mvc view pdf : Add text box to pdf file software application dll winforms html web page web forms 619-35-part1458

II. 
What’s Wrong with the Influential Statistical Information USPTO Reports? 
1.  USPTO Relies on a Biased Measure of Central Tendency 
USPTO shows us only the (apparently) arithmetic mean for each year. Arithmetic means 
are unbiased measures of central tendency only for distributions that are normally distributed. 
But the distribution of patent pendency times is known to be highly skewed.
119 
Thus, the 
arithmetic mean is an upwardly-biased indicator of central tendency. We have no way to know 
what the curve would look like if an unbiased measure had been used instead. We do know, 
however, that inferences based on a biased statistic will themselves be biased.
120 
Moreover, central tendency is not the only interesting statistic about a distribution. For 
example, regulatory design could be different if variation from the mean is  more serious 
problem than the magnitude of the mean itself, or if the tails of the distribution are especially 
important. From the limited information reported by USPTO, we have no idea what’s important. 
2.  The Influential Statistical Information is Misleading and/or Not Predictive 
As described further in Section V of this attachment, the influential statistical information 
provided overstates the likely impact of the rules on USPTO backlog.  It also understates the 
proportion of applications that would be affected. With respect to the proposed Limits on Claims 
Rule, USPTO asserts that it would have had no effect on the 98.8 percent of historic applications 
for which there were 10 or fewer independent claims. But the proposed rule would expand the 
definition of an independent claim, so that some claims now classified as “dependent” become 
“independent.”
121 
By changing the underlying basis for its statistic, USPTO undermines the 
utility of the historic data for estimating this percentage. 
119 
Lemley & Moore (2004), the primary authority on which USPTO relies for the conclusion that 
continued examinations ought to be severely attenuated, shows how skewed the distribution is in their 
Figures 1, 3 and 4.  For more discussion of this reference, see Attachment D. 
120 
The use of biased statistics is a violation of both the presentational and substantive objectivity 
standards in OMB’s and USPTO’s information quality guidelines. See Attachment K, Sec. III. Because 
Because 
USPTO’s forecasts are not transparent and reproducible, they are presumptively non-compliant with these 
se 
standards, as well. 
121 
The patent law divides claims into “independent” and “dependent” claims.  Generally, 
independent claims describe the broadest concept of the invention, and therefore present more issues and 
are more difficult to examine.  Dependent claims cover refinements of an invention, and serve several 
purposes: (a) to provide fallback positions in case prior art is discovered in the future that invalidates the 
broader claims, (b) to cover various legal technicalities, and (c) to teach the examiner about the invention 
to secure better examination of the independent claims.  It is not clear what alternative means the USPTO 
intends to provide to cover these three needs.  Further, the dividing line between “dependent” and 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-4 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
Add text box to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf online; add text to pdf file
Add text box to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text field pdf; how to add text to pdf file
Further, to the degree that USPTO expects this rule to reduce the number of applications 
that applicants file, the USPTO has provided no estimate of the social costs of this change. 
Scholarly studies have shown that the number of claims is the single strongest predictor of patent 
value,
122 
so a mere showing of number of patents affected is unlikely to be relevant to any 
regulatory impact analysis. 
III.  What Critical Influential Statistical Information Does USPTO Not Report? 
USPTO maintains a vast database containing millions of records. For each patent 
application, USPTO can trace its entire procedural history. Virtually all of these data have been 
ignored. 
1.  Distributions 
Each annual “average” that USPTO reports is a value from a distribution for that year. 
r. 
Knowing the distribution of the data for each year helps analysts better understand how to 
interpret the data.  Fortunately, USPTO has a rich database. It would be easy for the Office to 
report the entire distribution and not just a single summary statistic. OMB has been eager to see 
agencies perform uncertainty analysis,
123 
but many agencies and the National Academy of 
Sciences have complained that the data to support uncertainty analysis are often unavailable.
124 
Whatever the merits of those objections, they do not apply in this case because USPTO has at its 
disposal the kind of database that would make other agencies and scholarly researchers envious. 
2.  Disaggregation across multiple margins 
Patent applications are not all the same. The most obvious margins on which they differ 
include type (e.g., original, continued, RCE), technology area (USPTO has 8 technology 
centers), number of claims, and number of prior art references. These margins matter greatly for 
understanding the patent process and the legitimate complexity inherent to an application; 
USPTO aggregates them together as if they are all the same. 
“independent” is specified by statute, as are the respective fees, 35 U.S.C. § 41(a), 112 ¶ 4, so it is 
questionable whether the USPTO has authority to change either the definition or fee by rule. 
122 
Kimberley A. Moore, Worthless Patents, Berkeley Technology Law Journal vol. 20 no. 4, pp. 
1521-52, 1530-31 (Fall 2005). 
). 
123 
Office of Management and Budget. Circular A-4: Regulatory Analysis (2003); Final 
Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review, 70 Fed. Reg. 2664; Proposed Risk Assessment Bulletin 
(2006) (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/inforeg/proposed_risk_assessment_bulletin_010906.pdf). 
124 
National Research Council, Scientific Review of the Proposed Risk Assessment Bulletin from 
the Office of Management and Budget (2007) (http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11811.html). 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-5 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Document Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
add text to pdf in acrobat; how to enter text into a pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
add text pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
As a first and very simple step in exploratory data analysis, USPTO ought to disaggregate 
its patent pendency distributions by application type and technology area and test whether they 
are different. For example, is average patent pendency for RCEs much shorter than for original 
applications? If so, what might explain these facts? How could limiting continuation practice 
ice 
have any significant effect on backlog if it is discovered to be a minor contributor?
125 
Is the 
distribution significantly different by technology sector? If so, why does it make sense to write 
rules that apply uniformly to all technology sectors? 
USPTO’s database is remarkably rich. Properly analyzed, it would reveal myriad clues 
about the reason for the Office’s growing backlog problem. But without this analysis, it is 
difficult to reach any other conclusion but that the limited statistical information revealed is 
intended to support predetermined policy conclusions and not to inform regulatory decision-
-
making. 
IV.  Backlog as Evidence of a Congestion Externality 
In addition to utilizing USPTO’s database for clues, it helps to step back from the details 
of the patent process and think seriously about what kind of a problem it is. We believe that, at 
its root, the backlog problem is best understood as a congestion externality.
126 
Prospective 
patentees must submit their applications to the examining group that deals with a specific 
technological field — there are several hundred non-interchangeable examining groups — and 
and 
an applicant cannot just pick the one with the shortest queue. Moreover, generally they have to 
join the queue at the end.
127 
The more applicants there are in a given line, the greater is the 
congestion externality that each application imposes on the others. 
125 
If the average RCE consumes about 1/3 the examining resources as the average original 
application, then 100,000 RCEs contribute as much to backlog as 33,000 original applications. 
126 
There is a rich economic literature on congestion externalities that ought to be the subject of a 
chapter in the Regulatory Impact Analysis that USPTO ought to perform, or obtain from a competent 
third party. The literature suggests two general solutions: property rights and Pigouvian taxes. Additional 
chapters of the RIA should address these competing ideas. 
127 
USPTO has established an expedited application process that permits applicants to jump to the 
head of the queue in some situations. 
For example, applications for “design patents” (a patent on the ornamental appearance of an 
an 
object, as opposed to utility patents that cover traditional functional inventions) can be expedited if the 
application is filed in complete condition, and the applicant states that a preexamiantion search was 
conducted, for an extra fee of $900 (in addition to the filing and examination fees of $430.00).  37 C.F.R. 
§§ 1.155, 1.17(k). 
The rules for expedited examination of utility patents have varied over the years, but have never 
involved an extra fee.  Under rules in effect since August 2005, most instances of accelerated examination 
require that an applicant produce and submit an Examination Support Document.  Thus, USPTO does not 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-6 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C# C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to insert text in pdf using preview; adding text to pdf in reader
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer control allows to add various annotation comments to PDF document in .NET Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text field to pdf acrobat
The process is analogous to the toll plaza at the George Washington Bridge. First, drivers 
(patent applicants) must choose a lane (technology center) and cannot (or are not supposed to) 
cut in front of others. The (application) fee for crossing the bridge is the same for similar 
vehicles (applications). The threshold value of getting across the bridge (getting a patent) is the 
same, but the value of getting across quickly (short patent pendency) and being on the other side 
(the value of intellectual property rights protected) varies a lot.
128 
Understanding backlog as a congestion externality helps conjure up ideas for how to 
solve the problem.  For example, more toll booth operators (patent examiners) can be added or 
or 
“HOT” lanes (accelerated examination) installed to allow expedited passage to those with urgent 
gent 
need to cross the bridge. USPTO has hired more patent examiners and provides for accelerated 
examination
127
; thus, there is a precedent for USPTO offering the equivalent of HOT lanes for 
patent applicants in a hurry to secure approval.
127 
Understanding USPTO’s backlog problem as a congestion externality also helps explain 
what is conceptually wrong with USPTO’s proposed rules. The Continuations Rule would deny 
applicants the right to suspend their progress in the queue – the toll plaza analogy for 
continuation practice – but it would not change either the length of the queue or move applicants 
through it more quickly – indeed, a study might show that it increases average service time. 
Similarly, the Limits on Claims Rule would try to shorten the queue by denying some applicants 
the right to enter it, and making it easier for toll booth operators to process those who remain, but 
ut 
at the cost of refusing to provide any service to those who used to pay full asking price for a 
premium service.
129 
If applicants respond by dividing their applications into multiple parts, 
analogous to a trucking company that would divide cargo into multiple small red trucks if big 
ig 
charge a higher price to gain access to its HOT lane for utility patents. Rather, it shifts much of the cost 
and obligation of substantive examination to the applicant. Whether USPTO has designed its “HOT” 
lanes optimally is a matter for regulatory analysis. 
128 
This comparison also highlights important differences between the bridge analogy and the 
patent application process. First, there are alternative ways to get into Manhattan but there are no 
alternatives to USPTO. Second, the value of securing a patent varies by orders of magnitude across 
applicants.  Third, whereas no one considers the task of crossing the bridge complete having merely 
gotten into line, in the patent application process getting in line is what establishes your property right. 
Being first in line with a specific invention is not a matter of mere machismo or pride, but it’s essential 
for success.  Finally, continuation practice is akin to voluntarily suspending one’s progress in the queue. 
A driver might not do this in line at the George Washington Bridge, but people often let others pass in 
other kinds of line in order to delay their own processing. 
129 
USPTO proposes to act like an airline that has a vibrant demand for first class seats, but stops 
offering first class service. No regulation is needed to solve this problem. Customers seeking first class 
service would flock to competing airlines. USPTO does not have any competitors. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-7 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; adding text to a pdf form
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection.
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text to pdf document online
blue trucks are not allowed to cross the bridge, the rule will increase the length of the queue 
rather than reduce it.
130 
Other alternatives that were known to the PTO but not considered in the NPRM are 
mentioned in Attachment I, at Section III. 
I. 
V.
 
The Limited Data Presented by USPTO Indicate that the Continuations Rule Will 
Not Effectively Decrease Backlog 
In the preamble, USPTO provides internally inconsistent information about the nature of 
the backlog problem, the extent to which continued examinations contribute to it, and what effect 
on backlog the rule might have. This information is problematic for the following reasons: 
 
It incorrectly compares filings during a fiscal year with actions taken by USPTO 
during the same fiscal year irrespective of the fiscal year in which the applications 
acted upon were filed 
 
It exaggerates what the proposed rule could accomplish even under best-case 
assumptions 
 
It incorrectly assumes that the amount of effort to examine a continuation is the same 
as the amount of effort to examine a new application 
These errors misrepresent the problem of backlog and exaggerate the likely effect of the 
proposed rule on backlog. 
1.
 
USPTO’s Estimate of the Resources Devoted to Continuations Is Invalid 
USPTO says that roughly 30 percent of the Office’s examining resources must be applied 
to examining continued examination filings.
131 
This calculation is based on 317,000 non-
provisional applications filed, which includes 62,870 continuing applications, and 52,750 RCEs. 
RCEs. 
The figure of 30% is obtained by simple division. 
130 
USPTO's use of aggregate statistics to describe its backlog problem also masks the extent to 
which they are the result of how the Office deploys resources.  For example, the backlog in the software 
and electronics areas is much longer than for most chemical or biotechnology applications. This is due in 
large part to the difficulties USPTO has recruiting and retaining qualified examiners in areas where 
federal salaries do not compete with private sector options.  Also, examiner compliance with agency 
guidance is notably different across technology groups, subjective impression confirmed by remarkably 
different outcomes on appeals from different technology areas.  The use of differentiated statistical 
measures would suggest more reasonably available alternatives for regulatory analysis. 
131 
71 Fed. Reg. 48. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-8 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to add text box to pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
adding text to pdf form; how to add a text box in a pdf file
However, filings in any given year do not equal workload, nor is it a proxy for patent 
pendency. A queuing model, not simple arithmetic, is needed to accurately describe the process 
flow and identify the sources of backlog.
132 
2.
 
USPTO’s Estimate of the Reduction in Backlog From the Rule is Invalid 
In the NPRM, USPTO says it issued 289,000 First Office Actions in 2005.  By 
subtracting the number of continuing applications (62,870) from the non-provisional applications 
filed (317,000), the Office concludes that, had there been no continuation examination filings, it 
could have issued an office action in every new application received in 2005 (317,000 – 62,870 
= 254,130) and reduced the backlog by 35,000 (289,000 – 254,130 = 34,870). The calculation 
assumes (incorrectly) that the First Office Actions taken in 2005 were on applications filed in 
2005. But the obvious implication of the calculation remains: continued examination is the 
presumptive source of the backlog problem, even though the increased backlog is new but 
continued examination is not. 
However, USPTO also reveals that the number of continued examinations affected by 
this proposed rule is a small subset of this total. Of the 62,870 continuing applications submitted 
in fiscal 2005, 44,500 were continuation/continuation-in-part (CIP) applications, and only 11,800 
00 
of them were second or subsequent continuations. Of the 52,750 RCEs, only about 10,000 were 
second or subsequent continuations.
133 
At most, the proposed Continuations Rule could affect 
about 21,800 of all applications submitted in fiscal 2005, or 7%. Thus, under best-case 
se 
assumptions the proposed rule would increase throughput by about one-fourth as much as 
USPTO claims.
134 
If the draft final rule submitted to OMB differs from the rule proposed in the 
NPRMs by allowing more than one continuation as of right, the reduction in backlog would be 
even smaller. 
3.
 
Original and Continuation Applications Do Not Impose the Same Examination 
Burden 
USPTO assumes that there is a one-for-one trade-off between the resources needed to 
d to 
examine original and continued applications. This is extremely unlikely. Continued examinations 
are generally less demanding because the examiner is already familiar with the issues and the 
132 
The operations research literature is rich with queuing models. Surely one of them fits 
USPTO’s circumstances. 
133 
71 Fed. Reg. 50. 
134 
This assumes, of course, that none of the 21,800 applications could have satisfied the 
the 
(unspecified) discretionary criteria for an “allowable” second or further continuation.  Surely USPTO did 
id 
not intend that it would exercise its discretion in such an extreme manner.  But see remarks of John 
Whealan discussed in Attachment M, § II.2. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-9 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties.
add text boxes to pdf; acrobat add text to pdf
scope of the remaining issues to be resolved is narrower. The examiner of an RCE has even more 
of an advantage, as this is merely continued prosecution of the same set of claims.
135 
For a continuation application to require the same effort by USPTO, the identity of the 
examiner must change. But the lag time between a Final Rejection and the filing of a Request for 
Continued Examination is typically a matter of a few months, sometimes weeks. Thus, if 
continued examination poses the same workload burden on USPTO as an original application, 
the underlying problem probably is excessive examiner attrition.
136 
4.  Gains in Throughput from the Proposed Rule Are Modest or Nonexistent 
At 7%, the upper-bound gain in throughput from the proposed rule would be modest. If 
just half of applicants could satisfy the (unspecified) criteria for a second or subsequent 
examination, the gain in throughput would be so small as to be not statistically significant under 
normal rules of thumb for statistical inference. Ironically, USPTO admits as much: 
[T]he Office’s proposed requirements for seeking second and subsequent continuations 
will not have an effect on the vast majority of patent applications.
137 
It is impossible to see how a “reform” that affects such a small fraction of applications could 
uld 
have an effect larger than the uncertainties in USPTO’s projections. 
None of these calculations take into account the certainty that applicants will adapt to the 
new rules in ways that adversely affect backlog. For example, if the right to second and 
subsequent continued examinations is limited unpredictably, applicants will be much more likely 
to appeal adverse decisions; in many cases, appeal would become the only alternative. The effect 
on backlog of a massive increase in appeals is hard to quantify, but it is reasonably clear that it 
will slow down the examination process and lead to increased backlog. 
A high-quality examination in the first instance will always make the examination of a 
continuation more effective.  However, if the initial examination is piecemeal or slipshod (which 
the proposed Limits on Claims rule would mandate for complex applications), there is less useful 
ul 
work product that the examiner of a continuation (either the same examiner or a new examiner) 
can build on.  Thus, the amount of “rework” associated with a continuation is a function of the 
the 
135 
At the same time, the filing fee for continued examination is the same. That means USPTO 
“makes money” on continued examinations, as we describe in Attachment F section III. 
III. 
136 
USPTO has acknowledged that it has a serious problem with examiner attrition, a matter that 
we discuss in Attachment F, Section IV. A properly performed analysis of the backlog problem would 
ould 
ascertain the extent to which throughput is slowed by the need for new examiners to get up to speed on 
old applications. A comparison of examination times for original applications and RCEs would reveal 
whether they require the same level of examination effort. 
137 
71 Fed. Reg. 50. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-10 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
incentives the USPTO provides to ensure high quality examination at first application.  We 
suggest that a regulatory analysis should examine the extent to which high-quality first 
examination reduces the amount of “rework,” or equivalently, the extent to which low-quality 
first examination leads to “traffic accordion” pileups. 
A
TTACHMENT 
H: USPTO’
C
LAIMS OF 
R
EDUCTIONS IN 
B
URDEN ON 
USPTO 
P
AGE 
H-11 
ARE 
I
NVALID AND 
U
NRELIABLE 
Attachment I
I
USPTO Cannot Show that the Proposed Rules are the “Most Cost-
-
effective” Solution 
Even if it is assumed that regulation of some sort is essential, USPTO has disclosed no 
evidence that it has chosen the most cost-effective regulatory approach, as required by Sec. 
c. 
1(b)(5).  All data made public by USPTO suggests that USPTO did not even ask the relevant 
questions.
138 
I. 
The NPRMs are Essentially Silent on Social Costs and Benefits 
USPTO has not disclosed any analysis beyond the undocumented scenarios portrayed 
graphically in the Chicago Town Hall slides.
139 
Therefore, it is impossible for USPTO to have 
met any reasonable burden of proof that its draft rules are the most cost-effective regulatory 
ry 
approach just to reduce its own backlog. 
This is clearly true if the regulatory objective is founded on the regulatory philosophy and 
principles of Executive Order 12,866: USPTO has disclosed no data, analysis, or even a credible 
qualitative argument, as required by Sec. 1(b)(5), that the social costs of these rules are justified 
by their social benefits, including: 
 
the effect of restricted access to patent protection on businesses’ access to the capital 
markets, especially for venture businesses whose only book assets may be their 
intellectual property 
 
the effect on business R&D activities, if the value of patent protection is reduced 
 
the effect on the quality of patent disclosures, and the public’s ability to make use of 
those disclosures, that will attend applicants’ adjustments to the rules (for example the 
“disclosure splitting” into non-overlapping disclosures contemplated by the Limits on 
s on 
Claims Rule) 
 
the costs of exercising published rights to petition premature final rejection and appeal 
rejections as contemplated by the Continuations Rule, or preparation of Examination 
138 
See Attachment D, footnote 24, in which Commissioner Doll admits USPTO did no study to 
to 
identify the source of rework applications in its backlog, and had not attempted to differentiate between 
rework caused by applicants vs. caused by USPTO itself; Attachment C section IV, discussing an email 
email 
of Deputy Director Office of Patent Legal Administration Robert Clarke in which USPTO refuses to 
to 
disclose any study it may have done. 
139 
In Attachment L, we report that USPTO failed to disclose critical information despite repeated 
requests. In Attachment K, we show why the influential information on which USPTO relies does not 
adhere to applicable information quality standards. 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-1 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
Support Documents contemplated by the Limits on Claims Rule (discussed in Sec. II of 
of 
this Attachment I and in Attachment J) 
J) 
 
the social cost of patent protection that must be abandoned because of the increased costs 
imposed by the Rules 
 
the social value of reduced backlog, in view of the patent term protections of 35 U.S.C. 
§ 154(b) 
 
the cost of increased litigation caused by reduced certainty and specificity that may arise 
because of abbreviated examination 
USPTO alludes to various problems and asserts that inventors will benefit from these 
rules, but neither allusion nor assertion substitute for analysis. This is also true even if it is 
assumed that the only regulatory objective of interest is reducing USPTO’s backlog, because 
USPTO has presented no analysis of alternative ways to reduce backlog. USPTO has monetized 
none of the effects, making both benefit-cost analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis impossible. 
le. 
II. 
The Rules Foreclose Reliance on Lower-Cost Alternatives 
We describe below just a few examples of additional social costs, none of which were 
discussed in the NPRMs. USPTO likely did not disclose any data or analysis of social costs 
because, as one senior USPTO official admitted publicly, the procedures for compliance were 
apparently still in the “anecdotal” and “in my head” stage, weeks after the publication of the 
of the 
NPRMs.
140 
Town Hall slides
141 
80 and 81 illustrate how the Continuations rule will force applicants 
to take expensive steps and to anticipate USPTO decisions because, with fewer steps to the 
process, each one remaining has proportionally greater stakes. Slide 80 reads as follows, 
describing one of the very narrow circumstances in which USPTO proposes to allow 
continuation applications (emphasis added): 
Examples of a Showing for Filing a Second Continuing Application 
Example 2: In a continuation application, 
 
Data necessary to support a showing of unexpected results just became available to overcome 
a final rejection under 35 U.S.C. 103, and 
140 
John Whealan, speaking at Duke University Law School, Fifth Annual Hot Topics in 
Intellectual Property Law Symposium, http://realserver.law.duke.edu/ ramgen/spring06/students/ 
02172006a.rm (Feb. 17, 2006), at time mark 57:45, stating that procedures were still “in my head” and 
nd 
under development. 
141 
See Attachment N. 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-2 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested