mvc view pdf : Add text to pdf without acrobat SDK software API wpf windows .net sharepoint 619-31-part1436

social costs of error.
26 
Patent pendency is not well correlated to outcome value. For example, 
pendency could be lowered if applications were rushed through the examination process with a 
cavalier regard for patent quality, though one certainly would not correlate this decrease in 
pendency to an improvement in outcomes. Alternatively, USPTO could restrict access to the 
examination process and otherwise make the application process more cumbersome and 
expensive. This also would drive down pendency, but there is no basis for assuming that the 
quality of patents issued would improve, nor would it account for the losses associated with 
failing to issue patents that should have been issued but never entered examination. (Indeed, 
that’s precisely the mechanism by which these two rules would reduce patent pendency: they 
would reduce the number of applications, and especially complex ones.) 
USPTO’s regulatory rationale for these two draft rules can be reduced to agency 
convenience in service of the management goal of reducing patent pendency. It is conceivable 
that an agency’s management goal might be itself a “compelling public need.” That seems 
eems 
highly unlikely unless the management goal is very closely aligned with the substantive policy 
outcomes that the agency’s program is intended to achieve. Perhaps that kind of alignment exists 
in such extraordinary matters as national security emergencies. It does not exist in this case. 
Still, it’s not clear why USPTO elevates pendency and backlog over all other concerns, 
ns, 
such as costs, incentives for investment, and disclosure, clarity and precision in the definition of 
the scope of property rights. Perhaps there are other nonregulatory objectives USPTO has in 
mind for which it has unfortunately selected a blunt regulatory tool.
27 
26 
USPTO includes quality as one of its management goals. According to its strategic plan, 
USPTO measures quality three ways: 
“In-process compliance with published statutory, regulatory, and practice standards” 
” 
“End-of-process compliance with these same standards” 
s” 
“Review of statistically significant, random samplings of examiners’ work”. 
But there is an inevitable tradeoff between achieving these quality measures and reducing patent 
pendency. A proper Regulatory Impact Analysis would take account of the adverse effects on quality of 
regulatory efforts to reduce pendency. 
27 
Reducing patent pendency is the first of three metrics listed in OMB’s Program Assessment 
Rating Tool (PART). OMB rates USPTO performance as “adequate” (“Pendency, or the time to examine 
amine 
an application and issue a patent, remains high at 30 months, and approximately 500,000 patent 
applications await examination”). None of the three metrics is a measure of outcomes. See 
ExpectMore.gov at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/expectmore/summary/10000046.2003.html 
(summary) and http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/expectmore/detail/10000046.2003.html (detailed report). 
A
TTACHMENT 
C: T
T
HE 
D
RAFT 
R
ULES 
A
RE 
N
OT 
R
EQUIRED BY 
P
ATENT 
L
AW OR 
P
AGE 
C-5 
N
ECESSARY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
P
ATENT 
L
AW 
Add text to pdf without acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box on pdf; how to insert text into a pdf
Add text to pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf file; adding a text field to a pdf
Attachment D 
USPTO’s Written Rationale for Regulation is Insufficient 
USPTO is required to show that these draft final rules are needed and give an informative 
written explanation for that need: 
Each agency shall identify in writing the specific market failure (such as externalities, 
market power, lack of information) or other specific problem that it intends to address 
(including, where applicable, the failures of public institutions) that warrant new agency 
action, as well as assess the significance of that problem, to enable assessment of whether 
any new regulation is warranted (Sec. 1(b)(1), as amended). 
USPTO’s rationale for each of these rules is seriously flawed. 
I. 
Limits on Claims Rule 
The rationale for this draft rule is that initially examining more than 10 claims in a patent 
application is burdensome to USPTO, and limiting to 10 the number of claims that can be 
initially examined would reduce this burden: 
The changes proposed in this notice will allow the Office to do a better, more thorough 
and reliable examination since the number of claims receiving initial examination will be 
at a level which can be more effectively and efficiently evaluated by an examiner.
28 
This rationale does not take into account the reasons why applications might legitimately have 
more than 10 claims deserving of initial examination. Easing USPTO’s workload, without regard 
rd 
for its social costs and social benefits, is not a valid rationale for regulation. It is an especially 
egregious rationale when examination of those claims is an essential agency service that is 
funded directly by user fees that are set at a cost-recovery level that was requested by the agency 
itself.
29 
USPTO has a history of antipathy toward applications with many claims. In 1998, in 
response to the National Performance Review, the Office proposed similar (but less restrictive) 
limits on the number of claims it would review. In 1999, it abandoned the proposal in the face of 
widespread opposition. In the Appendix to this attachment, we reprint the relevant sections of the 
28 
71 Fed. Reg. 61. 
29 
35 U.S.C. § 41(a) (fees for claims over a set threshold vary from $25 to $200 each); USPTO 
Strategic Plan, Fee Purpose, http://web.archive.org/web/20030407093355/www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ 
com/strat21/feepurpose.htm (“This legislative proposal [establishes] a new schedule of patent fees … 
realigning fees so they better reflect the needs of customers and better correlate fees with the extra effort 
required to meet the demands of certain kinds of patent requests. This proposal would generate the levels 
of patent and trademark fee income needed to implement the goals and objectives of the strategic plan.”) 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-1 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other
add text pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
acrobat add text to pdf; add text box in pdf
preamble of both the 1998 Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) and the 1999 
1999 
notice in which the Office withdrew the proposal. 
1.  How the Current Process Works 
Applicants decide how many claims to file in an application based on their knowledge of 
the invention and the prior art, as well as various uncertainties, such as how a court might 
interpret claims or interpret the changes (or amendments) made to claims during examination, 
and the applicant’s general level of confidence in the thoroughness of the prior art searches 
during examination. There is no question that this is a complicated decision, and especially so for 
the most complex and commercially valuable patents. Significant technical and legal knowledge 
must be combined with experience dealing with USPTO policies, practices and procedures. 
Errors and oversights that may seem trivial early in the process can turn out to be crucial and 
devastating for the protection of intellectual property.
30 
For decades, USPTO has said that examination proceeds most efficiently when an 
applicant provides claims for initial examination “ranging from the broadest claim patent owner 
considers to be patentable over the prior art to the narrowest claim patent owner is willing to 
accept.”
31 
This puts all negotiating positions on the table early to give all parties an opportunity 
to consider all options that might result in agreement.  If there is no agreement, USPTO has long 
recognized that the examiner’s view on a full range of claims is essential if appeal is to be 
30 
The Festo decisions of the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in 2002 
and 2003 sharply limited the “doctrine of equivalents,” and placed a burden on applicants to present as 
as 
many claims as required to precisely and fully describe the entire scope of all patentable subject matter – 
subject matter that was formerly covered by inferences drawn from fewer claims now has to be covered 
expressly, or not at all.  Fest Corp. v. Sheets Kinzoku Kogyo Kabushiki Co., Ltd., 535 U.S. 722, 122 Sect. 
1831, 62 USPQ2d 1705 (2002) (Festo VIII) and Festo IX, 344 F.3d 1359, 1366, 68 USPQ2d 1321, 1326-
26-
27 (Fed. Cir. 2003). 
This change in the way claims are interpreted by courts prompted applicants to consider adopting 
various strategies, such as filing more claims, including more independent claims, in an attempt to 
preclude the need for amending claims during examination. See, e.g.,  John M. Benassi and Christopher 
K. Eppich, “Litigation and Prosecution after Festo III,” on-line at 
at 
http://www.buildingipvalue.com/n_us/182_186.htm (“One approach involves the filing of a number of 
different independent claims. The independent claims should encompass a scope that ranges from a very 
broad claim to a claim that is allowable as written.”).  Anecdotal evidence suggests that applicants have, 
e, 
in fact, adopted such strategies. USPTO could utilize its vast database to determine if, in fact, there has 
been an upward trend in the number of independent claims since the Festo decisions." 
31 
Rules to Implement Optional Inter Partes Reexamination Proceedings, 65 Fed. Reg. 76755, 
76767 col. 2-3 (Dec. 7 2000); John Love (now Deputy Comm’r for Patent Examination Policy) and Wynn 
nn 
Coggins, Successfully Preparing and Prosecuting a Business Method Patent Application, 
www.uspto.gov/web/menu/pbmethod/aiplapaper.rtf, presented at 2001 AIPLA meeting, at page 9. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-2 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
adding text pdf; adding text field to pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to add text to pdf file; how to add text to pdf document
meaningful: “[P]rior to the close of prosecution, the issues are well developed, patent owner is 
aware of the issues and positions of the … examiner, and patent owner has the right to present 
evidence and argument in light of the … examiner’s rejections and to present amended claims.”
32 
USPTO now says this practice is less efficient than it could be because it requires an 
initial patentability examination of every claim in an application, an effort that is wasted when 
the patentability of the dependent claims stand or fall together with the independent claim from 
which they directly or indirectly depend.
33 
The Office proposes to reduce its burden by limiting 
to 10 the number of claims that will be initially examined. USPTO makes no argument, and 
certainly offers no evidence, supporting the proposition that all inventions disclosed in each and 
every patent application can be adequately claimed by 10 or fewer claims deserving of initial 
examination. Rather, the problem USPTO seeks to solve is that applications with more than 10 
claims deserving of initial examination are more complex and entail more work for patent 
examiners, but examiners are not rewarded for doing more work on any given patent application. 
Any savings to be obtained by the Limits on Claims Rule is not apparent, however. 
Under the proposed rule, when an independent claim is allowed, all dependent claims are 
examined to ensure they are in the proper form.  This proposed examination practice is the same 
as current examination practice, and thus, under this scenario, the Limits on Claims Rule 
achieves no savings.  However, when an independent claim is rejected, then patentability – and 
an efficiently-obtained agreement between examiner and applicant – lies in the dependent claims 
ms 
that the USPTO proposes, under the proposed rule, not to examine.  If there is an efficiency to be 
gained by not looking for an agreement where it is most likely to be found, a well-considered 
regulatory analysis should explain it. 
2.  Applicants give USPTO clear and robust signals of patent value 
The filing fee for a “base level” application is $1,000.  The Office charges extra filing 
fees for extra complexity – more than a base number of claims, more than 100 pages of 
disclosure, prior art references provided to USPTO after a certain time period, and the like. 
These “complexity fees” can easily double the filing fee cost, or more.  In addition, there is an 
issue fee of $1,300, and “maintenance fees” of $900 due 3½
½
years after issue, $2,300 due 7½
years after issue, and $3,800 due 11½
years after issue.  These issue and maintenance fees are a 
significant source of revenue for USPTO.
34 
32 
Id. 
33 
71 Fed. Reg. at 62. 
34 
“The examination fees for patent applications are set at amounts that do not recover the 
USPTO’s costs of examining patent applications. The USPTO’s costs of examining applications are 
s are 
subsidized by issue and maintenance fees under §§ 41(a)(4) and 41(b)).”  Rationale for 2003 Fee Statute, 
http://web.archive.org/web/20030407092837/ www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/strat21/feeanalysis.htm. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-3 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
adding text to pdf in preview; adding text to a pdf
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text fields to a pdf
Crucially, these fees give robust signals to USPTO of the relative value placed on the 
application by the applicant: the applicant pays USPTO one or more of these “complexity fees” 
and also pays several times that amount in attorney fees for preparing the corresponding 
submission. Applicants do not bear these substantial costs unless they perceive significant value. 
A recent empirical study
35 
confirmed what one would intuit,
36 
that the costs borne up 
front for patent filing are strongly indicative of the value that the patent owner will later place on 
the patent, as signaled by continued payment of maintenance fees.  The most valuable patents are 
the ones that had the following characteristics, listed in the author’s order: 
1.
 
Patents with more claims are more valuable than patents with fewer claims. 
2.
 
Patents in which the applicant and examiner had cited more prior art references are more 
valuable than patents with fewer prior art references considered. 
3.
 
Patents cited as prior art by subsequent patents are more valuable 
4.
 
Patents with more inventors tend to be more valuable than patents with fewer inventors 
5.
 
Patents with more related applications, that is, that are part of a larger family of
continuations, are more valuable than patents with smaller families.
This suggests a number of ironies. First, the applications that are directly targeted by the two 
two 
proposed rules
37 
are the applications that patent owners on average believe to be most valuable. 
Second, at least three of the five characteristics that predict patent value are usually signaled by 
the time of first examination.
38 
As we discuss in more detail in Attachment F, section I, this 
his 
information could be used by USPTO in its examination resource allocation decisions, thereby 
reducing the harm to the most valuable patents arising from the backlog, but it is not. Third, the 
applications that USPTO most wants to discourage are precisely the ones that are more likely to 
generate the issue and maintenance fees that subsidize examination. 
35 
Kimberley A. Moore, Worthless Patents, Berkeley Technology Law Journal vol. 20 no. 4, pp. 
1521-52 (Fall 2005).  The results are summarized at pp. 1530-31. 
1. 
36 
Applicants are more likely to invest more money in the filing and examination of commercially 
important patent applications, either through the added expense of filing numerous claims of varying 
scope, through the added expense of filing further continuations in order to obtain claims covering the 
entire scope of applicant’s invention, and by performing a thorough prior art search and providing the 
examiner with the results of that search. See Worthless Patents at 1531. 
37 
And a third proposed rule not yet submitted to OMB for review as a draft final rule: RIN 0651-
-
AB95, “Changes to Information Disclosure Statement Requirements and Other Related Matters,” 71 Fed. 
ed. 
Reg. 38808 (July 10, 2006) (the “IDS Rule”). 
38 
Item 3 (the number of subsequent citations as prior art), cannot be ascertained during pendency. 
Item 5 (relationship to other applications in the same family) is sometimes discernable. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-4 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
to convert multi-page PDF files to multi-page TIFF files without losing any Fast conversion speed for TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF
how to add text box in pdf file; how to insert pdf into email text
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
add text to pdf file reader; adding text to pdf file
To better understand the impact of these rules, both on applicants and on future USPTO 
revenues, we believe the Office should do a proper Regulatory Impact Analysis. It has a vast 
storehouse of data from which it could develop credible proxy measures for patent value.  This 
would enable the Office to discern ways to reduce patent pendency while imposing the least cost 
on innovators, and possibly generating additional social benefits. 
3.
 
USPTO Does Not Explain its Reversal of Course 
It is also striking that USPTO would now seek to return to a “piecemeal examination” 
” 
scheme similar to what it abandoned in the early 1960s, but without the procedural flexibility 
that protected applicants under the old system.  Back then, USPTO used a procedure somewhat 
similar to the procedure still used in Europe and Japan today, under which the examiner need not 
examine for every issue in the first Office Action, and dialog between the applicant and the 
examiner continues for as long as the parties perceive progress.  “Final Rejection” was not 
not 
imposed until a genuine impasse was identified. 
In the early 1960’s, USPTO concluded that this was not efficient, and changed to a 
“compact prosecution” regime, where the examiner was required to fully consider every issue in 
the first Office Action, and “Final Rejection” was used as the incentive for applicants not to 
to 
press unreasonable positions. 
USPTO now seeks to impose a structure that seeks to marry the applicant-adverse aspects 
of modern “Final Rejection” practice and old “piecemeal examination” practice.  The Office 
Office 
does not explain how this combination provides incentives for examiners to be complete and 
efficient, or how it provides opportunities to reach agreement when the Office refuses to consider 
any more than opening negotiating positions. 
4.
 
The Limited Data Presented by USPTO Does Not Help Predict the Impact of 
the Rule 
The Limits on Claims Rule caps at 10 the number of independent claims that USPTO will 
initially examine without submission of an Examination Support Document (ESD).  In the 
preamble, USPTO said 1.2% of patent applications would be affected by the rule. This figure 
understates the true proportion of applications affected because the proposed rule changes the 
measurement base.
39 
The public has neither a valid baseline nor any way to consider the rule’s 
effects – only USPTO’s assurances that it will reduce the Office’s workload and therefore reduce 
duce 
patent pendency. 
39 
See Attachment H, Sec. II.2. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-5 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
II. 
Continuations Rule 
USPTO’s rationale is that the Office has a serious problem with backlog (i.e., “patent 
tent 
pendency”); continued examinations are the cause of this backlog; and restricting applicants to a 
single continued examination will solve it: 
[E]ach continued examination filing, whether a continuing application or request for 
continued examination, requires the United States Patent and Trademark Office (Office) 
to delay taking up a new application and thus contributes to the backlog of unexamined 
applications before the Office. In addition, current practice allows an applicant to 
generate an unlimited string of continued examination filings from an initial 
application.
40 
According to the rationale set forth in the NPRM, continued examinations are inherently 
undesirable and ought to be reduced or eradicated because they do not contribute significant 
social value: 
In such a string of continued examination filings, the exchange between examiners and 
applicants becomes less beneficial and suffers from diminishing returns as each of the 
second and subsequent continuing applications or requests for continued examination in a 
series is filed. Moreover, the possible issuance of multiple patents arising from such a 
process tends to defeat the public notice function of patent claims in the initial 
application.
41 
In public presentations, USPTO officials framed continued examination pejoratively as 
“rework,”
42 
implying that they involve applicants asking USPTO to re-examine claims that have 
already been fully examined.  While such “rework” may occur in limited situations where 
applicants abuse the continuation process, it simply doesn’t occur in most continued 
examinations. 
For example, continuation-in-part applications (CIPs), by definition, include new subject 
ct 
matter and the claims of these applications are usually directed to this new subject matter.  Thus, 
examinations of CIPs are likely examinations of new claims that have not previously been 
examined by USPTO, and therefore cannot be “rework.” As another example, when filing a 
Request for Continued Examination (RCE), applicants are specifically required to advance the 
examination of an application.  The examiner is provided with new information to consider (e.g., 
changes to the claim, new arguments, or new references).  Action by an examiner on an RCE is 
thus, by definition, not “rework.” Finally, continuation applications can be filed that are directed 
ted 
40 
71 Fed. Reg. 48. 
41 
Id. 
42 
See Attachment N, slide 18 of the Chicago Town Hall slides. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-6 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
to subject matter that is fully disclosed but has never been claimed by applicant.  Such new 
claims have never been considered by USPTO and also are not “rework.” 
” 
USPTO’s pejorative characterization of continuations as “rework” hints at a policy 
icy 
rationale that may explain the purpose of the draft rule.
43 
For example, senior officials may 
believe that inventors should not be allowed to pursue claims to additional aspects of an 
invention, even if those aspects are fully disclosed in an application as originally filed. 
Reasonable people may disagree about what the policy should be.
44 
But that policy balancing 
was done by Congress, which determined that both “continuing application” and “request for 
for 
continued examination” should be available as a matter of right.
t.
45 
As we discuss in more detail 
in Attachment E, USPTO does not have the authority to take these rights away. For that reason, 
senior officials expect to be sued if this rule is finalized and are not confident that they will 
prevail.
46 
III.  Backlog (“Patent Pendency”) 
USPTO says the problem it is trying to solve is a rise in its backlog, the number of patent 
applications in examination. But patent pendency is not a uniformly serious problem across all 
43 
In 1998, USPTO floated a similar proposal similar to the Limits on Claims Rule. In response to 
extensive opposition, the Office abandoned that effort in 1999. See the Appendix to this Attachment D for 
more information. 
44 
Under current law, an inventor’s duty to disclose an invention does not undermine his ability to 
claim its full economic benefits. If inventors no longer had these protections, fulfilling this duty would 
invite those who made no contribution to the invention to reap its economic value. The patent law must 
balance these competing interests, and that is the purview of Congress and not USPTO, whose function is 
to administer the policy tradeoffs that Congress enacts. 
45 
A “continuation application” is a later-filed application that claims the benefit of the filing date 
date 
of an earlier application.  Continuations as a matter of right have long been provided by statute, 35 U.S.C. 
§ 120 (1952), 5 Stat. 353 (1839).  Though the form and degree vary country-to-country, rights analogous 
ous 
to U.S. continuation practice, including an inventor’s right to add claims directed to additional inventions 
as those inventions are recognized, exist under the laws of all major patent systems, including at least 
Europe, Japan and Canada. 
46 
Eric Yeager, “USPTO Commissioner Doll Says That Limiting Continuations Will Improve 
Patent Landscape,” 72 Patent, Trademark & Copyright Law 1791 (704) (“John J. Doll, commissioner for 
or 
patents at the Patent and Trademark Office, Oct. 19 argued at the American Intellectual Property Law 
Association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.… When questioned on whether the agency had the 
statutory authority to make the rules changes, Doll said a lawsuit is highly likely and the agency has 
‘better than a 50/50 chance of prevailing.’”); USPTO Solicitor John Whealan, Duke University Law 
Law 
School, Fifth Annual Hot Topics in Intellectual Property Law Symposium, February 17, 2006, 
http://realserver.law.duke.edu/ramgen/spring06/students/02172006a.rm, at time mark 52:10 (“We can 
write rules, and they issue, and maybe they get overturned.”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-7 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
technology sectors. For example, the American Inventors Protection Act of 1999 enabled 
applicants to regain patent term lost due to excessive pendency. So for patentees whose 
inventions do not reach the market for many years (e.g., pharmaceuticals), current delays do not 
appear to pose a serious problem. But for patentees in industries where the pace of technological 
change is very rapid, delays may adversely affect their ability to use the patent system to protect 
their intellectual property. The economic value of their patents may be realized very early in the 
20-year patent term, with little or none of this value accruing, say, 10 or more years out.
.
47 
USPTO has recognized this market need and recently instituted an Accelerated 
Examination Procedure that gives applicants the opportunity to supply additional information 
with their patent filing in exchange for moving their application to the front of the queue.  Under 
this program, USPTO guarantees to issue a patent in 12 months. 
Significant differences in the value of reduced patent pendency across technology sectors 
highlights the need for proper regulatory analysis. This includes identifying reasonably available 
alternatives and avoiding the temptation to impose one-size-fits-all solutions that address the 
the 
legitimate needs of only a small subset of patent applicants. A complete regulatory analysis that 
includes, for example, an examination of the tendency of applicants from different technology 
areas to pay maintenance fees, may provide USPTO with additional information regarding the 
Technology Centers in which accelerated examination is most important. Armed with this 
information, the Office could alter its external and internal incentives and reallocate resources in 
a way that maximizes net benefits to all rather than just a narrowly defined few. 
In support of the Continuations Rule, USPTO cites two scholarly authorities for the 
proposition that continued examinations are the cause of its backlog problem. 
1.  President’s Commission on the Patent System (1966) 
This report has been in circulation for over 40 years. The changes it recommended 
required legislative action. Congress was well aware of it when it enacted major revisions of the 
Patent Act relating to continuation practice in 1994 and 1999.  For example, in 1994, Congress 
redefined patent term from the old 17-years-from-issue patent term, to a 20-years-from-filing 
-filing 
patent term. This put a practical but indirect cap on continuations,
48 
but did not eliminate them. 
In the American Inventors Protection Act of 1999, Congress then expanded continuation 
47 
This difference in the timing of how economic value from innovation is realized may explain 
why a small number of very large firms, all in the electronics industry, supported one or both proposed 
rules. See, e.g., the public comments to USPTO by Apple Computer, Cisco Systems, eBay, Intel, Micron 
Technology, Microsoft, and Oracle on the Continuations Rule (http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/ 
dapp/opla/comments/fpp_continuation/continuation_comments.html) and the Limits on Claims Rule 
(http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/comments/fpp_claims/claims_comments.html). 
48 
Before this change, one could theoretically have a continuation pending from an initial 
disclosure that was filed 30, 40, or more years earlier. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-8 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
practice, by creating the new procedure for Requests for Continued Examination (RCE) that 
USPTO now finds objectionable. We believe the RCE procedures have considerable merit 
because they enhance the ability of inventors to maximize the protection they obtain for their 
intellectual property. In any case, their merits are not matters of policy discretion open to 
USPTO. Congress has spoken, and USPTO lacks the statutory authority to restrict rights 
established by law (see Attachment E). 
2.  Lemley & Moore (2004) 
49 
USPTO justifies its claim that continued examinations are the cause of its backlog by 
reference to a single law review article written by a pair of distinguished legal analysts: 
Commentators have noted that the current unrestricted continuing application and request 
for continued examination practices preclude the Office from ever finally rejecting an 
application or even from ever finally allowing an application.
50 
USPTO’s reliance on Lemley & Moore is problematic for at least three reasons. 
First, Lemley & Moore do not address the problem of USPTO’s backlog. While they are 
critical of continued examination practice, their criticisms are based on unrelated issues. It is 
inappropriate to invoke Lemley & Moore in defense of a regulatory change motivated by 
concerns about which they were silent. 
Second, as Lemley & Moore themselves concede, the abuses that were the subject of 
their analysis have been almost entirely eradicated by action of Congress, the courts, and 
USPTO.
51 
Moreover, the major reforms occurred in 1995 and 1999 – long before Lemley & 
Moore was published – and they have virtually eliminated the phenomenon of “submarine” 
” 
patents. 
What is a “submarine” patent? This is the erstwhile and infamous practice of keeping a 
g a 
patent application hidden from public disclosure for years or even decades, using continued 
examination practice to illicitly incorporate the inventions of others observed in the marketplace, 
then surfacing them unexpectedly to sabotage a mature industry with infringement claims. The 
49 
Mark A. Lemley and Kimberly A. Moore, Ending Abuse of Patent Continuations, Boston 
University Law Review, vol. 84 (63-123) (2004) (hereinafter Lemley & Moore). 
50 
71 Fed. Reg. 49. 
51 
Congress acted through several statutes mentioned in the Lemley & Moore article, including a 
1995 statute that capped patent term at 20 years from filing and provided for publication of most patent 
applications. The courts acted in a series of cases cited in the “Continuations” NPRM: In re Bogese, 22 
, 22 
USPQ2d 1821, 1824 (Comm’r Pats. 1991) (Bogese I), and In re Bogese, 303 F.3d 1362, 64 USPQ2d 1448 
1448 
(Fed. Cir. 2002) (Bogese II).  In addition, the USPTO now provides web access, on a near real-time basis 
asis 
to most applications, and essentially all continuation applications that are related to issued patents, as they 
are prosecuted. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-9 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested