mvc view pdf : Adding text to a pdf in reader SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn 619-30-part1435

Attachment A 
Public Comments by Signatories Submitted to USPTO on its Notices 
of Proposed Rulemaking 
Adding text to a pdf in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf reader; add text pdf file
Adding text to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text in pdf file online; how to add text fields to pdf
Attachment B
B
The Draft Rules are “Economically Significant” under Executive
tive
Order 12,866
USPTO has represented to OMB that these draft final rules are significant under 
Executive Order 12,866, but not economically significant. These draft rules
should be 
considered a package because they have important interactive effects: complex patent 
applications are simultaneously more likely to contain more than 10 independent claims and 
benefit from continued examination practice to carefully refine the scope of those claims, and the 
two rules impose burdens and requirements that conflict with each other.  They meet the test for 
being economically significant because: 
 
They may have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more 
 
They may adversely affect in a material way the economy, and in particular, those sectors 
of the economy that are the engines of technical innovation 
I. 
Reasonably Expected Economic Effects 
The Continuations Rule would sharply limit patent applicants’ statutory right to file 
continuing applications and to request continued examination (collectively referred to here as a 
“continuation” but involving different procedures and circumstances). The proposed rule would 
ld 
allow only a single continuation unless the applicant could “show[] to the satisfaction of the 
he 
Director [of the Patent Officer] that the amendment, argument, or evidence [contained in the 
continuation] could not have been submitted during the prosecution of the prior-filed 
application” or “prior to close of prosecution in the application”.
”.
The preamble is silent 
concerning what criteria the Director considers sufficient.  For analytical purposes, it is 
appropriate to assume that the Director’s criteria would be stringent because otherwise the rule 
would be superfluous. 
In its Town Hall presentations, USPTO considered a third rule on related subject matter, RIN 
0651-AB95, “Changes to Information Disclosure Statement Requirements and Other Related Matters,” 71 
71 
Fed. Reg. 38808 (July 10, 2006) to be logically related and functionally intertwined with these two rules, 
see e.g. the “Chicago Slides” in Attachment N.  We agree. The IDS Rule also should be designated as 
ted as 
economically significant. 
71 Fed. Reg. 59, col. 3, and 61, col. 2. 
A
TTACHMENT 
B: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES ARE 
“E
CONOMICALLY 
S
IGNIFICANT
” 
P
AGE 
B-1 
UNDER 
E
XECUTIVE 
O
RDER 
12,866 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text fields in a pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; how to add a text box to a pdf
1.
 
Annual Economic Value of Patent Rights Foregone Likely Exceeds $100 
Million 
USPTO reports that approximately 317,000 patent applications were filed in FY 2005, 
with 62,870 of them being continuing applications and 52,000 being Requests for Continued 
Examination (RCEs).
Of the 62,870 continuing applications, 44,500 were designated as 
continuation/continuation-in-part (CIP) applications and about 18,500 were designated as 
as 
divisional applications.
Thus, 21,800 patent applications would have been affected in FY 2005 
if the proposed Continuations Rule had been in place. The $100 million threshold for an 
economically significant rule would have been exceeded by this NPRM alone if the average 
ge 
social value foregone from each of these 21,800 applications is just $4,587. 
Anecdotal (but reliable) data suggest that this threshold is easily exceeded.  The value of 
additional patent protection sought by filing the continuation must at least equal, and almost 
certainly exceeds, the cost to applicants of preparing and filing such applications. These typically 
ly 
exceed $5,000.
Turning now to the proposed Limits on Claims Rule, it would limit to 10 the number of 
claims that USPTO will initially examine without submission by the applicant of an Examination 
Support Document (ESD). In the preamble to the NPRM, USPTO estimated that 1.2% of patent 
applications would be affected by the rule.  In public presentations, USPTO presented data that 
suggest approximately 1.5% of patent applications contained more than 10 independent claims.
Using the lower value, the $100 million threshold would have been exceeded by this NPRM 
alone if the average social value of the additional claims made in approximately 3,800 (1.2% ×
% ×
×
315,000) such applications is greater than about $26,000. 
The data provided by USPTO understates the number of applications affected by the 
proposed Limits on Claims Rule, however. In addition to limiting the number of independent 
claims that USPTO will examine without an ESD, the Limits on Claims Rule also changes the 
definition of how claims are classified.
10 
Under the proposed rule, many claims that are 
currently regarded as dependent will be reclassified as independent. Accordingly, historical data 
provide a downwardly biased estimate of the scope of applications affected by the proposed rule. 
71 Fed. Reg. 50, col. 1. 
71 Fed. Reg. 50, col. 2 (“About 11,800 of the continuation/CIP applications were second or 
subsequent continuation/CIP applications. Of the over 52,000 requests for continued examination filed in 
fiscal year 2005, just under 10,000 were second or subsequent requests for continued examination.”) 
The filing fee alone for a continuation application is $1,000 and for a continued examination is 
$790 (halved for small entities). The market value of patent attorney time exceeds $300 per hour. 
See Attachment N, slide 57 of the Chicago Town Hall slides. 
10 
We explain this flaw more fully in Attachment H, at Section II.2. 
A
TTACHMENT 
B: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES ARE 
“E
CONOMICALLY 
S
IGNIFICANT
” 
P
AGE 
B-2 
UNDER 
E
XECUTIVE 
O
RDER 
12,866 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text pdf professional; adding text pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding text box to pdf; add text to pdf without acrobat
Even if the draft final rule under review by OMB has different cut-off values for independent and 
dependent claims, estimates of regulatory scope based on historical data are still downwardly 
biased as long as the draft rule reclassifies some dependent claims as independent. 
2.
 
Economic Value of Deciding Disputes, and Delay Due to Overloading of Senior 
USPTO Adjudication Capacity 
As a first approximation, we’ve assumed that patent applicants don’t change their 
eir 
behavior in response to these rules. Of course, applicants will change their behavior. For 
example, a predictable effect of the Continuations Rule is a significant increase in the number of 
appeals to the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences (BPAI). In the last several years, 
USPTO has been able to reduce the number of appeals to BPAI (and the number of appeals it 
loses) by affording applicants the ability to request a pre-Appeal Brief review by senior 
examiners and requiring high-level staff review after the appeal brief has been filed. These 
reforms have succeeded in identifying and rectifying some of the worst examiner mistakes. But 
if USPTO limits the number of continuations and examiners issue Final Rejections as they do 
now, senior USPTO management will be inundated by new demands for supervisory review 
prior to appeal.
11 
As noted above, the proposed Continuations Rule did not specify what criteria USPTO 
would use to determine whether a further continuation would be permitted, leaving that decision 
to the discretion of the Director of USPTO (or his designee).  With no reliable prospective 
standard by which applicants can predict how USPTO will exercise this discretion, uncertainty 
alone will raise the cost of resolving disputes. It is reasonable to expect that the number of 
contests within USPTO, plus civil suits against USPTO in federal district court, will rise 
monotonically with the number of denials. These predictable costs would contribute to exceeding 
the $100 million threshold. 
II. 
Adverse Effects on the Economy, and on Innovation 
These two NPRMs radically change the patent application and examination process. For 
them not to have adverse effects on innovation, it must be true that (a) second and subsequent 
11 
USPTO’s own evidence suggests that this is already occurring. For example, the backlog of 
882 appeals reported at 71 Fed. Reg. 51, col. 2, was a 20-year low. Since then, the Board’s backlog has 
as 
more than doubled, to 2,071 appeals at the date of this writing. Compare 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/dcom/bpai/docs/process/fy2007.htm and …/fy2005.htm. Similarly, the 
backlog in the Office of Petitions, which has historically been 2-4 months, is now over a year for issues 
such as the “Premature Final Rejection” petition that USPTO proposes as the best remedy for harshness 
ness 
of the Continuations rule. E.g., in application serial no. 09/385,394, a Petition for Review of Premature 
Final Rejection filed April 10, 2006 remains on the docket for consideration by Brian Hearn in the Office 
of Petitions as of June 4, 2007. 
A
TTACHMENT 
B: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES ARE 
“E
CONOMICALLY 
S
IGNIFICANT
” 
P
AGE 
B-3 
UNDER 
E
XECUTIVE 
O
RDER 
12,866 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text to pdf using preview; how to add text box to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET.
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text box in pdf document
continuations have no net social value and (b) any independent claims in a patent application 
over the tenth independent claim, or some other arbitrarily set limit, have no net social value. 
Both propositions conflict with both logic and our experience, and USPTO has provided 
no support for either of them. Logically, there is nothing special about continuation practice 
suggesting that a single continuation is the socially optimal number. Nor is there any logical 
basis for believing that the socially optimal number of independent claims is 10 or fewer.
12 
Our experience has been that continuation practice is essential for properly defining the 
scope of intellectual property rights for complex inventions. The examination and prosecution 
process is inherently iterative, and each side in the negotiation has generally appropriate 
substantive incentives.
13 
Applicants seek the broadest defensible scope for their intellectual 
property, and examiners deny claims that are either unclear (i.e., “vague and indefinite”), not 
, not 
supported by the technical disclosure, or overbroad because they cover the prior inventions of 
others (i.e., “prior art”). When the process begins, particularly with complex inventions, neither 
either 
applicants nor examiners can predict the scope of the patent that will be finally approved. This 
is 
discovery and sharing of information drives the process, which leads to more investigation and 
information discovery, and neither examiner nor applicant can perceive that an outcome is fair 
until the process has run its course.  Price competition among patent attorneys requires them to 
find the value-maximizing balance between the least-costly path to allowance and the broadest 
dest 
claims that are legally patentable, to the degree this balance can be predicted a priori, and to 
pursue the most-efficient path to it at every step. 
The proposed rules assume that these uncertainties do not exist and denies the social 
value of iterative negotiation to clearly define the scope of an applicant’s legitimate claims. 
USPTO falsely assumes that, very early in the process, applicants have near perfect knowledge 
about (1) all aspects of what was discovered, (2) which aspects of what they have discovered are 
re 
most valuable, (3) everything relevant to patentability that others invented that preceded their 
own discovery, and (4) the precise contour of what claims they will eventually be able to 
legitimately call their own. Perhaps most perplexingly, USPTO assumes that applicants have 
perfect knowledge about how an unknown patent examiner of unknown skill, training, and 
and 
experience will (5) understand the technology related to a complex invention, (6) evaluate his 
his 
application and (7) the prior art, (8) apply the patent law and guidance to the invention, and (9) 
(9) 
that the examiner and applicant will, during examination, find and consider all prior art that all 
12 
Because of its decades of experience implementing the Paperwork Reduction Act, OMB surely 
is familiar with the arbitrary nature of such thresholds, and the extent to which they induce strategic 
behavior (e.g., agencies propensity to discover that the optimal number of persons from whom to collect 
information is nine). 
13 
In Attachment F, we explain why examiners’ financial incentives are not compatible with 
th 
expeditious procedure. 
A
TTACHMENT 
B: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES ARE 
“E
CONOMICALLY 
S
IGNIFICANT
” 
P
AGE 
B-4 
UNDER 
E
XECUTIVE 
O
RDER 
12,866 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to enter text in pdf file; add text to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file
future potential licensees, litigants, and other challengers to the patent will ever be able to find.
14 
Neither preamble analyzes the practicality of any alternative to this iterative dialog or the effect 
of cutting it off or limiting it, especially in the context of a complex invention. 
USPTO’s proposed rules would damage innovation in at least two other important ways. 
First, by raising the cost of filing patent applications the Office will discourage inventors at the 
margin from submitting them and divert resources from other innovative activities. To the extent 
that innovation is financially motivated, reduced patent applications must translate into reduced 
protection for intellectual property, a diminished incentive to innovate, and less future 
intellectual property. These social costs may be impossible to quantify, but nevertheless they are 
very real. 
Second, the proposed rules create vast new uncertainty about whether intellectual 
property will be adequately protected in the United States. Uncertainty diminishes economic 
actors’ willingness to invest and take risks, and thus will reduce innovation by an unknown but 
significant amount.
15 
III.  Other Costs 
USPTO claims that these rules will reduce paperwork burden. For the Limits on Claims 
rule, this appears to reflect USPTO’s expectation that no applicant will actually submit the 
t the 
extremely burdensome Examination Support Document (ESD) that the Office would require for 
applications designating more than 10 claims for initial examination. For the Continuations Rule, 
le, 
USPTO appears to assume that either the circumstances that lead to continued examination will 
disappear or applicants will simply abandon affected applications. 
In Attachment M we show that USPTO has seriously underestimated the existing 
paperwork burden it imposes on the public, and why its estimates of burden reduction are invalid 
and unreliable. 
14 
Patent prosecution is akin to a contract negotiation in which applicant and examiner work to 
reach a consensus decision. The Continuations Rule would allow one side (USPTO) to impose on the 
other (patent applicants) the restriction that their negotiation shall have no more than two rounds. 
15 
USPTO may allege that applicants “game the system” by overfiling in various ways. Despite 
years of experience, patent attorneys are always uncertain about patent examiners will review and respond 
to similar claims, and how it will apply the Manual on Patent Examination Practice (MPEP). In addition 
to deterring some applications for patentable inventions from being filed at all, uncertainty about USPTO 
behavior logically causes defensive overfiling if (as in the case of patent applications) a failure to advance 
a claim means that it is permanently lost. See Office of Management and Budget, Economic Analysis 
Under Executive Order 12866 (“For risk-averse individuals, the certainty equivalent of [an uncertain] net 
et 
benefit stream would be smaller than the expected value of those net benefits, because risk intrinsically 
has a negative value”) 
A
TTACHMENT 
B: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES ARE 
“E
CONOMICALLY 
S
IGNIFICANT
” 
P
AGE 
B-5 
UNDER 
E
XECUTIVE 
O
RDER 
12,866 
Attachment C
C
The Draft Rules Are Not Required by Patent Law or Necessary to
Implement Patent Law
The most fundamental requirement of Executive Order 12,866 may be the stated 
regulatory philosophy: 
Section 1. Statement of Regulatory Philosophy and Principles. (a) The Regulatory 
ry 
Philosophy. Federal agencies should promulgate only such regulations as are required by 
law, are necessary to interpret the law, or are made necessary by compelling public need, 
such as material failures of private markets to protect or improve the health and safety of 
the public, the environment, or the well-being of the American people. In deciding 
whether and how to regulate, agencies should assess all costs and benefits of available 
regulatory alternatives, including the alternative of not regulating. Costs and benefits 
shall be understood to include both quantifiable measures (to the fullest extent that these 
can be usefully estimated) and qualitative measures of costs and benefits that are difficult 
to quantify, but nevertheless essential to consider. Further, in choosing among alternative 
regulatory approaches, agencies should select those approaches that maximize net 
benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety, and other 
advantages; distributive impacts; and equity), unless a statute requires another regulatory 
approach. 
We examine these circumstances justifying regulation in a logical order that is somewhat 
different from the text. 
I. 
Does the statute require another regulatory approach? 
USPTO’s rulemaking authority and obligation to examine patent applications are 
governed by federal patent law, most notably, 35 U.S.C. §§ 2, 3, 131 and 132 (see Attachment 
O). Nothing in any statute directs USPTO to restrict inventors’ access to continuations, nor does 
es 
the law direct USPTO to arbitrarily limit the number of claims that will be initially examined in a 
single patent application.
16 
Furthermore, nothing in the law directs USPTO not to maximize net 
et 
16 
USPTO may assert that the Limit on Claims Rule does not set an absolute limit on the number 
of claims that will be examined because applicants who want to have more than 10 claims initially 
examined are always free to submit the Examination Support Document (ESD). In Attachment M, Sec. 
ec. 
II.2, we note that senior USPTO officials have made public statements indicating that they do not expect 
ct 
applicants to actually utilize this “safe harbor” because it is overly burdensome. 
A
TTACHMENT 
C: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES 
A
RE 
N
OT 
R
EQUIRED BY 
P
ATENT 
L
AW OR 
P
AGE 
C-1 
N
ECESSARY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
P
ATENT 
L
AW 
social benefits from the issuance of patents. Thus, the regulatory philosophy in Executive Order 
12,866 unambiguously applies to these two draft final rules. 
II. 
Are these rules required by law or to interpret the law? 
USPTO was required to issue certain regulations implementing new provisions in the 
American Inventors Protection Act of 1999 (AIPA).
17 
These two draft rules are neither required 
by this law nor needed to interpret any provision of it. Congress has amended the Patent Act 
Act 
several times in recent decades, but never to limit the opportunities of inventors in any way 
ay 
analogous to the proposed rules, or to suggest that USPTO should do so.  For example, the AIPA 
made continued examinations easier, not harder, by adding a new “request for continued 
examination” provision as a lower-cost, easier alternative to older mechanisms for continuations. 
ns. 
It also extended patent term for some classes of continuation applications, and asked USPTO to 
study ways to encourage inventors to participate in the patent system, not to restrict 
participation.
18 
III.  Is there a material failure of private markets that would justify these regulations? 
The patent process is somewhat unusual insofar as it is a user fee based service the 
federal government provides to utilize market forces (intellectual property rights) in the 
furtherance of delivering a public good (stimulating innovation). The protection of intellectual 
property is precisely the kind of function that only governments can provide. Congress having 
acted to provide this public good, it has delegated to USPTO the authority to provide structure, 
process and predictability to this process, not to make policy concerning how much of the public 
good to provide. 
As we discuss in Attachment F, a strong case can be made that the problems USPTO is 
is 
seeking to remedy through regulation are the result of “government failure.”
19 
Unfortunately, 
instead of addressing governmental failure directly, USPTO appears to have chosen to further 
regulate the inventors and innovators who are the customers who pay user fees for its services. 
USPTO is a monopoly provider of these services. One of its problems is overcoming the natural 
17 
E.g., 65 Fed. Reg. 50092, “Request for Continued Examination Practice and Changes to 
to 
Provisional Application Practice; Final Rule” and 65 Fed. Reg. 56365, “Changes To Implement Patent 
nt 
Term Adjustment Under Twenty-Year Patent Term; Final Rule.” 
” 
18 
35 U.S.C. § 132(b); 35 U.S.C. § 154(b) (providing for term extension for certain continuation 
applications filed under § 120 but not RCE’s under § 132(b)); 113 Stat. 1501 § 4204 (instructing USPTO 
TO 
to “conduct a study of alternative fee structures that could be adopted … to encourage maximum 
participation by the inventor community”). 
19 
For a lengthy description and analysis of government failure, see Charles Wolf Jr., Markets or 
Governments? Choosing Between Imperfect Alternatives. MIT Press, 1988. See also Susan E. Dudley, 
Primer on Regulation, Mercatus Policy Series, Policy Resource No. 1, Mercatus Center, 2005. 
A
TTACHMENT 
C: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES 
A
RE 
N
OT 
R
EQUIRED BY 
P
ATENT 
L
AW OR 
P
AGE 
C-2 
N
ECESSARY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
P
ATENT 
L
AW 
characteristics of monopolists – producing less than the optimal quantity at a higher than optimal 
price.
20 
IV.
 
Has USPTO decided whether and how to regulate based on an assessment of all 
costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives, including the alternative of 
not regulating? 
USPTO has disclosed only the results of certain forecasts of changes in backlog (“patent 
nt 
pendency”). These results are found in the Chicago Town Hall slides.
.
21 
None of the results 
reported concern social benefits or social costs. Thus, if USPTO has performed any analysis of 
social benefits and costs, it has not disclosed it.  In May 2006, one of the signatories of this letter 
informally asked USPTO Deputy Director Office of Patent Legal Administration Robert Clarke 
if there were any other supporting data besides the limited information contained in the 
preambles to the Notices of Proposed Rulemaking. Mr. Clarke replied via email: 
We do not have a complete package of supporting information that is available for public 
inspection. The study for these packages was substantiated in a series of pre-decisional 
electronic communications that has not been made available to the public.
22 
In September 2006, another signatory filed a formal Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 
request. In October 2006, USPTO FOIA Officer Robert Fawcett replied that USPTO had 
“identified 114 pages of documents that are responsive to [the] request and are releasable.”23 
Mr. Fawcett did not acknowledge the existence of pre-decisional materials exempt from FOIA 
disclosure or explain why they were exempt, and none of the 114 pages released contain readily 
analyzable data that adhere to OMB’s (or USPTO’s) principles for information quality, most 
notably, the principles of transparency, reproducibility, and objectivity. 
20 
See W. Kip Viscusi, John M. Vernon, and Joseph E Harrington Jr., Economics of Regulation 
and Antitrust (2d ed.), MIT Press 1995. 
21 
See Attachment N, slides 49-54. 
54. 
22 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/comments/fpp_continuation/alderucci.pdf, 
page 39. 
23 
See Attachment N.  The 114 pages are the materials found in these four web pages: 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/chicagoslides.ppt 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/chicagoslidestext.html 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/focuspp.html 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/laiplabackgroundtext.html 
A
TTACHMENT 
C: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES 
A
RE 
N
OT 
R
EQUIRED BY 
P
ATENT 
L
AW OR 
P
AGE 
C-3 
N
ECESSARY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
P
ATENT 
L
AW 
If the responses that we received are full and accurate, USPTO did not perform any 
analysis of regulatory effects as required by Section 1(a) of Executive Order 12,866.
24 
V. 
What constitutes a “compelling public need”? 
The primary stated benefit of these two draft rules is to reduce USPTO’s backlog, and 
thereby improve various performance metrics. For example, the Office has established the 
reduction in backlog (“patent pendency”) as a performance goal under the Government 
nt 
Performance and Results Act (GPRA).
25 
Unfortunately, USPTO’s management goal of reduced patent pendency is, at best, a poor 
proxy for output.  Better output measures might include: 
1.
 
Maximizing the number of patent claims issued that meet some established standard 
of quality, and maximizing the number of patent claims denied that fail to meet this 
standard; and 
2.
 
Minimizing the number of erroneous decisions, including both invalid claims issued 
and valid patent claims denied. 
As a proxy for these output measures, patent pendency is not very helpful. Among pending 
patents, one cannot easily distinguish between valid and invalid patents being delayed. The 
social cost of delaying a valid patent is almost certainly much greater than the social cost of 
delaying an invalid patent, as there is no mechanism to compensate an innovator for the lack of 
or delay in obtaining a valid patent whereas invalid patents may be attacked or limited in several 
ral 
ways. 
More importantly, all output measures are inherently defective because they do not take 
account of the outcomes that the patent examination program was created to achieve – 
– 
maximizing the social value of protection provided for patentable intellectual property net of the 
24 
Public comments by senior USPTO officials also indicate that the Office did not analyze its 
data to ascertain whether applicants or examiners were predominantly responsible for its “rework” 
problem, which was the presumed cause of backlog. At one of the pubic “Town Hall” meetings, held in 
New York on April 7, 2007, a question was asked by a member of the audience, and answered by 
by 
Commissioner Doll as follows: 
Question: Commissioner Doll, did you do any studies to identify where these rework 
applications are coming from? Do you have any sense for whether they’re caused by the 
he 
examiner screwing up or the applicant screwing up? How are you getting into that 
problem? 
Commissioner Doll:  No, I didn’t differentiate between whether it was an applicant error 
or an examiner error. 
25 
United States Patent and Trademark Office, 2007-2012 Strategic Plan 
(http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/strat2007/stratplan2007-2012.pdf). 
A
TTACHMENT 
C: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES 
A
RE 
N
OT 
R
EQUIRED BY 
P
ATENT 
L
AW OR 
P
AGE 
C-4 
N
ECESSARY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
P
ATENT 
L
AW 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested