mvc view pdf : How to add text to a pdf document control Library system azure .net asp.net console 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN53-part1392

CHAPTER 11 · BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS INTERNET MARKETING
502
The exchange process
Traditionally, the exchange process would be initiated by the seller, who will attempt to sat-
isfy the demands of the buyer either by producing goods and services that explicitly meet
the buyer’s needs or by aggressive sales and communications campaigns designed to per-
suade the buyer to purchase a particular product or service. However, in recent years, the
nature of interactions between buyers and sellers, who form an important part of the
exchange process, have been changing. Blenkhorn and Banting (1991) discussed the con-
cept of reverse marketing in the mid-1980s. In the reverse marketing scenario, the buyer
initiates the exchange process by making the seller aware of his purchasing requirements
and in doing so changes the nature of the relationship as there is potentially more buyer
involvement at earlier stages, i.e. input at product development stage. Online it is not only
the direction of the motivation to purchase that is changing but also the number and type
of partners engaging in the exchange process and the structure of the supply chain. 
The buying function
In addition to market exchanges, the organisational buying function typically involves a
decision-making  process  that  is  different  from  consumer  purchasing  behaviour.
Organisational buying decisions are influenced by the following key factors: the power
and number of individuals in the buying group involved in the purchasing decision, the
type and size of purchase and choice criteria informing the purchase decision, and the level
of risk involved.
The buying group. Webster and Wind (1972) identified different profiles for partici-
pants involved in an organisational buying group: users, influencers, buyers, deciders
and gatekeepers. The composition of the buying group varies according to a com-
pany’s requirements regarding financial control and authorisation procedures. 
The type and size of purchase. These will vary dramatically according to the scale of the
purchase. Companies such as aircraft manufacturers will have low-volume, high-value
orders; others selling items such as stationery will have high-volume, low-value
orders. With the low-volume, high-value purchase the Internet is not likely to be
involved in the transaction itself since this will involve a special contract and financ-
ing  arrangement.  The  high-volume,  low-value orders, however,  are suitable for
e-commerce transactions and the Internet can offer several benefits over traditional
methods of purchase such as mail and fax (e.g. speed of transfer of information,
access to more detailed product information).
Choice criteria. The buying decision for organisations will typically take longer and be
more complicated than consumer purchasing decisions, as professional buying groups
assess product specifications against their buying requirements. To assist in this evalu-
ation, many B2B-specific portals have been created on the Internet, with the aim of
uniting buyers with sellers who have the products that match their requirements.
Such portals not only provide information about potential suppliers, but also enable
searching of product specifications and standards and parts catalogues. 
The level of risk. This varies depending on the type of product. In the case of routine-
purchase, low-cost goods required, say, for maintenance or repair purposes the level of
risk associated with a wrong purchase is low. However, in the case of a high-cost prod-
uct, for example either a capital equipment purchase or a bulk quantity of raw
material used in a manufacturing process, the associated risk of making a wrong pur-
chase is high. The Internet affords buyers and sellers the opportunity to be well
How to add text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf acrobat; add text to pdf document in preview
How to add text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text pdf; adding text to pdf document
TRA DING RELATIONSHIPS IN B2B M ARKETS
503
informed about a potential purchase, thereby reducing the risks associated with the
functionality of a particular product or service. However, online fraud and forgery are
increasing and global legal systems do not yet have laws to protect every aspect of
commercial use of the Internet, especially online contracts (Sparrow, 2000). Therefore,
the advantage of accessing a wide range of new trading partners across the Internet’s
global trading network is somewhat reduced by the threat of a previously unknown
party entering into a contract fraudulently. As a result, the risk of trading with new
suppliers via the Internet is potentially higher than in a face-to-face situation.
A key consideration is how Internet technologies can be used to facilitate a dialogue
with the various members of the buying group. A possible approach to consider is selec-
tive targeting, a process involving carefully examining specific aspects of the target
market and then preferentially targeting the selected market with specific online offer-
ings. Some examples of customer segments that are commonly targeted online include:
customers who are difficult to reach using other media – an insurance company look-
ing to target younger drivers could use the web in this way;
customers who are brand loyal – services to appeal to brand loyalists can be provided
to support them in their role as advocates of a brand as suggested by Aaker and
Joachimsthaler (2000);
customers who are not brand loyal – conversely, incentives, promotion and a good level
of service quality could be provided by the web site to try and retain such customers.
The same principles can be applied to organisational markets whereby larger customers
could be offered preferential access through an extranet. Smaller companies might be
offered additional services to enhance buyer–supplier relationships: online transactions,
Internet-based EDI and specialist portals providing detailed information for different
interests that support the buying decision.
Trading partnerships
The final consideration in this section is trading partnerships. Potentially, the impact of
trading in the online environment is a change in the number of suppliers and the struc-
ture of the supply chain. In the case of Bass Breweries, adoption of an e-procurement
system led to a reduction in the number of suppliers but engendered closer cooperation
between the buyer and the retained suppliers. 
Additionally, organisations are engaging in the exchange process with an increasingly
wide range of trading partners: for example, manufacturers are directly selling to con-
sumers, which can result in channel restructuring. There is evidence of such changes
resulting from adoption of Internet technologies to buyer–supplier relationships within
the financial service industry: large banking corporations supplying financial services
directly to cherry picked retail customers via the Internet. Disintermediated market
transactions of this kind are efficient because they remove the need to compensate
agents and intermediaries in the supply chain. High-tech transactional solutions of this
kind pose a serious threat to ‘retail’ banks that rely on a physical branch network to
serve their most valuable customers (Ellis-Chadwick et al., 2002). Channel restructuring
can also mean adding trading partners. A barrier for many organisations wishing to
operate in digital markets is the lack of technological and logistical knowledge. Faced
with this situation, a possible solution is to buy in expertise. New media intermediaries
offer a wide range of services from web development and management to operational
logistics. Wrigley and Lowe (2001) suggest that delivery and a company’s capacity to
fulfil orders is a critically important limiting factor that affects the growth of online
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf
CHAPTER 11 · BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS INTERNET MARKETING
504
reseller markets following the collapse of the dot-com bubble, circa 2000. Indeed, it is
possible that the more an organisation is in a position to take advantage of such limiting
factors the more likely will be the shift towards the online trading environment. 
Other notable innovations with the potential to alter online channel relationships are: 
Infomediation – a related concept where middlemen hold data or information to bene-
fit customers and suppliers.
Channel confluence – occurs where distribution channels start to offer the same deal to
the end-customer.
Peer-to-peer services – music swapping services such as Napster and Gnutella opened up
an entirely new approach to music distribution with both supplier and middleman
removed completely, thus providing a great threat but also an opportunity to the
music industry. 
Affiliation – affiliate programmes can turn customers into sales people. Many consider
sales people as part of distribution. Others see them as part of the communications mix. 
Restructuring of the channel to market through the use of Internet technologies can
deliver significant benefits in improved efficiency and reduced costs. 
This section has focused on the potential impact of the Internet on the exchange
process, the buying function and trading relationships. Through the use of Internet and
network technologies it is becoming possible for an organisation to build a highly
streamlined sales channel online. In many organisations, there are no observable stages
between inbound logistics and distribution to the final customer. There is minimum
human intervention in the whole supply process, which raises the question: To what
extent  are trading  relationships  becoming  ‘transactional’  rather than ‘relational’?
Perhaps this is because organisations have been developing strong links with suppliers
and other stakeholders through the use of technology, which has resulted in many activ-
ities being outsourced and the creation of new and different arrangements of trading
networks. Deise et al. (2000) describe value network management as ‘the process of
effectively deciding what to outsource in a constraint-based, real-time environment
based on fluctuation’. (For discussion of customer relationship management techniques
see Chapter 6.) A key point to remember is that whatever the incremental changes
taking place at various stages of the trading relationship, for many organisations, trading
relationships are becoming a more strategic issue. There are greater opportunities to
create competitive advantage by redefining the participants of the exchange process and
developing competitive differentiation by rethinking sales and service processes. 
The final theme of this chapter is Internet marketing strategies. It should be noted that it
is not the aim of this section to revisit the process of planning online marketing strate-
gies (which has been discussed in Chapter 4), but to consider how Internet marketing
strategies might be used and integrated into organisational planning activities. 
So far this chapter has focused on the online trading context, the electronic market-
place and trading relationships. In essence, each of these sections forms an integral part
of the online strategic planning process. According to Nicholls and Watson (2005),
although e-commerce is still a relatively new business activity for many organisations
there is a growing understanding within the literature of the importance of strategic
thinking to the successful development of online activities. During the dot-com boom
Digital marketing strategies
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
add editable text box to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text to pdf in acrobat; adding text fields to a pdf
DIGITAL MARKETING STRATEGIES
505
many companies were accused of a lack of strategic planning, which was ultimately said
to be the cause of their business failures (Porter, 2001). E-strategy has been discussed at
various levels from business re-engineering, new approaches to marketing planning to
analysing and measuring specifics of web-based activities. 
From a strategic planning perspective, Teo and Pian (2003) have found that the level
of Internet adoption has a significant positive relationship with an organisation’s com-
petitive advantage, which implies that organisations should seriously consider how to
engender positive support for online activities. Otherwise organisations that hesitate are
likely to be superseded by existing or new competitors. Whilst in the current climate this
sounds rather obvious, the business potential that can be derived from adopting Internet
technologies is not always immediately clear. This situation helps to reinforce the impor-
tance of digital marketing planning as it can help to ensure organisations reduce the risk
of losing their competitive edge by missing out on the benefits of new technology. On
the plus side, there are increasing opportunities to benefit from innovation, growth, cost
reduction, alliance, and differentiation advantages through planned adoption and devel-
opment of Internet and digital technologies as more trading partners become part of the
digital marketspace. 
From a tactical planning perspective Teo and Pian (2003) suggest organisations aiming
to differentiate themselves via web sites should switch their focus to internal productiv-
ity improvement and developing external partner relationships. They should look for
opportunities to create productivity improvements through the use of a web site and to
streamline business processes. 
According to Nicholls and Watson (2005), whether businesses are adopting strategic or
tactical approaches towards planning appears to be rather an ad hoc process. They recom-
mend that in order to use Internet technologies effectively businesses need to analyse ‘a
variety of situational antecedents and then the degree to which the offline and online
management infrastructure, marketing and logistics functions should be integrated can be
better understood’. (See Figure 11.5 for their model of e-value creation.) The model in
Figure 11.5 shows three key areas, the organisation’s core strategic objectives, its business
characteristics and its internal resources and competencies. Different objectives are likely
to suggest a requirement for different structures and strategies. For example, the objectives
of pursuing efficiency and cost reduction are likely to benefit from organisation-wide inte-
gration of Internet technologies, whereas targeting very narrow niche markets online may
not require such investment. The characteristics of the organisation (e.g. size) is likely to
have a significant impact on Internet strategies. Smaller organisations will have to consider
carefully  how  to  resource  a  fully  transactional  web  site  and  handle  the  logistics.
Furthermore, the core resources and competencies will impact on the extent to which the
Internet represents an opportunity to create competitive advantage. 
It is perhaps reasonable to suggest that organisations are reconsidering the e-commerce
proposition in the light of the boom-and-bust dot-com era. Indeed, there is a good deal of
emphasis currently being placed on the supply-side of e-commerce strategies. Streamlining
of procurement systems through the use of Internet technologies can make significant
cost reductions, which can produce useful financial benefits. Furthermore, organisations
operating in B2B sectors are better placed to implement such systems than the B2C 
organisations because they are:
familiar with the use of the similar techniques of EDI (although this is beyond the
reach of many SMEs);
under pressure to trade using e-commerce as often major customers such as supermar-
kets may stipulate that their suppliers must use e-commerce for reasons of efficiency
and cost. Alternatively, if a company’s products are not available direct on the Internet
then the company may lose sales to other companies whose products are available;
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF document file, edit selected text content, and export extracted text with customized format. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary
add text to pdf file reader; adding text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
CHAPTER 11 · BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS INTERNET MARKETING
usually involved in long-term relationships, making it more worthwhile to set up
links between business partners;
more likely to be involved in a greater volume of transactions, thereby justifying the
initial outlay required to develop the Internet-based systems.
Currently, it could be suggested that many organisation operating in the B2B sector
are in a transitional state when planning Internet strategies. Whilst research suggests
that lack of strategic foresight and strategic vision is hampering the growth and develop-
ment of online business it is also likely that organisations are going through a period of
learning that is equipping them with the knowledge required to develop successful
Internet strategies in the future. 
Figure 11.5 Model of strategic value creation 
Source: Nicholls and Watson, 2005
Business characteristics
 Size
 Location
 Sector
 Brand image
 Competitive environment
Resources and
competencies
 IT infrastructure
 Databases
 Store/warehouse capacities
 Management skills
 Organisational learning ability
Strategic objectives
 Sales growth
 Widen geographic spread
 Cost cutting
 Differentiation
 New target customer
E-value chain elements
 Firm structure
 Marketing and sales
 Logistics and fulfilment
Separation
Performance
outcomes
Integration
Performance
outcomes
E-business
adoption
strategy
Situational
antecedents
Value creation
process
Growth, volume and dispersion of electronic markets 
Case Study 11
Ellis-Chadwick et al. (2002) found size to be an important
indicator of whether a company would a) have a web site
and b) have developed a fully transactional web site. They
posited,  the  larger  the  retail  organisation  in  terms  of
number of outlets the more likely they are to have both a)
and b)  in  place.  They suggested  this may be because
those retailers with the largest network of outlets might
have most to lose should they be left as observers, rather
than active participants, in a vibrant Internet marketplace.
Alternatively,  it  could  be  that  those  retailers  with  the
506
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text box to pdf file
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
add text to pdf file online; add text to pdf online
largest numbers  of  outlets  are  most likely  to have the
investment resources, skilled personnel, scale and sophis-
tication of logistical and technical infrastructure necessary
to successfully support e-commerce. 
The DTI’s International benchmarking study (2004) also
found size to have an effect on web site adoption, with
almost 95% of large companies having  active sites. It
should be noted however, that in recent years, small and
medium  size  enterprises  (SMEs)  have  begun  to  take
advantage of the falling costs of going online. In the UK,
the rate of adoption of the Internet by SMEs is surpassing
official targets and the UK government continues to invest
in comprehensive programmes designed to get UK busi-
nesses online (Simpson and Docherty, 2004). Many SMEs
are taking advantage of easier-to-use web applications
and lower-cost outsourcing of web development and site
hosting particularly to serve marketing communications
objectives.  Therefore,  size  may  well  continue  to  be  a
useful predictor of the level and extent of Internet adop-
tion but as the Internet becomes more accessible a wider
range of companies are looking to benefit from becoming
involved with the online trading environment to serve an
increasing range of business objectives. 
The Department of Trade and Industry has been specifi-
cally monitoring the dispersion of use of ITC among UK and
International Businesses and in doing so the eighth study
has concluded there is a strong link between effective use
of ITC  and productivity. The  study  looked at  a range of
industries (see Table 11.2) in 11 different countries.
Major trends potentially affecting the growth rate of adop-
tion of Internet technologies identified by the study are:
More businesses are measuring the impact of technology
in order to determine how to deploy resources effectively.
More  businesses  are  discriminative,  selective and
focused on the use of the technology in order to facili-
tate more efficient usage.
Businesses  are  becoming  more  responsive to  cus-
tomer needs and in doing so are concentrating on the
needs and expectations of the markets they serve.
The growth  rate of  e-commerce is  slowing  as busi-
nesses seek to realise a wider range of benefits from
technology adoption including initiatives focusing on
improved efficiency, speed of  access and  customer
communications. In the UK 19% of the total sales of
businesses selling online are made through the online
channel, up just 5% from 2003.
Major trends relating to the dispersion of Internet tech-
nologies identified by the study are:
Significant differences in general levels of technology
adoption across industry sectors: 96% of UK financial
services businesses have a web site compared with
80% of construction businesses and 74% of UK pri-
mary businesses. This level of uptake is slightly higher
than the average of the other ten nations surveyed –
Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the
Republic of Ireland, South Korea, Sweden and the USA
– where the figures were 88%, 60% and 68% for each
of the sectors respectively.
The number of companies with Internet access is reach-
ing saturation. Some 95% of all companies in countries
surveyed had Internet access (see Figure 11.6.). In most
countries the proportion of companies with web sites
CASE STUDY 11
507
Table 11.2 Industrial sector analysis
Sector
Description
Government 
Public administration, education,
health care
Financial services Banking, insurance, pensions
Manufacturing
Food, drink, tobacco, textiles, 
clothing, motor vehicles, furniture
Transport and 
Freight, post, telecoms
communication
Services
Accountants, advertising, computing
activities, estate agents, legal 
services, vehicle hiring
Primary industry
Agriculture, chemicals, mining, utilities
Retail/wholesale
Distribution, repairs, hotels, catering
Construction
Construction
Figure 11.6 Proportion of business with 
Internet access
100
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
a
c
c
e
s
s
%
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
1997
Key
UK
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
High
2003 2004
Ger
USA
Fra
Jap
Can
Ita
Swe
Aus
ROI
SKo
Low
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text to a pdf document; add text to pdf without acrobat
remains  stable  between  55%  and  85%  (see  Figure
11.7).
Significant  variation  across  industries  in  levels  of
uptake of e-commerce. On the buy side, retail busi-
nesses  are  making  the  most  significant  amount  of
online purchases: 36% in the UK and an average of
38% across other surveyed nations. The construction
sector was the lowest in terms of uptake with 17% of
businesses in the UK and 21% in other nations. On the
sell side, of companies that enable customers to order
online, the percentage varies across sectors from 28%
to 10% (see Figure 11.8).
Sweden, Ireland and the UK remain ahead in terms of
levels of sophistication (see Figure 11.9).
This case has focused on the growth and dispersion of
Internet adoption and e-commerce and in doing so has
identified varying levels of uptake and usage of web tech-
nologies  across  the  nations  surveyed.  Academic
researchers (Doherty et  al., 1999, Teo  and Pian, 2003)
have produced various models of the ways organisations
use Internet technologies and how usage can be influ-
enced by various factors, for example, levels of maturity,
business integration, marketing applications and the cate-
gory of the adopter. 
Teo and Pian (2003) suggest that such different levels of
adoption are likely to confer different degrees of competi-
tive advantage, which they have found to be a key driver of
Internet adoption (see Table 11.3) and which ultimately will
affect the types of goals an organisation aims to achieve
through the application of Internet technologies.
The level of adoption affects the extent to which Internet
technologies impact on an organisation’s practical opera-
tions. In doing so it provides a context for digital strategy
formulation and ultimately the objectives pursued.
CHAPTER 11 · BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS INTERNET MARKETING
508
Figure 11.7 Proportion of business with a web site
100
H
a
v
e
a
w
e
b
s
i
t
e
%
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
1997
Key
UK
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
High
2003 2004
Ger
USA
Fra
Jap
Can
Ita
Swe
Aus
ROI
SKo
Low
Figure 11.8 Adoption of buying and selling online
Swe
7
0
6
6
7
2
Ger
4
4
6
2
5
9
UK
5
0
5
4
5
9
USA
5
6
6
3
5
8
Can
4
7
5
8
5
7
ROI
3
8
5
4
5
3
Aus
4
3
4
6
5
2
Ita
Difference
= 13 percentage
points
International
mean: 38%
International
mean: 51%
3
5
3
6
4
1
Jap
2
8
4
1
4
0
Fra
3
0
3
6
3
3
SKo
3
0
3
3
2002
Key
2003
2004
Swe
4
3
5
1
5
4
SKo
4
5
5
2
Ger
4
7
4
6
3
9
Aus
3
7
3
7
3
8
Jap
4
0
4
5
3
8
UK
3
2
3
2
3
7
Can
3
0
3
8
3
5
USA
3
4
3
6
3
4
ROI
3
6
4
1
3
4
Ita
3
3
2
9
3
3
Fra
1
8
2
1
2
2
2002
Key
2003
2004
CASE STUDY 11
509
Figure 11.9 Levels of sophistication of technology adoption
Source: DTI International benchmarking study 2004, www
.thecma.com/accounts/CMA/documents/Nov2004/ibs2004.pdf
9th
6th
Sweden
Environmental Influences
5th tie
2nd
Republic of
Ireland
People
People and
Awareness
Sub-index
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
Index
6th tie
3rd
South Korea
Awareness
7th tie
3rd
Sweden
Technology
Technology
and Adoption
7th tie
3rd
Sweden
Adoption
6th tie
2nd
Sweden
Process
Process and
Deployment
8th tie
2nd
Sweden
7th tie
3rd
Sweden
Deployment
7th tie
0.41
0.60
UK 2003
UK 2004
0.62
0.62
0.53
0.47
0.44
0.51
7th
USA
Impact
Overall ranking
UK
position
2003
UK
position
2004
Survey
best
2004
Table 11.3 Levels of web site development
Level of Internet adoption
Online development
Strategic contribution
Level 0 – e-mail adoption
e-mail account(s) but no web site.
Limited to internal and intra-
organisational communications.
Very limited resource implications.
Level 1 – Internet presence
Occupying a domain name or simple 
Initial Internet presence.
web sites providing mainly company 
At this stage experimentation is taking 
information and brochures, therefore
place to build skill / knowledge base. 
tending to be static content and 
Practically, implementation of 
non-strategic in nature.
technology is still in progress. 
Limited resource implications.
Level 2 – prospecting
Web sites provide customers with 
Prospecting. 
company information, product 
At this point growth and development 
information (as level 1) plus news, 
begins – providing potential customers 
events, interactive content, 
with access to the products with minimal 
personalised content, e-mail support,  information-distributing cost.
and simple search. 
Growing resource implications.
Level 3 – business integration
Web sites at this level are more 
Integration.
complex with added features for 
At this point integration begins to pull 
interactive marketing, sales ordering,  together business processes and 
online communities and secure 
business models. Internet strategy 
transactions. Also includes more 
becomes interlinked with a firm’s 
sophisticated versions of features 
business strategy. Business support, as 
found in levels 1 and 2, e.g.more 
well as cross-functional links between 
comprehensive information and search  customers and suppliers are developing.
facilities.
Level 4 – business transformation
At this level the Internet-based 
Transformation
activities are central to the 
At this level transformation starts to take 
organisation, transforming the overall 
place. Internet-based operations shape 
business model throughout the 
the organisation’s business strategies 
organisation.
and are used to focus on building 
relationships and seeking new business
opportunities. 
Source: adapted from Teo and Pian (2003)
Questions
1
Suggest three different marketing objectives that an organisation operating in the B2B sector might identify to
guide the company’s use of Internet technologies.
2
Choose one of the objectives proposed in your answer to question 1 and develop an argument as to why an
organisation might make this particular choice. Particularly, focus on the factors that might influence the choice
of marketing objectives.
3
Apart from organisational size, suggest other factors that might influence the level and extent of Internet and
web adoption.
4
Suggest ways a market-orientated B2B company operating in industrial printing markets might be using Internet
technologies
CHAPTER 11 · BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS INTERNET MARKETING
Summary
1
This chapter has examined B2B use of Internet technologies from a marketing per-
spective. In doing so  it  has considered the online trading environment, online
markets, trading partnerships and digital marketing strategies. 
2
B2B trading is affected by the environmental trading situation. Many aspects of the
online trading situation are different from the offline trading environment. 
3
The trading situation needs to be analysed in order to develop understanding of the
actions taking place. Online environmental analysis includes consideration of macro,
micro and internal elements and how they might affect the online trading environment.
4
Commercial exchanges in B2B markets explore the potential and importance of the
electronic market in terms of growth and dispersion of use of Internet technologies
across different industrial sectors. 
5
The growth in electronic markets has led to organisations increasingly making greater
use of Internet technologies moving beyond aiming to achieve marketing communi-
cation  objectives  towards  developing  sales  activities  and  investigating  ways  to
develop international markets.  
6
Organisational use of the Internet can lead to the development of customer-facing
and supplier-facing web-based applications, which will serve different objectives
and functions. 
7
The sales process in B2B markets is changing and the methods of communication and
the actual process of buying are changing (the buy class has a significant impact on
the extent to which transactions are completely automated).  Organisations are
increasingly investing in e-procurement systems. Streamlining of the purchasing
function is becoming more of a strategic issue as it is providing the opportunity to
create differential advantage. B2B markets tend to have fewer customers placing larger
orders (especially in industrial and government markets). Adoption of Internet tech-
nologies represents opportunities to streamline purchasing and sales operations and
in doing so enables an organisation to make significant cost savings. Furthermore,
there are also opportunities to create additional value and competitive advantage
through the redesign of established offline practices.
510
511
REFERENCES
8
Digital marketing strategies are not always integrated into a business’s wider planning
activities. However, this is becoming more important as organisations increasingly
integrate Internet technologies into the buying and selling activities. 
Exercises
Self-assessment exercises
1
Explain the significance of the online business context with specific reference to factors that
are likely to affect whether a business buys and/or sells online.
2
Assess the market potential for a construction company contemplating setting up a
transactional web site aiming to develop new international markets.
3
Suggest why some organisations have highly developed transactional web sites whereas
others merely use the Internet for e-mail.
4
Outline the advantages and disadvantages of buying and selling online.
Essay and discussion questions
1
Discuss why a business operating in an industrial market might be cautious about putting new
product specifications on the company web site.
2
Discuss to what extent trading online alters relationships between trading partners.
3
Explain how Internet technologies can contribute to the development of business strategies.
Examination question
1
Discuss the extent to which B2B e-marketplaces are fundamentally different to traditional
offline markets. 
References
Aaker, D. and Joachimsthaler, E. (2000) Brand Leadership, Free Press, New York.
Bakos,  Y.  (1991)  A  strategic  analysis  of  electronic  marketplaces,  MIS  Quarterly,  15(3),
September, 295–310.
Blenkhorn, D.L. and Banting, P.M. (1991) How reverse marketing changes buyer–seller’s roles,
Industrial Marketing Management, 20(6), 185–91.
Brynjolfsson, E. and Kahin, B. (2000) Understanding the Digital Economy, MIT Press.
Central Statistical Office (1992) Introduction to Standard Industrial Classification of Economic
Activities SIC(92). CSO Publications, London.
Croom, S. (2001) Restructuring supply chains through information channel innovation,
International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 21(4), 504.
Deise, M., Nowikow, C., King, P. and Wright, A. (2000) Executive’s Guide to E-Business: From
Tactics to Strategy, Wiley, New York.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested