A new system:
Automatically optimises content to improve customer
experience;
Avoids sending an e-mail campaign that has low click-
through or high unsubscribe rate;
Includes inbox management (avoid sending multiple
e-mails/week);
Has growing library of automated  e-mail programs
covering new releases and recommendations.
But there are challenges if promotions are too successful
if inventory isn’t available.
Your recommendations
‘Customers Who Bought X … also bought Y’ is Amazon’s
signature feature. Round (2004) describes how Amazon
relies on acquiring and then crunching a massive amount of
data. Every purchase, every page viewed and every search
is recorded. So there are now two new versions: ‘Customers
who shopped for X also shopped for …’, and ‘Customers
who searched for X also bought …’. They  also have a
system codenamed ‘Goldbox’ which is a cross-sell and
awareness raising tool. Items are discounted to encourage
purchases in new categories!
He also describes the challenge of techniques for sifting
patterns from noise (sensitivity filtering) and clothing and
toy catalogues change frequently so recommendations
become out-of-date. The main challenges though are the
massive data size arising from millions of customers, mil-
lions of items and recommendations made in real time. 
Partnership strategy
As Amazon grew, its share price growth enabled partner-
ship or acquisition with a range of companies in different
sectors. Marcus (2004) describes how Amazon partnered
with Drugstore.com (pharmacy), Living.com (furniture),
Pets.com  (pet  supplies),  Wineshopper.com  (wines),
HomeGrocer.com (groceries), Sothebys.com (auctions)
and Kozmo.com (urban home delivery). In most cases,
Amazon purchased an equity stake in these partners, so
that it would share in their prosperity. It also charged them
fees for placements on the Amazon site to promote and
drive traffic to their sites. Similarly, Amazon charged pub-
lishers for prime position to promote books on its site
which caused an initial hue-and-cry, but this abated when
it was realised that paying for prominent placements was
widespread in traditional booksellers and supermarkets.
Many of these new online companies failed in 1999 and
2000, but Amazon had covered the potential for growth
and was not pulled down by these partners, even though
for some such as Pets.com it had an investment of 50%.
Analysts  sometimes  refer  to  ‘Amazoning  a  sector’,
meaning that one company becomes dominant in an online
sector  such  as book retail such that it becomes  very
difficult for others to achieve market share. In addition
to developing, communicating and delivering a very strong
proposition,  Amazon  has  been able to consolidate its
strength  in  different  sectors  through  its  partnership
arrangements and through using technology to facilitate
product promotion and distribution via these partnerships.
The Amazon retail platform enables other retailers to sell
products online using the Amazon user interface and infra-
structure through their ‘Syndicated Stores’ programme. For
example, in the UK, Waterstones (www
.waterstones.co.uk
)
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
444
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
on the client side without additional add-ins and Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document HTML5 Document Viewer Developer Guide. To see
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; add text in pdf file online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to insert text box in pdf document; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
is one of the largest traditional bookstores. It found compe-
tition  with  online  so  expensive  and  challenging,  that
eventually  it entered  a partnership arrangement  where
Amazon markets and distributes its books online in return
for a commission online. Similarly, in the US, the large book
retailer Borders uses the Amazon merchant platform for
distributing its products. Toy retailer Toys’R’Us have a simi-
lar arrangement. Such partnerships help Amazon extend its
reach into the customer-base of other suppliers, and of
course, customers who buy in one category such as books
can be encouraged to purchase into other areas such as
clothing or electronics.
Another form of partnership referred to above is the
Amazon Marketplace which enables Amazon customers
and other retailers to sell their new and used books and
other goods alongside the regular retail listings. A similar
partnership approach is the Amazon ‘Merchants@’ pro-
gramme which enables third-party merchants (typically
larger than those who sell via the Amazon Marketplace) to
sell their products via Amazon. Amazon earns fees either
through fixed fees or sales commissions per unit. This
arrangement can help customers who get a wider choice
of products from a range of suppliers with the convenience
of purchasing them through a single checkout process.
Finally, Amazon has also facilitated formation of partner-
ships  with  smaller  companies  through  its  affiliates
programme. Internet legend records that Jeff Bezos, the
creator of Amazon was chatting to someone at a cocktail
party who wanted to sell books about divorce via her web
site. Subsequently, Amazon.com launched its Associates
Program in July 1996 and it is still going strong. Googling
www
.google.com/sear
ch?q=www
.amazon.com+-
site%3A
www
.amazon.com
for sites that link to the US site,
shows over 4 million pages, many of which will be affiliates.
Amazon does not use an affiliate network which would take
commissions from sale, but thanks to the strength of its
brand has developed its own affiliate programme. Amazon
has  created  tiered  performance-based  incentives  to
encourage affiliates to sell more Amazon products.
Marketing communications
In their SEC filings Amazon states that the aims of their
communications strategy are (unsurprisingly) to:
1 Increase customer traffic to our web sites
2 Create awareness of our products and services
3 Promote repeat purchases
4 Develop  incremental  product  and  service  revenue
opportunities
5 Strengthen and broaden the Amazon.com brand name. 
Amazon also believe that their most effective marketing
communications are a consequence of their focus on
continuously improving the customer experience. This
then creates word-of-mouth promotion which is effective
in  acquiring  new  customers and may also encourage
repeat customer visits. 
As well as this Marcus (2004) describes how Amazon
used the personalisation enabled through technology to
reach out to a difficult-to-reach market which Bezos origi-
nally called ‘the hard middle’. Bezos’s view was that it was
easy to reach 10 people (you called them on the phone) or
the ten million people who bought the most popular prod-
ucts (you placed a superbowl ad), but more difficult to
reach those in between. The search facilities in the search
engine and on the Amazon site, together with its product
recommendation features meant that Amazon could con-
nect its products with the interests of these people.
Online advertising techniques include paid search mar-
keting, interactive ads on portals, e-mail campaigns and
search engine optimisation. These are automated as far
as possible, as described earlier in the case study. As pre-
viously  mentioned,  the  affiliate  programme  is  also
important in driving visitors to Amazon and Amazon offers
a wide range of methods of linking to its site to help
improve  conversion.  For  example,  affiliates  can  use
straight text links leading direct to a product page and
they also offer a range of dynamic banners which feature
different content such as books about Internet marketing
or a search box. 
Amazon also use cooperative advertising arrangements,
better known as ‘contra-deals’ with some vendors and
other third parties. For example, a print advertisement in
2005 for a particular product such as a wireless router with
a free wireless laptop card promotion was to feature a spe-
cific Amazon URL in the ad. In product fulfilment packs,
Amazon may include a leaflet for a non-competing online
company  such  as  Figleaves.com  (lingerie)  or  Expedia
(travel). In return, Amazon leaflets may be included in cus-
tomer communications from the partner brands. 
The  associates  programme  directs  customers  to
Amazon web sites by enabling independent web sites to
make millions of products available to their audiences with
fulfilment performed by Amazon or third parties. Amazon
pays commissions to hundreds of thousands of partici-
pants in the associates programme when their customer
referrals result in product sales.
In addition, they offer everyday free shipping options
worldwide and recently announced Amazon.com Prime in
the US, their first membership programme in which mem-
bers  receive  free  two-day  shipping  and  discounted
overnight shipping. Although marketing expenses do not
include the costs of free shipping or promotional offers,
Amazon views such offers as effective marketing tools.
CASE STUDY 9
445
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add editable text box to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
versions. Users can add sticky note to PDF document. Able to Highlight PDF text. Able to underline PDF text with straight line. Support
how to add text to pdf document; adding text fields to pdf
Questions
1
By referring to the case study, Amazon’s web site for your country and your experience of Amazon offline 
communications evaluate how well Amazon communicates their core proposition and promotional offers.
2
Using the case study, characterise Amazon’s approach to marketing communications.
3
Explain what distinguishes Amazon in its uses of technology for competitive advantage.
4
How does the Amazon ‘culture of metrics’ differ from that in other organisations from your experience.
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
Year Ended December 31
2004 
2003 
2002 
2001 
2000
(in thousands, except per share data)
Net sales
$6,921,124  $5,263,699  $3,932,936  $3,122,433
$2,761,983
Income (loss) before change in accounting principle
588,451
35,282
(149,933)
(556,754) (1,411,273)
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
— 
— 
801 
(10,523)
Net income (loss)
588,451
35,282
(149,132)
(567,277) (1,411,273)
Basic earnings per share (1):
Prior to cumulative effect of change in accounting principal $         1.45
$         0.09
       (0.40) $        (1.53) $        (4.02)
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principal
— 
— 
0.01
(0.03)
Basic earnings per share (1)
$         1.45
$         0.09
       (0.39)  $        (1.56)  $        (4.02)
Diluted earnings per share (1):
Prior to cumulative effect of change in accounting principal $         1.39
$         0.08
       (0.40) $        (1.53) $        (4.02)
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principal
— 
— 
0.01
(0.03)
Diluted earnings per share (1)
$         1.39
$         0.08
       (0.39) $        (1.56) $        (4.02)
Shares used in computation of earnings (loss) per share:
Basic
405,926
395,479
378,363
364,211
350,873
Diluted
424,757
419,352
378,363
364,211
350,873
Balance Sheet and Other Data:
Total assets
$3,248,508
$2,162,033
$1,990,449
$1,637,547
$2,135,169
Long-term debt and other
1,855,319
1,945,439
2,277,305
2,156,133
2,127,464
Sources: Internet Retailer (2003), Marcus (2004), Round (2004), SEC (2005)
Summary
1
A structured measurement programme is necessary to collect measures to assess a web
site’s effectiveness. Action can then be taken to adjust the web site strategy or promo-
tional efforts. A measurement programme involves:
Stage 1: Defining a measurement process.
Stage 2: Defining a metrics framework.
Stage 3: Selecting of tools for data collection, reporting and analysis.
446
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
NET programming language, you may use this PDF Document Add-On for With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
add text to pdf file reader; how to enter text into a pdf form
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text pdf acrobat professional; add text to pdf acrobat
EXERCISES
2
Measures of Internet marketing effectiveness can be categorised as assessing:
Level 1: Business effectiveness – these measure the impact of the web site on the
whole business, and look at financial measures such as revenue and profit and pro-
motion of corporate awareness.
Level 2: Marketing effectiveness – these measure the number of  leads and sales
achieved via the Internet and effect of the Internet on retention rates and other
aspects of the marketing mix such as branding.
Level 3: Internet marketing effectiveness – these measures assess how well the site is
being promoted, and do so by reviewing the popularity of the site and how good it
is at delivering customer needs.
3
The measures of effectiveness referred to above are collected in two main ways –
online and offline – or in combination.
4
Online measures are obtained from a web-server log file or using browser-based tech-
niques. They indicate the number of visitors to a site, which pages they visit, and
where they originated from. These also provide a breakdown of visitors through time
or by country.
5
Offline measures are marketing outcomes such as enquiries or sales that are directly
attributable to the web site. Other measures of the effectiveness are available through
surveying customers using questionnaires, interviews and focus groups.
6
Maintaining a web site requires clear responsibilities to be identified for different
roles. These include the roles of content owners and site developers, and those ensur-
ing that the content conforms with company and legal requirements.
7
To produce a good-quality web site, standards are required to enforce uniformity in
terms of:
site look and feel;
corporate branding;
quality of copy.
Exercises
Self-assessment exercises
1
Why are standards necessary for controlling web site maintenance? What aspects of the site
do standards seek to control?
2
Explain the difference between hits and page impressions. How are these measured?
3
Define and explain the purpose of test and live versions of a web site.
4
Why should content development be distributed through a large organisation?
5
What is the difference between online and offline metrics?
6
How can focus groups and interviews be used to assess web site effectiveness?
7
Explain how a web log file analyser works. What are its limitations?
8
Why is it useful to integrate the collection of online and offline metrics?
447
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text box in pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
adding text to pdf in reader; add text to pdf document in preview
448
Essay and discussion questions
1
‘Corporate standards for a web site’s format and update process are likely to stifle the creative
development of a site and reduce its value to customers.’ Discuss.
2
‘There is little value in the collection of online metrics recorded in a web server log file. For
measurement programmes to be of value, measures based on marketing outcomes are more
valuable.’ Discuss.
3
You have been appointed as manager of a web site for a car manufacturer and have been
asked to refine the existing metrics programme. Explain, in detail, the steps you would take to
develop this programme.
4
The first version of a web site for a financial services company has been live for a year.
Originally it was developed by a team of two people, and was effectively ‘brochureware’. The
second version of the site is intended to contain more detailed information, and will involve
contributions from 10 different product areas. You have been asked to define a procedure for
controlling updates to the site. Write a document detailing the update procedure, which also
explains the reasons for each control.
Examination questions
1
Why are standards necessary to control the process of updating a web site? Give three
examples of different aspects of a web site that need to be controlled.
2
Explain the following terms concerning measurement of web site effectiveness:
(a) hits;
(b) page impressions;
(c) referring pages.
3
Measurement of web sites concerns the recording of key events involving customers using a
web site. Briefly explain five different types of event.
4
Describe and briefly explain the purpose of the different stages involved in updating an
existing document on a commercial web site.
5
Distinguish between a test environment and a live environment for a web site. What is the
reason for having two environments?
6
Give three reasons explaining why a web site may have to integrate with existing marketing
information systems and databases within a company.
7
You have been appointed as manager of a web site and have been asked to develop a metrics
programme. Briefly explain the steps you would take to develop this programme.
8
If a customer can be persuaded to register his or her name and e-mail address with a web site,
how can this information be used for site measurement purposes?
References
Adams, C., Kapashi, N., Neely, A. and Marr, B. (2000) Managing with measures. Measuring
ebusiness performance. Accenture white paper. Survey conducted in conjunction with
Cranfield School of Management.
Agrawal, V., Arjona, V. and Lemmens, R. (2001) E-performance: the path to rational exuber-
ance, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 1, 31–43.
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
Bourne, M., Mills, J., Willcox, M., Neely, A. and Platts, K. (2000) Designing, implementing
and updating performance measurement systems, International Journal of Operations and
Production Management, 20(7), 754–71.
Chaffey, D. (2000) Achieving Internet marketing success, The Marketing Review, 1(1), 35–60.
Cutler, M. and Sterne, J. (2000) E-metrics. Business metrics for the new economy. Netgenesis
white paper.
Friedman, L. and Furey, T. (1999) The Channel Advantage. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Grossnickle, J. and Raskin, O. (2001) The Handbook of Online Marketing Research: Knowing your
Customer Using the Net. McGraw-Hill, New York.
Internet Retailer (2003) The new Wal-Mart? Internet Retailer, Paul Demery. 
Kotler, P. (1997) Marketing Management – Analysis, Planning, Implementation and Control.
Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
Lynch, P. and Horton, S. (1999) Web Style Guide. Basic Design Principles for Creating Web Sites.
Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.
Malhotra, N. (1999) Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle
River, NJ.
Marcus, J. (2004) Amazonia. Five Years at the Epicentre of the Dot-com Juggernaut. The New Press,
New York.
Neely, A., Adams, C. and Kennerley, M. (2002) The Performance Prism. The Scorecard for
Measuring and Managing Business Success. Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
Parsons, A., Zeisser, M. and Waitman, R. (1996) Organizing for digital marketing, McKinsey
Quarterly, No. 4, 183–92.
Petersen, E. (2004) Web Analytics Demystified. Self-published. Available from 
www
.webanalyticsdemystified.com
.
Plant, R. (2000) eCommerce: Formulation of Strategy. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Revolution (2004) Alliance and Leicester banks on e-commerce, by Philip Buxtone, Revolution
(www
.r
evolutionmagazine.com
).
Round, M. (2004) Presentation to E-metrics, London, May 2005. www
.emetrics.or
g
.
SEC (2005) United States Securities and Exchange Commission submission Form 10-K from
Amazon. For the fiscal year ended 31 December, 2004.
Sterne, J. (2001) World Wide Web Marketing, 3rd edn. Wiley, New York.
Sterne, J. (2002) Web Metrics: Proven Methods for Measuring Web Site Success. Wiley, New York.
Wisner, J. and Fawcett, S. (1991) Link firm strategy to operating decisions through perform-
ance measurement, Production and Inventory Management Journal, Third Quarter, 5–11.
Further reading
Berthon, P., Pitt, L. and Watson, R. (1998) The World Wide Web as an industrial marketing
communication tool: models for the identification and assessment of opportunities,
Journal of Marketing Management, 14, 691–704. This is a key paper assessing how to measure
how the Internet supports purchasers through the different stages of the buying decision.
Friedman, L. and Furey, T. (1999) The Channel Advantage. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Chapter 12 is on managing channel performance.
Sterne, J. (2001) World Wide Web Marketing, 3rd edn. Wiley, New York. Chapter 11 is entitled
‘Measuring your success’. It mainly reviews the strengths and weaknesses of online methods.
Web links
ABCe (www
.abce.or
g.uk
). Audited Bureau of Circulation is standard for magazines in the
UK. This is the electronic auditing part. Useful for definitions and examples of traffic for
UK organisations.
E-consultancy (www
.e-consultancy
.com
) site has a section on web analytics including
buyers’ guides to the tools available.
WEB LINKS
449
E-metrics (www
.emetrics.or
g
). Jim Sterne’s site has many resources for online marketing
metrics.
Web Analytics Association (WAA, www
.webanalyticsassociation.or
g
). The site of the trade
association for web analytics has useful definitions, articles and forums on this topic.
Web Analytics Demystified (www
.webanalyticsdemystified.com
). A site to support Eric
Petersen’s books with a range of content.
CHAPTER 9 · MAINTAINING AND MONITORING THE ONLINE PRESENCE
450
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Understand the potential of online business-to-consumer markets
Identify the key uses of the Internet within a business-to-consumer
context
Identify Internet retail formats and understand the implications of
business models applied to the Internet by retail organisations
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
Who are the online customers?
What are customer expectations of web-based service delivery?
Which factors affect demand for online business-to-consumer
services?
What services can be provided online?
What are the key considerations when developing an e-retail
strategy?
Links to other chapters
This chapter builds on concepts and frameworks introduced earlier in
the book. The main related chapters are as follows:
 Chapter 4, which introduces strategic approaches to exploiting the
Internet
Chapter 6, which examines customer relationship management
issues
Chapter 7, which provides an introduction to the characteristics of
Internet consumer behaviour
Chapter 8, covering issues relating to successful site development
and operations
 Chapter 11, covering inbound retail logistics and the supply-side of
operations in reseller markets
10
Main topics
Online customers s 453
E-retailing 462
E-retail activities s 467
Implications for e-retail
marketing strategy 472
Case study 10
lastminute.com: establishing   and
maintaining a competitive position
478
Chapter at a glance
Business-to-consumer
Internet marketing
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested