mvc view pdf : Adding a text field to a pdf application control utility azure html asp.net visual studio 619-33-part1456

policies and practices.  However, once USPTO decides to propose new regulations, it is 
obligated to abide by established administrative law procedures. 
II. 
USPTO’s Proposed Retroactive Application of the Rules Exceeds Legal Bounds 
Senior officials have publicly stated that USPTO intends to give the rules retroactive 
effect.
70 
In particular, the new rules would apply to all applications that are pending under the old 
rules but not yet examined as of the effective date of the new rules.  This violates the law in three 
separate ways. 
First, new provisions cannot be “submarined” past the requirements for Notice and 
and 
Comment.
71 
Second, retroactivity violates limits on USPTO’s authority.  The Supreme Court 
rt 
explained the limits on agencies’ authority to promulgate retroactive rules in Bowen v 
Georgetown University Hospital, 488 U.S. 204, 209, 220 (1988), as follows: 
Retroactivity is not favored in the law. Thus, congressional enactments and 
administrative rules will not be construed to have retroactive effect unless their language 
requires this result. ... By the same principle, a statutory grant of legislative rulemaking 
authority will not, as a general matter, be understood to encompass the power to 
promulgate retroactive rules unless that power is conveyed by Congress in express terms. 
... “The power to require readjustments for the past is drastic. It ... ought not to be 
extended so as to permit unreasonably harsh action without very plain words”. Even 
where some substantial justification for retroactive rulemaking is presented, courts should 
be reluctant to find such authority absent an express statutory grant. 
A rule that has unreasonable secondary retroactivity – for example, altering 
future regulation in a manner that makes worthless substantial past investment incurred in 
reliance upon the prior rule – may for that reason be “arbitrary” or “capricious,” see 5 
U.S.C. § 706, and thus invalid. 
Bowen makes clear that retroactivity is measured with respect to the activities of the regulated 
party and its “past investment incurred in reliance upon the prior rule,” not with respect to 
to 
agency action.  USPTO’s examination schedule is irrelevant. 
t. 
70 
John Whealan, Duke University Law School, Fifth Annual Hot Topics in Intellectual Property 
Law Symposium, http://realserver.law.duke.edu/ramgen/spring06/students/02172006a.rm (Feb. 17, 
2006), at time mark 1:01:50, describing how USPTO will apply the rules retroactively to applications 
filed before the rules’ effective date. 
71 
Air Transport Ass’n v. Federal Aviation Admin., 169 F.3d 1, 7-8 (D.C. Cir. 1999) (rule invalid 
id 
where it departs unpredictably from the Notice’s proposed rule). 
A
TTACHMENT 
E: T
T
HE 
R
ULES 
E
XCEED THE 
A
UTHORITY 
D
ELEGATED TO 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
E-3 
UNDER THE 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCEDURE 
A
CT AND 
P
ATENT 
A
CT 
Adding a text field to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add text boxes to a pdf
Adding a text field to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document
Third, there is no delegation of retroactive rulemaking authority in the statute.  Even if 
the Office successfully defended a “substantial justification” within its jurisdiction (an unlikely 
ely 
possibility) – it has no authority to rely on that justification without authority from Congress. 
III.
 
USPTO Concedes that the Rules are “Substantive” and Therefore Beyond its 
Authority 
USPTO has procedural but not substantive rulemaking authority.
72 
But the cornerstone 
proposals of both rules are substantive, and therefore likely to be ruled beyond USPTO’s 
authority when challenged. The NPRMs readily concede that the new rules are intended to 
“affect substantive rights or interests,” and “encode the agency’s substantive value judgment,” 
nt,” 
two of the major tests
73 
used to determine whether a rule is procedural or substantive. After the 
NPRMs were published, in the early Town Hall presentations in February 2006, USPTO officials 
quite openly expressed the view that both the Continuations Rule and Limits on Claims Rule 
were being proposed for a substantive purpose reflecting USPTO’s policy judgment, and that 
at 
USPTO intended to substantively alter the delicate balance of rights that Congress created.
.
74 
IV.
 
The Rules Shift Burdens of Proof, and are Therefore Substantive 
The Supreme Court has noted that shifts in burdens of proof are “substantive.”
75 
Under 
federal patent law, USPTO always has the burden of proof whenever it rejects a patent 
nt 
72 
USPTO does “NOT … have authority to issue substantive rules,” 35 U.S.C. § 2(b)(2)(A)72; 
72; 
Merck & Co. v. Kessler, 80 F.3d 1543, 1550, 38 USPQ2d 1347, 1351 (Fed. Cir. 1996) (emphasis in 
Merck).  The full text of § 2 is set forth in Attachment O – note that USPTO has no responsibility to 
y to 
regulate, adjudicate, or gain competence in any aspect of the post-issuance economic lifetime of a patent, 
except for the very narrow scope of issues reviewable by reissue and reexamination. 
73 
E.g., JEM Broadcasting Co. v. Federal Communications Comm’n, 22 F.3d 320, 328 (D.C. Cir. 
Cir. 
1994) (a rule is ineligible for procedural classification “where the agency ‘encodes a substantive value 
alue 
judgment’” in the rule). 
74 
John Whealan, Duke University Law School, Fifth Annual Hot Topics in Intellectual Property 
Law Symposium, http://realserver.law.duke.edu/ramgen/spring06/students/02172006a.rm (Feb. 17, 
2006), at time mark 58:26, discussed reasons that USPTO would not permit continuations.  He stated that 
at 
he would introduce an “intent” element, and substantially rebalance substantive rights, in derogation of 
the law as stated by the courts, for example, in Kingsdown Medical Consultants Ltd v. Hollister Inc., 863 
F.2d 867, 874, 9 USPQ2d 1384, 1390 (Fed. Cir. 1988).  Mr. Whealan conceded that USPTO may well be 
acting illegally.  Id. at time mark 52:10. 
75 
Director, Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, Dept of Labor v. Greenwich Collieries, 
512 U.S. 267, 271 (1994) (“[T]he assignment of the burden of proof is a rule of substantive law.”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
E: T
T
HE 
R
ULES 
E
XCEED THE 
A
UTHORITY 
D
ELEGATED TO 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
E-4 
UNDER THE 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCEDURE 
A
CT AND 
P
ATENT 
A
CT 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text box to pdf file
application, for any reason.
.
76 
Both rules would shift burdens of proof, and are therefore 
“substantive” and outside the Office’s authority. 
ty. 
The Continuations Rule proposes to shift the burden of proof on the issue of the right to 
file a continuation from USPTO
77 
to applicants.
78 
Most egregiously, USPTO’s “Town Hall” 
” 
slides specifically state that USPTO would deny permission to file a continuation application 
when the underlying problem is USPTO’s own lack of diligence or violation of its own guidance 
documents.
79 
Similarly, the Limits on Claims Rule proposes to shift the burden of proof for 
patentability over prior art from USPTO to the applicant in certain circumstances.  It would 
require the applicant to perform a search and examine all claims against all documents submitted 
to the Office (for potentially dozens of documents that are of only secondary relevance). It would 
permit the Office to disallow claims until an applicant does so and it would allow the Office to 
automatically reject claims that it has not examined. Finally, both rules would shift the burden of 
proof on the issue of “double patenting.” 
” 
Each of these shifts of burden of proof are substantive, and therefore not a valid exercise 
of USPTO’s authority to issue regulations governing application and examination procedure. 
76 
In re Oetiker, 977 F.2d 1443, 1445-46, 24 USPQ2d 13443, 1444 (Fed. Cir. 1992) (“the 
he 
examiner bears the initial burden, on review of the prior art or on any other ground, of presenting a prima 
facie case of unpatentability. … If examination at the initial stage does not produce a prima facie case of 
unpatentability, then without more the applicant is entitled to grant of the patent” [emphasis added]); In re 
re 
Haas, 580 F.2d 461, 198 USPQ 334 (CCPA 1978) (refusal to examine is legally the same as a rejection). 
77 
35 U.S.C. § 120 (a continuation “shall have the same effect” as an original application); 35 
; 35 
U.S.C. § 131 (Director of USPTO “shall cause an examination to be made of the application,” not such 
uch 
applications as the Director picks and chooses, or some designated part of the application); In re Bogese, 
303 F.3d 1362, 1368-69, 64 USPQ2d 1448, 1453 (Fed. Cir. 2002) (USPTO may refuse further 
rther 
examination of an application only after satisfying fairly strict prerequisites, including notice). 
78 
The applicant must “show[] to the satisfaction of the Director that the amendment, argument, 
or evidence could not have been submitted during the prosecution of the prior-filed application” or “prior 
prior 
to the close of prosecution in the application.”71 Fed. Reg. 59, col. 3, and 61, col. 2. 
79 
See Attachment N, slides 82 and 83 of the Chicago Town Hall slides (Continuation will not be 
ot be 
permitted in cases where examiner’s work violated USPTO’s guidance documents, or was otherwise 
se 
inadequate or incomplete, even when so inadequate as to constitute “premature final rejection”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
E: T
T
HE 
R
ULES 
E
XCEED THE 
A
UTHORITY 
D
ELEGATED TO 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
E-5 
UNDER THE 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCEDURE 
A
CT AND 
P
ATENT 
A
CT 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET.
adding text field to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text to a pdf file; add text to pdf acrobat
Attachment F 
Existing Regulations or Administrative Practices Created or 
Contributed to the Problems USPTO Seeks to Remedy 
USPTO has disclosed no analysis of the extent to which its existing regulations or 
administrative practices have created or contributed to the problems it seeks to remedy, as 
required by Sec. 1(b)(2).
80 
USPTO has disclosed no analysis of alternatives to direct regulation, 
including most notably “providing economic incentives to encourage the desired behavior” (Sec. 
c. 
1(b)(3)). 
In this case, it is not regulated parties who would benefit from economic incentives; 
patent examination is a user fee-funded government service. Instead, it is USPTO patent 
atent 
examiners who need economic incentives that more closely align their rewards to the social 
value of the applications they are reviewing.  If USPTO’s internal inefficiencies were addressed, 
the backlog problem for which these rules are said to be the solution would be greatly reduced. 
Both proposed rules appear to assume that every application can and should be shaped at 
filing to fit a “standard box” corresponding to a standard quantum of examination work.  In 
In 
Section I, we describe that “standard box,” the internal incentive system under which examiners’ 
’ 
performance is measured. We show that examination resources are not allocated based on either 
the level of effort required to perform a competent and thorough examination or the social value 
of the application. These incentives are perverse and color every aspect of the examination 
process, and indirectly affect how users of the system behave. In Section II, we explain the user-
-
fee basis of USPTO’s funding and note that USPTO set the fees to recover the full cost of 
service. What the two draft rules propose to do is stop providing certain services for which 
USPTO is paid. In Section III, we show that continued examinations require less examining 
resources than initial applications and, in some instances, may be a revenue center for USPTO. 
In Section IV, we show that USPTO has serious problems recruiting and retaining competent 
examiners. In Sections V and VI, we explain how USPTO exacerbates these problems by 
by 
rewarding examiners for unproductive activity and penalizing them for reviewing technically 
complex applications.  We believe that a regulatory impact analysis would assist the USPTO in 
developing internal metrics to more accurately allocate its supply of examination resources to the 
variety of products that its customers want to buy, rather than compel its customers to buy only 
the one-size-fits-all product that USPTO would find it easier to sell. 
ell. 
80 
See Attachment C, text accompanying footnote 24, in which Commissioner Doll admits 
dmits 
USPTO did no studies to identify the source of “rework” applications in its backlog, and had not 
attempted to differentiate between rework applications that arise by applicant error or examiner error. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-1 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text pdf professional
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding text to a pdf; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
I. 
How Examiner Performance is Measured 
Patent examiner performance and productivity is based on a metric known as a “count.” 
” 
The count system is described in MPEP § 1705 (see Attachment Q). Examiners always get two 
wo 
“counts” per application (and in a few cases, a third).  The first “count” is given for the 
r the 
examiner’s First Action on the Merits (FAOM), and the second is given for “disposal.” The 
The 
examiner receives a “disposal” count if (1) he grants an Allowance (i.e., awards a patent), (2) the 
the 
applicant abandons the application, (3) the examiner issues a rejection to which the applicant 
files a Request for Continued Examination (RCE), or (4) certain other actions. Thus, the 
examiner gains a reward if his action leads to an RCE. That creates a strong incentive to issue at 
least one final rejection. 
The examiner’s reward of a count is independent of the validity of his action. 
Applications that should not be rejected may be rejected solely to motivate the applicant to 
submit an RCE. The examiner is neither rewarded for issuing “good” patents nor penalized for 
for 
issuing “bad” ones. There is no difference in the examiner’s reward if he rejects a “bad” claim or 
claim or 
rejects a “good” one. It’s all the same.
same.
81 
All applications in the same technology area receive a similar “examination budget” – the 
the 
amount of time the examiner has to review it
82 
– irrespective of several factors that obviously are 
very important, both to the examiner and to the applicant: 
Whether the application has many claims, or few
83 
Whether the application is 10 pages long or 210 pages long 
Whether the applicant cited no prior art references to USPTO or cited 200 references
84 
81 
The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has complained about USPTO’s predilection for 
not revealing the basis for its adverse decisions. See, e.g., In re Oetiker, 977 F.2d 1443, 1449, 24 USPQ2d 
SPQ2d 
1443, 1447 (Fed. Cir. 1992), Plager, J., concurring (“The examiner cannot sit mum, leaving the applicant 
to shoot arrows into the dark hoping to somehow hit a secret objection harbored by the examiner”). 
82 
USPTO scales examination budgets by technologies – for example, complex biotech patent 
applications receive more time than simple mechanical devices.  However, we understand that for several 
years USPTO has not adjusted its scaling factors to keep pace with increasing complexity in some 
technological areas. 
83 
An application with many claims may be burdensome to the examiner but it does not impose a 
genuine burden to USPTO because the applicant will have paid task-specific extra fees to cover the cost 
st 
of additional examination. The Office appears not to have aligned its internal incentives to the prices it 
charges applicants. 
84 
In the proposed IDS Rule, (RIN 0651-AB95, “Changes to Information Disclosure Statement 
ent 
Requirements and Other Related Matters,” 71 Fed. Reg. 38808 (July 10, 2006)), USPTO would reduce 
uce 
the fee it charges for considering large numbers of prior art references, so long as they are presented early 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-2 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document.
adding text to pdf online; how to enter text into a pdf form
 
Whether the application is a new application or a fifth continuation 
on 
 
that can be allowed after ministerial review 
 
or that otherwise can be predicted to require less time to examine than a new 
application 
 
Whether the application is in actual litigation, imminent litigation or no likely litigation 
 
Whether the application is allowed or finally rejected. 
 
The value of the intellectual property the applicant seeks to protect 
 
The value of timely review to the applicant 
Applicants give USPTO either definitive information or strong signals on all but one of these 
factors that should affect examination.  But under current USPTO compensation metrics, this 
information does not affect an examiner’s time budget.
85 
Finally, the examiner’s reward is the same whether he performs a competent and 
thorough review, or a sloppy, careless and uninformed one – one count for a first action on the 
merits, one count for disposal.  Indeed, in response to a question of whether USPTO permitted 
and incentivized “hide the ball” examination techniques in violation of the agency’s guidance 
document, USPTO stated in a formal written decision that it would not review whether or not 
counts were actually earned by bona fide examination.
n.
86 
II.
 
The December 2004 Increase in USPTO User Fees Was Advertised as the Solution 
to the Backlog Problem 
Effective December 2004, USPTO obtained the authority to impose higher user fees.  For 
example, the fee for each claim in excess of 20 was raised from $18 to $50 and for each 
in examination.  One option for regulatory analysis is the idea of calibrating its examination fees and 
examiner time budget to account for cases where there is a great deal of potentially material prior art, as 
required by 35 U.S.C. § 41(d)(2). 
85 
Many public comments have reminded USPTO that it has both the authority and the requisite 
information it needs to rationally allocate examination time. See “Changes To Implement the Patent 
Business Goals, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” 64 Fed. Reg. 53772-53845 (October 4, 1999), 
), 
Alternatives (2) and (3) (“(2) charge fees for an application based upon what it costs (e.g., number of 
claims, pages of specification, technology, IDS citations) to examine the application; and (3) credit 
examiners based upon the number of claims in the application”); Comments of Heritage Woods, 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/comments/fpp_continuation/ heritagewoods_con.pdf, 
pages 23-32 (discussing various alternatives to the Rules). 
86 
09/385,394, Decision on Petition of Feb. 10, 2006, “[I]nternal Office procedures (i.e., crediting 
of work completed) are neither petitionable or appealable and will not be addressed further…”  The 
agency’s practice with respect to counts and “final rejection” are discussed further in Attachment J. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-3 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
independent claim in excess of 3 was raised from $86 to $200.
87 
The patent bar and users of the 
patent system, including many signatories to this letter, supported these increases precisely 
because USPTO assured us that backlog would decline if only they had the funds to dramatically 
increase staffing and establish incentives that improved examiner retention. Users of the patent 
system agreed that Congress had “starved” USPTO during the period 1992-2003 by diverting 
rting 
hundreds of millions of dollars of user fee revenue: 
88, 89 
AIPLA supported the fee increase, which was said to be necessary “to 
substantially cut the size of [the PTO’s] inventory,” because we believed that it 
it 
would allow the PTO to both improve quality of the patents it granted and reduce 
the pendency of its backlog of patent applications. Congress did increase patent 
fees beginning in fiscal year 2005, and the PTO is now in the second year of that 
increase. It hired approximately 1,000 new patent examiners in FY 2005 and plans 
to hire 1,000 more for each of the next four years. We understand that the Office 
has experienced some difficulties in training and retaining these new examiners. 
We also understand that the Office has developed a new approach to training 
examiners and is targeting new hires that will be more likely to make their career 
in the PTO. 
On the other hand, the Office has repeatedly stated, without providing any 
justification, that it “cannot hire its way out” of the backlog situation in which it 
it 
finds itself. Absent some compelling evidence to back up this claim, AIPLA 
cannot accept this mere statement as justification for the proposed rule changes. 
While it is true that hiring additional examiners would not instantly reduce the 
backlog of pending applications, any search for a remedy to this problem must 
consider the PTO’s current situation and how it got there. Congress essentially 
starved the PTO of the resources it needed to keep pace with the increase in patent 
application filings from roughly FY 1992 through FY 2003, diverting nearly $800 
million in fees generated by this increase. Hundreds of examiners, who would be 
fully trained and experienced today, were not hired. Many of the examiners in the 
87 
Compare 37 C.F.R. § 1.17 from 2004 and today (Attachment P).  For example, an application 
ion 
with 10 independent claims and 52 total claims would incur $3,000 (= {(10-3) ×
3) ×
$200} + {(52-20) ×
×
$50}) in “excess claims,” in addition to the $1,000 filing fee for a basic application.  Thus a moderately 
ly 
complex application costs four times the filing fee of a basic application. 
88 
See AIPLA’s comment letter on the Continuations Rule, April 24, 2006, http://www.uspto.gov/ 
web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/comments/fpp_continuation/aipla.pdf at page 3 (page 4 of the pdf) (“Congress 
essentially starved USPTO of the resources it needed to keep pace with the increase in patent application 
filings from roughly FY 1992 through FY 2003, diverting nearly $800 million in fees generated by this 
increase. Hundreds of examiners, who would be fully trained and experienced today, were not hired.”) 
89 
AIPLA’s letter, loc. cit.; Figueroa v. United States, 466 F.3d 1023, 1027-28 (Fed. Cir. 2006) 
2006) 
(describing the history of “fee diversion,” Congressional failure to authorize USPTO’s authority to spend 
pend 
the fee income it earned). 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-4 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
PTO at that time have aged and are retiring. Now the Office must find and train the 
needed examiners, and must provide an attractive workplace and appealing 
working conditions in order to retain them. This solution will take time; it will not 
happen overnight. But neither did the crisis in which the Office finds itself arise 
overnight. 
The purpose of the additional user fee revenue was to increase hiring, and indeed, USPTO 
forecasts that with these new hires and low attrition, the pendency time will be under 35 months 
in 2011, while without hiring pendency would have exceeded 40 months.
90 
Now USPTO 
officials say that the Office “cannot hire its way out” of the backlog.
og.
91 
III.
 
Continued Examinations Require Less Examining Resources than Initial 
Applications 
In the preamble to the proposed Continuations Rule, USPTO assumes that the resources 
needed to examine initial and continuation applications are identical. Therefore, every continuing 
application not submitted means an initial application will be examined instead.
92 
There are three 
scenarios under which this assumption could hold: the first is rare, and the other two are highly 
implausible. The rare scenario requires that the examiner who reviewed a parent application not 
review the corresponding continuation application. The first implausible scenario concedes that 
the same examiner reviews both applications, but assumes that at the time he reviews the 
continued examination he has no recollection of the earlier application.
93 
In the second 
implausible scenario, all effort expended in earlier examination becomes irrelevant and unusable 
in continued examination.  USPTO has presented no evidence supporting any of these 
propositions.  In fact, common sense suggests that they are true only in unusual circumstances 
and therefore should not be used as the basis for extrapolating changes in USPTO output. 
Continuations are almost always reviewed by the same examiner – the only routine exception is 
when the earlier examiner leaves USPTO employment. The typical time lag between rounds of 
examination is five to ten months, so a complete lack of recollection is unlikely. 
90 
See Chicago Town Hall Slides at 51. 
91 
Eric Yeager, “USPTO Commissioner Doll Says That Limiting Continuations Will Improve 
Patent Landscape,” 72 Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal 704ff (“‘We can’t hire our way out of the 
the 
patent application backlog, and that is certain,’ Doll said.”).  Even if it is assumed that USPTO’s forecasts 
casts 
are valid and reliable, the effect of these two rules would be to reduce pendency by just three months. See 
Attachment N, slide 53 of the Chicago Town Hall Slides, reproduced at Attachment H, section II. 
II. 
92 
71 Fed. Reg. 50, col. 1. 
93 
A parallel is easy to make to OMB’s experience in regulatory review. Staff turnover sometimes 
means final proposed and draft final rules are reviewed by different Desk Officers, especially when a 
significant period of time has elapsed. Rarely, however, does a Desk Officer reviewing a draft final rule 
have no recollection of his own prior review of the draft proposed rule. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-5 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
Instead, it is far more likely that the same examiner reviews both the original and 
continuation applications, and recalls a significant amount of detail.
94 
Examiners reuse the prior 
art search (the single largest time commitment in reviewing a new application for the first time) 
from earlier rounds of examination, and only do “follow up” searches of prior art that was 
as 
recently published.  Therefore, the examining resources necessary to examine a continuation are 
almost certain to be less than those needed to examine a new application. That means for every 
continued application USPTO does not examine, it will examine a fraction of one new 
application with the same resources.
95 
Continuation applications, CIPs, and RCEs appear to be at least self-funding
ng
96 
and may 
be profit centers for USPTO.  We predict, for example, that continuation applications on average 
require significantly less examination resources and generate higher levels of maintenance fee 
revenue than original applications.  We also predict that a well-conducted Regulatory Impact 
Analysis would show that the perverse incentive structures described in Section I, and problems 
ms 
the Office has recruiting and retaining competent examiners, are greater contributors to backlog 
than the application attributes it proposes to regulate.
97 
If the inefficiencies created internally by 
USPTO were addressed, we predict that USPTO’s backlog would be brought under control.  Of 
Of 
course, performing a Regulatory Impact Analysis that complies with Circular A-4 would allow 
low 
USPTO to evaluate these various issues and enable it to structure reforms that attack the 
underlying problem rather than unrelated but observable symptoms. 
IV.
 
USPTO Has Serious Problems Recruiting and (Especially) Retaining Competent 
Examiners 
To work as a patent examiner, one must have earned a college degree in a relevant 
technical field plus, in some technological fields, have a higher lever degree, such as a master’s 
or Ph.D.  Job postings on the USPTO web site give a starting salary of $38,435, and promotion 
94 
USPTO will have ample data that can be analyzed to determine how often the examiner of the 
continuation application is not the same as the examiner of the earlier application.  We encourage USPTO 
to include an analysis of this data in preparing a complete regulatory analysis of the impact of the 
Continuations Rule. 
95 
The parallel to OMB review applies here as well. The resources it needs to review draft rules 
and ICRs would be significantly greater if every submission were new and there was no institutional 
memory. 
96 
If they are not, then USPTO has set its fees in violation of statute, and has both the obligation 
and authority to reset its fees.  35 U.S.C. § 41(d)(2) (“The Director shall establish fees … to recover the 
estimated average cost to the Office…”); see also footnote 29. 
29. 
97 
See Section IV below and Chicago Town Hall slides (Attachment N) at 20 (shows hiring and 
attrition over the past few years). 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-6 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
potential limited to GS-14 equivalent.
nt.
98 
Postings indicate that higher salaries ($63,885 -
-
$83,052) are available for examiners with Ph.D. degrees or the equivalent.
.
99 
These salaries may 
be competitive for newly minted degree-holders, but they probably are not sufficient to retain 
employees, especially in the expensive metropolitan Washington, DC area. GS-15 positions pay 
better ($120,982-$145,400), but they require years of experience and usually involve 
lve 
management responsibilities. 
The retention problem is made worse by the fact that examiners obtain extremely 
valuable, specialized human capital while employed at USPTO, and they must leave government 
service to capitalize on it.
100 
Starting private sector salaries for persons with similar skills and 
human capital are much higher – for example, a median starting salary in the Virginia suburbs 
for an electrical engineer with a Master’s Degree and one year experience in some technical 
ical 
fields is about $70,000 per year.  Many examiners leave USPTO to attend law school, or more 
frequently attend law school at night while still employed at the USPTO, to become patent 
lawyers.  Attorneys with 7-9 years’ experience in law firms earn about $200,000 per year.
ear.
101 
In short, examiner retention is a significant problem and one that may well be endemic to 
the nature of USPTO’s work. It may, in fact, be an impossible problem to solve without 
ut 
returning to the deferred compensation civil service model, which rewarded long term service.
102 
Labor markets are brutally efficient at allocating resources, and USPTO simply may not be able 
to overcome normal market forces with any of the tools at its disposal. 
98 
See 
http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/getjob.asp?JobID=53094580&jbf574=CM56&brd=3876&AVSDM=20 
07%2D04%2D14+13%3A00%3A07&q=EXAMINER&vw=d&Logo=0&FedPub=Y&caller=%2Fa9pto 
%2Easp&FedEmp=N&SUBMIT1.x=0&SUBMIT1.y=0&ss=0&SUBMIT1=Search+for+Jobs&TabNum= 
1&rc=3. 
99 
See 
http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/getjob.asp?JobID=53094737&AVSDM=2007%2D04%2D14+13%3A0 
0%3A05&Logo=0&q=EXAMINER&FedEmp=N&jbf574=CM56&brd=3876&vw=d&ss=0&FedPub=Y 
&caller=/a9pto.asp&SUBMIT1.x=0&SUBMIT1.y=0&SUBMIT1=Search+for+Jobs. 
100 
Attrition also has social benefits: e.g., the corps of patent experts outside the government 
ent 
performs better because there is a cohort that has worked on the “other side” of the table. The challenge to 
e to 
USPTO is to avoid excess attrition, especially among its most competent examiners. 
101 
American Intellectual Property Law Assn, Report of the Economic Survey 2005, page I-52. 
102 
We are aware of no serious interest in such a change. We mention it only to point out that 
potential solutions may exist if the problem of retention per se is deemed crucial. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-7 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested