mvc view pdf : How to insert text in pdf file application control utility azure html asp.net visual studio 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN8-part1398

be part of the internal value chain of a company. Porter’s original work considered both
the internal value chain and the external value chain or network. Since the 1980s there
has been a tremendous increase in outsourcing of both core value-chain activities and
support activities. As companies outsource more and more activities, management of the
links between the company and its partners becomes more important. Deise et al. (2000)
describe value network management as:
the process of effectively deciding what to outsource in a constraint-based, real-time envi-
ronment based on fluctuation.
Electronic communications have facilitated this shift to outsourcing, enabling the trans-
fer of information necessary to create, manage and monitor partnerships. These links are
not necessarily mediated directly through the company, but can take place through inter-
mediaries known as value-chain integrators or directly between partners. In addition to
changes in the efficiency of value-chain activities, electronic commerce also has implica-
tions for whether these activities are achieved under external control or internal control.
These changes have been referred to as value-chain disaggregation (Kalakota and Robinson,
2000)  or deconstruction (Timmers, 1999) and value-chain reaggregation (Kalakota  and
Robinson, 2000) or reconstruction (Timmers, 1999). Value-chain disaggregation can occur
through deconstructing the primary activities of the value chain and then outsourcing as
appropriate. Each of the elements can be approached in a new way, for instance by working
differently with suppliers. In value-chain reaggregation the value chain is streamlined to
increase efficiency between each of the value-chain stages. 
The value network offers a different perspective which is intended to emphasise:
the  electronic  interconnections  between  partners  and  the  organisation  and
directly between partners that potentially enable real-time information exchange
between partners;
the dynamic nature of the network. The network can be readily modified according to
market conditions or in response to customer demands. New partners can readily be
introduced into the network and others removed if they are not performing well;
different types of links can be formed between different types of partners. For exam-
ple, EDI links may be established with key suppliers, while e-mail links may suffice for
less significant suppliers.
Figure 2.6, which is adapted from the model of Deise et al. (2000), shows some of the
partners of a value network that characterises partners as:
1 supply-side partners (upstream supply chain) such as suppliers, business-to-business
exchanges, wholesalers and distributors;
2 partners who fulfil primary or core value-chain activities. The number of core value-
chain activities that will have been outsourced to third parties will vary with different
companies and the degree of virtualisation of an organisation which involves out-
sourcing non-core services;
3 sell-side partners (downstream supply chain) such as business-to-business exchanges,
wholesalers, distributors and customers (not shown, since they are conceived as dis-
tinct from other partners);
4 value-chain integrators or partners who supply services that mediate the internal and
external value chain. These companies typically provide the electronic infrastructure
for a company and include strategic outsourcing partners, system integrators, ISPs
and application service providers (ASPs).
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
52
Value network
The links between an
organisation and its
strategic and non-
strategic partners that
form its external value
chain.
How to insert text in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to a pdf document; add text boxes to pdf
How to insert text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf file reader; adding text to pdf in reader
Examples which illustrate the importance of value networks to Internet marketing are the
affiliate networks and ad networks described in Chapter 8. Rather than working directly
with individual publishers to drive visitors to a site, an online merchant will work with
an affiliate network provider such as Commission Junction (www
.cj.com
) or ad network
such as Miva (www
.miva.com
) which manages the links with the third parties.
New channel structures
Channel structures describe the way a manufacturer or selling organisation delivers
products and services to its customers. The distribution channel will consist of one or
more intermediaries such as wholesalers and retailers. For example, a music company is
unlikely to distribute its CDs directly to retailers, but will use wholesalers which have a
large warehouse of titles that are then distributed to individual branches according to
MARKETPLACE
53
Figure 2.6 Members of the value network of an organisation
Source: Adapted from Deise et al. (2000)
Core value chain
activities
Strategic core VC partners
Non-strategic service partners
*includes IS partners, for example:
Strategic outsourcer
System integrator
ISP/WAN provider
ASP provider
Manufacturing
Value chain integrators*
Product
warehousing
Inbound
logistics
Human
resources
Value chain integrators*
Admin
e.g. travel
Fulfilment
Downstream
VC partners
Sell-side
intermediaries
Suppliers
Upstream
VC partners
Buy-side
intermediaries
Finance
Channel structure
The configuration of
partners in a
distribution channel.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File in C#. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; how to add text box to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; how to insert text in pdf using preview
demand. A company selling business products may have a longer distribution channel
involving more intermediaries.
The relationship between a company and its channel partners can be dramatically
altered by the opportunities afforded by the Internet. This occurs because the Internet
offers a means of bypassing some of the channel partners. This process is known as
disintermediation or, in plainer language, ‘cutting out the middleman’.
Figure 2.7 illustrates disintermediation in a graphical form for a simplified retail chan-
nel.  Further  intermediaries  such  as  additional  distributors  may  occur  in  a
business-to-business market. Figure 2.7(a) shows the former position where a company
marketed and sold its products by ‘pushing’ them through a sales channel. Figures 2.7(b)
and (c) show two different types of disintermediation in which the wholesaler (b) or the
wholesaler and retailer (c) are bypassed, allowing the producer to sell and promote direct
to the consumer. The benefits of disintermediation to the producer are clear – it is able
to remove the sales and infrastructure cost of selling through the channel. Benjamin and
Weigand (1995) calculate that, using the sale of quality shirts as an example, it is possi-
ble to make cost savings of 28% in the case of (b) and 62% for case (c). Some of these
cost savings can be passed on to the customer in the form of cost reductions.
At the start of business hype about the Internet in the mid-1990s there was much spec-
ulation that widespread disintermediation would see the failure of many intermediary
companies as direct selling occurred. While many companies have taken advantage of
disintermediation, the changes have not been as significant as predicted. Since purchasers
of products still require assistance in the selection of products this led to the creation of
new intermediaries, a process referred to as reintermediation. In the UK Screentrade
(www
.scr
eentrade.co.uk
, Figure 2.8) was established as a broker to enable different insur-
ance companies to sell direct. While it was in business for several years, it eventually
failed as online purchasers turned to established brands. However, it was sold to an exist-
ing bank (Lloyds TSB) which continues to operate it as an independent intermediary.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
54
Disintermediation
The removal of
intermediaries such as
distributors or brokers
that formerly linked a
company to its
customers.
Figure 2.7 Disintermediation of a consumer distribution channel showing: 
(a) the original situation, (b) disintermediation omitting the wholesaler, and
(c) disintermediation omitting both wholesaler and retailer
(a)
Producer
Wholesaler
Retailer
Consumer
(b)
Producer
Wholesaler
Retailer
Consumer
(c)
Producer
Wholesaler
Retailer
Consumer
Reintermediation
The creation of new
intermediaries between
customers and
suppliers providing
services such as
supplier search and
product evaluation.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
how to add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf using preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
how to insert pdf into email text; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Figure 2.9 shows the operation of reintermediation in a graphical form. Following dis-
intermediation, where the customer goes direct to different suppliers to select a product,
this becomes inefficient for the consumer. Take, again, the example of someone buying
insurance, to decide on the best price and offer, they would have to visit say five differ-
ent insurers and then return to the one they decide to purchase from. Reintermediation
removes this inefficiency by placing an intermediary between the purchaser and seller.
This intermediary performs the price evaluation stage of fulfilment since its database has
links updated from prices contained within the databases of different suppliers.
What are the implications of reintermediation for the Internet marketer? First, it is
necessary to make sure that a company, as a supplier, is represented with the new inter-
mediaries operating within your chosen market sector. This implies the need to integrate,
using the Internet, databases containing price information with that of different interme-
diaries. Secondly, it is important to monitor the prices of other suppliers within this
sector (possibly by using the intermediary web site for this purpose). Thirdly, long-term
partnering arrangements such as sponsorships need to be considered. Finally, it may be
appropriate to create your own intermediary to compete with existing intermediaries
or to pre-empt similar intermediaries. For example, the Thomson Travel Group set
up Latedeals.com (www
.latedeals.com
) in direct competition with Lastminute.com
(www
.lastminute.com
). A further example is that, in the UK, Boots the Chemist set up its
own intermediaries Handbag (www
.handbag.com
) and Wellbeing (www
.wellbeing.com
).
This effectively created barriers to entry for other new intermediaries wishing to operate
in this space. Such tactics to counter or take advantage of reintermediation are sometimes
known as countermediation.
MARKETPLACE
55
Figure 2.8 Screentrade insurance intermediary (www
.scr
eentr
ade.c
om
Countermediation
Creation of a new
intermediary by an
established company.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
adding text field to pdf; add text pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
adding text to a pdf file; adding text to pdf reader
Market mapping and developing channel chains is a powerful technique recommended
by McDonald and Wilson (2002) for analysing the changes in a marketplace introduced by
the Internet. A market map can be used to show the flow of revenue between a manufac-
turer or service provider and its customers through traditional intermediaries and new
types of intermediaries. For example, Thomas and Sullivan (2005) give the example of a
US multi-channel retailer that used cross-channel tracking of purchases through assigning
each customer a unique identifier to calculate channel preferences as follow: 63% bricks-
and-mortar store only, 12.4% Internet-only customers, 11.9% catalogue-only customers,
11.9% dual-channel customers and 1% three-channel customers.
A channel chain is similar – it shows different customer journeys for customers with dif-
ferent channel preferences. It can be used to assess the current and future importance of
these different customer journeys. An example of a channel chain is shown in Figure 2.10.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
56
Figure 2.9 From (a) original situation to (b) disintermediation or (c) reintermediation or
countermediation
Intermediary 
Customer 
Company
(a)
Disintermediation 
Countermediation 
Customer 
Company
(b)
Intermediary 
Customer 
Company
(c)
Figure 2.10 Example of a channel chain map for consumers selecting an estate agents
to sell their property
Search engine 
Word-of-mouth 
Mixed-mode journey 
Estate agents 
site 
vs
vs
At home 
Phone/e-mail 
Search engine 
Online journey 
Portal: 
Rightmove 
Book online 
E-mail/text 
Local property 
paper 
Offline journey 
Go to agents 
At home 
Monthly letter 
Awareness
of agent
Search and 
select agents 
Negotiation 
Viewings 
feedback 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
how to insert text box in pdf; add text to pdf file
Location of trading in marketplace
While traditional marketplaces have a physical location, Internet-based markets have no
physical presence – it is a virtual marketplace. Rayport and Sviokla (1996) used this dis-
tinction to coin the new term electronic marketspace. This has implications for the way
in which the relationships between the different actors in the marketplace occur.
The new electronic marketspace has many alternative virtual locations where an
organisation needs to position itself to communicate and sell to its customers. Thus, one
tactical marketing question is ‘What representation do we have on the Internet?’ A par-
ticular aspect of representation that needs to be reviewed is the different types of
marketplace location. Berryman et al. (1998) have identified a simple framework for this.
They identify three key online locations for promotion of services and for performing e-
commerce transactions with customers (Figure 2.11). The three options are:
(a) Supplier-controlled sites (sell-side at supplier site, one supplier to many customers). This is
the main web site of the company and is where the majority of transactions take
place. Most e-tailers such as Amazon (www
.amazon.com
) or Dell (www
.dell.com
) fall
into this category.
(b) Buyer-controlled sites (buy-side at buyer site, many suppliers to one customer). These are
intermediaries that have been set up so that it is the buyer that initiates the market-
making. This can occur through procurement posting where a purchaser specifies what
they wish to purchase, it is sent by e-mail to suppliers registered on the system and
MARKETPLACE
57
Electronic
marketspace
A virtual marketplace
such as the Internet in
which no direct contact
occurs between buyers
and sellers.
Representation
The locations on the
Internet where an
organisation is located
for promoting or selling
its services.
Figure 2.11 Different types of online trading location
Sell-side @ supplier site
One-to-many
(a)
(b)
(c)
Buy-side @ buyer site
Many-to-one
Trade via
supplier’s
web site
Many-to-many
Neutral exchanges
Key
Supplier
Customer
Trade via
intermediary
web site
Trade via
buyer’s
web site
then offers are awaited. Aggregators involve a group of purchasers combining to pur-
chase a multiple order and thus reducing the purchase cost. General Electric Trading Post
Network was the first to set up this type of arrangement (http://tpn.geis.com
– site no
longer available), but it remains uncommon in comparison to the other two alternatives.
(c) Neutral sites or intermediaries (neutral location – many suppliers to many customers). For
consumers evaluator intermediaries that enable price and product comparison have
become commonplace as we have seen. B2B intermediaries are known as trading
exchanges, marketplaces or hubs. Examples of independent B2B exchanges mentioned
in the previous edition are Vertical Net (www
.ver
tical.net
), Commerce One Marketsite
(www
.commer
ceone.com
) and Covisint (www
.covisint.net
), none of which now exist
in their original form. While some B2B intermediaries remain for some commodities
or simple services (for example, EC21 (www
.ec21.com
), Elance (www
.elance.com
),
eBay Business (http://business.ebay
.com
)) the new trading arrangements have not
developed as predicted by many analysts due to the complexity of business purchase
decisions and negotiations and their destabilising nature on markets. 
Commercial arrangement for transactions
Markets can also be considered from another perspective – that of the type of commer-
cial arrangement that is used to agree a sale and price between the buyer and supplier.
The main alternative commercial arrangements are shown in Table 2.3.
It can be seen from Table 2.3 that each of these commercial arrangements is similar to
a traditional arrangement. Although the mechanism cannot be considered to have
changed, the relative importance of these different options has changed with the
Internet. Owing to the ability to rapidly publish new offers and prices, auction has
become an important means of selling on the Internet. A turnover of billions of dollars
has been achieved by eBay from consumers offering items ranging from cars to antiques.
Many airlines have successfully trialled auctions to sell seats remaining on an aircraft
just before a flight.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
58
Table 2.3 Commercial mechanisms and online transactions
Commercial (trading) mechanism
Online transaction mechanism of Nunes et al. (2000)
1 Negotiated deal
Negotiation – bargaining between single seller and buyer
Example: can use similar mechanism to auction as on 
Continuous replenishment – ongoing fulfilment of orders 
Commerce One (www
.ec21.com
)
under preset terms
2 Brokered deal
Achieved through online intermediaries offering auction 
Example: intermediaries such as Screentrade 
and pure markets online
(www
.scr
eentrade.co.uk
)
3 Auction 
Seller auction – buyers’ bids determine final price of 
C2C: eBay (www
.ebay
.com
)
sellers’ offerings
B2B: eBay business (http://business.ebay
.com
)
Buyer auction – buyers request prices from multiple sellers
Reverse – buyer posts desired price for seller acceptance
4 Fixed price sale
Static call – online catalogue with fixed prices
Example: All e-tailers
Dynamic call – online catalogue with continuously
updated prices and features
5 Pure markets
Spot – buyers’ and sellers’ bids clear instantly
Example: Electronic share dealing
6 Barter
Barter – buyer and seller exchange goods
Example: www
.intagio.com
Business models in e-commerce
A consideration of the different business models made available through e-commerce is
of particular importance to both existing and start-up companies. Venkatraman (2000)
points out that existing businesses need to use the Internet to build on current business
models while at the same time experimenting with new business models. New business
models may be important to gain a competitive advantage over existing competitors and
at the same time head off similar business models created by new entrants. For start-ups
or dot-coms the viability of a business model will be crucial to funding from venture
capitalists. But what is a business model? Timmers (1999) defines a ‘business model’ as:
An architecture for product, service and information flows, including a description of the
various business actors and their roles; and a description of the potential benefits for the
various business actors; and a description of the sources of revenue.
It can be suggested that a business model for e-commerce requires consideration of
the marketplace from several different perspectives:
Does the company operate in the B2B or B2C arena, or a combination?
How is the company positioned in the value chain between customers and suppliers?
What is its value proposition and for which target customers?
What are the specific revenue models that will generate different income streams?
What is its representation in the physical and virtual world, i.e. high-street presence,
online only, intermediary, mixture?
Timmers (1999) identifies no less than eleven different types of business model that
can be facilitated by the web as follows:
1 e-shop – marketing of a company or shop via the web;
2 e-procurement – electronic tendering and procurement of goods and services;
3 e-mall – a collection of e-shops such as BarclaySquare (www
.bar
clays-squar
e.com
);
4 e-auctions – these can be for B2C, e.g. eBay (www
.ebay
.com
), or B2B, e.g. QXL
(www
.qxl.com
);
5 virtual communities – these can be B2C communities such as Habbo Hotel for
teenagers  (www
.habbo.com
 or  B2B  communities  such  as  Clearlybusiness
(www
.clearlybusiness.com/community
) which are both important for their potential
in e-marketing and are described in the virtual communities section in Chapter 6;
6 collaboration platforms – these enable collaboration between businesses or individuals,
e.g. E-groups (www
.egr
oups.com
), now part of Yahoo! (www
.yahoo.com
) services;
7 third-party marketplaces – marketplaces are intermediaries that facilitate online trad-
ing by putting buyers and sellers in contact. They are sometimes also referred to as
‘exchanges’ or ‘hubs’;
8 value-chain integrators – offer a range of services across the value chain;
9 value-chain service providers – specialise in providing functions for a specific part of
the value chain such as the logistics company UPS (www
.ups.com
);
10 information brokerage – providing information for consumers and businesses, often to
assist in making the buying decision or for business operations or leisure;
11 trust and other services – examples of trust services include Internet Shopping is Safe
(ISIS) (www
.imr
g.or
g/isis
) or TRUSTe (www
.tr
uste.or
g
) which authenticate the qual-
ity of service and privacy protection provided by companies trading on the web.
Figure 2.12 suggests a different perspective for reviewing alternative business models.
There are three different perspectives from which a business model can be viewed. Any
individual organisation can operate in different categories, as the examples below show,
MARKETPLACE
59
Business model
A summary of how a
company will generate
revenue, identifying its
product offering, value-
added services,
revenue sources and
target customers.
but most will focus on a single category for each perspective. Such a categorisation of
business models can be used as a tool for formulating e-business strategy. The three per-
spectives, with examples are:
1 Marketplace position perspective. The book publisher is the manufacturer, Amazon is a
retailer and MSN is a retailer, marketplace intermediary and media owner.
Revenue model perspective. The book publisher can use the web to sell direct and MSN and
Amazon can take commission-based sales. Yahoo! also has advertising as a revenue model.
3 Commercial model perspective. All three companies offer fixed-price sales, but in its
place as a marketplace intermediary, MSN also offers other alternatives.
Michael Porter (2001) urges caution against overemphasis on new business or revenue
models and attacks those who have suggested that the Internet invalidates his well-
known strategy models. He says:
Many have assumed that the Internet changes everything, rendering all the old rules about
companies and competition obsolete. That may be a natural reaction, but it is a dangerous
one . . . [companies have taken] decisions that have eroded the attractiveness of their
industries and undermined their own competitive advantages.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
60
Figure 2.12 Alternative perspectives on business models
1. Marketplace position
Manufacturer or
primary service
provider
Reseller/retailer
(intermediary)
Marketplace/exchange
(intermediary)
Media owner
or publisher
(intermediary)
2. Revenue model
Direct product
sales of
product or service
B
B
B
A
Y
Y
A
Y
Y
Subscription or
rental of
service
Commission-based
sales
(affiliate, auction,
marketplace)
Advertising
(banner ads,
sponsorship)
3. Commercial model
Fixed-price
sale
Brokered or
negotiated
deal
Auction or
spot
Key
Y = Yahoo!
A = Amazon
B = Book publisher
B
A
Y
Y
Y
Not-for-profit
organisation
Sales of syndicated
content or services
(for media owner)
Product or service
bundling
Loyalty based
pricing
or promotions
Supply chain
provider
or integrator
Y
He gives the example of some industries using the Internet to change the basis of com-
petition away from quality, features and service and towards price, making it harder for
anyone in their industries to turn a profit.
Revenue models
Revenue models specifically describe different techniques for generation of income. The
main revenue models are shown in the second column of Figure 2.12. For existing com-
panies, revenue models have been based upon the income from sales of products or
services. This may be either for selling direct from the manufacturer or supplier of the
service or through an intermediary that will take a cut of the selling price. Both of these
revenue models are, of course, still crucial in online trading. There may, however, be
options for other methods of generating revenue: perhaps a manufacturer may be able to
sell advertising space or sell digital services that were not previously possible. Activity 2.3
explores some of the revenue models that are possible.
Situation analysis related to customers is very important to setting realistic objectives esti-
mates for online customers and developing appropriate propositions for customers online.
Customer-related analysis can be divided into two. First, understanding the potential and
actual volume of visitors to a site (demand analysis) and the extent to which they convert
to outcomes on the site such as leads and sales (conversion modelling). Secondly, we need
to understand the needs, characteristics and buyer behaviour of online customers (also
covered in Chapter 7), often collectively referred to as customer insight.
Demand analysis and conversion modelling
It is essential for Internet marketing and e-marketing managers to understand the cur-
rent levels and trends in usage of the Internet for different services and the factors that
affect how many people actively use these services. This evaluation process is demand
analysis. If customer usage of online media is evaluated for customers in a target market,
CUSTOMERS
61
Revenue models
Describe methods of
generating income for
an organisation.
Activity 2.3
Revenue models at Yahoo!
Purpose
To illustrate the range of revenue generating opportunities for a company operating 
as an Internet pure-play.
Yahoo! (www
.yahoo.com
) is a well-known intermediary with local content available for many
countries. 
Activity
Visit the local Yahoo! site for your region, e.g. www
.yahoo.co.uk
, and explore the different site
services which generate revenue. Reference the investor relations reports to gain an indication
of the relative importance of these revenue sources.
visit the
w.w.w.
Customers
Customer insight
Knowledge about
customers’ needs,
characteristics,
preferences and
behaviours based on
analysis of qualitative
and quantitative data.
Specific insights can be
used to inform
marketing tactics
directed at groups of
customers with shared
characteristics.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested