mvc view pdf : Adding text to a pdf document software control dll winforms web page html web forms 663061-part1465

The elasticity of the share with respect to the input of agent i can be interpreted as
the degree of meritocracy because it measures how one’s share responds to one’s e¤orts.
The elasticity of the production function with respect to the input of agent i; can be
interpreted as the inverse degree of congestion because it measures how output responds
inputs. Thus Proposition 1 says that when the possibilities of destruction are not small
the degree of meritocracy is bounded above by a factor that depends on the degree of
congestion, the possibilities of destruction and the relative productivity of agents.
One might think that under reasonable circumstances, it will be possible to simplify
the necessary conditions, as it is done in Principal-Agent problems. We may hope that
the ful…llment of the necessary condition for some i implies the ful…llment of necessary
conditions for all agents. Or, we may hope that for a given agent, say i, the ful…llment
of the necessary condition with respect to another agent, say j, implies the ful…llment
of the necessary condition of i with respect to any agent less productive than j. Next
example shows that the …rst hope is not warranted.
Example 1. Let n = 2; 
1
= 1; 
2
=2; s
i
(R
1
;R
2
) =
R
i
R
i
+R
j
+
1 
2
and choose R(:)
such that M = 2: The production function has constant elasticity of substitution, X =
(
P
(R
i
)
)
r
;with   1 and r  1. The necessary condition for no sabotage reads:
4
3(3  )
r
2
+1
(2
+1
+1) for agent 1 and
4
3( + 3)
r2
2 + 1
1
2
2+ 1
=
r(2+ 2
)
2 + 1
for agent 2:
For  = 1; (inputs are perfect substitutes) these conditions read:

15r
4+5r
and  
3r
 r
:
The …rst (resp. second) inequality holds trivially when r > 0:4 (resp. r > 0:25). We
see that 15r=(4 + 5r)  3r=(1   r) if and only if 0:1  r: Thus for r 2 (0:1;0:25) the
ful…llment of the …rst inequality implies the ful…llment of the second but for r 2 (0;0:1)
is the other way around.
11
Adding text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf file; add text to pdf reader
Adding text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf in preview; adding text to pdf
The interpretation of this example is that if production is not very responsive to
inputs, i.e. r is small, sabotage comes from the most productive agent using her superior
capabilities to sabotage the other agent, given the scarce impact of her e¤orts on output.
When r becomes larger the comparative advantage of the most productive agent is to
devote all her time to production activities and he becomes the target of sabotage.
Fortunately, our second conjecture is valid.
Proposition 2. Given an agent i; if the inequality (3:2) holds for l, it holds for all j
such that 
j
<
l
:
Proof. To prove this, it is enough to show that if 
j
<
l
then

l
i
M+ 1
0
B
@
P
k6=i
k
l
P
k6=i
k
1
C
A
<

j
i
M+ 1
0
B
@
P
k6=i
k
j
P
k6=i
k
1
C
A
;
(3.3)
which is equivalent to show that
(
l
j
)>

j
i
l
i
X
k6=i
k
l
j
i
j
l
i
M:
(3.4)
Since 
j
<
l
;
l
j
is increasing in ; and since   1; it follows that
l
j
l
j
,
thus,
l
j
i
j
l
i
0:
(3.5)
And since M >
P
k6=i
k
=
j
;
l
j
i
j
l
i
M>

j
i
l
i
X
k6=i
k
;
(3.6)
which implies that the right hand side of inequality (3.4) is negative while the left hand
side is positive. Thus, inequality (3.4) holds.
To conclude this section, the following example, which is a generalization of Example
1, highlights the role of the di¤erent variables in the condition (3.2):
12
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; adding text pdf file
Example 2. Let us assume that: (i) The sharing rule has the form
R
i
P
n
k=1
R
k
+
1 
n
; with 0    1:
(3.7)
(i) The production function is of CES type,
X=
n
X
i=1
(R
i
)
!
r
with   1 and r  1:
(3.8)
Under i) and ii) we have the following:
@s
i
(R
0
)
@R
i
R
0
i
s
i
(R0)
=

i
P
k6=i
k
(
P
n
k=1
k
)2(

i
P
n
k=1
k
+
1 
n
)
;
(3.9)
@f(R
0
)
@R
i
R
0
i
f(R0)
=
r
i
P
n
k=1
k
:
(3.10)
By Proposition 2 we can restrict our attention to the necessary condition for agent i
not to sabotage agent n: Thus, inequality (3.2) can be written as
i
P
n
k=1
k

i
P
n
k=1
k
+
1 
n
r(
n
M+ 
i
)
P
n
k=1
k
0
B
@
P
n
k=1
k
n
P
k6=i
k
1
C
A
:
(3.11)
We now study the e¤ect of the variables in the two sides of (3.11): We see that the
e¤ects of M, and r are what we expect from intuition, i.e. an increase in M -the
relative power of destruction with respect to production- makes harder the ful…llment
of (3.11) andanincrease of r -the responsiveness of output with respect to inputs- makes
easier the ful…llment of (3.11). But the e¤ects of  and ’s are complex, even though
some interpretation of what is going on is possible.
E¤ect of : To analyze the e¤ect of  assume …rst that n > 2; and there are at least
an agent k such that 
k
<
n 1
:Let us restrict our attention to inequality (3.11) for
i= n   1 and j = n: Notice that  only a¤ects the expression
r(
n
M+ 
n 1
)
P
n
k=1
k
:
(3.12)
13
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
add text field pdf; adding text to pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based
add text pdf professional; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
This expression re‡ects the e¤ect of sabotage from n   1 to n on output. It re‡ects
the opportunity cost of sabotage. It can be shown that (3.12) is increasing in , and
it goes to zero when  goes to minus in…nity (perfect complementarity) (see Lemma
2 in the Appendix for details). Thus, in the limit, the unique level of meritocracy
compatible with no sabotage is  = 0 (even if we have constant returns to scale, r = 1):
The interpretation of this result is that when inputs approach perfect complementarity,
output depends only on the input provided by the least productive agent, so there are
incentives to sabotage any other agent because output will be una¤ected.
When n = 2 the situation is di¤erent, because a reduction in the input provided by
agent 1 -coming either from a sabotage of 2 into 1 or from the distraction of resources
implied by sabotage of agent 1- reduces production. As a consequence, sharing rules can
be more meritocratic when there are two agents only. Formally, the expression (3.12)
goes to r when  !  1. So in the limit inequality (3.11) can be written as:

r(
1
+
2
)
2
2
1
2
(M  1) + r(
2
2
2
1
)
:
(3.13)
It can be shown that the right hand side depends on the relative productivity of agents,
and is U-shaped with a unique minimum at 
1
=
2
=(M   r   1)=(M + r  1). This
form re‡ects the trade-o¤ of sabotage for agent 1: When agent 2 is very productive,
sabotage has no noticeable impact on the relative ranking so it is a waste of time. And
when both agents are almost identical, sabotage a¤ects output which is bad from the
saboteur interests. Thus meritocracy takes the highest possible value in one of the
extremes of 
1
=
2
.
E¤ect of ’s. It is di¢ cult to say something in general about the e¤ect of productivities
on (3.11). Let us simplify this inequality by assuming perfect substitution, i.e.  = 1.
Then, (3.11) reads
i
P
n
k=1
k

i
P
n
k=1
k
+
1 
n
r(
j
M+ 
i
)
j
P
k6=i
k
:
(3.14)
14
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text field to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to
add text in pdf file online; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
-E¤ect of 
i
:From the previous equation, we see that when 
i
!1 the LHS of (3.14)
tends to one but the RHS tends to in…nite, thus the inequality holds. In this case,
the large productivity of i yields incentives to concentrate her activities in production
matters. Also when 
i
! 0 the LHS of (3.14) tends to zero but the RHS tends to
a positive number and thus (3.14) also holds. This is more intriguing but it can be
explained by noting that when 
i
is close to 0, the distribution e¤ect, i.e. the change in
i’share measured here by the LHS of (3.14), is negligible so sabotage does not pays o¤.
Finally, it is clear that the necessary condition may not hold for intermediate values of
i
where the interplay between the production and the distribution e¤ect can produce
complicated patterns.
-E¤ect of 
j
: When 
j
!1 the LHS of (3.14) tends to zero but the RHS tends to
r, thus (3.14) holds. Again this can be explained by saying that in this case the large
productivity of j makes the distribution e¤ect to be nil. When
j
!
P
k6=i;j
k
=(M 
1) (which is the lower bound in the case we are analyzing) the LHS of (3.14) tends to
a…nite number but the RHS tends to in…nite and thus (3.14) also holds. In this case
what happens is that we get close to the case where M 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
in which
the necessary condition always holds. Again, the necessary condition may not hold for
intermediate values of 
j
for reasons identical to those explained before.
-E¤ect of
P
k6=i;j
k
: When
P
k6=i;j
k
!0 (3.14) reads
i
i
+
j
i
i
+
j
+
1 
n
r(
j
M+
i
)
j
(M   1)
;
which may or may not hold. In this case we are back to the case of two agents where
the necessary condition may or may not hold, depending on the interplay between 
i
and 
j
:Finally, when
P
k6=i;j
k
!(M   1)
j
the LHS of the above inequality tends
to a positive number but the RHS tends to in…nite and thus the inequality is satis…ed.
The explanation is identical to the case where 
j
!
P
k6=i;j
k
=(M   1). Again,
15
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
This C# .NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
add text to pdf using preview; how to add text box in pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
the necessary condition may not hold for intermediate values of
P
k6=i;j
k
for reasons
identical to those explained before.
E¤ect of . An increase in  makes the LHS of (3.11) larger. For given values of all
other variables, this makes harder the ful…llment of this condition.
The necessary condition yields an upper bound on the degree of meritocracy compatible
with no sabotage. This is very clear when all agents are identical, because the left hand
side of (3.11) simpli…es to  and the condition gives us the bound directly. Let us work
out the non symmetrical case. De…ne
q
ij
r(
j
M+
i
)
P
n
k=1
k
0
B
@
P
n
k=1
k
j
P
k6=i
k
1
C
A
:
(3.15)
Now, condition (3.11) can be written as
(
i
P
n
k=1
k
+q
ij
(
1
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
)) 
q
ij
n
:
(3.16)
Notice that for some agents,
i
P
n
k=1
k
<q
ij
(
i
P
n
k=1
k
1
n
) and so (3.16) holds for any
. However, at least, for all agents whose productivity is less than the average -i.e.
1
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
-the left hand side of (3.16) is positive and thus it can be written as

q
ij
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
+q
ij
(
1
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
)
:
(3.17)
Let S be the set of agents for whom
i
P
n
k=1
k
>q
ij
(
i
P
n
k=1
k
1
n
). For any i 2 S de…ne
ij
q
ij
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
+q
ij
(
1
n
i
P
n
k=1
k
)
;
(3.18)
and let 
i
min
j6=i
ij
: Then, the maximum degree of meritocracy compatible with
no sabotage is min(1;min
i2S
i
): By Proposition 2 for each agent i the most restrictive
bound if the one towards the most productive agent, that is, a
i
= 
in
for all i =
1;:::;n  1; and 
n
=
n(n 1)
:Furthermore, notice that for each agent i, 
ij
<1 if and
16
only if q
ij
<1: Otherwise, any degree of meritocracy is compatible with no sabotage.
In our discussion on the e¤ect of  we have proved that q
(n 1)n
is increasing in ; by
(3.18) as  decreases the maximum degree of meritocracy compatible with no sabotage
decreases. The most favorable case for meritocracy is the case of perfect substitutes
inputs ( = 1). In this case,
q
ij
r(
j
M+ 
i
)
j
P
k6=i
k
;
which is less than one if and only if
r<
j
P
k6=i
k
j
M+ 
i
:
In the Cobb-Douglas case, it is easily calculated that
lim
!0
q
ij
=
1
n
r(M +1)
0
B
@
P
n
k=1
k
j
P
k6=i
k
1
C
A
;
which is less than one if and only if
r<
n(
j
P
k6=i
k
)
(M + 1)
P
n
k=1
k
:
4. A Su¢ cient Condition for No Sabotage.
In this section we study under what conditions a Nash equilibrium with no sabotage
exists. To make the problem tractable, we assume that the individual’s input is given
by
R(l
i
;l
i
) = max(T  
X
j6=i
l
ij
K
X
j6=i
l
ji
;0);
(4.1)
R
i
(l
i
;l
i
) = 
i
R(l
i
;l
i
); i 2 f1;::;ng
17
Where the parameter K is a positive constant. Notice that in this case, if agent i uses
one unit of labor time to sabotage the input of agent j; he reduces his input in one unit
and the input of agent j in K units. Thus,
@R(l
i
;l
i
)
@l
ij
@R(l
i
;l
i
)
@l
P
i
=K for all (l
i
;l
i
)such that T  
X
j6=i
l
ij
K
X
j6=i
l
ji
0:
Next lemma simpli…es the search for an equilibrium without sabotage because it
characterize the best response of i when the rest of agents is not sabotaging anyone.
Lemma 1. Let l
i
=(l
i1
;:::;l
ii 1
;l
ii+1
;::;l
in
)be a best response for agent i to l
i
=0;
then if 
j

k
;and l
ij
>0; R
k
(l
i
;l
i
) R
j
(l
i
;l
i
)and consequently l
ik
l
ij
:
Proof. Notice …rst that if l
i
is a best response to l
i
=0; then T   Kl
ij
0 for
all j: Suppose not, that is, suppose that there is an agent j such that T   Kl
ij
<0:
Then agent i can decrease the time dedicated to sabotaging agent j up to a point
such that T   Kl
0
ij
=0: Thus agent i will increase her input without a¤ecting the in-
put of the other agents, which implies that she will be better o¤ and will contradict
that l
i
is a best response against l
i
= 0: Suppose that R
k
(l
i
;l
i
) > R
j
(l
i
;l
i
); let
^
l
i
be such that
^
l
il
= l
il
for all l 6= j;k;
^
l
ij
= l
ij
"
j
;
^
l
ik
= l
ik
+"
k
where "
k
> 0;
"
j
>0, 
k
"
k
=
j
"
j
and
^
l
ij
0: Thus, R
k
(l
i
;l
i
)+ R
j
(l
i
;l
i
)= R
k
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)+ R
j
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)
and R
i
(
^
l
i
;l
i
) > R
i
(l
i
;l
i
);which implies that s
i
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)  s
i
(l
i
;l
i
); so the share of
this agent does not decrease. Finally, let us see that the production increases. Re-
call that f(R
1
;::;R
n
) = F(
P
n
j=1
(R
j
)) with   homogeneous of degree   1. We
distinguish two cases. First, suppose that  > 0: In this case   is increasing and con-
cave, thus  (R
i
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)) >  (R
i
(l
i
;l
i
));  (R
k
(l
i
;l
i
))  (R
k
(
^
l
i
;l
i
))   (R
j
(
^
l
i
;l
i
(R
j
(l
i
;l
i
);andsince f is strictly increasing inall its arguments,F is strictly increasing
in
P
n
j=1
(R
j
); therefore f(R
1
(
^
l
i
;l
i
);::;R
n
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)) > f(R
1
(l
i
;l
i
);::;R
n
(l
i
;l
i
)): Sec-
ondly, suppose that  < 0: In this case   is decreasing and convex, thus  (R
i
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)) <
18
(R
i
(l
i
;l
i
));  (R
k
(l
i
;l
i
))  (R
k
(
^
l
i
;l
i
))   (R
j
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)  (R
j
(l
i
;l
i
); and since f is
strictly increasing in all its arguments, F is strictly decreasing in
P
n
j=1
(R
j
); therefore
f(R
1
(
^
l
i
;l
i
);::;R
n
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)) > f(R
1
(l
i
;l
i
);::;R
n
(l
i
;l
i
)): In both cases the production
increases which implies that 
i
(
^
l
i
;l
i
)> 
i
(l
i
;l
i
):
Lemma 1 implies that if an agent is not sabotaging the most productive agent, he
is not sabotaging anyone.
In the last section we proved that if M 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
for all i;j, the necessary
condition for no sabotage holds: Notice that, given our assumption on the individual’s
input, M = K: The next Proposition shows that if K 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
for all i;j, zero
sabotage is a Nash equilibrium. The intuition is that since the damage that agents can
in‡ict on each other is small, sabotage does not pay o¤.
Proposition 3. Assume K 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
for all i;j: Then l
ij
= 0 for all i;j 2
f1;::;ng is a Nash equilibrium.
Proof. Let us see that for each agent i the best response to l
i
= 0 is l
i
= 0:
Suppose on the contrary that the best response to l
i
=0 involves positive sabotage by
agent i. Let l
i
=(l
i1
;:::;l
ii 1
;l
ii+1
;::;l
in
)be such that l
ij
>0 for some j: By Lemma 1,
l
in
>0:De…ne R
l
j

j
R(l
i
;0) for all agent j; and let R
l
the vector of inputs evaluated
at the point (l
i
;0); that is, R
l
=(R
l
1
;:::;R
l
n
):
As we have shown in the proof of Lemma 1, T   Kl
ij
0 for all j: Let us see …rst that
there is at least one agent j such that T  Kl
ij
>0: Suppose not, then T  
P
j6=i
l
ij
=
 T(n   1)=K: Since K 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
for all i;j; K  n   1; which implies that
 T(n   1)=K  0: Thus R
l
i
=0: But this can not be the best response of agent i
to l
i
=0: Since nothing is produced, the payo¤ of this agent is zero. By reducing the
sabotage activities he will get a positive payo¤. Therefore
P
j6=i
R
l
j
>0: Finally, let
us see that for all l
i
such that
P
j6=i
R
l
j
>0;
@
i
(l
i
;0)
@l
in
<0; and thus l
in
=0, which by
19
Lemma 1 implies that l
ij
=0 for all j: By the de…nition of 
i
,
@
i
(l
i
;0)
@l
in
=
@s
i
(R
l
)
@l
in
f(R
l
)+ s
i
(R
l
)
@f(R
l
)
@l
in
:
From (4.1) we have that
@R
n
(l
i
;0)
@l
in
= K
n
;and
@R
i
(l
i
;0)
@l
in
= 
i
:Since the production
function is strictly increasing in all its arguments, it follows that
@f(R
l
)
@l
in
@f(R
l
)
@R
n
K
n
@f(R
l
)
@R
i
i
<0:
Thus, in order to see that
@
i
(l
i
;0)
@l
in
<0; it is enough to show that
@s
i
(R
l
)
@l
in
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
n
K
n
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
i
i
0.
(4.2)
If the sharing rule is constant, the above inequality always holds. It also holds if l
i
is
such that R
l
i
=0; because since sharing rules are homogeneous of degree cero,
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
i
R
l
i
+
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
n
X
j6=i
R
l
j
=0;
and since
P
j6=i
R
l
j
> 0;
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
n
= 0: For all other l
i
such that R
l
i
> 0; proving that
inequality (4.2) holds, is equivalent to prove that
@s
i
(Rl)
@R
i
@s
i
(Rl)
@R
n
K
n
i
:
Since the sharing rule is homogeneous of degree cero,
@s
i
(R
l
)
@R
i
@s
i
(Rl)
@R
n
=
P
j6=i
R
j
(l
i
;0)
R
i
(l
i
;0)
=
T
P
j6=i
j
K
P
j6=i
j
l
ij
i
(T  
P
j6=i
l
ij
)
:
Notice that, since K 
P
k6=i
k
=
j
for all i;j;
P
j6=i
j
K
n
; and by the order of
the agents, 
j

n
:Thus,
T
P
j6=i
j
K
P
j6=i
j
l
ij
i
(T  
P
j6=i
l
ij
)
n
K(T  
P
j6=i
l
ij
)
i
(T  
P
j6=i
l
ij
)
=
n
K
i
;
20
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested