mvc view pdf : Add text box in pdf software application cloud windows winforms wpf class 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN50-part1389

The impact of an increasing number of consumers and businesses accepting the Internet
and other forms of digital media as a stable channel to market is an increase in customer
expectations, which creates competitive pressures and challenges for e-retailers. In part,
this has been caused by new market entrants that have established their market position
by, say, offering very wide and deep product choice, dynamic demand-driven pricing or
instantaneous real-time purchase and delivery. 
The growth in spending is amply demonstrated in Table 10.5.
As a result, due to advances such as speed and interactivity brought about by digital
technologies and the extension of trading time, customer expectations of levels of serv-
ice have risen significantly. Therefore organisations are required to adopt a more
dynamic and flexible approach to dealing with these raised expectations.
Allegra Strategies (2005) identified a number of performance gaps and Table 10.6 pres-
ents some of the most significant gaps and the managerial implications.
For the e-retailers it is important to identify any performance gaps and develop strate-
gies which help to close the gaps. For example, in the case of logistics, research has found
that utilising carriers (road haulage, air freight) that have higher levels of positive con-
sumer awareness with appropriate online strategies (i.e. offering a choice of carriers) can
contribute to the consumer’s willingness to buy and overall satisfaction with the online
buying experience. Therefore, development of strong awareness and brand image among
consumers can prove to be a beneficial strategy for both the e-retailer and the carrier, since
consumers have traditionally carried out the home delivery function themselves (i.e. shop-
ping in ‘brick and mortar’ retail stores). Of course, this in itself raises the expectations of
the care taken by the delivery agent, which has the implication of having to introduce
better handling of goods as well as the speed with which the goods need to be delivered
(Esper et al., 2003). A further consideration is that the retailer and the chosen carrier need
to be able jointly to satisfy the consumer so that they may benefit from co-branding. 
How the online consumer accesses the retailers’ goods has given rise to various for-
mats (discussed earlier in the chapter) and distribution strategies but this only forms part
of the retailers e-strategy. Nicholls and Watson (2005) discuss the importance of creating
e-value in order to develop profitable and long-term strategies and agree that logistics
and fulfilment is a core element of online value creation but at two other important
platforms: firm structure, and marketing and sales. 
Firm structure can be used strategically depending on organisational capabilities and
technology infrastructure. Porter (2001) described the emergence of integration and the
potential impact on e-value chains. Integration can ensure faster decision making, more
flexibility and attract suitable e-management specialists and capital investment (Nicholls
and Watson, 2005). In the case of the UK grocery sector, larger retails have adopted dif-
ferent approaches towards structuring their online operations: Tesco serves 95% of the
CHAPTER 10 · BUSINESS-TO-CONSUMER INTERNET MARKETING
472
Implications for e-retail marketing strategy
Table 10.5 Growth in online buyers and their spend
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005F
2006F
Online shopping spend (£ million) 4,055
7,124
10,210
12,614 15,692
18,568
21,444
Online shopping buyers (millions)
5
8
11
14
17
20
23
Source: Allegra Strategies Forecasts/Euromonitor/APACS/ONS/IMRG
Add text box in pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf file; adding a text field to a pdf
Add text box in pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to a pdf document; how to insert text in pdf reader
UK population by using a store-based model whereas ASDA, which offers less product
lines, has based its model on the classical warehouse model. However, it is equally
important to remember that the lack of a suitable infrastructure can be limiting in how
the technology can be used (see Chapter 11). 
Marketing and sales can be used in customer-centric value creation strategies in the
form of interactive marketing communications strategies (see Chapter 4 for a detailed
discussion) and revenue streams. Indeed according to Dennis et al. (2004), there are four
revenue stream business models, which in turn are based on advertising, merchandising
and sales, transaction fees and subscriptions. 
Strategic implications for retailers wishing to be successful online are far reaching and
require a retailer to develop a carefully informed strategy, which is guided by a business
model that can satisfy corporate objectives through the deriving value from corporate
capabilities whilst effectively meeting the expectations of the online consumer. The
target market and the product category can have a significant influence on success. Now
read Mini Case Study 10.5 and consider the offline impact of online marketing.
IMPLICATIONS FOR E-RETAIL MARKETING STRATEGY
473
Table 10.6 Performance gaps and managerial implications 
Performance gap
Commentary
Managerial implications
The disparity between 
The gap between Internet use and the 
Companies need to develop web sites to 
consumer expectations 
lack of web site development means 
capture this behaviour
and web site offer
there is still the potential to capture 
A failure to do so will result in lost sales as 
browse and buy behaviour
consumers browse and/or buy elsewhere
i.e. the effect is both ‘on’ and ‘off’ line
The disparity between brand 
Retailer brand strength is frequently not 
The first ‘dot-com’ wave was concerned 
strength offline vs online
reflected online. This may dilute current 
with establishing first mover advantage. 
brand perception and leaves an opening 
This second wave is concerned with 
for competitors to establish a stronger 
‘bricks and mortar’ retailers establishing 
online brand presence even if they are 
their brand strengths online i.e. a ‘brand’ 
weaker ‘offline’
wave
Any lack of investment will deliver mind
share advantages to competitors even if
they have a lesser brand. In this second
wave it will be difficult to recover a 
competitive position once any brand
advantage has been lost 
A lack of alignment between 
The most advanced entrants are from 
The market is still at an early stage in many 
the nature of the online 
overseas or national catalogue 
retail categories. There remains a potential 
competitive environment 
companies, the larger retailers (to a 
competitive advantage for a ‘bricks and 
and the maturity of 
variable extent) and specialist niche 
mortar’ retailer to ‘grab this window of 
consumer demand
companies
opportunity’
Inertia in decision-making
There is a ‘battle for budgets’ within 
Barriers to customer contact need to be 
retailers i.e. retrench and invest in core 
removed. Budgetary constraints are 
business at the expense of new channels
misaligned where the cost of doing 
Some retail cultures run counter to 
nothing means lost opportunity at best and
non-traditional means of ‘doing business’
and at worst lost competitive advantage
The maturing outsourcing market may
unblock the cost-benefit perception
Source: Allegra Strategies (2005)
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Add Text Box. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Add Text Box. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET.
adding text to a pdf document; add text to pdf document in preview
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
add text to pdf reader; how to add text fields to a pdf document
474
Increasingly, companies are keen to understand the effect and impact of their promotional spend and par-
ticulary how different marketing communication tools perform. As with broadcast media advertising, it can
be difficult to assess the impact of Internet marketing initiatives on offline sales. Traditionally, in the retail
sector, it is not common practice to track the reasons why consumers arrive in a particular store to make
their purchase. However according to Hewitt (2004) the Internet is ‘not just a great promotion vehicle, it’s
also the tracking source that enables us to close the loop and see what happened after the visitor left the
Web site and went shopping’. He suggests several ways in which retailers might use the Internet to follow
their customers’ offline purchasing behaviour. Tactics to gather information include the following. 
Pre-purchase Internet surveys 
Certain products and services are ideal for selling online; books, travel and entertainment tickets, and finan-
cial services whereas other products such as cars, consumer electronics and clothing are researched but
not often purchased online. AOL conducted a series of surveys of 1,004 people who had purchased TVs
within the last six months and 521 people who intended to buy a TV within the next six months to find the
differing types of media such consumers employed to find information to inform their purchasing decision
(see Figure 10.5). The surveys revealed that in-store displays (58%) and past experience/previous owner-
ship (48%) are the most important sources of TV purchase decision making, while retailer flyers (13%) and
online (12%) are ranked by TV purchasers as the most important media sources for new TV information.
This kind of survey is useful as it provides an indication of the effectiveness of online promotion. It
also suggests that it is necessary to link online promotion with in-store promotion, especially if retailers
are solely using the Internet as a marketing communication channel 
Mini Case Study 10.5
The offline impact of online marketing
CHAPTER 10 · BUSINESS-TO-CONSUMER INTERNET MARKETING
Figure 10.5 Sources of information for new TV purchases
Source: Hewitt, D. (2004) ‘You CAN Tell How You’re Selling Offline’ from http://www.imediaconnection.com/
content/2892.asp, March 01, 2004
None of the above
4%
Other
22%
Radio 0%
TV commercial
6%
Magazines
6%
Newspapers
8%
Product brochure
10%
Online info. (Internet)
12%
Media sources
Key
Non-media sources
Retailer flyer
13%
Friends/Family/Word of mouth
33%
Store/salesperson
38%
In-store display
58%
Past experience/previous ownership
48%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
installed. Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to insert pdf into email text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to insert text in pdf file
475
Online coupon redemption
This technique is often used in the early adoption stages of the Internet as a marketing communication.
The online advertiser incorporates/promotes a discount coupon via e-mail (or web site) and requests the
customer print out a voucher and then take it to a participating store in order to redeem the discount
(e.g. see Figure 10.6 concerning McArthur Glen Designer Outlets). On redemption of the printed voucher
the retailer is able to analyse the impact of the online promotion on the offline purchasing behaviour and
in doing so develops an understanding of their return on investment in online advertising. 
Online rebate/gift with purchase
In this instance the retailer tracks the online customer’s information through the
use of cookies and offers some form of discount or gift offer with purchase.
Generally, the customer will be required to register online (see Figure 10.7).
Just as consumer use of the Internet has been growing rapidly during the
last decade so too has the use of the Internet as a medium to communicate a
company’s marketing messages. Research has shown the Internet as having an
increasing share of voice when compared with other media. Furthermore, a
survey conducted by PricewaterhouseCooper (2005) found that consumer
advertisers are leading the online advertising spend (see Figure 10.8). The
strategic implications of such findings are that retailers should be developing
measurement techniques to determine the effectiveness of the online media on
the offline spend.
IMPLICATIONS FOR E-RETAIL MARKETING STRATEGY
Figure 10.6 Online coupon redemption in an offline store 
Share of voice
The relative advertising
spend of the different
competitive brands
within the product
category. Share of voice
(SOV) is calculated by
dividing a particular
brand’s advertising
spend by the total
category spend (De
Pelsmacker et al.,
2004).
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text field to pdf; how to enter text in pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection.
adding text to a pdf; add text pdf acrobat
CHAPTER 10 · BUSINESS-TO-CONSUMER INTERNET MARKETING
476
Figure 10.7 Online rebate with online purchase:
Sainsbury’s online promotional offer 
Question
To what extent is the Internet a ubiquitous marketing communication channel? In other words, is it
possible for all types of companies operating in all sectors to communicate with all consumer target
markets to an equal level of effectiveness? If not, how could retailers determine how to allocate online
promotional spend?
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
add text to pdf acrobat; add text to pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
adding text to pdf in preview; add text to pdf in acrobat
IMPLICATIONS FOR E-RETAIL MARKETING STRATEGY
477
Figure 10.8 Internet advertising by major industry and retail category
Source: PricewaterhouseCooper (2005)
60.0%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0%
Consumer
related
%
o
f
t
o
t
a
l
r
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
49%
51%
Computing
18%
15%
Financial
services
17%
13%
Telecom
1%
7%
Pharma and
Healthcare
5%
5%
2005 Qtr 2
Key
2004 Qtr 2
2005 Q2 vs. 2004 Q2
Internet ad revenues by major industry category*
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0%
Retail
%
o
f
c
o
n
s
u
m
e
r
r
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
40%
48%
Automotive
16%
22%
Entertainment
15%
10%
Leisure
16%
13%
Packaged goods
7%
6%
2005 Qtr 2
Key
2004 Qtr 2
2005 Q2 vs. 2004 Q2
Internet ad revenues by major consumer category*
* Categories listed represent the top five ranked by revenue, and may not add up to 100 per cent.
Consumer advertiser spend surges in 2005
Consumer advertisers represented the largest category of Internet and spending, accounting for 51
per cent of 2005 second-quarter revenues, up from 49 per cent reported for the same period in 2004.
Computing advertisers represented the second-largest category of spending at 15 per cent of 2005
second-quarter revenues, down from the 18 per cent reported in the second quarter of 2004.
Financial services advertisers represented the third-largest category of spending at 13 per cent of
2005 second-quarter revenues, down from the 17 per cent reported in the same period in 2004.
Telecom companies accounted for 7 per cent of 2005 second-quarter revenues, up sharply from the
1 per cent reported in the same period in 2004, while Pharmaceutical and Healthcare accounted for
5 per cent of 2005 second-quarter revenues, consistent with the second quarter of 2004.
Retailed the Consumer-Related categories at 48 per cent, up sharply from the 40 per cent
reported for the second quarter of 2004, followed by Automotive at 22 per cent, Leisure (travel,
hotel and hospitality) at 13 per cent, Entertainment (music, film and TV entertainment) at 10 per
cent, and Packaged goods at 6 per cent.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
adding text to a pdf in preview; adding text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties.
how to add text fields to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
In conclusion, it is now widely acknowledged that there is a need for a company to have
a coherent e-strategy underpinned by a clear vision of how it may take advantage of the
Internet. An online retailer’s strategy is likely to be affected by the type of online format it
adopts, the type of products and services it sells and the market segments it chooses to serve.
Retailers will defend their existing market share through consideration of strategic
and competitive forces. It is the actions of retailers and their on- and offline behaviour
in response to peer actions and new entrants’ behaviour and success rate that are likely
to shape the future of the Internet as a retail environment. Retailers need to ensure that
the value created by e-retailing is additional rather than a redistribution of profitability.
It has been suggested that by removing the physical aspects of the retail offer the
Internet may also provide the opportunity for increased competition (Alba et al., 1997).
Pureplays can easily combine e-commerce software with scheduling and distribution to
bypass traditional retail distributors. These virtual merchants could therefore threaten
existing distribution channels for consumer products. The Internet is thus likely to
appeal to new entrants who have not already invested in a fixed-location network.
However, the boom and bust of the dot-com era has demonstrated that this opportunity
must be supported with a sound business plan aimed at generating profits and not
media attention per se.
CHAPTER 10 · BUSINESS-TO-CONSUMER INTERNET MARKETING
lastminute.com: establishing and maintaining a 
competitive position
Case Study 10
Retailing online renders one of the established mantras of
the  fixed  location  retailer  ‘location  location  location’
redundant. So how are the new e-retailers establishing
and maintaining a competitive position in the Internet’s
marketspace? 
lastminute.com was an early leader with its develop-
ment of a web site which operated as an online travel
agent and retailer (see Figure 10.9). The company founded
by Martha Lane Fox and Brent Hoberman in 1998 has
recently been acquired by Travelocity and Sabre Holdings. 
Strategy and business model
The valuation achieved by the company at its float was
seen by many at best as very unrealistic – its paper value
exceeded the value of longstanding established travel
agents  like  Thomas  Cook  Plc.  Many  dismissed  last-
minute.com’s  valuation  as  being  an  indicator  of  the
absurdity of the dot-com phenomenon and dismissed
excessive investment as irrational. 
One  of the problems with most  of the commentary
about lastminute.com in particular and e-commerce in
general was that it focused too much on the front-end busi-
ness idea behind the models and too little on the model’s
place within its sector (Panourgias, 2003). Over time the
company has proved to be an established online brand. 
Sales and marketing
lastminute.com built its market share by focusing on making
innovative use of Internet technologies to deliver services to
the end consumer that were close to the end of their shelf-
life, i.e. late booking of holidays and hotel rooms. One of the
core advantages is that there were few logistical issues to
deal with when the purchaser takes themselves to the point
of consumption (e.g. visiting the theatre, see Figure 10.10). In
this way the company is able to supply both niche and
increasingly mass market needs. 
lastminute.com  use  advanced  personalisation  tools
to deliver a highly customised online experience, sending
different  tailored  me-
sages  to  online  cus-
tomers who have opted
in  to  receive  online
marketing,  promotions
and  newsletters.  The
messages are varied
according to the profile
of the target customers
and personalised e-mails
478
Figure 10.9 Lastminute.com products and services 
are developed by using different blocks of text, features
and promotions so that the e-mail delivers relevant content
and offers (e.g. adventure holidays or cultural city breaks in
European cities) to a particular type of person. 
Infrastructure
Externally, lastminute.com is very effective in what it offers
to its target markets; internally, its back-office systems
and supply chain side of the business functions very effi-
ciently. The key to success in this case is company-wide
highly-integrated systems, which can easily be scaled up
or down and deliver a high level of flexibility. As a result,
the business can easily expand to meet the needs of the
markets and accommodate the integra-
tion of a large number of businesses on
the supply side into the group. An addi-
tional advantage is that having developed
the expertise the team at lastminute.com
is able to sell their knowledge to others
thereby routing more trade and informa-
tion through the portal in a similar way to
other major online operators. 
Competition
This  has  become  a  highly  competitive
sector  and  both  online  players  like
expedia.com,  and  laterooms.com,  and
long-established  high-street brands, are
competing with lastminute.com for market
share. In addition, supply and demand pat-
terns can change quickly as external events
in the trading environment have an impact. 
lastminute.com has become a very well-
known and established online brand and
has developed the technological know-how
which has allowed the company to create
significant 
competitive 
advantage.
Furthermore, it provides its customers with
a user-friendly interface, with many interac-
tive and informative features (e.g. virtual
hotel tours) that enable the customer to
preview a hotel prior to booking. The com-
pany has used each of the key dimensions
of e-strategy to create a very robust busi-
ness  model,  which continues  to  attract
both customer and suppliers. 
Questions
1
The online travel business is growing rapidly and as
a result competition is intensifying. Suggest how
lastminute.com can maintain and develop its
market share in the future. 
2
Discuss how lastminute.com positions itself against
the competition? What is the company’s online
value proposition?
3
Visit the web site of some of lastminute.com’s lead-
ing competitors and analyse how much of a threat
they pose to the company. 
CASE STUDY 10
479
Figure 10.10 lastminute.com theatre tickets
Source: http://www.lastminute.com/site/entertainment/theatre/product_list.html?CATID=94227
Summary
1
This chapter has focused on online consumers and e-retailers and in doing so has
introduced some of the key issues that might eventually affect the overall success of
e-retail markets. 
2
Online customer expectations are being raised as they become more familiar with
Internet and other digital technologies and as a result companies are being forced to
adopt a more planned approach towards e-retailing.  Additionally, in doing e-retail
managers are considering who their customers are, how and where they access the
Internet and the benefits they are seeking.
3
Web sites that do not deliver value to the online customer are unlikely to succeed. 
E-retailers need to develop a sound understanding of who their customers are and
how best to deliver satisfaction via the Internet. Over time, retailers may begin to
develop more strategically focused web sites.
4
Given current levels of growth in adoption from both consumers and retailers it is
reasonable to suggest the Internet is now a well-established retail channel that pro-
vides an innovative and interactive medium for communications and transactions
between e-retail businesses and online consumers.  
5
The web presents opportunities for companies to adopt different retail formats to sat-
isfy their customer needs which may include a mix of Internet and physical-world
offerings. Furthermore, bricks-and-mortar retailers and pureplay retailers use the
Internet in various ways and combinations including sales, ordering and payment,
information provision and market research.
6
Web sites focusing on the consumer vary in their function. Some offer a whole suite
of interactive services whereas others just provide information. The logistical prob-
lems associated with trading online are limiting the product assortment some retailers
offer.
7
Trading via the Internet challenges e-retailers to pay close attention to the online
markets they are wishing to serve and to understand there are differences between the
on- and offline customer experiences.
8
The virtual environment created by the Internet and associated technologies is a
growing trading platform for retailing. This arena is increasing both in terms of the
number of retail businesses that are online and the extent to which the Internet is
being integrated into almost every aspect of retailing. As a result retailers must choose
how they can best employ the Internet in order to serve their customers rather than
whether to adopt the Internet at all.
480
CHAPTER 10 · BUSINESS-TO-CONSUMER INTERNET MARKETING
481
Exercises
REFERENCES
Self-assessment exercises
1
Describe the variables that a retailer might consider when trying to identify an online target
market.
2
Describe the different types of formats an online retailer might follow.
3
List the various activities a retailer might include in a customer-facing web site.
Essay and discussion questions
1
Evaluate the potential of the Internet as a ‘retail channel’.
2
Discuss whether you consider that all products on sale in the high street can be sold just as
easily via the Internet.
3
Australasia is home to approximately 2% of Internet users around the globe. Describe how an
online retailer might choose to target a market. Illustrate your answer with examples.
4
Select three web sites that demonstrate the different ways in which a retailer might use the
Internet to interact with its customers. Compare the contents of the web sites and explain
what the potential benefits are for the customers of each of the sites.
Examination questions
1
It was once predicted that the Internet would replace high-street stores and that within ten years
the majority of retail purchases would be made online. Discuss the extent to which you think the
goods and services available via the Internet can satisfy the needs of the average consumer.
2
Compare and contrast the opportunities that a high-street e-retailer faces with those of a
pureplay e-retailer.
References
Abdel-Malek, L., Kullpattaranirun, T. and Nanthavanij, S. (2005) A framework for comparing
outsourcing strategies in multi-layered supply chains, International Journal of Production
Economics 97 (3), 318.
Alba, J., Lynch, J.C., Weitz, B., Janiszewski, C., Lutz, R., Sawyer, A. and Wood, S. (1997)
Interactive home shopping. Consumer, retailer and manufacturer incentives to participate
in electronic marketplaces, Journal of Marketing, 61 (July), 38–53.
Allegra (2005) Allegra Strategies Limited, London WC2N 5BW. 
Ballantine, J. (2005) Effects of interactivity and product information on consumer satisfaction
in an online retail setting, International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management, 33(6),
461–71.
Bauer, R. (1960) Consumer behavior as risk taking, Proceedings of the American Marketing
Association, December, 389–98.
Blackwell, R., Miniard, P. and Engel, J. (2001) Consumer Behaviour, Dryden, USA.
Butler, Sarah (2005) Internet stores expect a merry Christmas as online sales soar, The Times,
16 November. www
.timesonline.co.uk/ar
ticle/0,,2-1874371,00.html
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested