mvc view pdf : Adding text to pdf software application cloud windows winforms wpf class 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN5-part1388

the Internet should be used to encourage two-way communications, which may be
extensions of the direct-response approach. For example, FMCG suppliers such as Nestlé
(www
.nescafe.co.uk
) use their web site as a method of generating interaction by provid-
ing incentives such as competitions and sales promotions to encourage the customer to
respond with their names, addresses and profile information such as age and sex.
Hoffman and Novak (1997) believe that digital media represent such a shift in the
model of communication that it is a new model or paradigm for marketing communica-
tions. They suggest that the facilities of the Internet represent a computer-mediated
environment in which the interactions are not between the sender and receiver of infor-
mation, but with the medium itself. They say:
consumers can interact with the medium, firms can provide content to the medium, and in
the most radical departure from traditional marketing environments, consumers can pro-
vide commercially-oriented content to the media.
It has taken ten years of the growth in use of individual recommendations, auction
sites, community sites and more recently blogs and podcasts for the full extent of this
shift to become apparent. In 2005, a Business Week cover feature article referred to the
‘Power of us’ to explain this change and showed that although relatively few consumers
are creating blogs (low single-figure percentages), a large proportion of Internet users are
accessing them.
2 Intelligence
The Internet can be used as a relatively low-cost method of collecting marketing
research, particularly about customer perceptions of products and services. In the com-
petitions referred to above, Nestlé are able to profile their customers’ characteristics on
the basis of questionnaire response. 
A wealth of marketing research information is also available from the web site itself.
Marketers use the web analytics approaches described in Chapter 9 to build their knowl-
edge of customer preferences and behaviour according to the types of sites and content
which they consume when online. Every time a web site visitor downloads content, this
is recorded and analysed as ‘site statistics’ as described in Chapter 9 in order to build up
a picture of how consumers interact with the site.
3 Individualisation
Another important feature of the interactive marketing communications is that they can
be tailored to the individual (Figure 1.11(b)) at relatively low costs, unlike in traditional
media where the same message tends to be broadcast to everyone (Figure 1.11(a)).
Importantly, this individualisation can be based on the intelligence collected about site
visitors and then stored in a database and subsequently used to target and personalise
communications to customers to achieve relevance in all media. The process of tailoring
is also referred to as personalisation – Amazon is the most widely known example where
the customer is greeted by name on the web site and receives recommendations on site
and in their e-mails based on previous purchases. This ability to deliver ‘sense and
respond communications’ is another key feature of Internet marketing.
Another example of personalisation is that achieved by business-to-business e-tailer
RS Components (www
.rswww
.com
). Every customer who accesses their system is pro-
filed according to their area of product interest and information describing their role in
the buying unit. When they next visit the site information will be displayed relevant to
their product interest, for example office products and promotions if this is what was
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
22
Podcasts
Individuals and
organisations post
online media (audio
and video) which can be
viewed in the
appropriate players
including the iPod
which first sparked the
growth in this
technique.
Web analytics
Techniques used to
assess and improve the
contribution of 
e-marketing to a
business, including
reviewing traffic
volume, referrals,
clickstreams, online
reach data, customer
satisfaction surveys,
leads and sales.
Personalisation
Delivering
individualised content
through web pages or
e-mail.
Sense and respond
communications
Customer behaviour is
monitored at an
individual level and the
marketer responds
with communications
tailored to the
individual’s need.
Adding text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in a pdf document; acrobat add text to pdf
Adding text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf form; how to add text field to pdf
23
HOW DO INTERNET MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIFFER FROM TRADITIONAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS? 
selected. This is an example of what is known as mass customisation where generic cus-
tomer information is supplied for particular segments, i.e. the information is not unique
to individuals, but is relevant to those with a common interest. Personalisation and
mass customisation concepts are explored further in Chapter 6.
4 Integration
The Internet provides further scope for integrated marketing communications. Figure
1.12 shows the role of the Internet in multi-channel marketing. When assessing the
marketing effectiveness of a web site, the role of the Internet in communicating with
customers and other partners can best be considered from two perspectives. First, there
is outbound Internet-based communications from organisation to customer. We need to ask
how does the Internet complement other channels in communicating the proposition
for the company’s products and services to new and existing customers with a view to
generating new leads and retaining existing customers? Second, inbound Internet-based
communications customer to organisation: how can the Internet complement other chan-
nels to deliver customer service to these customers? Many companies have now
integrated e-mail response and web site callback into their existing call-centre or cus-
tomer service operation. 
Mass customisation
Delivering customised
content to groups of
users through web
pages or e-mail.
Figure 1.11 Summary of degree of individualisation for: (a) traditional media (same
message), (b) new media (unique messages and more information exchange between
customers)
Company
Customer
Customer
Customer
Customer
Customer
Customer
Same message
to all customers
(or customers in
each segment)
Different messages
to each customer
(or customers in
micro-segment)
(a)
Company
(b)
Outbound Internet-
based
communications
The web site and 
e-mail marketing are
used to send
personalised
communications to
customers.
Inbound Internet-
based
communications
Customers enquire
through web-based
form and e-mail.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text block to pdf; how to add text to a pdf in reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding text fields to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
24
Some practical examples of how the Internet can be used as an integrated communi-
cations tool as part of supporting a multi-channel customer journey (Figure 1.13) are the
following:
The Internet can be used as a direct-response tool, enabling customers to respond to
offers and promotions publicised in other media.
The web site can have a direct response or callback facility built into it. The
Automobile Association has a feature where a customer service representative will
contact a customer by phone when the customer fills in their name, phone number
and a suitable time to ring.
The Internet can be used to support the buying decision even if the purchase does not
occur via the web site. For example, Dell has a prominent web-specific phone number
on their web site that encourages customers to ring a representative in the call centre
to place their order. This has the benefits that Dell is less likely to lose the business of
customers who are anxious about the security of online ordering and Dell can track
sales that result partly from the web site according to the number of callers on this
line. Considering how a customer changes from one channel to another during the
buying process, this is referred to as mixed-mode buying. It is a key aspect of devising
online marketing communications since the customer should be supported in chang-
ing from one channel to another.
Customer information delivered on the web site must be integrated with other data-
bases of customer and order information such as those accessed via staff in the call
centre to provide what Seybold (1999) calls a ‘360 degree view of the customer’.
The  Internet  can  be  used  to  support  customer  service.  For  example  easyJet 
(www
.easyjet.com
), which receives over half its orders electronically, encourages users
to check a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) compiled from previous customer
enquiries before contacting customer support by phone.
Figure 1.12 Channel requiring integration as part of integrated e-marketing strategy
Intermediary
E-mail
Phone
Mail
Person
Web
Customer
Company
Mixed-mode buying
The process by which a
customer changes
between online and
offline channels during
the buying process.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text field to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
5 Industry restructuring
Disintermediation and reintermediation are key concepts of industry restructuring that
should be considered by any company developing an e-marketing strategy and are
explored in more detail in Chapters 2, 4 and 5.
For the marketer defining their company’s communications strategy it becomes very
important to consider the company’s representation on these intermediary sites by answer-
ing questions such as ‘Which intermediaries should we be represented on?’ and ‘How do
our offerings compare to those of competitors in terms of features, benefits and price?’.
6 Independence of location
Electronic media also introduce the possibility of increasing the reach of company com-
munications to the global market. This gives opportunities to sell into international
markets that may not have been previously possible. The Internet makes it possible to
25
HOW DO INTERNET MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIFFER FROM TRADITIONAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS? 
Figure 1.13 The role of mixed-mode buying in Internet marketing
Product
evaluation
Decision to
purchase
Online
Offline
Mail,
fax,
phone,
person
Fulfilment
Specify
purchase
Payment
Product
evaluation
Decision to
purchase
Fulfilment
(digital)
Specify
purchase
Payment
1
2
5
3
4
Activity 1.3
Integrating online and offline communications
Purpose
To highlight differences in marketing communications introduced through the use of the
Internet as a channel and the need to integrate these communications with existing channels.
Activity
List communications between a PC vendor and a home customer over the lifetime of a product
such as a PC. Include communications using both the Internet and traditional media. Refer to
channel-swapping alternatives in the buying decision in Figure 1.13 to develop your answer.
Disintermediation
The removal of
intermediaries such as
distributors or brokers
that formerly linked a
company to its
customers.
Reintermediation
The creation of new
intermediaries between
customers and
suppliers providing
services such as
supplier search and
product evaluation.
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB.NET. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to add a text box in a pdf file
sell to a country without a local sales or customer service force (although this may still
be necessary for some products). In such situations and with the restructuring in con-
junction with disintermediation and reintermediation, strategists also need to carefully
consider channel conflicts that may arise. If a customer is buying direct from a company
in another country rather than via the agent, this will marginalise the business of the
local agent who may want some recompense for sales efforts or may look for a partner-
ship with competitors.
Kiani (1998) has presented a useful perspective to differences between the old and
new media, which are shown as a summary to this section in Table 1.2.
Marketers require a basic understanding of Internet technology in order to discuss the
implementation of e-marketing with suppliers such as digital marketing agencies and
with the internal IT team. In the final section of this chapter we provide a brief intro-
duction to the technology, with which many readers will already be familiar. The
Internet has existed since the late 1960s when a limited number of computers were con-
nected for military and research purposes in the United States to form the ARPAnet. 
Why then has the Internet only recently been widely adopted for business purposes?
The recent dramatic growth in the use of the Internet has occurred because of the devel-
opment of the World Wide Web. This became a commercial proposition in 1993 after
development of the original concept by Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist working at
CERN in Switzerland in 1989. The World Wide Web changed the Internet from a diffi-
cult-to-use tool for academics and technicians to an easy-to-use tool for finding
information for businesses and consumers. The World Wide Web is an interlinked
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
26
Table 1.2 An interpretation of the differences between the old and digital media
Old media
Digital media
Comment
One-to-many communication
One-to-one or many-to-many
Hoffman and Novak (1996) state that 
model 
communication model
theoretically the Internet is a many-to-many 
medium, but for company-to-customer
organisation(s) communications it is best
considered as one-to-one or one-to-many
Mass-marketing push model
Individualised marketing or
Personalisation possible because of
mass customisation. 
technology to monitor preferences and tailor
Pull model for web marketing
content (Deighton, 1996)
Monologue
Dialogue
Indicates the interactive nature of the World
Wide Web, with the facility for feedback
Branding
Communication
Increased involvement of customer in 
defining brand characteristics. Opportunities
for adding value to brand
Supply-side thinking
Demand-side thinking
Customer pull becomes more important
Customer as a target
Customer as a partner
Customer has more input into products and
services required
Segmentation
Communities
Aggregations of like-minded consumers
rather than arbitrarily defined target segments
Source: After Kiani (1998)
Internet
The physical network
that links computers
across the globe. It
consists of the
infrastructure of
network servers and
communication links
between them that are
used to hold and
transport the vast
amount of information
on the Internet.
A short introduction to Internet technology
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
add text pdf; adding text to a pdf form
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text box to pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
publishing medium for displaying graphic and text information. This information is
stored on web server computers and then accessed by users who run web browser pro-
grams such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Apple Safari or Mozilla Firefox which display
the information and allow users to select links to access other web sites.
Promoting web site addresses is important to marketing communications. The techni-
cal name for web addresses is uniform or universal resource locators (URLs). URLs can be
thought of as a standard method of addressing similar to postal codes that make it
straightforward to find the name of a site.
Web addresses are structured in a standard way as follows:
http://www
.domain-name.extension/filename.html
The domain name refers to the name of the web server and is usually selected to be
the same as the name of the company, and the extension will indicate its type. The
extension is also commonly known as the global top-level domain (gTLD). Note that
gTLDs are currently under discussion and there are proposals for adding new types such
as .store and .firm.
Common gTLDs are:
.com represents an international or American company such as www
.travelocity
.com
.
.co.uk represents a company based in the UK such as www
.thomascook.co.uk
.
.ac.uk is a UK-based university (e.g.www
.derby
.ac.uk
).
.org.uk and .org are not-for-profit organisations (e.g. www
.gr
eenpeace.or
g
).
.net is a network provider such as www
.demon.net
.
The ‘filename.html’ part of the web address refers to an individual web page, for exam-
ple ‘products.html’ for a web page summarising a company’s products. When a web
address is typed in without a filename, for example www
.bt.com
, the browser automati-
cally assumes the user is looking for the home page, which by convention is referred to as
index.html. When creating sites, it is therefore vital to name the home page index.html
(or an equivalent). The file index.html can also be placed in sub-directories to ease access
to  information.  For  example,  to  access  a  support  page  a  customer  would  type
www
.bt.com/suppor
t
rather than www
.bt.com/suppor
t/index.htm
. In offline communica-
tions sub-directories are publicised as part of a company’s URL strategy (see Chapter 8).
How does the Internet work?
The Internet enables communication between millions of connected computers world-
wide. Information is transmitted from client PCs whose users request services from
server computers that hold information and host business applications that deliver the
services in response to requests. Thus, the Internet is a large-scale client–server system.
The client PCs within homes and businesses are connected to the Internet via local
Internet service providers (ISPs) which, in turn, are linked to larger ISPs with connection
to the major national and international infrastructure or backbones.
Infrastructure components of the Internet
Figure 1.14 shows the process by which web browsers communicate with web servers. A
request from the client PC is executed when the user types in a web address, clicks on a
hyperlink or fills in an online form such as a search. This request is then sent to the ISP
and routed across the Internet to the destination server. The server then returns the
requested web page if it is a static (fixed) web page, or if it requires reference to a database,
27
A SHORT INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET TECHNOLOGY
World Wide Web
The World Wide Web is
a medium for
publishing information
and providing services
on the Internet. It is
accessed through web
browsers, which display
site content on different
web pages. The content
making up web sites is
stored on web servers.
Web servers
Web servers are used
to store the web pages
accessed by web
browsers. They may
also contain databases
of customer or product
information, which can
be queried and
retrieved using a
browser.
Web browsers
Browsers such as
Mozilla Firefox and
Microsoft Internet
Explorer provide an easy
method of accessing and
viewing information
stored as HTML web
documents on different
web servers.
Uniform (universal)
resource locator
(URL)
A web address used to
locate a web page on a
web server.
Client–server
The client–server
architecture consists of
client computers such
as PCs sharing
resources such as a
database stored on a
more powerful server
computer.
Internet service
provider (ISP)
A provider enabling
home or business
users a connection to
access the Internet.
They can also host
web-based
applications.
Backbones
High-speed
communications links
used to enable Internet
communications across
a country and
internationally.
Static web page
A page on the web
server that is invariant.
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
28
such as a request for product information, it will pass the query on to a database server
and will then return this to the customer as a dynamically created web page. Information
on all file requests such as images and pages is stored in a transaction log file which
records the page requested, the time it was made and the source of the enquiry. This
information can be analysed using a log file analyser along with different browser-based
web analytics techniques to assess the success of the web site as explained in Chapter 9.
Web page standards
The information, graphics and interactive elements that make up the web pages of a site
are collectively referred to as content. Different standards exist for text, graphics and
multimedia. The saying ‘content is king’ is still applied to the World Wide Web, since
the content quality will determine the experience of the customer and whether they will
return to that web site in the future.
Text information – HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)
Web page text has many of the formatting options available in a word processor. These
include applying fonts, emphasis (bold, italic, underline) and placing information in
tables. Formatting is possible since the web browser applies these formats according to
instructions that are contained in the file that makes up the web page. This is usually
written in HTML or Hypertext Markup Language. HTML is an international standard
established by the World Wide Web Consortium (published at www
.w3.or
g
) and
intended to ensure that any web page written according to the definitions in the stan-
dard will appear the same in any web browser.
A simple example of HTML is given for a simplified home page for a B2B company in
Figure 1.15. The HTML code used to construct pages has codes or instruction tags such
as <TITLE> to indicate to the browser what is displayed. The <TITLE> tag indicates what
appears at the top of the web browser window. Each starting tag has a corresponding
end tag, usually marked by a ‘/’, for example <B>plastics</B> to embolden ‘plastics’.
Dynamic web page
A page that is created
in real time, often with
reference to a database
query, in response to a
user request.
Transaction log file
A web server file that
records all page
requests.
Log file analyser
Software to summarise
and report the
information in the
transaction log file.
Figure 1.14 Information exchange between a web browser and a web server
Client PC running
web browser
User requests page
http ‘get’ communication
http ‘send’ communication
Server returns
page requested
Database and
applications
servers
Server running
web server
software
HTML and
graphics files
Transaction
log file
‘The Internet’
ISP
ISP
Content
Content is the design,
text and graphical
information that forms
a web page. Good
content is the key to
attracting customers to
a web site and retaining
their interest or
achieving repeat visits.
HTML (Hypertext
Markup Language)
A standard format used
to define the text and
layout of web pages.
HTML files usually have
the extension .HTML or
.HTM.
29
A SHORT INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET TECHNOLOGY
Text information and data – XML (Extensible Markup Language)
When the early version of HTML was designed by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN, he based it
on the existing standard for representation of documents. This standard was SGML, the
Standard Generalised Markup Language which was ratified by the ISO in 1986. SGML
uses tags to identify the different elements of a document such as title and chapters.
HTML used a similar approach, for example the tag for title is <TITLE>. While HTML
proved powerful in providing a standard method of displaying information that was
easy to learn, it was purely presentational. It lacked the ability to describe the data on
web pages. A metadata language providing data about data contained within pages
would be much more powerful. These weaknesses have been acknowledged, and in an
effort coordinated by the World Wide Web Consortium, the first XML or eXtensible
Markup Language was produced in February 1998. This is also based on SGML. The key
word describing XML is ‘extensible’. This means that new markup tags can be created
that facilitate the searching and exchange of information. For example, product infor-
mation on a web page could use the XML tags <NAME>, <DESCRIPTION>, <COLOUR>
and <PRICE>. The tags can effectively act as a standard set of database field descriptions
so that data can be exchanged through B2B exchanges.
The importance of XML for data integration is indicated by its incorporation by
Microsoft into its BizTalk server for B2B integration and the creation of the ebXML (elec-
tronic business XML) standard by their rival Sun Microsystems. 
Figure 1.15 Home page index.html for The B2B Company in a web browser showing
HTML source in text editor
Metadata
Literally, data about
data – a format
describing the
structure and content
of data.
XML or eXtensible
Markup Language
A standard for
transferring structured
data, unlike HTML
which is purely
presentational.
Graphical images (GIF, JPEG and PNG files)
Graphics produced by graphic designers or captured using digital cameras can be readily
incorporated into web pages as images. GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) and JPEG
(Joint Photographics Experts Group) refer to two standard file formats most commonly
used to present images on web pages. GIF files are limited to 256 colours and are best
used for small simple graphics, such as banner adverts, while JPEG is best used for larger
images where image quality is important, such as photographs. Both formats use image
compression technology to minimise the size of downloaded files. Portable Network
Graphics is a patent and licence-free standard file format approved by the World Wide
Web Consortium to replace the GIF file format. 
Animated graphical information (GIFs and plug-ins)
GIF files can also be used for interactive banner adverts. Plug-ins are additional pro-
grams, sometimes referred to as ‘helper applications’, and work in association with the
web browser to provide features not present in the basic web browser. The best-known
plug-ins are probably that for Adobe Acrobat which is used to display documents in .pdf
format (www
.adobe.com
) and the Macromedia Flash and Shockwave products for pro-
ducing interactive graphics (www
.macr
omedia.com
).
Audio and video standards
Traditionally sound and video or ‘rich media’ have been stored as the Microsoft stan-
dards .WMA and .AVI. Alternative standards are MP3 and MPEG. These formats are used
on some web sites, but they are less appropriate for sites such as that of the BBC
(www
.bbc.co.uk
), since the user would have to wait for the whole clip to download
before hearing or viewing it. Streaming media are now used for many multimedia sites
since they enable video or audio to start playing within a few seconds – it is not neces-
sary for the whole file to be downloaded before it can be played. Formats for streaming
media have been established by Real Networks (www
.r
ealnetworks.com
).
Internet-access software applications
Over its lifetime, many tools have been developed to help find, send and receive infor-
mation across the Internet. Web browsers used to access the World Wide Web are the
latest of these applications. These tools are summarised in Table 1.3. In this section we
will briefly discuss the relevance of some of the more commonly used tools to the
modern organisation. The other tools have either been superseded by the use of the
World Wide Web or are of less relevance from a business perspective.
The application of the Internet for marketing in this book concentrates on the use of
e-mail and the World Wide Web since these tools are now most commonly used by busi-
nesses for digital marketing. Many of the other tools such as IRC and newsgroups, which
formerly needed special software to access them, are now available from the WWW.
Web 2.0
Since 2004, the Web 2.0 concept has increased in prominence amongst web site owners
and developers. The main technologies and principles of Web 2.0 have been explained
in an influential article by Tim O’Reilly (O’Reilly, 2005). It is important to realise that
Web 2.0 isn’t a new web standard or a ‘paradigm shift’ as the name implies, rather it’s an
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
30
GIF (Graphics
Interchange
Format)
A graphics format and
compression algorithm
best used for simple
graphics.
JPEG (Joint
Photographics
Experts Group)
A graphics format and
compression algorithm
best used for
photographs.
Plug-in
An add-on program to a
web browser providing
extra functionality such
as animation.
Streaming media
Sound and video that
can be experienced
within a web browser
before the whole clip is
downloaded.
Web 2.0 concept
A collection of web
services that facilitate
certain behaviours
online such as
community
participation and
user-generated
content, rating and
tagging.
31
A SHORT INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET TECHNOLOGY
evolution of technologies and communications approaches which have grown in impor-
tance since 2004–5. The main characteristics of Web 2.0 are that it typically involves:
Web  services  or  interactive  applications  hosted  on  the  web  such  as  Flickr
(www
.flickr
.com
), Google Maps™ (http://maps.google.com
) or blogging services such as
Blogger.com or Typepad (www
.typepad.com
);
Supporting participation – many of the applications are based on altruistic principles
of community participation;
Encouraging creation of user-generated content – blogs are the best example of this.
Another example is the collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia (www
.wikipedia.com
);
Enabling  rating  of  content  and  online  services  –  services  such  as  delicious
(http://del.icio.us
) and traceback comments on blogs support this. These services are
useful given the millions of blogs that are available – rating and tagging (categorising)
content help indicate the relevance and quality of the content;
Ad funding of neutral sites – web services such as Google Mail/GMail™ and many
blogs  are  based  on  contextual  advertising  such  as  Google  Adsense™  or
Overture/Yahoo! Content Match;
Data exchange between sites through XML-based data standards. RSS is based on
XML, but has relatively little semantic markup to describe the content. An attempt by
Google to facilitate this which illustrates the principle of structured information
exchange and searching is Google Base™ (http://base.google.com
). This allows users to
Table 1.3 Applications of different Internet tools
Internet tool
Summary
Electronic mail or e-mail
Sending messages or documents, such as news about a new product or sales 
promotion between individuals
Internet Relay Chat (IRC),
These are synchronous communications tools for text-based ‘chat’ between different
Instant Messaging (IM)
users who are logged on at the same time. IM from providers such as AOL, Yahoo! 
and MSN has largely replaced IRC and provides opportunities for advertising to users
Usenet newsgroups
Forums to discuss a particular topic such as a sport, hobby or business area.
Traditionally accessed by special newsreader software, but can now be accessed via
a web browser from www
.deja.com
(now part of Google – www
.google.com
)
FTP file transfer
The File Transfer Protocol is used as a standard for moving files across the Internet.
FTP is still used for marketing applications such as downloading files such as 
product price lists or specifications. Also used to upload HTML files to web servers
Gophers, Archie and WAIS
These tools were important before the advent of the web for storing and searching
documents on the Internet. They have largely been superseded by the web which
provides better searching and more sophisticated document publishing
Telnet
This allows remote access to computer systems. For example, a retailer could check
to see whether an item was in stock in a warehouse using a telnet application
Blogs
Web-based publishing of regularly updated information in an online diary type format
using tools such as Blogger.com or Typepad
Really Simple Syndication (RSS)
An XML-based content distribution format commonly used for accessing blog 
information
Podcasting
A method of downloading and playing audio or visual clips for portable devices such
as the iPod or MP3 players or fixed devices
World Wide Web
Widely used for publishing information and running business applications over the
Internet, accessed through browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari 
and Opera
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested