mvc view pdf : Add text to pdf reader SDK application API .net html winforms sharepoint 619-36-part1459

 
The data is the result of a lengthy experimentation that was started after applicant received 
the rejection for the first time (emphasis added). 
It frequently happens that data could exist before the time cutoff set in this slide, but they are 
expensive to collect or prepare for submission; or, because the examiner’s position is not clearly 
articulated, it is difficult to present the data in precisely the form that will be persuasive to the 
examiner.  If there is a lower-cost approach to replying to the examiner, and hold the higher-cost 
ost 
alternatives in reserve, then that is what is done.  If the examiner is persuaded by these lower-
cost alternatives, the higher cost approaches are not needed.  However, USPTO proposes to 
require the applicant to gather every bit of available data and present it at the earliest 
opportunity, because of a new “use it or lose it” approach.
ch.
142 
Example 2 has a further practical difficulty that USPTO failed to appreciate. 
Experiments that start late enough to fall within Example 2 are often themselves expensive – and 
take longer than the six month window available to respond to an Office Action.  Thus, it may 
very well be that experiments where costs were avoided by starting late enough to be permissible 
within “Example 2” are the very experiments that cannot be completed within the time window 
ndow 
available. 
Slide 81, which reads as follows, goes even further: 
Example 3: In a continuation application, 
 
The final rejection contains a new ground of rejection that could not have been 
anticipated by the applicant, and 
 
The applicant seeks to submit evidence which could not have been submitted earlier 
to overcome this new rejection (emphasis added). 
Slide 81 expressly requires applicants to anticipate “new grounds of rejection” that the examiner 
ner 
has never articulated, but could be anticipated, and anticipate what data could be submitted to 
to 
respond to that unarticulated rejection that could be raised some time in the indefinite future. 
USPTO proposes that applicants must predict all issues that an examiner might raise any time 
ime 
during prosecution, and flood the examiner with all data that might become relevant, before the 
examiner raises “the rejection for the first time,” without regard for cost. 
142 
Ironically, it appears that USPTO itself is attempting to introduce explanations that it could 
have prepared and submitted earlier, but did not.  Six weeks into the Notice and Comment period, it still 
had no clear idea of the standard it intended to apply.  John Whealan, speaking at Duke University Law 
School, Fifth Annual Hot Topics in Intellectual Property Law Symposium, http://realserver.law.duke.edu/ 
ramgen/spring06/students/02172006a.rm (Feb. 17, 2006), at time mark 57:45 stated “[Y]ou’re going to 
to 
have to explain why you need to do this, and why you didn’t do it sooner.  Now what satisfies that 
explanation?  I’ve been on the road doing this a couple weeks now, and I’ve actually got some people 
le 
working on some examples that we may try to put out.  But anecdotally, in my head, what would satisfy 
it?” 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-3 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
Add text to pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text pdf acrobat
Add text to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text field to pdf form
III.  A Number of Available Alternatives were Known to USPTO but Not Considered 
Cost-effectiveness cannot exist absent a comparison to alternatives, yet there is no public 
evidence that the Office considered any alternatives at all. Therefore, USPTO cannot possibly 
ly 
show that its draft rules are the “most cost-effective regulatory approach,” as required by Sec. 
by Sec. 
1(b)(5). 
USPTO knew of a number of alternatives, including the alternatives listed in a 1999 
Federal Register notice, used by other patent offices, proposed by USPTO and enabled in the 
1999 American Inventors Protection Act, or the like.
.
143 
These alternatives were not discussed in 
the NPRMs.  We list a few here.  USPTO’s regulatory impact analysis should include analysis of 
each of these alternatives: 
1.
 
Are the fees as adjusted in December 2004 sufficient to cover USPTO’s costs for the 
activities involved in examination of applications?  USPTO represented to Congress that 
the new fee levels would “correlate fees with the extra effort required to meet the 
demands of certain kinds of patent requests. This proposal would generate the levels of 
patent and trademark fee income needed to implement the goals and objectives of the 
strategic plan.”
144 
2.
 
Credit examiners based upon the number of claims in the application, and other measures 
of complexity (see Attachment F, § V). 
). 
3.
 
Defer examination until an applicant requests it, as in Japan and Canada – permit an 
application to simply lie pending for some period of time until the applicant requests 
examination and pays a fee.  Based on the rate at which applicants pay 4-year 
maintenance fees, perhaps 10-20% of applications will never be examined. 
d. 
The suggestions of Stephen G. Kunin, the recently-retired Deputy Assistant Commissioner for 
Patent Examination Policy, are particularly astute, and deserve particular consideration:
145 
4.
 
Improve examiner productivity by various performance-based, or billable hour pay 
systems 
143 
“Changes To Implement the Patent Business Goals, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” 64 Fed. 
Reg. 53772-53845 (October 4, 1999) (see Attachment D, Appendix 1); 35 U.S.C. § 41 as amended in 
ended in 
1999 (restructuring fees to permit some of the alternatives discussed here). 
144 
USPTO Strategic Plan, Fee Purpose, http://web.archive.org/web/20030407093355/ 
www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/strat21/feepurpose.htm 
145 
Slides of Stephen G. Kunin, the recently-retired Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Patent 
Examination Policy, titled “PTO Rulemaking Alternatives” presented at USPTO “Town Hall” Meeting, 
eting, 
New York, NY, April 7, 2006, available at  http://www.aipla.org/Content/ContentGroups/ 
Speaker_Papers/Road_Show_Papers/200612/AIPA/kuninPPT.pdf. 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-4 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
adding text to pdf in acrobat; adding text pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text box in pdf; add text pdf acrobat professional
5.
 
Improve examiner productivity by close review of work quality, including review of 
completeness of rejections as well as allowances 
6.
 
Mandatory technical training for all examiners in all fields of technology 
7.
 
Reinforce “compact prosecution” principles, not weaken them as proposed by the Rules: 
s: 
provide a thorough search and examination of all claims, and a thorough search of subject 
matter reasonably expected to be claimed, with a complete first Office Action, and early 
indication of allowable subject matter 
8.
 
Do examination right the first time:  Reduce rework caused by inadequate searches and 
improper claim interpretation, by instituting patentability review conferences before Final 
Action (that is, implement “second set of eyes” review for rejections, as well as 
allowances) 
9.
 
Examine related cases together, rather than further fractionating them as proposed in the 
Limits on Claims rule: batch search and examine related applications regardless of filing 
dates, provide incentives to applicants to identify related cases and hold pre-first office 
action interviews 
10. Modify the order in which applications are examined: Offer expedited examination for 
PCT national stage entry applications 
11. Permit third parties to request examination of long pending applications by submitting a 
document equivalent to the petition to make special accelerated examining procedure 
12. Modify examiner goals and incentives to align examiners’ incentives with efficient 
examination: Reduce production credits for continuation applications and  RCE 
13. Reevaluate examiner production expectancies and provide more time for the search and 
first office action; provide examiners with time to review amendments and evidence 
submitted after final rejection to negotiate allowances by examiner’s amendment 
14. Exploit searches from foreign patent offices and reduce examiner search time 
accordingly, especially for PCT cases 
15. Eliminate second action Final Rejection Practice that forces the filing of RCE, and the 
attendant examiner incentives to stall, especially where examiner applies new grounds of 
rejection or applies new prior art 
16. Reduce restriction requirements by adopting a unity of invention standard for national 
applications 
17. Restriction requirements should be made only after a search of the first claimed invention 
18. Do away with “second pair of eyes” program as currently implemented (because only 
only 
allowances are reviewed, an examiner has no practical authority to issue patents; 
anonymous and unaccountable second reviewers, with little exposure to the application, 
withdraw a high proportion of allowances) 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-5 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to pdf in preview; add text pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to enter text in a pdf document; add text to pdf using preview
19. Deal with continuation abuse through finely crafted rules based on prosecution laches 
ches 
(the Continuations Rule states that it is not an attempt to codify Bogese, but it isn’t clear 
why) 
Other insightful alternatives are set forth in the comment letters, for example, those included in 
Attachment A: 
20. USPTO should take more care that its employees carefully observe published guidance 
procedures, and should provide enforcement of those procedures during examination 
phase 
21. USPTO should provide some form of enforcement of its procedural rules and guidance 
through legally-trained ombudsmen, and should remove this function from Technology 
gy 
Center Directors who have a financial interest in denying enforcement of USPTO 
procedural requirements 
22. Several rules should be restored to their 1990’s form, which permitted applicants to take 
ke 
certain steps during the interval before an examiner resumed examination, rather than 
imposing arbitrary date cutoffs that have the effect of requiring examiners to examine 
claims that applicant no longer wants to have examined 
23. Provide applicants more opportunity to assist an examiner in focusing on the relevant 
issues, through more telephone interviews, and the like 
A Regulatory Impact Analysis that complies with Circular A-4 and includes an analysis 
is 
of the various issues raised in this Attachment I would allow USPTO to determine if the 
approach it has taken in the proposed rules is, in fact, the most cost-effective solution for the 
identified problem. 
A
TTACHMENT 
I: USPTO C
C
ANNOT 
S
HOW THAT THE 
P
ROPOSED 
R
ULES ARE THE 
P
AGE 
I-6 
“M
OST 
C
OST 
E
FFECTIVE
” S
OLUTION 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to pdf document; add text block to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to insert text into a pdf; add editable text box to pdf
Attachment J
J
USPTO’s Promises of Procedural Remedies Against Substantive
ve
Harshness are Illusory
Many of the public comment letters observed that the proposed rules would have harsh 
consequences that could deprive innovators of valid intellectual property claims.  The letters 
rs 
observed that there would be little recourse if USPTO rejected an application before fully 
evaluating it.  In the slides
146 
handed out by USPTO at various public discussions, senior 
officials advised applicants to use “Petitions to the Director”
147 
to reopen prosecution when an 
application was prematurely “finally” rejected, as an alternative to a continuation application. 
on. 
Petitions directed to premature final rejection are complex and difficult to prepare
re
148
, and 
(under current practice) are cost-effective in only a small number of cases.  Nonetheless, at least 
east 
146 
See Attachment N, slide 82 and 83. 
3. 
147 
There are two paths of review within USPTO: appeal to the Board of Patent Appeals, 37 
C.F.R. 41.1 et seq., and Petition to the Director under 37 C.F.R. § 1.181.  Generally, if the question is one 
one 
whose answer is either “‘Yes,’ this claim is patentable,” or ‘No,’ it isn’t,” then the issue is appealable.  All 
able.  All 
non-appealable issues are necessarily petitionable, 37 C.F.R. § 1.181(a)(1), plus there is some area of 
a of 
overlap. 
At least some decisions reflect a “reverse turf war” within the USPTO: neither the Director nor 
r nor 
the Board of Patent Appeals will entertain issues relating to incomplete examination, and neither will 
issue mandatory orders to examiners to compel complete examination as required by the MPEP.  To 
further aggravate the situation, the Board will not entertain an appeal on the merits where the examiner 
has failed procedurally to articulate his/her basis for rejecting claims in the manner required by the 
agency’s guidance document.  Ex parte Rozzi, 63 USPQ2d 1196 (BPAI 2002) (Board will not act as 
t as 
tribunal of first instance); Ex parte Gambogi, 62 USPQ2d 1209, 1212 (BPAI 2001) (“We decline to 
to 
substitute speculation” for the “more definite statement of the grounds of rejections” that has to come 
ome 
from the examiner, and “We decline to tell an examiner precisely how to set out a rejection.”); Ex parte 
rte 
Braeken, 54 USPQ2d 1110 (BPAI 1999) (appeal is not “ripe,” and Board declines to either examine or 
or 
decide the appeal).  However, officials deciding petitions take an incompatible view, that all issues 
relating even indirectly to claims are not petitionable, even those issues going to whether the examiner 
examined and rejected claims at all, whether agency guidance was violated, or whether examination was 
complete enough to permit the Board to hear an appeal, even if the issue is specifically designated as 
petitionable in the MPEP.  See, e.g., 09/385,394, Decision of Nov. 8, 2005 (holding an issue of premature 
re 
final rejection to be appealable; contrary agency guidance in MPEP § 706.07(c) is not acknowledged, let 
alone distinguished). 
148 
Our limited experience is that these petitions can cost anywhere from about $3,000 to $15,000 
00 
each.  Because it is all attorney time, this cost applies to large and small entities alike.  To put it in 
perspective, the cost of filing a continuation application, such as a Request for Continued Examination, is 
A
TTACHMENT 
J: USPTO’
P
ROMISES OF 
P
ROCEDURAL 
R
EMEDIES 
A
GAINST 
P
AGE 
J-1 
S
UBSTANTIVE 
H
ARSHNESS ARE 
I
LLUSORY 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to insert text box on pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
add text in pdf file online; how to add text field to pdf
one signatory to this letter attempted to utilize the USPTO’s “premature final rejection” 
on” 
procedures on several occasions.  These petitions were all dismissed or denied on various 
arious 
grounds that never reached the merits of the precise breaches of guidance that were raised: 
 
Various USPTO officials stated that they never grant such petitions, because premature 
ure 
final rejection is appealable subject matter, not petitionable.
149 
These officials cite no 
authority for the proposition, and fail to distinguish contrary agency precedent and 
guidance.
150 
 
USPTO petitions decisions often recharacterize issues to irrelevant grounds and thereby 
avoid deciding the precise breach complained of.
151 
 
UPSTO decisions often do not carefully and accurately state the law.
152 
 
“Premature final rejection” is inherently a time-sensitive issue, and must be decided 
before deadlines run out,
153 
else an applicant must either act in a way that diminishes the 
remedy grantable by the petition, or face abandonment of the application.  Decisions on 
this class of petition appear to be selectively delayed
154 
until that time deadline has 
$790 ($395 for small entities) plus about ½
hour of attorney time.  In contrast, the cost of filing this 
petition is roughly equal to the total post-filing cost of prosecuting a typical application. 
149 
See, e.g., 09/385,394, Decision of Nov. 8, 2005 (holding an issue of premature final rejection 
to be appealable, not petitionable). 
150 
E.g., MPEP § 706.07(c), “prematureness of a final rejection … is purely a question of practice, 
wholly distinct from the tenability of the rejection.  It may therefore not be advanced as a ground for 
appeal, or made the basis of complaint before the Board of Patent Appeals…  It is reviewable by petition 
under 37 CFR 1.181.” 
151 
For example, in 09/385, 394, issues directed to untimely examination were denied because 
examination was eventually completed.  Issues relating to incomplete examination were denied because 
se 
the petitions examiner would only consider timeliness.  A typical set of errors is set forth in a Petition 
on 
filed April 10, 2006, seeking higher review of lower-level decisions in application 09/385,394. 
152 
09/385,394, Decision of May 4, 2004, at page 6, stating that the test for mootness is whether 
an event is “likely to recur,” and refusing to issue an order to ensure that it will not recur, when Supreme 
Court precedent provides mootness of a federal agency action only when the agency accepts a “heavy 
burden” of showing that it will cease all “offending conduct,” Adarand Constructors v. Slater, 528 U.S. 
216, 221-22 (U.S. Sup. Ct. 2000); see also 09/385,394, Decision of Nov. 8, 2005, at page 5, stating that 
at 
the Kronig and Wiechert decisions will not be followed because “it cannot be seen.” 
.” 
153 
37 C.F.R. § 1.181(f) (“The mere filing of a petition will not stay any period for reply that may 
be running…”) 
154 
09/385,394, a Petition for Review of Premature Final Rejection filed April 10, 2006 remains 
on the docket for consideration by Brian Hearn in the Office of Petitions fourteen months later.  The 
Petitions Office representative contacted on June 6, 2007 confirmed that Mr. Hearn’s backlog is 2-4 
A
TTACHMENT 
J: USPTO’
P
ROMISES OF 
P
ROCEDURAL 
R
EMEDIES 
A
GAINST 
P
AGE 
J-2 
S
UBSTANTIVE 
H
ARSHNESS ARE 
I
LLUSORY 
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
adding a text field to a pdf; add text pdf file acrobat
lapsed.  USPTO then denies the petition as moot, but refuses to honor the procedural 
benefits that accrue to an applicant on the USPTO’s determination of mootness.
155 
Based on this experience, the protections provided for in the USPTO’s guidance document to 
deal with procedural error by its examiners, and relied upon by the USPTO in addressing 
applicants concerns about the harshness of the Continuations Rule, do not appear to exist in 
practice.
156 
While we appreciate that this experience may be anecdotal, we submit that all such 
evidence presented by patent practitioners will necessarily be anecdotal.  Patent applicants 
possess a widely dispersed data set that defies systematic collection.  The USPTO, on the other 
hand, possesses a centralized database and full knowledge of whether petitions to the Director 
will present an effective check and remedy for procedural errors and violations of agency 
ency 
guidance by examiners during prosecution.  We believe that the USPTO should perform a 
thorough analysis that complies with Circular A-4, and that this analysis should include a 
transparent reporting and analysis of the petitions filed to dispute improper finality and the 
resolution of such petitions, and whether these petitions are being soundly decided on the law. 
months.  Similarly, two petitions on different issues were filed in the same art unit at about the same time: 
a petition directed to an unrelated issue was decided in a few weeks, while the Final Rejection petition 
filed on April 8, 2005 was decided on September 9, five months. 
155 
Under Supreme Court precedent, the legal effect of an assertion of mootness by the USPTO is 
often identical in consequence to a grant of all relief sought in the petition – a party asserting mootness 
accepts responsibility for “completely and totally eradicating all effects of the alleged violation,” and 
states “with assurance that there is no reasonable expectation that the alleged violation will recur.”  That 
is, by asserting mootness, USPTO waives all challenges to even unproved “allegations” raised in a 
petition, and accepts the responsibility to eradicate all effects.  However, at the highest levels an applicant 
can access, USPTO uses mootness as a way to deny all relief, not to implement an obligation to eradicate 
all effects.  See, e.g., 09/385,394, Decision of Dec. 4, 2003. 
156 
USPTO often does not adhere to its own guidance. See, e.g., In re Alappat, 33 F.3d. 1527, 
527, 
1580, 31 USPQ2d 1545, 1588 (Fed. Cir. 1994) (en banc) (Plager, J., concurring) (“The Commissioner [of 
Patents] has an obligation to ensure that all parts of the agency … conform to official policy of the 
agency, including official interpretations of the agency’s organic legislation.  Otherwise the citizenry 
would be subject to the whims of individual agency officials of whatever rank or level, and the Rule of 
Law would lose all meaning…”). 
A
TTACHMENT 
J: USPTO’
P
ROMISES OF 
P
ROCEDURAL 
R
EMEDIES 
A
GAINST 
P
AGE 
J-3 
S
UBSTANTIVE 
H
ARSHNESS ARE 
I
LLUSORY 
Attachment K 
USPTO Failed to Comply with Applicable Information Quality 
Principles and Guidelines 
The Federal Information Quality Act and OMB’s government-wide Information Quality 
ty 
Guidelines have been in place for almost five years.
157 
USPTO, separate from the Department of 
Commerce of which it is part, issued its own guidelines implementing OMB’s guidelines taking 
into account its particular needs.
158 
Both OMB’s and USPTO’s guidelines require that information USPTO disseminates 
es 
satisfy applicable quality standards.
159 
The standards relevant to these draft rules are utility, 
reproducibility and objectivity. 
USPTO’s definitions of these terms follow the definitions established by OMB. In 
addition, because the information in question constitutes the agency’s basis for regulatory 
decision-making, it is inherently influential.
l.
160 
I. 
Utility 
“Utility” refers to the usefulness of the information to its intended users, including the 
public.  In assessing the usefulness of information that the agency disseminates to the 
public, the agency considers the uses of the information not only from its own 
perspective but also from the perspective of the public (Sec. 6(b)). 
In principle, it’s possible that the limited information disclosed by USPTO in support of 
these two draft rules is sufficiently useful from its own perspective. However, it is inarguably 
false that this information is useful “from the perspective of the public.” As documented in 
in 
Attachment L and Attachment N, USPTO’s responses to both informal and formal requests for 
for 
supporting data, models and assumptions, and its apparent willingness to provide selected 
157 
Office of Management and Budget, “Guidelines for Ensuring and Maximizing the Quality, 
Objectivity, Utility, and Integrity of Information Disseminated by Federal Agencies; Notice; 
Republication, 67 Fed. Reg. 8452. 
158 
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, “Information Quality Guidelines,” online at 
at 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ido/infoqualityguide.html. 
159 
Nothing in this Attachment should be construed to imply that the domain of information 
disclosed by USPTO is sufficient for purposes of Executive Order 12,866. We restrict our review to the 
information that USPTO actually disclosed. 
160 
“Influential” information is defined by USPTO as “information that will have or does have 
ave 
clear and substantial impact on important public policies or important private sector decisions consisting 
primarily of statistical information on USPTO filings and operations.” 
A
TTACHMENT 
K: USPTO F
F
AILED TO 
C
OMPLY WITH 
A
PPLICABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
P
AGE 
K-1 
Q
UALITY 
P
RINCIPLES AND 
G
UIDELINES 
individuals with privileged access, proves that agency officials know that the public considers 
the information it has disseminated to have little or no utility. 
II. 
Reproducibility 
“Reproducibility” means that the information is capable of being substantially 
reproduced, subject to an acceptable degree of imprecision.  For information judged to 
have more (less) important impacts, the degree of imprecision that is tolerated is reduced 
(increased).  With respect to analytical results, “capable of being substantially 
reproduced” means that independent analysis of the original or supporting data using 
identical methods would generate similar analytical results, subject to an acceptable 
degree of imprecision or error (Sec. 7). 
The reason that the Administrative Procedure Act and E-Government Act of 2002 require 
disclosure of an agency’s data, models and assumptions is to provide informed comment during 
the prescribed public comment period. As a prerequisite, the public must be able to reproduce 
USPTO’s own analyses. Without access, it is simply impossible to do so.
.
161 
III.  Objectivity 
Objectivity” involves two distinct elements, presentation and substance.  The presentation 
element includes whether disseminated information is being presented in an accurate, 
clear, complete, unbiased manner, and within a proper context.  Sometimes, in 
disseminating certain types of information to the public, other information must be 
disseminated in order to ensure an accurate, complete, and unbiased presentation. 
Sources of the disseminated information (to the extent possible, consistent with 
confidentiality protections) and, in a scientific, or statistical context, the supporting data 
and models need to be identified, so that the public can assess for itself whether there 
may be some reason to question the objectivity of the sources.  Where appropriate, 
supporting data shall have full, accurate, transparent documentation, and error sources 
affecting data quality shall be identified and disclosed to users.  The substance element 
focuses on ensuring accurate, reliable, and unbiased information.  In a scientific, or 
statistical context, the original or supporting data shall be generated, and the analytical 
results shall be developed, using sound statistical and research methods.  If the results 
have been subject to formal, independent, external peer review, the information can 
generally be considered of acceptable objectivity (Sec. 6(a)). 
In this case, both presentational and substantive objectivity are important.  Most clearly, 
USPTO’s forecasts of future backlog must be “accurate, reliable, and unbiased.”  Whether the 
the 
161 
This is not a Shelby Amendment “data access” issue given an information quality veneer. The 
he 
data, models and assumptions in question are USPTO’s, not those of an arguably independent third party. 
A
TTACHMENT 
K: USPTO F
F
AILED TO 
C
OMPLY WITH 
A
PPLICABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
P
AGE 
K-2 
Q
UALITY 
P
RINCIPLES AND 
G
UIDELINES 
agency’s forecasts meet these tests speaks directly to the merits of its stated regulatory objective, 
assuming arguendo that the stated objective is defensible under law and Executive Order 12,866. 
To be presentationally objective, USPTO’s forecasts must be presented in “an accurate, 
e, 
clear, complete, [and] unbiased manner, and within a proper context.”  We are especially 
concerned about “completeness” and “proper context.” For USPTO’s forecasts to be complete, 
omplete, 
they must at a minimum include information about how rates are predicted to vary by application 
type, art and technology center. In addition, additional information is needed about variability 
and uncertainty.
162 
To be in a “proper context,” it is essential to have “accurate, reliable, and 
and 
unbiased” information about the effects these rules would have on applicants and innovation. 
n. 
USPTO’s forecasts are presented without documentation in any of these areas. The 
forecasts have no utility for the regulated public; are not reproducible; and cannot satisfy the 
presentational objectivity test. 
USPTO might have been able to meet these quality standards if it had subjected its 
analyses to independent external peer review, in accordance with OMB’s government-wide 
de 
standards.
163 
According to USPTO, it does not use peer review as a tool for pre-dissemination 
review to ensure that applicable information quality standards are met.
164 
Rather, it utilizes other 
unspecified procedures.
165 
162 
Variability is a measure of the extent to which random influences would affect predicted 
backlogs. Uncertainty is a measure of the extent to which predicted backlogs would change if the 
different assumptions or models were used, especially if USPTO’s models have not been validated. 
163 
Office of Management and Budget, “Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review,” 70 
70 
Fed. Reg. 2664. 
164 
“Based on the review it has conducted, the United States Patent and Trademark Office 
believes that it does not currently produce or sponsor the distribution of influential scientific information 
(including highly influential scientific assessments) within the definitions promulgated by OMB. As a 
result, at this time the United States Patent and Trademark Office has no agenda of forthcoming 
influential scientific disseminations to post on its website in accordance with OMB’s Information Quality 
Bulletin for Peer Review.” See http://www.uspto.gov/main/policy/infoquality_peer.htm. 
165 
“Historically, a pre-dissemination review process of all USPTO information disseminated is 
is 
incorporated into the normal process of formulating the information.  This review is at a level appropriate 
to the information, taking into account the information’s importance, balanced against the resources 
required and the time available to conduct the review.  USPTO’s business units treat information quality 
as integral to every step of USPTO’s development of information, including creation, collection, 
maintenance, and dissemination.  USPTO receives and relies on feedback from both internal and external 
customers if the accuracy or completeness of the information disseminated is below standard.  Corrective 
measures are taken immediately to limit the impact and re-disseminate the corrected information.  In an 
an 
unbiased manner, USPTO makes every effort to provide complete databases on USPTO website of all 
patents and trademarks that have ever been captured electronically.  All USPTO information 
A
TTACHMENT 
K: USPTO F
F
AILED TO 
C
OMPLY WITH 
A
PPLICABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
P
AGE 
K-3 
Q
UALITY 
P
RINCIPLES AND 
G
UIDELINES 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested