mvc view pdf : How to enter text in pdf file software Library dll windows .net html web forms 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN6-part1396

CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET M ARKETING
32
upload data about particular services such as training courses in a standardised format
based on XML. New classes of content can also be defined;
Rapid application development using interactive technology approaches known as
‘Ajax’ (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML). The best-known Ajax implementation is
Google Maps which is responsive since it does not require refreshes to display maps.
From the Internet to intranets and extranets
‘Intranet ’ and ‘extranet’ are two terms that arose in the 1990s to describe applications of
Internet technology with specific audiences rather than anyone with access to the
Internet. Access to an intranet is limited by username and password to company staff,
while an extranet can only be accessed by authorised third parties such as registered
customers, suppliers and distributors. This relationship between the Internet, intranets
and extranets is indicated by Figure 1.16. It can be seen that an intranet is effectively a
private-company Internet with access available to staff only. An extranet permits access
to trusted third parties, and the Internet provides global access.
Extranets provide exciting opportunities to communicate with major customers since
tailored information such as special promotions, electronic catalogues and order histo-
ries can be provided on a web page personalised for each customer. As well as using the
Internet to communicate with  customers, companies  find  that internal  use of  an
intranet or use of an extranet facilitates communication and control between staff, sup-
pliers and distributors. Second, the Internet, intranet and extranet can be applied at
different levels of management within a company. Table 1.4 illustrates potential market-
ing applications of both Internet and intranet for supporting marketing at different
levels of managerial decision making. Vlosky et al. (2000) examine in more detail how
extranets impact business practices and relationships.
Intranet
A network within a
single company that
enables access to
company information
using the familiar tools
of the Internet such as
email and web
browsers. Only staff
within the company can
access the intranet,
which will be
password-protected.
Extranet
Formed by extending
the intranet beyond a
company to customers,
suppliers,
collaborators or even
competitors. This is
again password-
protected to prevent
access by general
Internet users.
Figure 1.16 The relationship between access to intranets, extranets and the Internet
Internet
Marketing
Extranet
Marketing/purchasing
Intranet
IT Dept
Intranet
Company
only
The
world
Suppliers,
customers,
collaborators
Suppliers,
customers,
collaborators
The
world
Extranet
The Internet
How to enter text in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text in pdf file online; adding text to a pdf
How to enter text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf; how to add text to pdf document
To conclude this chapter, read Case Study 1 for the background on the success factors
which have helped build one of the biggest online brands.
CASE STUDY  1
Table 1.4 Opportunities for using the Internet, extranets and intranets to support marketing functions
Level of management
Internet
Intranet and extranet
Strategic
Environmental scanning
Internal data analysis
Competitor analysis
Management information
Market analysis
Marketing information
Customer analysis
Database
Strategic decision making
Operations efficiency
Supply chain management
Business planning
Monitoring and control
Simulations
Business intelligence (data warehouses)
Tactical and
Advertising/promotions
Electronic mail
operational
Direct marketing
Data warehousing
Public relations
Relationship marketing
Distribution/logistics
Conferencing
Workgroups
Training
Marketing research
Technology information
Publishing
Product/service information
Customer service
Internet trading
Sponsorship
eBay thrives in the global marketplace
Case Study 1
Context
It’s hard to believe that one of the most celebrated dot-
coms  has  now  celebrated  its  tenth  birthday.  Pierre
Omidyar,  a 28  year  old  French-born software engineer
living in California coded the site while working for another
company, eventually launching the site for business on
Monday, 4 September, 1995 with the more direct name
‘Auction Web’. Legend reports that the site attracted no
visitors in its first 24 hours. The site became eBay in 1997
and site activity is rather different today; peak traffic in
2004 was 890 million page views per day and 7.7 gigabits
of outbound data traffic per second. At the end of 2005,
if eBay was a country it would be the 9th largest with its
157 million ‘eBayers’.
Mission
eBay describes their purpose as to ‘pioneer new commu-
nities around the world built on commerce, sustained by
trust, and inspired by opportunity’.
At  the  time  of  writing  eBay  comprises  three  major
businesses: 
1 The eBay Marketplace. The mission for the core eBay
business is to ‘create the world’s online marketplace’.
eBay’s SEC filing notes some of the success factors for
this  business  for  which  eBay  seeks  to manage  the
functionality,  safety,  ease-of-use  and  reliability  of
the trading platform.
2 PayPal. The mission is to ‘create the new global stan-
dard for online payments’. This company was acquired
in 2003.
3 Skype Internet telephony. This company was acquired
in 2005.
This case focuses on the best known, the eBay Marketplace.
Revenue model
The vast majority of eBay’s revenue is for the listing and
commission on completed sales. For PayPal purchases
33
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF. HTML5Editor.dll. Copy following file and folders to DNN Site project:
add text to pdf file; add text to pdf in preview
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to insert text in pdf using preview
34
an additional commission fee is charged. Margin on each
transaction is phenomenal since once the infrastructure is
built, incremental costs on each transaction are tiny – all
eBay  is  doing  is  transmitting  bits  and  bytes  between
buyers and sellers.
Advertising and other non-transaction net revenues
represent a relatively small  proportion of  total  net rev-
enues and the strategy is that this should remain the case.
Advertising and other net revenues totalled $94.3 million
in 2004 (just 3% of net revenue). 
Proposition
The eBay marketplace is well known for its core service
which enables sellers to list items for sale on an auction or
fixed-price basis giving buyers the opportunity to bid for
and purchase items of interest. 
Software tools are provided, particularly for frequent
traders including Turbo Lister, Seller’s Assistant, Selling
Manager and Selling Manager Pro, which help automate
the selling process; the Shipping Calculator, Reporting
tools, etc. Today over sixty per cent of listings are facili-
tated  by  software,  showing  the  value  of  automating
posting for frequent trading.
Fraud is a significant risk factor for eBay. BBC (2005)
reported that around 1 in 10,000 transactions within the
UK were fraudulent. 0.0001% is a small percentage, but
scaling this up across the number of transactions, this is a
significant volume.
eBay has developed ‘Trust and Safety Programs’ which
are particularly important to reassure customers  since
online services are prone to fraud. For example, the eBay
feedback forum can help establish credentials of sellers
and buyers. There is also a Safe Harbor data protection
method and a standard purchase protection system.
According to the SEC filing, eBay summarises the core
messages to define its proposition as follows:
For buyers:
Selection 
 
Value 
 
Convenience 
 
Entertainment
For sellers:
 
Access to broad markets 
 
Efficient marketing and distribution costs 
 
Ability to maximise prices 
 
Opportunity to increase sales
Competition
Although there are now few direct competitors of online
auction services in many countries, there are many indirect
competitors. SEC (2005) describes competing channels as
including online and offline retailers, distributors, liquida-
tors, import and export companies, auctioneers, catalog
and mail-order companies, classifieds, directories, search
engines, products of search engines, virtually all online and
offline  commerce  participants  (consumer-to-consumer,
business-to-consumer  and  business-to-business)  and
online and offline shopping channels and networks. 
BBC  (2005)  reports  that  eBay  are  not  complacent
about competition. It has already pulled out of Japan due
to competition from Yahoo! and within Asia and China is
also  facing  tough  competition  by  Yahoo!  which  has a
portal with a  broader  range  of services more  likely  to
attract subscribers.
Before the advent of online auctions, competitors in the
collectibles space included antique shops, car boot sales
and charity shops. Anecdotal evidence suggests that all of
these are now suffering at the hands of eBay. Some have
taken the attitude of ‘if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em’. Many
smaller  traders who have previously run antique or car
boot sales are now eBayers. Even charities such as Oxfam
now have an eBay service where they sell high-value items
contributed by donors. Other retailers such as Vodafone
have used eBay as a means to distribute certain products
within their range.
Objectives and strategy
The overall eBay aims are to increase the gross merchan-
dise volume and net revenues from the eBay Marketplace.
More detailed  objectives  are defined  to  achieve  these
aims, with strategies focusing on:
1 Acquisition – increasing the number of newly registered
users on the eBay Marketplace.
2 Activation – increasing the number of registered users
that become active bidders, buyers or sellers on the
eBay Marketplace.
3 Activity – increasing the volume and value of transac-
tions that are conducted by each active user on the
eBay Marketplace 
The focus on each of these 3 areas will vary according to
strategic priorities in particular local markets.
eBay  Marketplace  growth  is  also  driven  by  defining
approaches to improve performance in these areas. First,
category growth is achieved by increasing the number and
size  of  categories  within  the  marketplace,  for  example:
Antiques, Art, Books and Business & Industrial. Second, for-
mats for interaction. The traditional format is auction listings,
but it has been refined now to include the ‘Buy-It-Now’ fixed
price format. Another format is the ‘Dutch Auction’ format,
where a seller can sell multiple identical items to the highest
bidders. eBay Stores was developed to enable sellers with a
wider  range of products to showcase their products in a
more traditional retail format. eBay say they are constantly
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET M ARKETING
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating Q 2: As the source image file (which I provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add text pdf; add text block to pdf
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to enter text in pdf file
exploring new formats for example through the acquisition in
2004  of mobile.de in  Germany  and Marktplaats.nl  in the
Netherlands,  as  well as investment in craigslist,  the US-
based classified ad format. Another acquisition is Rent.com,
which enables expansion into the online housing and apart-
ment rental category. Finally marketplace growth is achieved
through delivering specific sites localised for different geog-
raphies as follows. You can see there is still potential for
greater localisation, for example in parts  of Scandinavia,
Eastern Europe and Asia.
Localised eBay marketplaces:
Australia
 
India 
 
South Korea 
 
Austria 
 
Ireland
 
Spain 
 
Belgium 
 
Italy 
 
Sweden 
 
Canada 
 
Malaysia 
 
Switzerland 
 
China
 
The Netherlands
 
Taiwan 
 
France 
 
New Zealand 
 
United Kingdom 
 
Germany 
 
The Philippines
 
United States 
 
Hong Kong
 
Singapore
In its SEC filing, success factors eBay believes are impor-
tant to enable it to compete in its market include:
ability to attract buyers and sellers; 
volume of transactions and price and selection of goods; 
customer service; and 
brand recognition.
It  also  notes  that  for  its  competitors,  other  factors  it
believes are important are:
community cohesion, interaction and size; 
system reliability; 
reliability of delivery and payment; 
web site convenience and accessibility; 
level of service fees; and 
quality of search tools.
This  implies that eBay believes  it  has optimised these
factors, but its competitors  still have opportunities for
improving performance in these areas which will make the
market more competitive.
Risk management
The SEC filing lists the risks and challenges of conducting
business internationally as follows:
regulatory requirements, including regulation of auction-
eering, professional selling, distance selling, banking,
and money transmitting;
CASE STUDY  1
Consolidated Statement of Income Data
Year Ended December 31
2000 
2001
2002
2003
2004 
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
Net revenues 
$ 431,424 
$ 748,821 
$ 1,214,100 
$ 2,165,096 
$ 3,271,309 
Cost of net revenues 
95,453 
134,816
213,876 
416,058 
614,415 
Gross profit 
335,971 
614,005
1,000,224 
1,749,038 
2,656,894 
Operating expenses: 
Sales and marketing 
166,767 
253,474 
349,650
567,565 
857,874 
Product development
55,863
75,288 
104,636 
159,315 
240,647 
General and administrative
73,027
105,784
171,785 
302,703 
415,725 
Patent litigation expense 
29,965 
Payroll tax on employee 
stock options
2,337
2,442
4,015 
9,590 
17,479 
Amortisation of acquired 
intangible assets 
1,433
36,591
15,941 
50,659 
65,927 
Merger related costs
1,550
– 
Total operating expenses
300,977
473,579
646,027 
1,119,797 
1,597,652 
Income from operations
34,994 
140,426
354,197 
629,241 
1,059,242 
Interest and other income, net 
46,337 
41,613
49,209
37,803 
77,867 
Interest expense
(3,374) 
(2,851)
(1,492)
(4,314) 
(8,879) 
Impairment of certain 
equity investments
– 
(16,245) 
(3,781) 
(1,230) 
Income before cumulative effect
of accounting change, income
taxes and minority interests 
77,957 
162,943
398,133 
661,500 
1,128,230 
Provision for income taxes 
(32,725) 
(80,009) 
(145,946) 
(206,738) 
(343,885) 
Minority interests 
3,062
7,514
(2,296) 
(7,578) 
(6,122) 
Income before cumulative effect 
of accounting change 
48,294
90,448 
249,891 
447,184
778,223 
Cumulative effect of accounting 
change, net of tax 
(5,413) 
Net income 
$ 48,294 
$ 90,448
$ 249,891
$ 441,771 
$ 778,223 
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit also illustrates how to scan many pages into a PDF or TIFF file in C#
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Data Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim baseDocs
how to add text to a pdf file; how to add text field to pdf
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET M ARKETING
legal uncertainty regarding liability for the listings and
other content provided by users, including uncertainty
as  a  result  of  less  Internet-friendly  legal  systems,
unique local laws, and lack of clear precedent or appli-
cable law;
difficulties in integrating with local payment providers,
including banks, credit and debit card associations,
and electronic fund transfer systems; 
differing levels of retail distribution, shipping, and com-
munications infrastructures; 
different  employee/employer  relationships  and  the
existence of workers’ councils and labour unions; 
difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations; 
longer payment cycles, different accounting practices,
and greater problems in collecting accounts receivable;
potentially adverse tax consequences, including local
taxation of fees or of transactions on web sites; 
higher telecommunications and Internet service provider
costs;
strong local competitors;
different and more stringent consumer protection, data
protection and other laws;
cultural ambivalence towards, or non-acceptance of,
online trading;
seasonal reductions in business activity; 
expenses associated with localising products, includ-
ing offering customers the ability to transact business
in the local currency;
laws and business practices that favour local competi-
tors or prohibit foreign ownership of certain businesses; 
profit repatriation restrictions, foreign currency exchange
restrictions, and exchange rate fluctuations;
volatility in a specific country’s or region’s political or
economic conditions; and 
differing intellectual property laws and taxation laws.
Results
eBay’s  community  of  confirmed  registered  users  has
grown from around two million at the end of 1998 to more
than 94 million at the end of 2003 and to more than 135
million at December 31, 2004. It is also useful to identify
active users who contribute revenue to the business as a
buyer or seller. eBay had 56 million active users at the end
of 2004 who they define as any user who has bid, bought,
or listed an item during a prior 12-month period.
Financial results are presented in the tables on p. 35
and above.
Supplemental Operating Data
Year Ended December 31
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004 
(In millions)
U.S. and International Marketplace Segments: 
Confirmed registered users
22.5
42.4
61.7 
94.9 
135.5 
Active users 
17.8 
27.7 
41.2 
56.1 
Number of non-stores listings 
264.7
419.1
629.7
955.0 
1,339.9 
Number of stores listings 
4.0
8.6
16.0
72.7 
Gross merchandise volume
$ 5,422
$ 9,319 
$ 14,868
$ 23,779
$ 34,168 
Sources: BBC (2005), SEC (2005)
Question
Assess how the characteristics of the digital media
and the Internet together with strategic decisions
taken by its management team have supported eBay’s
continued growth.
36
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text to pdf
Summary
SUMMA RY
1
Internet marketing refers to the use of Internet technologies, combined with tradi-
tional media, to achieve marketing objectives. E-marketing and digital marketing
have a broader perspective and imply the use of other technologies such as data-
bases and approaches such as customer relationship management (e-CRM).
2
A customer-centric approach to digital marketing considers the needs of a range of
customers using techniques such as persona and customer scenarios (Chapter 2) to
understand customer needs in a multi-channel buying process. Tailoring to individ-
ual customers may be practical using personalisation techniques.
3
Electronic commerce refers to both electronically mediated financial and informa-
tional transactions.
4
Sell-side e-commerce involves all electronic business transactions between an organ-
isation and its customers, while buy-side e-commerce involves transactions between
an organisation and its suppliers.
5
‘Electronic business’ is a broader term referring to how technology can benefit all
internal business processes and interactions with third parties. This includes buy-
side and sell-side e-commerce and the internal value chain.
6
E-commerce transactions include business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer
(B2C), consumer-to-consumer (C2C) and consumer-to-business (C2B) transactions.
7
The Internet is used to develop existing markets through enabling an additional
communications and/or sales channel with potential customers. It can be used to
develop new international markets with a reduced need for new sales offices and
agents.  Companies  can provide  new services and  possibly  products  using the
Internet.
8
The Internet can support the full range of marketing functions and in doing so can
help reduce costs, facilitate communication within and between organisations and
improve customer service.
9
Interaction with customers, suppliers and distributors occurs across the Internet. The
web and e-mail are particularly powerful if they can be used to create relevant, person-
alised  communications.  These  communications  are  also  interactive. If  access is
restricted to favoured third parties this is known as an extranet. If Internet technolo-
gies are used to facilitate internal company communications this is known as an
intranet – a private company internet.
10
The marketing benefits the Internet confers are advantageous both to the large cor-
poration and to the small or medium-sized enterprise. These include:
a new medium for advertising and PR;
a new channel for distributing products;
opportunities for expansion into new markets;
new ways of enhancing customer service;
new ways of reducing costs by reducing the number of staff in order fulfilment.
37
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET M ARKETING
38
Self-assessment exercises
1
Which measures can companies use to assess the significance of the Internet to their
organisation?
2
Why did companies only start to use the Internet widely for marketing in the 1990s, given that
it had been in existence for over thirty years?
3
Distinguish between Internet marketing and e-marketing.
4
Explain what is meant by electronic commerce and electronic business. How do they relate to
the marketing function?
5
What are the main differences and similarities between the Internet, intranets and extranets?
6
Summarise the differences between the Internet and traditional media using the six Is.
7
How is the Internet used to develop new markets and penetrate existing markets? What types
of new products can be delivered by the Internet?
Essay and discussion questions
1
The Internet is primarily thought of as a means of advertising and selling products. What are
the opportunities for use of the Internet in other marketing functions?
2
‘The World Wide Web represents a pull medium for marketing rather than a push medium.’
Discuss.
3
You are a newly installed marketing manager in a company selling products in the business-to-
business sector. Currently, the company has only a limited web site containing electronic
versions of its brochures. You want to convince the directors of the benefits of investing in the
web site to provide more benefits to the company. How would you present your case?
4
Explain the main benefits that a company selling fast-moving consumer goods could derive by
creating a web site.
Examination questions
1
Contrast electronic commerce to electronic business.
2
Internet technology is used by companies in three main contexts. Distinguish between the
following types and explain their significance to marketers.
(a) intranet
(b) extranet
(c) Internet.
3
An Internet marketing manager must seek to control and accommodate all the main methods
by which consumers may visit a company web site. Describe these methods.
4
Imagine you are explaining the difference between the World Wide Web and the Internet to a
marketing manager. How would you explain these two terms?
5
What is the relevance of ‘conversion marketing’ to the Internet?
6
Explain how the Internet can be used to increase market penetration in existing markets and
develop new markets.
Exercises
References
Ansoff, H. (1957)  Strategies for diversification, Harvard Business  Review, September–October,
113–24.
BBC  (2005)  eBay’s  10-year  rise  to  world  fame.  Robert  Plummer  story  from  BBC  News,
 September.  http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/business/4207510.stm
 Published:
2005/09/02.
Business Week (2005) The Power of Us. Mass collaboration on the Internet is shaking up busi-
ness. Feature, June  20, 2005. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_25/
63938601.htm
Chaffey, D. (2006) E-Business and E-Commerce Management, 3rd edn. Financial Times/Prentice
Hall, Harlow.
Deighton,  J.  (1996)  The  future  of  interactive  marketing,  Harvard  Business  Review,
November–December, 151–62.
Dibb, S., Simkin, S., Pride, W. and Ferrell, O. (2001) Marketing. Concepts and  Strategies, 4th
European edn. Houghton Mifflin, New York. See Chapter 1, An overview of the marketing
concept.
Economist (2000) E-commerce survey. Define and sell, pp. 6–12. Economist supplement, 26
February.
EIAA (2005) European Advertising Association. European media research, October 2004.
Research conducted by Millward Brown. Published at www
.eiaa.net
in 2005. 
Hoffman, D.L. and Novak, T.P. (1996) Marketing in hypermedia computer-mediated environ-
ments: conceptual foundations, Journal of Marketing, 60 (July), 50–68.
IAB (2005) Internet Advertising Bureau. Bi-annual advertising spend  study conducted with
PricewaterhouseCoopers. Published at www
.iabuk.net
.
Kiani, G. (1998) Marketing opportunities in the digital world, Internet Research: Electronic
Networking Applications and Policy, 8(2), 185–94.
McDonald, M. and Wilson, H. (1999) E-Marketing: Improving Marketing Effectiveness in a Digital
World. Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
O’Reilly,  T.  (2005)  What  Is  Web  2?  Design  Patterns  and  Business  Models  for  the  Next
Generation of Software. Web article, 30 September. O’Reilly Publishing, Sebastopol, CA.
SEC (2005) United States Securities and Exchange Commission submission Form 10-K. eBay
submission for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2004.
Seybold, P. (1999) Customers.com. Century Business Books, Random House, London.
Smith, P.R. and Chaffey, D. (2005) E-Marketing Excellence – at the Heart of EBusiness, 2nd edn.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Svennivig, M. (2004) The interactive viewer: reality or myth? Interactive  Marketing, 6(2),
151–64.
Vlosky, R.,  Fontenot,  R. and Blalock, L. (2000) Extranets: impacts on business relationships,
Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, 15(6), 438–57.
Further reading
Deighton,  J.  (1996)  The  future  of  interactive  marketing,  Harvard  Business  Review,
November–December, 151–62. One of the  earliest articles to elucidate the significance of
the Internet for marketers. Readable.
Hoffman, D.L. and  Novak, T.P. (1997) A new marketing paradigm for electronic commerce,
The Information Society, Special issue on electronic commerce, 13 (Jan.–Mar.), 43–54. This
was the seminal paper on Internet marketing when it was published, and is still essential
reading  for  its  discussion  of  concepts.  Available  online  at  Vanderbilt  University
(http://
ecommer
ce.vanderbilt.edu/papers.html
).
Smith, P.R.  and Chaffey, D.  (2005) E-Marketing Excellence: at the Heart of EBusiness, 2nd edn.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. Chapter 1 gives more details on the benefits of Internet
marketing.
39
FURTHER READING
Web links 
ClickZ Experts (www
.clickz.com/exper
ts
). An excellent collection of articles on online
marketing communications. US-focused. 
 
ClickZ Stats (www
.clickz.com/stats
). The definitive source of news on Internet develop-
ments, and reports on company and consumer adoption of Internet and characteristics in
Europe and worldwide. A searchable digest of most analyst reports.
 
DaveChaffey.com (www
.davechaf
fey
.com
). A blog containing updates and articles on all
aspects of digital marketing structured according to the chapters in Dave Chaffey’s books.
 
Direct Marketing Association UK (www
.dma.or
g.uk
). Source of up-to-date data protection
advice and how-to guides about online direct marketing.
 
E-consultancy.com (www
.e-consultancy
.com
). UK-focused portal with  extensive supplier
directory, best-practice white papers and forum.
 
eMarketer (www
.emarketer
.com
). Includes reports on media spend based on compilations
of other analysts. Fee-based service.
 
Interactive Advertising Bureau (www
.iab.net
). Best practice on interactive advertising. See
also www
.iabuk.net
 
Marketing Sherpa (www
.marketingsherpa.com
). Case studies and  news  about online
marketing.
 
Netimperative (www
.netimperative.com
). News from the UK new media industry.
Print media
 
New Media Age (www
.newmediazer
o.com/nma
). A weekly magazine reporting on the UK
new media interest. Full content available online.
 
Revolution magazine (www
.r
evolutionmagazine.com
).  A monthly  magazine on UK new
media applications and approaches. Partial content available online.
 
Sloan  Center  for  Internet  Retailing (http://ecommer
ce.vanderbilt.edu
).  Originally
founded  in  1994  as  Project  2000  by  Tom  Novak  and  Donna  Hoffman  at  School  of
Management,  Vanderbilt University, to study  marketing  implications of the Internet.
Useful links papers.
 
University of Strathclyde, Department of Marketing, Marketing Resource Gateway (MRG)
(www
.marketing.strath.ac.uk/dcd/
). A comprehensive directory of marketing-related links.
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET M ARKETING
40
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Identify the different elements of the Internet environment that
impact on an organisation’s Internet marketing strategy
Assess competitor, customer and intermediary use of the Internet
Evaluate the relevance of changes in trading patterns and business
models enabled by e-commerce
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
How are the competitive forces and value chain changed by the
Internet?
How do I assess the demand for Internet services from customers?
How do I compare our online marketing with that of competitors?
What is the relevance of the new intermediaries?
Links to other chapters
This chapter, together with the following one, provides a foundation for
later chapters on Internet marketing strategy and implementation:
 Chapter 3, The Internet macro-environment complements this
chapter
 Chapter 4, Internet marketing strategy explains how environment
analysis is used as part of strategy development
Chapter 5, The Internet and the marketing mix considers the role of
‘Place’ in the online marketing mix
2
Main topics
Marketplace 45
Customers 61
Online buyer behaviour r 74
Competitors 85
Suppliers 86
Intermediaries 86
Case study 2
Zopa launches a new lending
model   90
Chapter at a glance
The Internet 
micro-environment
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested