mvc view pdf : Adding text to pdf control SDK platform web page winforms asp.net web browser 9-1-art-60-part1513

Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics, 
Volume 9, Issue 1, 
Spring 2016, pp. 124-141. 
http://ejpe.org/pdf/9-1-art-6.pdf 
A
UTHOR
N
OTE
 An  earlier  version  of  this  paper  was  submitted  for  the  300th 
anniversary of the publication of The fable of the bees and the centennial of Erasmus 
University.  I  would  like  to  thank  Harro  Maas,  Laurens  van  Apeldoorn,  and  Johan 
Olsthoorn  for  organizing  the  conference  ‘Science,  politics  and  economy.  The 
unintended  consequences  of  a  diabolic  paradox’  held  at  the  Erasmus  University 
Rotterdam on 6 June, 2014. 
Bees on paper: the British press reads the 
Fable 
M
ATTEO 
R
EVOLTI
Goethe University Frankfurt am Main 
Abstract:  The  British  press  played  a  significant  role  by  influencing 
public debates following the publication of Mandeville’s The fable of the 
bees. Between 1714 and 1732, British newspapers published over three 
hundred reports on the Fable that circulated in the form of editorials 
and  advertising  announcements.  These  publications  not  only  offered 
general  information  on  the  Fable,  they  also  fueled  controversy 
surrounding  Mandeville’s  text.  In  this  article  I  will  analyse  how  the 
British  press  introduced  the  Fable  to  its  readers  and  influenced  its 
reception. Specifically, my aim is to show how the Fable’s reception was 
shaped by the political and economic orientation of the newspapers in 
question. In doing so, I will analyze appearances of the Fable and its 
critics in the British press. I will then examine the language and topics 
used  by  two  popular  essay-papers,  the  Mist  weekly  journal  and  the 
Craftsman, who presented Mandeville’s book. 
Keywords:  newspapers,  advertisings,  Nathaniel  Mist,  Robert  Walpole, 
Jonathan Wild, South sea bubble 
Bernard Mandeville submitted his last publication, A letter to Dion, to 
the printer James Roberts in 1732. In this seventy-page essay, the Dutch 
author responded to George Berkeley, who had attacked the Fable in his 
Alciphron  or  the  minute  philosopher  (1732).  Mandeville  ironically 
maintained that the Irish bishop had not read a single page of his work 
but only reproduced the criticisms of the Fable set forth in sermons and 
newspapers.  Indeed,  the  Berkeleian  condemnation  of  Mandevillean 
topics, such as the celebration of vices or the notion of human nature, 
had been adopted and discussed by  the  British public opinion in the 
years before. Specifically, newspapers were responsible for making the 
Adding text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to add text to a pdf in reader
Adding text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf online; add text to a pdf document
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
E
RASMUS 
J
OURNAL FOR 
P
HILOSOPHY AND 
E
CONOMICS
125 
Fable well-known among the public, frequently casting it as an attack 
upon  religion  and  public spirit.  From  Mandeville’s  point of view,  the 
press  had  published  misleading  editorials  about  his  book  and  thus 
compromised its reception. The Dutch author complained in particular 
about the increasing influence enjoyed by newspapers, noting ironically 
that “if we find the London Journal have a Fling at the Fable of the bees 
one  Day,  and The  craftsman another,  it  is a  certain  Sign that the  ill 
Repute of the Book, must will be established and not to be doubted of” 
(Mandeville 1732, 6). Mandeville’s claim was intended to vilify one of the 
more salient aspects of English society: the newspaper industry.  
Very little research has been done on the reception of the Fable in 
the British press. Kaye’s classical edition of the Fable provides a partial 
list of newspaper articles on the Fable (Mandeville 1924, II: 418-426). In 
his critical study, Martin Stafford (1997) cites only eight articles. This 
paper  argues  that  newspapers  played  a  crucial  role  in  the  debate 
triggered by Mandeville’s work in four ways. Firstly, the press provided 
step by step reporting on the origin and development of the discussion 
surrounding Mandeville’s text. For instance, the Evening post printed the 
presentment  by  the  Grand  Jury  of  Middlesex  on  11  July  1723. 
Mandeville’s response to the aspersions cast on his book appeared in 
the London journal of 10 August 1723. Secondly, some of the Fable’s 
critics  used  the  press  to  attack  the  work  of  the  Dutch  author.  For 
example,  Francis  Hutcheson  attacked  the  Fable  in  the  Dublin  weekly 
journal and London journal several times. In addition to these critiques, 
the newspapers also published  false news items  regarding the  Fable, 
such  as  Mandeville’s  supposed  abjuration  of  his  opinions  in  1728.
1
Finally, in many cases the press was unabashedly biased. Newspapers 
representing  opposing  political  views  often  offered  contradictory 
interpretations  of Mandeville, always casting  him as contrary to their 
own positions (some as a Whig, others as a Tory, etc.).  
T
HE 
F
ABLE AND THE 
B
RITISH NEWSPAPERS
During  the  restoration  of  Charles  II,  the  press  was  regulated  by  the 
Licensing Act, which specified that every publication had to be licensed 
and supervised by the Stationer’s Company. The only paper to hold this 
1
On Saturday, 9 March 1728, the London evening post printed the following note: “On 
Friday Evening, the first Instant, a Gentleman well-dress’d, appeared at the Bonfire 
before St. James’s Gate, who declared himself the author of the Fable of the Bees: And 
that  he  was  sorry  for  writing  the  same:  and  recollecting  his  former  Promise, 
pronounced this Words: I commit my Book to the Flames; and threw it in accordingly”. 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to insert text box on pdf; add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text boxes to a pdf; how to add text field to pdf
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
V
OLUME 
9,
I
SSUE 
1,
S
PRING 
2016 
126 
authorization was the London gazette, which served as the official organ 
of government and was printed in a single sheet twice weekly. Following 
the  lapsing  of  the  Licensing  Act  in  1695,  there  was  an  upsurge  of 
newspapers and periodicals in England and its provinces (Plomer 1922; 
Siebert 1965; Black 1987; Harris 1987; Clark 1994; Raymond 1999; Heyd 
2012).  Between  May  and  October  1695,  three  tri-weekly  newspapers 
appeared: the Flying post, the Post boy, and the Post man, all of which 
were delivered to the local postmaster. Under the reign of Queen Anne 
the first daily, the Daily courant (1702), was printed; in August 1706 the 
first evening paper, the Evening post, appeared. Generally, newspapers 
were  edited  and  published  by  printers  who  also  printed  books, 
pamphlets, ballads, etc. They circulated in taverns, coffee-houses, and 
clubs, and informed their readers about domestic and foreign news; in 
some cases, they offered commentary on political, moral, and economic 
topics as well. The rapid expansion of the press was followed by the 
growth of the printing industry, which often combined commercial and 
political  interests.  In  1724,  the  printer  Samuel  Negus  offered  Lord 
Viscount  Townshend  a  complete  list  of  all  the  printing-houses  in 
London  (Nichols  1812-1815,  I:  288-312).  The  list  not  only  gave  an 
account  of  the  printers,  it  also  informed  Townshend  of  the  political 
stances of the publishers. For instance, the printer Roberts was known 
“to be well affected to King George” (Nichols 1812-1815, I: 292), whereas 
the printer of the Evening post was a “Roman catholick” (Nichols 1812-
1815,  I:  312).  Consequently,  many  newspapers  were  connected  to 
political parties and they quickly assumed Whig or Tory associations: 
the Daily courant from London was a Whig publication, whereas the Post 
boy was an organ of the Tory party.
2
According to Speck and Holmes 
(1967,  2),  in  the  early  eighteenth  century  the  press  was  the  most 
effective  instrument  of  party  propaganda  in  Great  Britain.  The 
newspapers constituted an important means of evaluating the extent to 
which popular opinion supported or opposed a particular issue. Many 
papers were sponsored by politicians, as demonstrated by Bolingbroke’s 
support  of  The  craftsman  journal,  or  the  editing  of  the  Mist  weekly 
journal by the Jacobite, Nathaniel Mist.  
Given this context, the reception of the Fable was at times influenced 
by the political affiliation of the papers. Mandeville himself denounced 
2
Whereas in Anne’s reign the metropolitan newspapers followed the classic distinction 
in Whig and Tory, under the kingdom of George II they tend to divide into government 
and opposition (Speck 1986, 48). 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text pdf professional; add text field pdf
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
E
RASMUS 
J
OURNAL FOR 
P
HILOSOPHY AND 
E
CONOMICS
127 
the  contradictions  of  “our  party  writers”  (1732,  6),  which  he  saw  as 
disparaging to his work. Indeed, the press not only provided an account 
of the controversy sparked by the Fable, it also provided its readers with 
various interpretations of the debate. First, the newspapers purposely 
misrepresented  Mandeville’s  text,  publishing  the  most  provocative 
passages  of  his  work.  The  denial  of  virtues,  the  legalization  of 
prostitution, and the praise of self-interest were the most popular Fable 
quotes published in the papers. Secondly, the press associated the Fable 
with several specific issues. For instance, the Tory press presented the 
Fable’s content in association with certain negative topics such as the 
South sea  bubble or  the thief  Jonathan  Wild; on  the other hand, the 
Whig newspapers emphasized the coexistence of virtues and commerce, 
denying the Fable’s motto, private vices, public benefits. It is thus clear 
that newspapers of the time represent a key piece in the puzzle of the 
debate surrounding the Fable. 
T
HE FIRST NOTICES REGARDING THE 
F
ABLE
The first notice about Bernard Mandeville in the British press appeared 
on 18 January,  1704, in  the Post man  and  the historical account; the 
newspaper,  under  the  direction  of  Richard  Baldwin,  advertised  an 
edition of Aesop dress’d or a collections of fables written by B. Mandeville 
MD.
3
Another  reference to  the  Dutch  author  was  then  occasioned by 
Mandeville’s Treatise  of  the hypochondriack  and histeryck  passions  in 
1711.  On  27  December,  1711,  the  Post  man  expanded  the  notice, 
publishing the Dutch physician’s London address as it appeared on the 
frontispiece of the Treatise.
4
On 7 December, 1714, the Post man also 
announced  the  publication  of  The  fable  of  the  bees.  According  to 
Mandeville, the metropolitan press only began to pay serious attention 
to the Fable after the Grand Jury‘s indictment in July of 1723. In the 
3
Other works of Mandeville were advertised between 1704 and 1711, but most of them 
appeared anonymously. For instance, on 18 April, 1704, the Daily courant advertised 
Typhon or the wars between the gods and giants; on 2 April, 1705, the Grumbling hive 
was promoted by the Daily courant, and on 23 November, 1709, the Virgin unmask’d 
was advertised by the Observator. 
4
“A Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions, vulgarly call'd the Hypo in 
Men  and  Vapours  in  Women;  in  which  the  Symptoms,  Causes,  and  Cure of  those 
Diseases  are  set  forth,  after  a  Method  entirely  new.  The  whole  interspers'd,  with 
Instructive Discourses on the real Art of Physick itself; and entertaining Remarks on 
the modern Practice of Physicians and Apothecaries: Very useful to all, that have the 
Misfortune to stand in need of either. In 3 Dialogues. By B. de Mandeville, MD. To be 
had  of  the  AUTHOR,  at  his  House  in  MANCHESTER  COURT,  in  Channel-Cow, 
Westminster […] just published”. 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB.NET. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add
adding text to pdf file; add text in pdf file online
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text pdf; add text fields to pdf
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
V
OLUME 
9,
I
SSUE 
1,
S
PRING 
2016 
128 
third edition of the Fable, he complained that “the first Impression of 
the Fable of the Bees, which came out in 1714, was never carpt at, or 
publickly taken notice of” (1924, I: 473). As Speck remarked (1978, 1), 
the first edition of the Fable attracted some readers, but indeed does 
not  appear  to  have excited  much  comment.  Nevertheless,  there  were 
some  reports  on  the  Fable  circulating  between  1718  and  1722.  For 
instance, on 15 October, 1719, the Evening post advertised the re-release 
of “the celebrated poem of the Fable of the Bees”. On 7 August, 1722, the 
Post  man  advertised  both  the  Fable  of  the  bees  and  Free  thoughts, 
informing its readers that both had been written by Dr. Mandeville. As a 
result, it was public knowledge that Mandeville had written the Fable 
from at least 1722 onwards; it thus stands to reason that Mandeville’s 
Fable was reasonably well known prior its 1723 second edition. 
On 11 July, 1723, the indictment of the Grand Jury against the Fable 
was  inserted  in  the  Evening  post  and  Mandeville’s  book  suddenly 
attracted  widespread attention in  the British  media.  This was shortly 
followed by an increase in both reports on the Fable as well as attacks 
against  it.  On  27  July,  1723,  the  London  journal  published  an 
anonymous  letter  addressed  to  Lord  C.  praising  the  politics  of  the 
current  government  against  the  infidelity:  under  the  pseudonym  of 
Theophilus  philo-britannus,  the  author  suggested  that  the  Fable  and 
three Cato’s letters were supporters of the Pretender. In addition, the 
correspondent  of  the  London  journal  maintained  that  the  texts  in 
question  undermined  the  current  government  and  the  protestant 
succession: 
My Lord, 
‘TIS Welcome News to all the King’s Loyal Subjects and true Friends 
to  the  Establish’d  Government  and  Succession  in  the  Illustrious 
House of Hanover, that your Lordship is said to be contriving some 
Effectual  Means  of  securing  us  from  the  Dangers,  wherewith  his 
Majesty’s  happy  Government  seems  to  be  threatened  by  Catiline, 
under the Name of Cato; by the Writer of a Book, intituled, The Fable 
of  the  Bees,  &c.  and  by  others  of  their  Fraternity,  who  are 
undoubtedly  useful Friends to  the  Pretender, and  diligent, for  his 
sake,  in  labouring  to  subvert  and  ruin  our  Constitution,  under  a 
specious Pretence of defending it. 
The name adopted by the reporter contains a clue that might better 
illuminate his political background and stance.
5
Indeed, the pseudonym 
5
The pseudonym of Theophilus Philo-Britannus only appeared in the article at issued.  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
add text block to pdf; how to add text box to pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add text pdf file acrobat; add text to pdf acrobat
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
E
RASMUS 
J
OURNAL FOR 
P
HILOSOPHY AND 
E
CONOMICS
129 
appears to refer to Britannicus, a name employed by the English bishop 
Benjamin  Hoadly.  Walpole  bought  the  London  journal  in  1722  and 
entrusted it to Hoadly, who had always been a loyal supporter of the 
protestant succession and the Whig party (Sanna 2012, 88-101). From 
1722 to 1724, Hoadly was the editor of the London journal and, under 
his direction,  it became the mouthpiece of Walpole and  Townshend’s 
government.  Theophilus  could  very  well  have  been  a  member  of 
Hoadly’s  entourage,  which  defended  the  Whig  government  from  the 
charges  brought  by  its  enemies.  It  would  thus  make  sense  for 
Theophilus to cast the Fable in opposition to the Whig party, thereby 
affirming that  Mandeville’s  text  had more  in common with the hated 
Jacobite  party  instead.  On  10  August,  1723,  Mandeville  replied  to 
Theophilus from the  London journal in an effort to defend his work, 
asserting that,  “I  think  myself  indispensably  obliged  to  vindicate  the 
above-said  Book  against  the black Aspersions that undeservedly have 
been cast upon it”. 
At the beginning of the “battle of the bees” (Schneider 1987, 101), 
the  press  influenced  the  public  reception  of  the  Fable  through  its 
advertisements.  For  instance, on 17 August,  1723, the  British journal 
advertised an essay by the reverend William Hendley, entitled A defence 
of charity schools. In his Defence, the first response to Mandeville to be 
advertised by newspapers, the reverend from Islington aimed to defend 
charity  schools  from  the  attacks  mounted  by  the  Fable  and  Cato’s 
letters. Although the Defence was not published until the following year 
due  to  a  long  sickness  suffered  by  the  English  reverend,  the 
advertisement  not  only  promoted  Hendley’s  text  but  also  called  the 
Fable an atheistic book: 
A very Reverend and very Learned Divine hath undertaken, in two 
Months, to answer the Objections made by Cato, and the Author of 
the Fable of the Bees, against the present Management of the Charity-
Schools. This elaborate Performance is to be printed by Subscription; 
and, considering the Qualifications of the Author, ‘tis not doubted 
but that there will be great Contributions to this Work of Charity; for 
who is so well qualify’d  to prove  these Authors  to be  Atheist, or 
anything  else,  as  one,  who,  in  the  latter  End  of  the  late  Reign, 
publish’d  a  Sermon,  entitled,  Whigs  no  Christians?  Who  a  more 
proper Advocate for the Teachers in these Schools! 
The  British  journal  concluded  the  advertisement  by  reminding 
readers  of  a  sermon  of  Hendley’s  called  Whigs  no  Christians.  This 
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
V
OLUME 
9,
I
SSUE 
1,
S
PRING 
2016 
130 
sermon  was  delivered  in  1713,  in  Putney,  on  the  anniversary  of  the 
martyrdom of Charles I. In it, Hendley defended the divine right of kings 
whose sovereignty had been established by God: given the divine nature 
of his power, Hendley argued, the king could not be deposed because of 
the disparity between him and common citizens. According to Hendley, 
citizens have no independent rights and must submit to the authority of 
the sovereign. The sermon therefore denied the right of resistance and 
asserted that the rebels must be banished from the Church of England. 
Among the rebels listed, the sermon also included the Whigs and Low-
Churchmen  as  people  who  should  be  excluded  from  the church  and 
denied the label of Christian. As Hendley remarked, “But such Men as 
these (nowadays known by the name of Whigs, or Low-Churchmen) […] 
should  they  be  excluded  the  Pale  of  the  Church,  and  be  denied  the 
Denomination of Christians, and ranked among Jews or Heatens” (1713, 
5).  By  mentioning  Hendley’s  sermon,  the  British  journal  associated 
Mandeville’s A defence of charity school with the Jacobite stance taken 
by  Hendley,  whose  previous  sermon  was  the  main  sponsor  for  the 
Pretender. The British journal thus encouraged its readership to view the 
Fable as somehow connected to the Whig pamphlets that Hendley had 
denounced in his earlier sermon. In doing so, the newspaper indirectly 
yet effectively framed the Fable, alongside Cato’s letters, as belonging to 
the body of Whig literature condemned by the Jacobite pastor. 
T
HE BEES IN GREAT CARTER LANE
:
N
ATHANIEL 
M
IST AND THE 
F
ABLE
The  following  year  the  Fable  began  to  attract  significant  public 
attention. Firstly, Mandeville’s text was no longer associated with Cato’s 
letters; rather, it was considered as an independent book. Secondly, the 
criticisms addressed to Mandeville were not exclusively focused on the 
Essay on charity and charity schools but referred to the whole text of the 
Fable.
6
Mandeville used the notoriety gained by the Fable to promote his 
new  publications:  a  third  edition  of  the  Fable,  A  modest  defence  of 
publick stews, and reprint of The virgin unmask’d. Despite these efforts, 
however, Mandeville’s name initially appeared in the newspapers due to 
his  publication  Free  thoughts  (1722).  On  30  May,  1724,  the  British 
journal’s correspondent addressed a letter to  Crito containing  a long 
extract from Mandeville’s work. The journalist, under the pseudonym of 
6
The early criticisms of Mandeville’s text appeared within a few months: in January the 
newspapers advertised William Law’s Remarks; a month later Richard Fiddes published 
his Treatise; and finally, in April the Daily journal publicized John Dennis’ essay. 
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
E
RASMUS 
J
OURNAL FOR 
P
HILOSOPHY AND 
E
CONOMICS
131 
B.A,  complained about  the  scarce  interest in  the  Free  thoughts,  even 
though Mandeville’s work had been translated into French.
7
Within this 
context,  the  Mist  weekly  journal,  one  of  the  papers  most  critical  of 
Mandeville’s text, offered readers a curious interpretation of the Fable. 
The  essay-paper  was  linked  to  Nathaniel  Mist,  a  British  printer  who 
explicitly opposed the Whig party. In Samuel Negus’s list, the publisher 
of  the  “scandalous  Weekly  journal”  (Nichols,  1812-1815,  I:  311)  was 
included among the Jacobite printers, and indeed Mist was repeatedly 
tried  by  the  government  for  sedition.
8
On  8  August,  1724,  Mist 
published a review of A modest defence of publick stews, suggesting that 
the author of A modest defence was the very same man who had written 
the Fable. In addition, the publisher of the Weekly journal maintained 
that Mandeville was an admirer of the Dutch Republic, a position that 
could be seen from his plan to open public stews in London modeled 
after the Dutch ones:  
The  Treatise intitled The Fable of the Bees, perhaps, has  as much 
good and bad Reasoning in it as ever were seen in the Writings of the 
same Author. This Gentleman I take to be the first among us who 
has  argued  for  a  publick  Toleration  of  Vices.  He  seems  a  great 
Admirer of the Policies of the Dutch […]. 
The following year Mist’s journal changed its name to Mist weekly 
journal. On 19 June, 1725, the Mist’ published a brief account of the life 
of the famous thief-taker and criminal, Jonathan Wild, based on a semi-
satirical  biography  published  some  weeks  after  Wild’s  death.  In  his 
account, the Mist’ reporter stressed that the thief-taker belonged to the 
political and cultural background of the Whig party. Firstly, Wild was 
introduced as a freethinker “and a little inclin’d to Atheism”; secondly, 
he was presented to be as supporter of the Whig party and its motto 
“keep what you get and get what you can”. In particular, the reporter 
highlighted Wild’s plan to write an essay entitled, De legibus naturae, in 
7
“Give me, therefore, leave to present you with a very good Paper out of an excellent 
Book, too little known. It is Dr. Mandeville’s Free Thoughts on Religion, &c. To the 
Reproach of our Taste, it has  been  twice  translated into French, and  yet is  scarce 
known in England. It was written for the Interest of the Establishment; and yet the 
Friends of the Establishment have, for want of reading it, not promoted it”. 
8
In December 1716, Mist bought the Weekly journal from Robert Mawson, changing its 
name  to  Weekly  journal  or  Saturday’s  post.  As  Harris  remarked  (2003,  51),  this 
periodical was published in the famous Great Carter lane, which was situated on the 
south side of St. Paul Cathedral and included several important coffee houses like the 
celebrated Lloyd. 
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
V
OLUME 
9,
I
SSUE 
1,
S
PRING 
2016 
132 
which  the  notorious  double-dealer  intended  to  legitimise  all  kind  of 
knavery as virtuous and honorable actions:  
He communicated to me a Design he had of getting a Treatise wrote 
De  Legibus  Naturae;  under  which  Title,  Theft  and  all  Kinds  of 
Knavery  should  be  recommended  as  vertuous  and  honourable 
Actions;  and  that  they  were  justifiable  by  Laws  of  Nature,  which 
teach  us  to  seek own  Good;  and  that  he  intended to  employ  the 
ingenious Pen of the Author of the Fable of the Bees for that Purpose, 
whom he look’d upon to be equal to the Subject.  
The  Mist’  thus associated  Mandeville  with a  wicked and  depraved 
element of English society in the figure of Wild. Both the Fable and the 
thief-taker were identified by the Jacobite journal as the main sponsors 
of the Whig party, a party which was considered to be the author of all 
criminal and dishonest activities.  
At the same time, the Mist’ also paid a great deal of attention to the 
Fable’s critics and often adopted their claims against Mandeville’s book. 
On 11 June, 1726, for instance, a Mist’ reporter informed his readership 
of how he and his friend had been offended by “a Book entitled, The 
Fable  of  the  Bees;  or,  Private  Vices  Publick  Benefits,  and  it  has  been 
Matter of great Grief to us, to see a Person so hardy as openly to write in 
Defence of Vice”. In response to the Fable, the two Mist’ journalists held 
up Law’s Remarks and The enquiry whether a general practice of virtue 
tends  to  the  wealth  or  poverty  as  the  main  bulwarks  standing  in 
opposition to Mandeville’s text. In particular, the Mist’ reporter praised 
the recent publication of the anonymous treatise, True meaning of the 
fable of the bees: 
[…] and as Auxiliaries, we sent for every Answer to the Fable of the 
Bees which our News Papers gave us Notice of. And much Ground 
did we get by the Assistance of two Pieces, the one entitled, Remarks 
on the Fable of the Bees, &c. The other, An enquiry whether a general 
Practice  of  Virtue  tends  to  the  Wealth  or  Poverty,  Benefit  or 
Disadvantage of  a People  &c.  […] This,  Sir, has  hitherto  been our 
Case, but now do we prepare for Victory, and compleat Conquest, we 
have met with a Book, entitled The true Meaning of the Fable, &c. and 
we venture to say, that it really is the True meaning of the Fable of 
the Bees, and that it has set that perplex Book, in its just, and proper 
Light.  
R
EVOLTI 
/
B
EES ON PAPER
E
RASMUS 
J
OURNAL FOR 
P
HILOSOPHY AND 
E
CONOMICS
133 
According to True meaning, the Fable aimed to enrich only a small 
part  of  the  nation  while  enslaving  the  rest  of  society.  Although  the 
Dutch  author  pretended  to  write  for  the  benefit  of  the  multitude,  it 
claimed, he actually supported an arrangement in which the poor would 
be  forced  into  the  position  of  badly  paid  labourers.  This  position 
motivated  his  continuous attacks on  institutions, such as  the  charity 
schools, the clergy, and the universities. The Mist’ journalist concluded, 
in a comment addressed to Nathaniel Mist, by saying “now, Sir, if you 
are  of  my  Sentiments,  and  think  the  True  Meaning,  &c.  has  set  the 
Author which opposes it, in a just Light, […] give this a Place in your 
Paper”. 
Another interesting reference to the controversy around Mandeville’s 
text appeared some months early. On 5 March, 1726, the Mist advertised 
the recent publication of True meaning, informing its readership that 
the  text  had  been  conceived  of  as  a  response  to  Bluet’s  Enquiry. 
Although the authorship of the Enquiry is a vexed question (Sakmann 
1897, 125; Kaye 1921, 461-462; Carrive 1980, 26; Stafford 1997, 229), 
the Mist reported the death of its author:  
There was publish’d this Week, a Defence of the Fable of the Bees in 
the form of a Letter, to the Author of an Enquiry, &c. whose Death 
has been mentioned in this paper some time since, with his deserv’d 
Praise.  It  is  submitted  to  the  Publick  to  determine,  whether  the 
Greatness of  the  Performance, or other prudential Considerations, 
were true Cause that induce this Writer to delay his Letter ‘till after 
the Decease of the Person whom it was directed. Or whether or no, if 
this Insult on the Dead  should awaken one of them to come and 
shew him the Inquiry and Baseness of his Purposes, he would repent. 
B
ETWEEN 
P
HILANTROPOS AND THE SECOND PART OF THE 
F
ABLE
The  Fable’s  critics  themselves  also  used  the  press  to  advertise  their 
work. On 14 November, 1724, Francis Hutcheson, under the pseudonym 
of Philantropos, published an announcement in the London journal for 
his essay, An inquiry into the original of our ideas of beauty and virtue. 
In  the  article  the  Scottish-Irish  philosopher  included  some  passages 
from  his  work  defending  the  Shaftesbury’s  moral  system.  Two  years 
later, Hutcheson wrote a series of articles in the Dublin weekly journal 
that  presented,  in  advance,  some  of  the  passages  found  in  his  later 
Reflections upon laughter, and observations upon the Fable of the bees 
(1750). In three of these articles Hutcheson criticized Mandeville’s views, 
maintaining that virtue and commerce were compatible and luxury did 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested