mvc view pdf : How to add text to a pdf in acrobat SDK application API wpf html .net sharepoint 619-34-part1457

V.
 
USPTO Actively Incentivizes its Examiners to Turn Out Faulty Work Product that 
Delays Examination 
The “flat rate” of two counts per application gives examiners a strong incentive to turn 
turn 
out haphazard, incomplete work product. 
 
An examiner gets one “disposal” count, whether that disposal is in the form of an 
an 
allowance, an abandonment, or an applicant’s filing of a continuation application. (MPEP 
§ 1705, Attachment Q). 
). 
 
At least as of spring 2006, examiners were not subject to any penalty relating to 
promotion, retention or compensation, for turning out bad work.
103
This combination of incentive structures ensures that examiners have only weak incentives to 
examine applications in a way that advances them toward a meaningful conclusion.
104 
USPTO’s continued use of “flat rate” time budgets, and acceptance of perverse incentives 
tives 
and misallocation of resources, is especially surprising after 2003.  In 1999, Congress ordered 
USPTO to analyze its cost and fee structures to better align USPTO’s operations with the needs 
103 
Public remarks of Stephen Kunin, former Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Patent 
Examination Policy, USPTO “Town Hall” Meeting, New York, NY, April 7, 2006. 
6. 
104 
When an application claims two inventions that are “independent and distinct” of each other, 
the law permits USPTO to “divide” it, or “restrict” an application to one invention (“division” and 
“restriction” meaning the same thing).  Restriction allows USPTO to legitimately assign different 
inventions that may be included in a single application to multiple examiners with different subject matter 
expertise.  However, both the fee schedule and the “count” system incentivize USPTO to improperly 
divide a single invention into many daughter applications.  USPTO’s guidance — the Manual on Patent 
Examination practice -- allows the Office even wider latitude -- to divide applications with inventions that 
hat 
are “independent or distinct.” 
Thus, several different examiners often review similar applications involving different aspects of 
the same invention at the same time.  Economies of scale in examination are lost, and applicants have to 
provide duplicative (or even inconsistent) arguments to satisfy multiple examiners arguably interpreting 
the same law and guidance.  We predict that a well-conducted regulatory impact analysis would show that 
at 
USPTO’s restriction practice is a major contributor to inefficiency and backlog. 
In 2003, USPTO published for comment a White Paper setting forth 10 ideas for reforming 
restriction practice. The Office received 26 comments that contain a wealth of insight and helpful advice. 
These public comments used to be linked on its webpage containing links to public comments on dozens 
of proposed Office actions. See http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/comments/index.html
row titled “Summary of Public Comments and the Restriction Reform Options to be Studied by the 
United States Patent and Trademark Office (November 2003)”. USPTO has replaced the link to these 
public comments with a link to its own 9-page summary of the comments. 
s. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-8 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to add text to pdf file with reader
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text in pdf file; add text to a pdf document
of inventors.
105 
USPTO did so
106
, and restructured both its fee calculation algorithms and 
relative fee levels in 2004 
to more closely align applicant payment and USPTO revenue with actual cost, 
reduce the incentives for applicants to pursue wasteful examination, and recover 
USPTO cost of operations more directly.  The net effect is to elicit a level of 
participation from applicants … that provides economies in examination while 
maintaining and improving timeliness and quality.  These benefits arise from a 
proposed structure that … better aligns fees with the value provided, that 
minimizes additional administrative complexity, and that retains the financial 
incentives for inventors of less financial means. 
Since then, a number of public comments to a number of past USPTO Requests for Comment 
have noted the misallocation of resources that arises because of the “flat rate” count system. 
These comments noted that the problem under study by USPTO was the product of the count 
system and could be cured by applying the same logic to examination budgets as USPTO applied 
to fees. USPTO has apparently ignored those suggestions.
107 
Many of the public comments noted that applicants are happy to pay the costs of 
thorough examination, subject to two conditions: (a) the fees charged should be reasonably 
tailored to the Office’s costs, and (b) the Office must ensure that examination proceeds in a 
predictable way under regular procedures.  The Office’s response to these offers has not been 
encouraging.
108 
105 
American Inventors Protection Act of 1999, Pub. L. No. 106-113, 113 Stat. 1501, 1501A-555, 
5, 
§ 4204 (directing USPTO to “conduct a study of alternative fee structures that could be adopted [by the 
he 
Office] to encourage maximum participation by the inventor community in the United States.”). 
106 
The results of that study are reported in part at 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/strat21/ action/sr1fr1.htm. 
107 
See, for example, http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/preognotice/ 
unitycommentssummary.pdf, which contains no mention of the issue, though the idea was raised in 
several of the comment letters. 
108 
For example, in late April 2002, the Office proposed a punitive exponential fee structure 
(literally exponential, size
1.25
), rather than a linear cost-recovery fee structure.  See 
http://web.archive.org/web/20021005230103/http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/strat2001/ 
faq.htm#q53. Some applications would have required filing fees in the millions of dollars.  The Office 
appears to be unwilling or unable to propose economically-rational “burden sharing” and instead appears 
ears 
overtly confrontational, and oppositional to those inventors who have complex inventions. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-9 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
how to add text box in pdf file; how to enter text in pdf form
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; adding text to pdf reader
VI.
 
A Significant Fraction of “Continuation” Applications May Be Generated Because 
use 
of Perverse Incentives Relating to “Final Rejection” 
” 
USPTO’s guidance document, the MPEP, sets out the criteria for “metering” the quantum 
of examination given an application for each filing fee.  When that quantum of examination has 
been performed, and the application has not been allowed, the applicant has several options – 
almost always, a continuation application is by a factor of 3-10 the least expensive.  This 
continuation application occasions a new filing fee to get a new quantum of examination.  The 
“meter” is supposed to run out when an examiner has given two thorough rounds of examination 
to the application, so that the second rejection can be made “final.”
109 
Applicants can respond in several ways to an Office Action that fails to meet the criteria 
for final rejection: 
(1) An applicant can request that the examiner withdraw the finality of the office action. 
This rarely works. The examiner’s compensation is directly on the line; a petition is a direct 
ct 
request that the examiner commit more effort in return for no additional reward in “counts” (see 
section I of this Attachment F). Also, examiners are not held accountable for breach of the 
the 
agency’s guidance documents
s
110
, and most examiners lack the legal training to decide such 
questions with precision.  Not surprisingly, many examiners are extremely reluctant to withdraw 
109 
Guidance for the required thoroughness for these two rounds is stated in the MPEP, especially 
Chapter 2100 (specifying the tasks an examiner must do in each round of examination) and § 706.07(a), 
which defines the conditions under which a rejection may be made “final”: 
”: 
“Under present practice, second or any subsequent actions on the merits shall be final, 
except where the examiner introduces a new ground of rejection that is neither 
necessitated by applicant’s amendment of the claims nor based on information submitted 
in an information disclosure statement …. Where information is submitted in an 
information disclosure statement …, the examiner may use the information submitted, …, 
and make the next Office action final whether or not the claims have been amended, 
provided that no other new ground of rejection which was not necessitated by amendment 
to the claims is introduced by the examiner. … Furthermore, a second or any subsequent 
action on the merits in any application or patent undergoing reexamination proceedings 
will not be made final if it includes a rejection, on newly cited art, other than information 
submitted in an information disclosure statement …, of any claim not amended by 
applicant or patent owner in spite of the fact that other claims may have been amended to 
require newly cited art. …” 
However, as we discuss in Attachment J, that guidance is not enforced in the context of “premature final 
rejection” or any other. 
110 
Public remarks of Stephen Kunin, former Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Patent 
Examination Policy, USPTO “Town Hall” Meeting, New York, NY, April 7, 2006. 
6. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-10 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text box in pdf document
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text in pdf reader; how to enter text in pdf file
final rejection and give further examination, no matter how incomplete or untimely the 
examination was. 
(2) If the examiner declines request (1), an applicant can petition to withdraw the finality 
of the office action. 
Attorney fees for this petition are typically $3,000-15,000.  In our experience, this is never 
ever 
successful because USPTO as a matter of course does not grant them (see Attachment J). Also, 
o, 
higher-level decision-makers are being asked to act contrary to their own financial interests.  See 
See 
MPEP § 1706. 
(3) The applicant can file a Request for Continued Examination (RCE) and continue 
prosecuting the application. 
Considering that the filing fee for an RCE is $790 (halved for small entities) compared with the 
cost of preparing and filing a petition, not to mention its likelihood of success, it makes sense to 
file the RCE. Examiners like RCEs because they earn at least one, and usually two, more 
re 
“counts,” usually with less effort than would be required to review a new application. 
A very substantial fraction of the continuation applications of which USPTO complains 
are likely to be the consequence of its compensation metrics, and the Office’s delegation of the 
relevant questions to officials that have a direct financial interest in the outcome.  Given the 
economic incentives USPTO gives its employees, it seems at best incongruous that the 
Continuations Rule would restrict the option that is the most economically expeditious way of 
handling premature final rejection. 
As applicants possess a dispersed data set that defies systematic analysis, our comments 
here are necessarily anecdotal.  A complete regulatory analysis in compliance with Circular A-4 
would allow USPTO to utilize their vast database to perform a thorough analysis of this issue. 
A
TTACHMENT 
F: E
XISTING 
R
EGULATIONS OR 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
RACTICES 
P
AGE 
F-11 
C
REATED OR 
C
ONTRIBUTED TO THE 
P
ROBLEMS 
USPTO S
EEKS TO 
R
EMEDY 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
adding text to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text box in pdf
Attachment G
G
USPTO Did Not Rely on the Best Available Scientific, Technical,
,
Economic and Other Information
Sec 1(b)(7) of Executive Order 12,866 requires agencies to base their regulations on the 
best available information. Fortunately, USPTO collects vast quantities of useful data on patent 
applications. It has at its disposal a database containing millions of records. 
Unfortunately, there is little evidence from the preambles to the NPRMs that USPTO 
adequately utilized this database – to diagnose the problems it wanted to solve, to identify 
regulatory alternatives, or to choose among such alternatives.  To the best of our knowledge 
based on USPTO’s response to a FOIA request by one of the coalition members, the entire 
administrative record for both of these NPRMs consists of 114 pages:
111 
o
 
Data tables from slides delivered at the Los Angeles Intellectual Property Law 
Association’s “Washington and the West” Conference, January 25, 2006, (“The State 
tate 
of the Patent System; Background for Rule Proposal”) 
o
 
An 85-slide presentation delivered by Commissioner for Patents John Doll dated 
dated 
February 1, 2006, and delivered first at the Chicago Town Hall meeting, and 
subsequently many times elsewhere (“Chicago Town Hall Slides”) 
I. 
The Data Tables
112 
The data tables provide summary statistics on a number of phenomena of potential 
interest.  Many of these data tables are duplicative over data contained in the Chicago Town Hall 
Slides.  To the extent that there is overlap, we defer discussion of this data to section II below. 
Data that is not duplicative over the Chicago Town Hall slides include the following: 
1.
 
a data table showing the first action pendency and average total pendency for 
various technology centers 
2.
 
data illustrating the increase in continuation (continuation, CPA/RCE, CIP) filing 
rates from FY1980 to FY2005 
3.
 
data illustrating the increase in continuation filing percentage (as percent of total 
filings) from FY1980 to FY2005 
111 
See Attachment N. 
112 
Id. 
A
TTACHMENT 
G: USPTO D
D
ID 
N
OT 
R
ELY ON THE 
B
EST 
A
VAILABLE 
S
CIENTIFIC
P
AGE 
G-1 
T
ECHNICAL
, E
CONOMIC AND 
O
THER 
I
NFORMATION 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
add text field to pdf; how to insert a text box in pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
adding text pdf files; how to insert text into a pdf file
4.
 
data illustrating the drop in appeal pendency from FY2001 to FY2005 
5.
 
a brief description of appeal programs through which applications are reviewed 
by senior examiners before review by the Board of Patent Interferences and 
Appeals (BPAI) 
For (1) through (3) above, no analysis of the data is provided to examine obvious 
questions concerning the underlying causes for the data (e.g., why are the pendency figures as 
shown in (1) above? why has there been an increase in continuation filings from FY1980 to 
FY2005?).  Without an analysis of underlying causes there is no way of determining if the 
changes proposed in the Continuations Rule will reverse the trends shown in the data or 
otherwise improve performance. 
For (4) above, the data illustrate what we acknowledge to be a success story – the ability 
of USPTO to drive down the appeal pendency over the past 5 years.  However, what is lacking is 
an analysis of the potential impact on this positive trend if the Continuations Rule is 
implemented.  We believe that if the rule is promulgated as proposed, appeals will drastically 
increase as applicants attempt to preserve their limited number of continuations and RCEs.  We 
predict that the data from FY 2001 to FY2008 or FY2009 will look far different, resembling 
more of a V shape as the positive trend of the past few years is suddenly reversed. 
For (5) above, USPTO describes several appeal programs that have been instituted to 
provide review of appeal cases by senior examiners to limit the need for the BPAI to hear cases 
in which the examiner is most certainly to be reversed.  These programs have helped reduce the 
BPAI’s backlog and should be commended.  Again, what is lacking is an analysis of the potential 
impact on these programs if the Continuations Rule is implemented.  As noted above, we believe 
the Continuations Rule will result in a drastic increase in the number of appeals.  The description 
provided in (5) highlights the fact that this increase is likely to have a tremendous impact not 
only on the Administrative Law Judges that sit on the BPAI, but also on the most senior 
examiners in the examining corps.  We believe that such a drain on examining resources will 
contribute to rather than alleviate the backlog that USPTO seeks to reduce. 
II. 
The Chicago Town Hall Slides
113 
These slides appear to be a presentation (or set of presentations), but to the best of our 
knowledge they were distributed at the various Town Hall meetings but never actually presented 
113 
See  http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/chicagoslides.ppt 
(PowerPoint) and (http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/dapp/opla/presentation/chicagoslidestext.html 
(HTML), Attachment N. USPTO directs readers as follows: 
For background and justification, see slides 8-30 and 48-60
60
For proposals on [Continuations Rule], see slides 31-38 and 72-85
85
For proposals on [Limits on Claims Rule], see slides 39-47 and 61-71
-71
1
A
TTACHMENT 
G: USPTO D
D
ID 
N
OT 
R
ELY ON THE 
B
EST 
A
VAILABLE 
S
CIENTIFIC
P
AGE 
G-2 
T
ECHNICAL
, E
CONOMIC AND 
O
THER 
I
NFORMATION 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
adding text fields to a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
adding text to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
or discussed. Most of the slides that contain data are only descriptive rather than analytical (i.e., 
they do not contain the results of inferential statistical analyses) or they describe selected results 
of forecasting. Several slides deserve particular attention. 
Slides 50-54 are forecasts of patent pendency under six alternative scenarios. The details 
behind these scenarios, including the modeling USPTO performed to construct the slides, have 
not been disclosed by USPTO. Moreover, when some of the signatories of this letter asked 
USPTO for the underlying data and models used to produce the forecasts, USPTO officials 
declined to do so on the ground that the data and models were pre-decisional and thus not subject 
to public disclosure. In Attachment K, we show USPTO has failed to adhere to the letter and 
spirit of the Information Quality Act and OMB’s government-wide Information Quality 
ity 
Guidelines. 
A
TTACHMENT 
G: USPTO D
D
ID 
N
OT 
R
ELY ON THE 
B
EST 
A
VAILABLE 
S
CIENTIFIC
P
AGE 
G-3 
T
ECHNICAL
, E
CONOMIC AND 
O
THER 
I
NFORMATION 
Attachment H
H
USPTO’s Claimed Reduction in Backlog Is Unlikely to Materialize 
In the preambles to its draft rules, USPTO claims that they will reduce the Office’s 
backlog but does not provide any reproducible quantitative estimates of how much reduction will 
be realized. In fact, the preamble does not provide usable data on the size of the backlog. The 
only place we can find estimates of either the magnitude of the problem USPTO is trying to 
solve or the effects of these draft rules is in the Chicago Town Meeting slides.
.
114 
I. 
What does USPTO Expect to Achieve? 
Below we have reproduced Slide 53, which summarizes average patent pendency (in 
months of examination time) and forecasts patent pendency under four scenarios, assuming an 
8.1% annual increase in patent applications submitted:
115 
 
Business as usual (RED line at top) 
 
1,000 new hires, low examiner attrition (YELLOW line second from top) 
 
1,000 new hires, low examiner attrition, plus proposed Limits on Claims Rule and 
proposed Continuations Rules (BLUE line third from top) 
 
BLUE scenario plus third planned rule
116 
that would require a Patentability Report, 
similar to an Examination Support Document, to be filed with any new application of 
any significance (PURPLE line at bottom) 
114 
For the complete slide set, see Attachment N.  In Attachment L, we report that USPTO has 
has 
refused to make public the data, models and assumptions used to construct these forecasts. In Attachment 
K, we show why this violates the federal Information Quality Act and OMB’s implementing Information 
Quality Guidelines. In Attachment E, we explain why these (and other) defects lead to a material violation 
on 
of the Administrative Procedure Act. 
115 
This graph may be most interesting for what it does not include: there are no scenarios 
showing how internal USPTO reforms such as revising the ”count” system, reining in excessive and 
inappropriate use of restriction practice, or providing better examiner oversight, to name just two 
examples, would drive down pendency.  A regulatory impact analysis would allow the USPTO to prepare 
a complete list of scenarios showing the impacts of both internal and external reforms that could help the 
USPTO address its backlog problem. 
116 
“Patentability Reports” of this slide appear to correspond to “Patentability Justification” 
n” 
documents that would be required under a third rule, the IDS Rule,” RIN 0651-AB95, “Changes to 
anges to 
Information Disclosure Statement Requirements and Other Related Matters,” 71 Fed. Reg. 38808 (July 
10, 2006).  However, this is merely an inference because to our knowledge, USPTO has not public 
disclosed what would be required in a “Patentability Report.” 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-1 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
The graph appears to convey one of two messages. One possibility is that average patent 
pendency historically ranged within a fairly narrow band, but since 2002 it has wildly escaped its 
historic range. Alternatively, the increase in patent pendency occurred beginning in 1994 and 
2002 was simply an aberration. Statutory changes occurred in 1995 and 1999, but the upward 
trend shows no significant discontinuities around those years.  USPTO offers no explanation for 
it, either – not in the Chicago Town Hall slides or in the preambles to the proposed rules. Yet it 
offers these rules as the solution to a problem whose origin they have not clearly identified. 
Further, USPTO’s graph clearly intends to communicate that unless drastic action is taken to 
address the backlog, by 2011 average patent pendency will have doubled since the mid-1990s 
(red line). 
Most of the increase shown on the graph is forecast, not data. The choice of baseline is a 
critical element of any analysis and comparison, but USPTO has not disclosed that information. 
Moreover, the visual appearance is misleading because the vertical axis does not begin at the 
origin.
117 
117 
Plotting data on a graph using only a portion of the scale exaggerates the visual appearance of 
variation. This is especially problematic when, as in this case, the scale excludes zero. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-2 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
As described elsewhere in Attachment, as well as in Attachment K, it is perilous to draw 
aw 
inferences from these statistics.
118 
We have focused here on the visual messages that USPTO 
appears to want the public to take away. 
USPTO forecasts that if nothing is done, the upward trend from 1994 to 1999, which 
abated from 1999 to 2002 for unexplained reasons, will return (red line). The basis for this 
forecast is unclear, and USPTO has not disclosed the analysis which produced it. USPTO also 
forecasts that as a result of these draft rules, by 2011 average patent pendency will decline from 
about 34 months (yellow line) to about 31 months (blue line), or about 10%. Similarly, the basis 
for this forecast also has not been disclosed. 
118 
In Attachment K, we explain why USPTO’s presentation of influential information does not 
not 
adhere to applicable information quality standards with respect to transparency, reproducibility, and 
presentational objectivity. In Sections II and III below, we show why the influential information USPTO 
relies on does not adhere to the substantive objectivity standard, either. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-3 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested