mvc view pdf : How to add a text box to a pdf SDK application project winforms html asp.net UWP 9-12book0-part1520

grades
grades
¥ 
12
¥ 
12
This is Your Future. Don’t Leave It Blank.
Making Sense of 
n
fulfill curriculum requirements 
n
teach skills that correlate with 
national standards 
n
navigate the U.S. Census Bureau Web site
n
bring the census to life for your students 
n
drive home the importance and many 
benefits of the census
w
ill
he
l
p you 
t
o:
THIS TEACHING GUIDE
D-3273HTG (3/99)
How to add a text box to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf in preview; how to add text fields to pdf
How to add a text box to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
acrobat add text to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
STRAND 2: COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
STRAND 3: MANAGING DATA
1.
Size It
Up
2.
Make
Your Own
Map
3.
Future
Focus
4. 
District
Decisions
6. 
Forecasting
the Future
5.
Samples
and Stats
Students will read and 
use a U.S. population 
cartogram.
Students will create a 
thematic map to compare
statistical data.
Students will discuss the
importance of the census,
then design an advertisement
for Census 2000.  
Students will learn about 
reapportionment and
redistricting, then debate 
how congressional districts
should be drawn.
Students will learn about
population estimates and
population projections.
Students will analyze  
different sampling 
methods and then design
their own surveys.
l
Geography
l
Geography
l
Math
l
Art
l
Civics and
Government
l
Art
l
Language Arts
l
Civics and
Government
l
Geography
l
Math
l
Civics and
Government
l
Science
l
Geography
l
Math
l
Civics and
Government
l
Geography
l
Reading a
Cartogram
l
Using Thematic
Maps
l
Thinking
Creatively
l
Thinking
Critically
l
Understanding 
Estimates and
Projections
l
Understanding 
Statistics
l
People, Places, 
and Environment
l
Time, Continuity,  
and Change
l
The World in 
Spatial Terms
l
People, Places, and
Environment
l
Individuals, Groups,
and Institutions
l
The World in 
Spatial Terms
l
Human Systems 
l
Civic Ideals and 
Practices
l
Individuals, Groups, 
and Institutions
l
Power, Authority, 
and Governance
l
Time, Continuity,
and Change
l
Human Systems
l
The Uses of
Geography
l
Algebra
l
Time, Continuity, 
and Change
l
Mathematics as
Communication
l
Human Systems
l
Statistics
l
Mathematics as
Communication
l
The World in 
Spatial Terms
l
The Uses of
Geography
Scope and Sequence
LESSON
OBJECTIVE
CURRICULUM
CONNECTIONS
SKILLS
STANDARDS*
STRAND 1: MAP LITERACY
*NCSS Social Studies Standards, NCTM Math Standards and 
The Geography Education Standards Project Geography Standards
For Grades 9-10
For Grades 11-12
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Add Text Box. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Add Text Box. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET.
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text to a pdf in reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf
Table of
Contents
Map Literacy
Lesson 1
Size It Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Reading a Cartogram
Lesson 2
Make Your Own Map  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Using Thematic Maps
Community Involvement
Lesson 3
Future Focus  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Thinking Creatively
Lesson 4
District Decisions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Thinking Critically
Managing Data
Lesson 5
Samples and Stats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Understanding Statistics
Lesson 6
Forecasting the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
Understanding Estimates and Projections
Additional Resources
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inside Back Cover
Geography/Math/Art
Math/Civics & Government/Geography/Science
For Grades 9-10
For Grades 11-12
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; add editable text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text fields in a pdf
How to Use
This Guide
The lessons in this guide introduce students to Census 2000 with 
high-interest, grade-level appropriate activities designed to meet your
curricular needs. Students will learn what a census is and why it’s 
important to them, their families, and the community.
Your Scope and
Sequence (on the inside front cover) provides an at-a-glance
summary of the lessons in this book. These lessons are divided
into three learning strands: Map Literacy, Community
Involvement, and Managing Data. The Scope and Sequence
identifies skills, objectives, national standards, and curriculum
areas for each lesson. This way, you can easily find lessons
that support your classroom goals. Map, computer, and
library icons allow you to quickly see which lessons interface
with the We Count! wall map, and those that offer special 
enhancements using Internet and library resources. 
Each lesson in this
guide consists of a teacher lesson plan and two reproducible
activity pages. Because students in grades 9-12 have attained
different degrees of mastery, the lessons in each strand have
been stepped (one lesson aimed at grades 9-10; one lesson
aimed at grades 11-12), allowing you to tailor your teaching
to the individual needs of your students. 
This teaching guide is based on a unifying concept: The census is an 
important part of our democracy. Before you begin using the lessons, write this concept on the
board. Explain that information gathered by the census helps America learn what America needs.
SYMBOL KEY
Library
We Count! 
Wall Map
Internet
For Grades 9-10
For Grades 11-12
Customized for your classroom
Lesson planning at a glance
Before you begin
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf document in preview; how to add text to a pdf in reader
Suggested Groupings: 
Individuals, partners
Getting Started:
Introduce this activity to the class by letting
students know that they will compare 
information gathered from a U.S. population 
cartogram with information gathered from a
standard U.S. map. They will use information
gleaned from both maps to draw conclusions
about state population density.
Invite students to share their prior knowledge
of the census. Then discuss the idea that the U.S.
Census Bureau’s primary obligation, as directed
by the Constitution, is to provide population
totals, by state, every ten years. Data from the
census are used to apportion seats in the House
of Representatives and to redraw voting districts
within states. The data are useful for a variety of
other purposes, such as mapmaking. For 
example, the mapmaker who created the car-
togram used census population data to calculate
each state’s size. In fact, both the cartogram and
the We Count! wall map represent information
that would not be available without the census.
Using the Activity Worksheets:
l
Distribute copies of worksheet pages 4 and 5
to students.  Introduce both the We Count! wall
map (including the inset map) and the maps on
page 5. Have a volunteer read the text on page
4 aloud. Discuss the fact that both the We
Count! wall maps and the cartogram show pop-
ulation and population density information. The
type of information shown differs, however. The
We Count! maps show numerical population
data. The cartogram does not. Instead, it shows
a state’s population in relation to other states.
The states on the cartogram are drawn in math-
ematical proportion to their populations. 
l
Ask students whether the We Count!
Population Density inset map or the cartogram
would better answer this question: Which state
is more densely populated, Georgia or South
Dakota?(The We Count!
Population Density inset
map should be used to
answer this question correct-
ly. However, by using both
the cartogram and the
Population Density map, the
answer could also be found.)
l
Have students answer these questions: How
does Florida look on the cartogram? Is it bigger
or smaller than on the regular map? Is it bigger
or smaller than other states?(Florida is larger
relative to the other states on the cartogram
than it is on the standard map.)Then, have stu-
dents answer the questions on worksheet page 4.
Wrapping Up:
l
Review student answers to questions 1-5 and
8 on the handout. 
l
Ask students which states they identified as
densely populated or sparsely populated in 
questions 6-7. Have them explain the reasoning
behind their choices.
l
Discuss situations in which a cartogram might
be useful, and situations in which a cartogram
would be less useful than a standard map.
Extension Activity:
Have students review
updated population data from the U.S. Census
Bureau Web site (www.census.gov). Under the
box labeled “People” choose “Estimates,” and
then select “State Population Estimates.” Based
on this data: Which states might now appear
larger on the cartogram? Which might now
appear smaller?
Answers: 
Page 4: 1.California. 2.Pennsylvania; 
because it’s larger on the cartogram. 
3.New York, Illinois, Kansas, South 
Dakota. 4.Answers will vary. 5.Answers 
will vary. 6.Possible answers: Massachusetts,
Connecticut, New Jersey. 7.Answers will 
vary. 8.California, New York, Texas.
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will learn how to read and use a cartogram.
l
Students will synthesize information from more than one map.
l
Students will draw conclusions about population density.
SIZE 
IT UP
Map Literacy
Chalkboard
Definitions
cartogram:a diagram
in map form.
relative:compared
with others.
proportional: sized 
in relation to some-
thing else.
apportion:to make a
proportionate division
or distribution.
3
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to add text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Drawing. Add Sticky Note. Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with Other SDKs. Barcode Read. Barcode
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in preview
Lesson 1 
Activity Worksheet
Reading a Cartogram
Standard maps of the United States make it easy to compare the relative land area of each state.
Using these maps, it’s clear that Montana is much larger than Connecticut. These maps don’t tell you
anything about population, however. To find that information, you need to look at a special purpose
map that uses census data.
The We Count! wall map is one example. It uses color and numbers to show population data from
the 1990 Census while maintaining geographical accuracy. 
The cartogram at the top of the next page is another kind of special purpose map. In a cartogram,
the size of each state is not related to the size of the land area. The mapmaker isn’t concerned with
the accuracy of boundaries or land areas, but does preserve the shapes and positions of geographic
locations. This cartogram was specially drawn so that the size of each state is proportionalto the
number of people who live there. At a glance, you can easily see the relative size of each state’s
population.
Montana, due to its small population, is shown much smaller than it appears on a standard map.
The small state of Connecticut looks much larger. Texas, which has both a large land area and a
large population, is shown more or less the same size as it would be on a standard map. Using the
cartogram and the standard map, you can draw conclusions about state population density. 
Use the two maps on page 5 (the U.S. Population Cartogram and the Standard U.S.
Map) to answer the following questions:
1.
Which state has the largest population?
2.
Which state has a larger population, 
West Virginia or Pennsylvania?
How can you tell?
3.
Rank these states according to the 
size of their populations, from highest 
to lowest: South Dakota, Illinois, 
New York, Kansas.
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
List a state that is much larger on the 
cartogram than on the regular map.
5.
Find your own state on the cartogram. 
Does it appear smaller or larger relative 
to its size on the standard map?
6.
Find a densely populated state by comparing
the cartogram to the standard U.S. map.
7.
Name a sparsely populated state other 
than Montana.
8.
Based on the cartogram, which three states
would you conclude have the most U.S. 
representatives?
Size 
It Up
4
D-3273HTG
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
installed. Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide
adding text to a pdf file; how to add text box to pdf document
Lesson 1 
Activity Worksheet
Reading a Cartogram 
(continued)
Size 
It Up 
(continued)
5
D-3273HTG
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Suggested Groupings: 
Small groups
Getting Started:
Tell students that their group will be working
with the table of census data on page 7 to make
their own thematic map. They can use the We
Count! wall map as a guide, or for inspiration.
Direct students’ attention to the We Count!
wall map. Discuss the map’s legend, or key, which
explains what the symbols and colors on the map
represent. Use examples from an atlas to illustrate
other techniques cartographers use to show data
on a map, such as patterns and pictographs.
Using the Activity Worksheets: 
Distribute copies of pages 7 and 8 to groups.
Direct students’ attention to the table on page 7.
Ask a volunteer to read the text and explain
what types of data this table shows.
Go over the map-making instructions with
students. Make sure they understand that they
will be representing both sets of information
from the table on one map. Have a volunteer
explain the two ways in which data is presented
on the We Count! wall map. (With color and
numbers.) Ask: Does either table present its data
in ranges?(No.) What must be done with one of
these sets of data to be able to color-code it?(It
must be divided into ranges.)Can both sets of
data be color-coded on the same map?(No.)
Point out that the We Count! wall map is only
one way in which two types of data can be 
presented on the same map. Invite students to
suggest other ways to present two types of data.
These might include using both colors and 
patterns, or patterns and symbols, that 
represent ranges.
Encourage groups to make a draft of their
maps before completing their final version.
Suggest they assess their drafts to decide if they
have chosen the clearest way to present both
sets of data. You may want to give each group
several copies of the map on
page 8 to work with.
Wrapping Up:
l
Have groups share their
final maps with their 
classmates. Discuss the 
techniques each group 
used to represent the data
in the table.
l
Invite volunteers to dis-
cuss whether seeing two
kinds of data on one map
was useful. How do the
two sets of data compare?
Do states with the highest
percentages of college grad-
uates tend to have higher
per capita incomes than
others? What generalizations
can you make?
l
Point out that correlating
two forms of data does not prove that they are
related, nor does it explain what causal relation-
ship (if any) there might be. Other factors might
be at work. However, if two sets of data do seem
related, it is fair to ask the question “Why?” 
Do you think people with college educations are
more likely to get higher-paying jobs? Could it
be more difficult for some people to afford a 
college education? Explain.
Extension Activities:
l
As an extension, students might enjoy
selecting two other categories of information
available from the U.S. Census Bureau and
making their own maps to display the data.
They can look for data at the U.S. Census
Bureau Web site (www.census.gov). 
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will read and use a thematic map.
l
Students will make their own thematic map using census data.
l
Students will compare data in two statistical categories.
Chalkboard
Definitions
thematic map:a
map that displays
information about a
specific subject.
per capita:by or
for each person in 
a population.
per capita income:
the total number of
dollars earned by
state residents
divided by the total
state population.
pictograph:a dia-
gram representing
statistical data
using symbols.
Map Literacy
MAKE YOUR 
OWN MAP
6
Lesson 2 
Activity Worksheet
Using Special Purpose Maps
The We Count! wall map in your classroom is a thematic map. This map is designed to show state 
populations based on 1990 Census data. In addition to the state population totals, the states are 
color-coded according to population ranges. This color-coding makes relationships between state 
populations easier to see. For example, what does the color-coding tell you about the Northeast?
The South? The Midwest? The West? 
Below, you will find some census information about each state. The percent of college graduates
includes those 25 and older who have a bachelor’s degree. Per capita income is the total amount of
income earned by everyone in the state, divided by the state population. 
Your job is to make a map that shows both sets of data from this table. Follow the steps below.
1.Decide how you want to represent the data sets. Remember, you are putting the data on a map to
create a visual message. If you just write the corresponding numbers from the table in each state, are
you making good use of the map? Will the reader be able to see the patterns in the map?
2.How can you use colors, patterns, or symbols to represent the data sets? You will need to divide the
data into ranges. To do this, arrange each set from least to greatest, and divide it according to the number
of ranges you would like to use. Make sure each range or category contains data. Then, color the map.
3.Once you have represented the data on your map, fill in the map key. Include the ranges for the 
colors, patterns and/or symbols you have used.
Alabama
16%
$11,486
Alaska
23%
$17,610
Arizona
20%
$13,461
Arkansas
13%
$10,520
California
23%
$16,409
Colorado
27%
$14,821
Connecticut
27%
$20,189
Delaware
21%
$15,854
D.C.
33%
$18,881
Florida
18%
$14,698
Georgia
19%
$13,631
Hawaii
23%
$15,770
Idaho
18%
$11,457
Illinois
21%
$15,201
Indiana
16%
$13,149
Iowa
17%
$12,422
Kansas
21%
$13,330
Kentucky
14%
$11,153
Louisiana
16%
$10,635
Maine
19%
$12,957
Maryland
27%
$17,730
Massachusetts
27%
$17,224
Michigan
17%
$14,154
Minnesota
22%
$14,389
Mississippi
15%
$9,648
Missouri
18%
$12,989
Montana
20%
$11,213
Nebraska
19%
$12,452
Nevada
15%
$15,214
New Hampshire
24%
$15,959
New Jersey
25%
$18,714
New Mexico
20%
$11,246
New York
23%
$16,501
North Carolina
17%
$12,885
North Dakota
18%
$11,051
Ohio
17%
$13,461
Oklahoma
18%
$11,893
Oregon
21%
$13,418
Pennsylvania
18%
$14,068
Rhode Island
21%
$14,981
South Carolina
17%
$11,897
South Dakota
17%
$10,661
Tennessee
16%
$12,255
Texas
20%
$12,904
Utah
22%
$11,029
Vermont
24%
$13,527
Virginia
25%
$15,713
Washington
23%
$14,923
West Virginia
12%
$10,520
Wisconsin
18%
$13,276
Wyoming
19%
$12,311
% of College 
Per
State
Graduates
Capita Income
% of College 
Per
State
Graduates
Capita Income
Make Your
Own Map
Using Special Purpose Maps(continued)
8
D-3273HTG
Lesson 2 Activity Worksheet
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested