mvc view pdf : Add text block to pdf application software cloud windows html winforms class 619-32-part1447

most famous “submarine” patents were those of Jerome Lemelson, who probably was 
as 
responsible for Congress taking the action it did in 1994. 
At one time, Jerome H. Lemelson was the patentee of over 185 unexpired patents and 
many pending patent applications.  In 1998, users of bar code scanners began to receive letters 
from stating that their use infringed various Lemelson patents.  One such patent, U.S. Patent No. 
4,338,626, issued in 1982 on an application that claimed priority to 1954, almost 30 years earlier. 
Under U.S. patent law at the time, patents were entitled to a 17-year term from the date of 
issuance.  Thus, Lemelson alleged that he “invented” the bar code scanner as early as 1954 and 
was entitled to a patent that would not expire until 45 years later. Many of Lemelson’s nearly 
200 issued patents were similarly obtained by such egregious abuse of the patent system, and 
they were used to extract hundreds of millions of dollars in royalties. 
Fortunately, this kind of abuse of patent continuation practice is no longer possible.
52 
1994 statute and the AIPA deny applicants the ability to avoid public disclosure unless the patent 
application is filed solely in the U.S. and has no related applications issued as patents, and 
determines patent lifetime from the date of application rather than the date of issuance.  Further, 
the USPTO now makes available on its web site the files for very nearly all continuation 
applications – competitors now have “real time” insight into the scope of claims that are being 
sought.  Thus, the majority of patent claims can no longer be hidden, and delaying final decision 
cannot increase patent value.
53 
Indeed, the so-called Lemelson cases are famous because they were rare. Lemley & 
y & 
Moore also acknowledge that abuses of this sort have never been common
54 
and that various 
changes in the law have taken care of every type of “abuse” that they identify.
y.
55 
In any case, 
52 
Though the NPRM does not cite it, USPTO officials have claimed in public forums that the 
Continuations Rule is needed to prevent submarine patents. Thus far, however, they have not supported 
these claims with evidence documenting the extent to which submarine patents still exist after courts 
decided the Lemelson and Bogese cases of 2002 and Congress enacted legislative reforms in 1995 and 
5 and 
1999. 
53 
USPTO may assert that a published application can still be considered a “submarine” patent 
ent 
because one does not know what claims may ultimately be drafted from the published disclosure. 
However, web access to the file enables the public to gain enough knowledge to successfully manage this 
issue. 
54 
“[T]he abuse of continuation practice is not as pervasive as some might think,” Lemley & 
Moore, 84 B.U.L.R. at 118 
55 
Lemley & Moore, 84 B.U.L.R. at 79, 83-85, 88-89, and 91-93: almost every section describing 
bing 
some form of past abuse concludes by identifying the change in the law that shut down the abuse, 
including 1995, 1999 and 2003 statutory changes; common law changes that confine patents to only that 
which the inventor invented and disclosed, and render “abusive” patents unenforceable, and give USPTO 
authority to strike abusive applications.  Lemley & Moore omit mention of USPTO’s practice, just new at 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-10 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
Add text block to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf; how to input text in a pdf
Add text block to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert pdf into email text; adding text to pdf in preview
USPTO expressly states that this rule is not intended as a remedy for abuse,
e,
56 
and it cites no 
evidence suggesting that abuse remains a significant problem. So, even if some level of abuse 
might remain in the system, the Continuations Rule is not needed to fix it. The Office has all the 
authority it needs to police instances of abuse as they arise on a case-by-case basis. 
is. 
Third, as a source of influential information, Lemley & Moore suffers from serious 
problems that foreclose any use by USPTO for regulatory decision-making, even to address the 
problem of patent “abuse.” For example, Lemley & Moore do not clearly define the term 
“abuse.”  There is probably a consensus that several of the phenomena they discuss – delay, 
submarine patenting, changing claims, “evergreening” – were indeed abusive. But they come 
me 
perilously close to asserting that all patent continuations are per se abusive without regard for 
any social value they might contain. That they do not truly believe this becomes clear, however, 
when they discuss proposed remedies.  For example, they reject the notion that continuation 
applications should be prohibited and finally settle on (coincidentally) the same alternative that 
USPTO proposed in the Continuations Rule: a single continuation by right. Whereas USPTO 
proposes this as a remedy to solve its backlog problem, however, Lemley & Moore propose it as 
a political compromise between competing interests.57 Unlike USPTO, Lemley & Moore 
acknowledge that USPTO lacks the statutory authority to make such a policy change.58 
Two other features of Lemley & Moore are worthy of additional comment.  First, this 
paper is based on analysis of a substantial data set. They collected data on over 2 million patents 
issued from 1976-2000, which suggests that a host of hypotheses could have been rigorously 
tested. Unfortunately, the only data analyses they report are descriptive – distributions of 
prosecution times (Figures 1 and 3) and pendency (Figure 4); the length of time under 
examination at USPTO (Figure 2); the proportion of patents with continuations by technology 
sector (Table 2); and total prosecution time by year (Table 1). Descriptions of data can be useful 
and revealing, but they are not amenable for determining causality or drawing interesting or 
policy-relevant inferences. 
their publication date, of providing web access to pending applications.  Lemley & Moore note that courts 
have long held that “there is nothing improper, illegal or inequitable” in continuations not addressed by 
these laws, which appear to cover essentially the entire remainder.  Lemley & Moore, 84 B.U.L.R. at 77. 
56 
71 Fed. Reg. 50 (“The proposed rules are not an attempt to codify Bogese II or to simply 
ly 
combat such extreme cases of prosecution laches.”) 
57 
Lemley & Moore at 106-107 (“Even if policymakers conclude that there are good reasons to 
to 
permit patentees to file continuation applications … those reasons don’t justify an unlimited number of 
continuation applications. A compromise proposal might, therefore, limit each applicant to no more than 
one continuation application… Allowing even one continuing application will give the applicant five or 
six bites at the apple. Surely that is enough.”). 
58 
Lemley & Moore at 105 (“Abolishing patent continuations would require legislative action”) 
and 107 (“Limiting the number of continuation applications may require an act of Congress”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-11 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
algorithm, Named Bzip2 yet. DXT1. The value is 3. It is also known as Block Compression1 or BC1. DXT3. The value is 4. It is collectively
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text pdf
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
Default); //More TODO:may create some block in footer. header.CreateParagraph(); //Create a run and text in paragraph Create and Add Table to Footer & Header.
add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf reader
Second, virtually the entire data set predates both the Lemelson and Bogese cases that 
hat 
were decided in 2002 and the reforms made by Congress in 1995 and 1999.
59 
Their data could 
be compared with a new data set consisting of patents applied for since these reforms were 
instituted, and such a comparison might yield useful estimates of the effects of these judicial and 
legislative reforms. But it is analytically inappropriate to use data that are known to characterize 
an outdated system to describe the current system, much less use them to diagnose current 
problems or propose remedies. 
3.  Applying Federal Information Quality Guidelines to Lemley & Moore 
The federal Information Quality Act,
60 
as interpreted by OMB in its government-wide 
Information Quality Guidelines, requires that influential information disseminated by federal 
agencies be objective both in substance and in presentation.
61 
USPTO’s dissemination of 
Lemley & Moore does not meet the presentational objectivity standard even if the data and 
analyses therein are guaranteed to be substantively objective. 
First, Lemley & Moore deals with the ambiguously defined problem of patent “abuse” 
” 
but USPTO’s stated objective is to reduce examination backlog. Abuse, however defined, 
contributes to backlog but it is not the only cause. For example, backlog would be expected if 
USPTO staffing did not keep up with growth in innovation. Thus, a vibrant economy may be one 
explanation for USPTO’s backlog. The number of patent applications nearly doubled in the 9 
years from FY 1996-2005, but USPTO examiner staffing has not kept pace. 
Lemley & Moore can’t be considered authoritative about backlog because they discuss it 
only in passing. Moreover, none of their analyses suggest that continued applications are the 
culprit.  It is a clear violation of the presentational objectivity standard to utilize and treat as 
“influential” scientific, technical, economic or statistical information that was created for and 
relates to unrelated phenomena, even if that information is assured to be substantively objective. 
Second, USPTO expressly disclaims any intent to solve the problem of “abuse” through 
ugh 
this rulemaking.
62 
That means Lemley & Moore is simply an inappropriate scholarly reference 
59 
Lemley & Moore’s data window, which closes with 2000, includes only the simpler 
applications filed after the June 1995 statutory amendment, but few complex applications filed after this 
amendment.  Similarly, essentially all applications subject to the 1999 statutory amendment are excluded. 
60 
Sec. 515, Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public 
Law 106-554), codified at 44 U.S.C. § 3516 note). 
61 
Office of Management and Budget, “Guidelines for Ensuring and Maximizing the Quality, 
Objectivity, Utility, and Integrity of Information Disseminated by Federal Agencies; Notice; 
Republication,” 67 Fed. Reg. 8452. 
62 
See 71 Fed. Reg. 50 (“The proposed rules are not an attempt to codify Bogese II or to simply 
ly 
combat such extreme cases of prosecutions laches.”) 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-12 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
0); //More TODO:May create some block in endnote //Save 4.Create text for run footnoteRun.CreateText("Text created in Create or Add Table in Footnote & Endnote.
add text box to pdf; add text boxes to pdf document
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Block 2-1-5, #29 Yonglin Road, Chengdu City, Sichuan Province, China. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
add text to pdf file online; adding text pdf file
unless it is accompanied by transparent acknowledgement that the article concerns unrelated 
issues. 
Of course, that would beg the question why USPTO cites it.  Clearly, the Office intends 
that the public infer that its proposed limitation on continuation practice is supported by the data 
and analysis in Lemley & Moore.
63 
In that regard, USPTO is adopting the inferences of Lemley 
& Moore as an objective characterization of its own, and under applicable information quality 
guidelines, it is thus responsible for their objectivity. 
63 
Whether Professor Lemley and/or Judge Moore personally support or oppose USPTO’s draft 
rule is immaterial. Only the portion of their joint research contained in this 2004 law review article is 
relevant. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-13 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function; Microsoft Visual Studio; Open an existed Windows Application; Add RasterEdge.DotNetImaging
add text to pdf document in preview; how to add text fields to pdf
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Provide basic transformation functions, like Crop, Rotate, Resize, Flip and more; Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc.
how to add text box to pdf document; adding text box to pdf
Attachment D, Appendix 1 
USPTO’s 1998 Proposal to Limit Applicants to 40 Claims, 
and its 1999 Abandonment of that Proposal 
USPTO has previously proposed limits on claims. In a 1998 Advanced Notice of 
Proposed Rulemaking, the agency identified claims limits as one way to help implement its 
“business goals” “to increase the level of service to the public.” Vice President Gore’s National 
tional 
Performance Review prompted this initiative. The agency asserted that it had statutory authority 
to make these changes in patent practice. 
In 1999, USPTO abandoned this initiative in response to widespread criticism. The 
agency lists seven broad objections raised by public comments (including a direct challenge to its 
claim of statutory authority).  The Comments offered seven alternative approaches for USPTO to 
consider instead. 
The record for the Limits on Claims Rule currently under consideration by OMB contains 
no analysis of any of these alternatives, and fails to address or avoid the specific objections that 
at 
were raised. 
Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 192 / 
Goals). 
The Patent Business Goals have been 
Monday, October 5, 1998 / Proposed Rules 
established in response to the Vice-
53498-53530 
President’s designation of the PTO as 
as 
an 
agency that has a high impact on the public, and 
they are designed to make the PTO a more 
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
business-like agency. The focus of the Patent 
Business Goals is to increase the level of service 
Patent and Trademark Office 
to the public by raising the efficiency and 
37 CFR Part 1 
effectiveness of the PTO’s business processes. 
[Docket No.: 980826226–8226–01] 
1] 
The PTO is considering a number of changes to 
the rules of practice and procedure to support the 
RIN 0651–AA98 
Patent Business Goals. The PTO is publishing 
Changes To Implement the Patent Business 
this Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to 
Goals 
allow for public input at an early stage in the 
rule making process. The PTO is soliciting 
AGENCY: Patent and Trademark Office, 
comments on these specific changes to the rules 
Commerce. 
of practice or procedures. 
ACTION: Advance notice of proposed 
… 
rulemaking. 
Topic #4. Limiting the number of claims in an 
SUMMARY: The Patent and Trademark Office 
application (37 CFR 1.75) 
(PTO) has established business goals for the 
organizations reporting to the Assistant 
Summary: The PTO is considering a change to 
Commissioner for Patents (Patent Business 
37 CFR 1.75 to limit the number of total and 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-14 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
independent claims that will be examined (at one 
time) in an application. The PTO is considering 
a change to the rules of practice to: (1) limit the 
number of total claims that will be examined (at 
one time) in an application to forty; and (2) limit 
the number of independent claims that will be 
examined (at one time) in an application to six. 
In the event that an applicant presented more 
than forty total claims or six independent claims 
for examination at one time, the PTO would 
withdraw the excess claims from consideration, 
and require the applicant to cancel the excess 
claims. This change would apply to all non-
reissue utility applications filed on or after the 
effective date of the rule change, to all reissue 
utility applications in which the application for 
the original patent was subject to this change, 
and to national applications filed under 35 
U.S.C. 111(a), as well as national applications 
that resulted from a PCT international 
application. 
Discussion: Applications containing an 
excessive number of claims present a specific 
and significant obstacle to the PTO’s meeting its 
business goals of reducing PTO processing time 
to twelve months or less for all inventions. 
While the applications that contain an excessive 
number of claims are relatively few in 
percentage (less than 5%), these applications 
impose a severe burden on PTO clerical and 
examining resources, as they are extremely 
difficult to properly process and examine. The 
extra time and effort spent on these applications 
has a negative ripple effect, resulting in delays in 
the processing and examination of all 
applications, which, in turn, results in an 
increase in pendency for all applications. In 
view of the patent term provisions of 35 U.S.C. 
154, as amended by the Uruguay Round 
Agreements Act (URAA), Pub. L. 103–465, 108 
Stat. 4809 (1994), PTO processing time and 
pendency are concerns to the PTO and all 
applicants. Thus, the PTO considers it 
inappropriate to continue to permit the proclivity 
of a relatively low number of applicants (less 
than 5%) for excessive claim presentation to 
result in delays in examination and unnecessary 
pendency for the vast majority of applicants. 
Approximately 215,000 utility applications were 
filed in the PTO in Fiscal Year 1997. PTO 
computer records indicate that the approximate 
number and percentage of applications filed in 
Fiscal Year 1997 containing the following 
ranges of independent and total claims breaks 
down as follows: 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-15 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
These numbers indicate that over 95% of all 
applications filed in Fiscal Year 1997 contained 
fewer than forty total claims and over 95% of all 
applications filed in Fiscal Year 1997 contained 
fewer than six independent claims. Thus, the 
rule change under consideration should not 
prevent the overwhelming majority of applicants 
from presenting the desired number of total and 
independent claims for examination. In addition, 
the rule change under consideration will benefit 
the overwhelming majority of applicants, since it 
will stop a relatively small number of applicants 
from occupying an inordinate amount of PTO 
resources. 
While the problem with applications containing 
an excessive number of claims is now reaching a 
critical stage, this problem has long confronted 
the PTO… 
For these reasons, it is now time for the PTO to 
act to limit the use of excessive numbers of 
claims in an application. The PTO is specifically 
proposing to deal with this problem now on a 
systemic basis by limiting, via rulemaking, the 
number of claims that will be examined in an 
application. This proposal supports the PTO 
business goals of reducing PTO processing time 
to twelve months or less for all inventions, and 
aligning fees to be commensurate with resource 
utilization and customer efficiency. 
A rule limiting the number of claims in an 
application is within the PTO’s rulemaking 
authority under 35 U.S.C. 6(a) if it ‘‘is within 
the [PTO’s] statutory authority and is reasonably 
related to the purposes of the enabling 
legislation * * * and does no violence to due 
process.’’ See Patlex Corp. v. Mossinghoff, 758 
758 
F.2d 594, 606, 225 USPQ 543, 252 (Fed. Cir. 
1985) (citations omitted). 
Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 191 / 
Monday, October 4, 1999 / Proposed Rules 
53772-53845 
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Patent and Trademark Office 
37 CFR Parts 1, 3, 5, and 10 
[Docket No.: 980826226–9185–02] 
2] 
RIN 0651–AA98 
Changes To Implement the Patent Business 
Goals 
AGENCY: Patent and Trademark Office, 
Commerce. 
ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking 
Limiting the Number of Claims in an 
Application (Topic 4) 
The Office indicated in the Advance Notice that 
it was considering a change to § 1.75 to limit the 
number of total and independent claims that will 
be examined (at one time) in an application. The 
Office was specifically considering a change to 
the rules of practice to: (1) Limit the number of 
total claims that will be examined (at one time) 
in an application to forty; and (2) limit the 
number of independent claims that will be 
examined (at one time) in an application to six. 
In the event that an applicant presented more 
than forty total claims or six independent claims 
for examination at one time, the Office would 
withdraw the excess claims from consideration, 
and require the applicant to cancel the excess 
claims. 
While the comments included sporadic 
support for this proposed change, the vast 
majority of comments included strong 
opposition to placing limits on the number of 
claims in an application. The reasons given for 
opposition to the proposed change included 
arguments that: (1) Decisions by the Court of 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-16 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) 
leave such uncertainty as to how claims will be 
interpreted that additional claims are necessary 
to adequately protect the invention; (2) the 
applicant (and not the Office) should be 
permitted to decide how many claims are 
necessary to adequately protect the invention; 
(3) there are situations in which an applicant 
justifiably needs more than six independent and 
forty total claims to adequately protect an 
invention; (4) the proposed change exceeds the 
Commissioner’s rule making authority; (5) the 
change will simply result in more continuing 
applications and is just a fee raising scheme; (6) 
the Office currently abuses restriction practice 
and this change will further that abuse; and (7) 
since only five percent of all applicants exceed 
the proposed claim ceiling, there is no problem. 
Several comments which opposed the proposed 
change offered the following alternatives: (1) 
Charge higher fees (or a surcharge) for 
applications containing an excessive number of 
claims; (2) charge fees for an application based 
upon what it costs (e.g., number of claims, pages 
of specification, technology, IDS citations) to 
examine the application; and (3) credit 
examiners based upon the number of claims in 
the application. Several comments which 
indicated that the proposed change would be 
acceptable, placed the following conditions on 
that indication: (1) That a multiple dependent 
claim be treated as a single claim for counting 
against the cap; (2) that a multiple dependent 
claim be permitted to depend upon a multiple 
dependent claim; (3) that a Markush claim be 
treated as a single claim for counting 
applications are taken up by the same examiner 
in the same time frame; (5) that allowed 
dependent claims rewritten in independent form 
do not count against the independent claim limit; 
(6) that the Office permit rejoinder of dependent 
claims upon allowance; and (7) that higher claim 
limits are used. 
Response: This notice does not propose 
changing § 1.75 to place a limit on the number 
of claims that will be examined in a single 
application. 
A
TTACHMENT 
D: USPTO’
W
RITTEN 
R
ATIONALE FOR 
R
EGULATION IS 
P
AGE 
D-17 
I
NSUFFICIENT 
Attachment E
E
The Rules Exceed the Authority Delegated to USPTO under the
Administrative Procedure Act and Patent Act
t
As noted in many of the comments submitted in response to the two NPRMs, USPTO 
likely does not have the legal authority to promulgate either the Continuations Rule or the Limit 
on Claims Rule.  While we understand that it is not OMB’s role to supplant the judgment of 
agency officials with regard to their statutory authority, some statutory matters are more clear cut 
than others. We believe that it is important to avoid a predictable (and likely unfavorable to 
USPTO) legal challenge. If these rules are promulgated, an enormous cloud of legal uncertainty 
inty 
will surround USPTO and all patent applications while these rules wind their way through the 
courts. Significant legal uncertainty is itself a social cost of regulation, especially regulation in 
cases where the agency’s likelihood of prevailing is small. 
I. 
Administrative Procedure Act 
USPTO’s failure to provide a rational connection between a problem and its proposed 
regulatory action violates not only EO 12,866, but also other provisions of law. In particular, 
these rules are highly vulnerable to challenge under the Administrative Procedure Act.
64 
1.  Failure to Disclose Critical Information 
USPTO will not be permitted to rely on any evidence in support of its position that it did 
not put into the administrative record.  In this instance, USPTO is doubly vulnerable because the 
114 pages of information it has presented have little or no connection to the inadequacies it 
purports to address.
65 
When agencies use models to project regulatory effects, they must 
disclose those models and all assumptions.
66 
USPTO has computer models and assumptions, 
64 
Senior USPTO officials have conceded as much.  See footnote 46. 
65 
Advocates for Highway & Auto Safety v. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Admin., 429 F3d 1136, 
1145-46 (D.C. Cir. 2005) (rule invalidated where it merely responds to symptoms indicated in another 
er 
document, “with little apparent connection” to the underlying causes of the problem or alternative 
recommendations). 
66 
U.S. Air Tour Ass’n v. Fed. Aviation Admin., 298 F3d 997, 1008 (D.C. Cir. 2002) (“When an 
en an 
agency uses a computer model, it must ‘explain the assumptions and methodology used in preparing the 
model and, if the methodology is challenged, must provide a complete analytic defense.’ ”); Engine Mfrs 
Assn v EPA, 20 F3d 1177 (D.C. Cir. 1994) (APA requires making rulemaking data intelligibly available 
to allow meaningful comment so public sees ‘accurate picture of reasoning’); Solite Corp v EPA, 952 F2d 
A
TTACHMENT 
E: T
T
HE 
R
ULES 
E
XCEED THE 
A
UTHORITY 
D
ELEGATED TO 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
E-1 
UNDER THE 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCEDURE 
A
CT AND 
P
ATENT 
A
CT 
and apparently based these rules on them.  USPTO offered to make them available to a trade 
association (see § I.3, below).  But USPTO did not include them in the rulemaking file, and 
declined to make them available when requested.
67 
Similarly, agencies are required to publish 
technical studies and data on which they rely; if USPTO did any such study it did not make it 
available for comment. 
2.  USPTO May Not Rely on Off-Point Studies 
An agency’s rulemaking may not be sustained when it relies on academic studies that are 
not directed to the precise issue at hand.
68 
As we discuss in Attachment D, section III.2, the 
the 
NPRMs rely heavily on the Lemley & Moore paper for its proposed single continuation 
provision, but the Lemley & Moore paper is silent on USPTO’s backlog problem and suggests 
this as a remedy for different issues. 
3.  Ex Parte Communications 
USPTO may have engaged in improper ex parte communications with a trade 
association.  News reports indicate that USPTO offered to share information outside the proper 
channels of the administrative record.
69 
We do not know if those communications occurred, or 
the content of any communications that did occur.  However, the offer to selectively disclose the 
agency’s key information raises questions that should be resolved before the rules are 
promulgated. 
USPTO historically has kept open good lines of communication with its user base, and 
we strongly support agency efforts to inform itself of the practical day-to-day effects of its 
ts 
473, 484 (D.C. Cir. 1991) (“An agency commits serious procedural error when it fails to reveal portions 
ons 
of the technical basis for a proposed rule in time to allow for meaningful commentary”).  Indeed, where 
an agency fails to make its data available, not only is the rule invalid, but the agency is foreclosed from 
introducing new evidence during judicial review.  With no evidence to support “substantial justification” 
for its position, the agency may be exposed to attorney fees under the Equal Access to Justice Act.  See 
Hanover Potato Products v Shalala, 989 F2d 123, 128, 131 (3rd Cir. 1993) (failure of agency to make its 
rulemaking data available is sufficient lack of justification to warrant an award of attorney fees) 
67 
See footnote 22 and accompanying text in Attachment C. 
68 
Public Citizen v Federal Motor Carrier Safety Admin, 374 F3d 1209 (D.C. Cir. 2004) (rule 
invalid for relying on external studies not on the precise issue, failure to make cost-benefit analysis) 
69 
Eric Yeager, “USPTO Commissioner Doll Says That Limiting Continuations Will Improve 
Patent Landscape,” 72 Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal 704ff (USPTO “invited the AIPLA board 
oard 
to take a look at the agency’s models and the assumptions they are based upon. Those models will reveal 
that USPTO’s proposed change to continuation practice will turn the backlog situation around”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
E: T
T
HE 
R
ULES 
E
XCEED THE 
A
UTHORITY 
D
ELEGATED TO 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
E-2 
UNDER THE 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCEDURE 
A
CT AND 
P
ATENT 
A
CT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested