mvc view pdf : How to add text to a pdf in acrobat application SDK utility azure wpf .net visual studio 9-12book1-part1521

Suggested Groupings: 
Small groups
Getting Started:
Discuss with students the importance of 
getting involved in their community and helping
to increase census awareness. As a way of doing
this, students will develop census ads. The goal
is to choose a specific segment of the population
as their target audience and encourage them to
return their census forms, thereby helping the
Census Bureau achieve an accurate count of the
nation’s population.
Explain that conducting a decennial census is
a tremendous undertaking. When people don’t
return their forms by mail, the U.S. Census
Bureau must hire employees to knock on doors
and record the census information — a costly
process. In 1990, many of the more than
300,000 temporary census employees were
hired specifically to visit households that did
not return forms. It can cost six times as much
to count each household in this way. One goal
of Census 2000 is to increase the percentage of
households that return the census form by mail.
Brainstorm the importance of responding to 
the census and the ways in which census data
affect our nation’s future. (E
x
amples include:
apportioning representation in the House of
Representatives; allocating money for educa-
tion, transportation, and other services.)
Using the Activity Worksheets:
Distribute copies of pages 10 and 11.
Divide students into small groups. Have
groups read the text and do the first activity on
page 10. 
After groups complete the first activity, have 
volunteers explain how results of the census
might affect the 
household categories.
Students can visit the U.S.
Census Bureau Web site (www.census.gov) or the
library to find more information for their ads.
Before students begin designing their ads, 
encourage them to brainstorm examples of
other public service campaigns.You might 
discuss ad campaigns designed to encourage
people to register to vote, or to discourage 
people from drinking and driving. 
l
You may wish to offer students the opportunity
to select the type of ad they want to work on.
They might want to do a print ad, a radio ad,
or a television ad. A print ad should include
visual elements. A radio ad should be written in
a formal script. A TV ad should contain a script
as well as a storyboard of visuals.
l
Have students design their ads.
Wrapping Up:
l
Invite students to use their advertisement
viewing experience to analyze various ads. 
At what target audience are these ads aimed?
How can you tell?
l
Have each group present their ads. For each ad,
a group spokesperson should explain the segment
of the population they targeted and the reasoning
they used when designing their ad for that 
category.
Answers:
Page 10 (Possible answers):
1.C, E, H.  2.C, H.  3.D, F, G.
4.B.  5.G.  6.A, C, D, H.
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will recognize the importance of the census and the
need to advertise this importance.
l
Students will identify the potential concerns of different 
segments of the population.
l
Students will design an advertisement for Census 2000.
Community Involvement
Chalkboard
Definitions
decennial:occurring
every 10 years.
target audience:
a specific group of
people at which an
advertisement or other
presentation is aimed.
FUTURE 
FOCUS
9
D-3273HTG
Grades 9-10
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text boxes to a pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text field to pdf form; how to enter text into a pdf
Lesson 3 
Activity Worksheets
Thinking Creatively
Census data are used to make a wide variety of federal, tribal, state, 
and local decisions that affect all U.S. residents. The U.S. Census Bureau 
needs to spread the word about the importance of filling in and returning 
the Census 2000 form.
Design an Ad
Now it’s time for your group to create a Census 2000 advertisement aimed at a specific segment
of the population or target audience (for example: students in grades 9-12; unmarried adults, ages 
18 to 30). As you design, you might want to keep the following in mind:
l
What will your ad say? What information about the census and the future will be of interest to
your target audience? What would be a convincing reason for your targeted audience to participate
in the census? How will your target audience affect ad placement? List three places you would
want to display your ad. 
The box below shows some examples of how Census 2000 data can affect the future. 
As with many other things, people’s concerns about the future vary according to who they are. 
Families with school-age children might have very different concerns than the elderly. 
Decide which effects of census data (in the box 
to the right) might most concern the household 
categories listed below. Then write those letters in
the blanks. (Letters may be used more than once.)
Household Categories
1.Households with children under age 5
2.Households with school-age children
3.Households with people
age 65 and over
4.Households with cars
5.Households without cars
6.All households
The CensusÉ
A.
Determines how many representatives 
each state has in Congress.
B.
Can affect where new roads will be built.
C.
Can determine where new schools and 
libraries are needed.
D.
Can play a role in locating new hospitals.
E.
Can play a role in locating new day 
care centers.
F.
Can play a role in locating new nursing homes.
G.
Can affect public transportation.
H.
Can play a role in locating new parks and
recreational centers.
Ways Census Data Can Affect the Future
Future 
Focus
10
D-3273HTG
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
add text in pdf file online; how to insert text box in pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; adding text pdf
Lesson 3 
Activity Worksheet
Thinking Creatively 
(continued)
Future 
Focus 
(continued)
Use the space below to sketch an outline of your ad. 
11
D-3273HTG
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; add text pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to a pdf
Getting Started:
l
Review the legislative branch of 
our government: the House of
Representatives and Senate.
l
Introduce the concepts of 
reapportionment and redistricting,
emphasizing these points:
1.The Census Bureau collects popula-
tion totals; reapportionment decisions
are made by Congress; redistricting
decisions are made by state legislators. 
2.Before the 1960s, apportionment
of state legislature seats was often
based on land area not population,
so a sparsely populated area could
have the same congressional clout as a
more densely populated one. 
3.Courts today have interpreted the “one person, one
vote” principle to mean congressional, state, and local
districts must be composed of approximately equal
population totals. Redistricting occurs to reflect changes
in relative numbers of people living in each state.
4.Population redistribution within states affects 
redistricting. Redistricting by population can often
lead to oddly shaped districts that don’t conform to
municipalboundaries. 
5. After the 1990 Decennial Census, lawsuits were filed
challenging several newly drawn congressional districts.
The most well-known of these cases involved North
Carolina’s 12th District, which was a ribbon-like, 160-
mile long district that was drawn, in compliance with
the Voting Rights Act, to redress prior discrimination
against minorities in North Carolina. Although
African-Americans make up nearly 25 percent of North
Carolina’s population, an African-American had not
been elected tocongressfrom thatstate in over100years.
l
A political party with control of a state legislature
may try to “gerrymander” district boundaries to favor
its party over others. Political gerrymandering is not
illegal. However, courts have ruled in the North
Carolina case that “racial gerrymandering” is illegal.
l
Discuss whether gerrymandering in any form
should be legal. What factors should be considered in
drawing congressional districts?
Using the Activity Worksheets:
l
Distribute copies of pages 13 
and 14. Review the redistricting 
timeline with students, then have 
them research the redistricting process
in their state. To assist them in their
research, refer students to the Web
sites on page 14.
Have students complete page 13,
then review their responses.
Divide students into four groups.
Explain that the groups will debate a
proposed change in the way congres-
sional districts are drawn. There will
be two duplicate debates. To help 
students prepare, have them research and answer
the debate prep questions.
l
Next, have the groups read the debate statement
and choose sides. Explain that, during the debate,
each side will be allowed to speak twice for up to
10 minutes, once to present their argument, and
once for rebuttal of the other side’s argument. 
The side in favor of the debate statement will go
first and will receive an extra one minute counter-
rebuttal at the end. 
l
Have groups present their debates. Discuss the
issue. Which side receives more support? 
Extension:
l
Have students find out more about their  
own congressional voting district. Who is their 
representative?Students can check the library 
or visit www.house.gov
/
writerep.
Answers:
1.Students should note trends: representation 
(and population) in the Northeast and Midwest
have declined since 1960; while representation has
increased in the South and West. 2.Answers will
vary and might include: a smaller tax base; a strain
on natural resources. 3.Answers will vary. Growing
regions should insure that issues
important to them are debated 
in Congress.
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will use a timeline to learn about reapportionment and redistricting.
l
Students will debate redistricting based on municipal boundaries vs. population counts.
DISTRICT 
DECISIONS
Chalkboard
Definitions
reapportionment:the 
reassignment of congressional 
representation based on
changes in state populations. 
redistricting:drawing new con-
gressional district boundaries.
municipal:relating to a town,
city, or urban area.
gerrymandering:redrawing
district boundaries to give a
political party or other group
an electoral advantage.
Community Involvement
12
D-3273HTG
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add text to pdf file; how to insert pdf into email text
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text pdf professional
Lesson 4 
Activity Worksheet
Thinking Critically
Census population counts play an important role in how we are represented in the House of
Representatives. When a state’s population changes significantly (compared to the rest of the country), the
House of Representatives adds or subtracts a representative from that state. This is called reapportionment
When state populations change, the state legislatures use census population counts to draw new district
boundaries. This is called redistricting. The timeline below shows you how the process works:
District 
Decisions
1.
What does this table tell you about changes in the nation’s population? Why do you think these 
changes have taken place?
2.
How have these changes affected these regions?
3.
How do you think shifts in regional population might affect the goals or priorities of the 
House of Representatives?
13
D-3273HTG
C
e
nsus population 
counts coll
e
ct
e
d.
Th
e
Pr
e
sid
e
nt r
e
c
e
iv
e
s
population counts from
th
e
U.S. C
e
nsus Bur
e
au.
R
e
apportionm
e
nt.
Congress determines 
which states gain/lose 
representatives based on
census counts.
Th
e
Hous
e
of 
R
e
pr
e
s
e
ntativ
e
informs th
e
stat
e
s.
Some states gain seats, 
others lose seats.
By April 1, 2001
In time for the 2002
Congressional Elections
November 5, 2002
January 2003
Now use this table to answer the questions below.
Census Redistricting Timeline
Congressional Representatives by Region:
1960
1970
1980
1990
108
104
95
88
133
134
142
149
125
121
113
105
69
76
85
93
R
egion
North
e
ast
CT, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT
South
AL, AR, DC, DE, FL, GA, KY, LA, 
MD, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, 
WV
Midw
e
st
IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE,
OH, SD, WI
W
e
st
AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NM,  
NV, OR, UT, WA, WY
Census Day
April 1, 2000
By December 31, 2000
Within 1 wee
k
of the 
opening of Congress,
January 2001
Within 15 days of when
Congress determines
reapportionment.
Stat
e
Le
gislatur
e
r
e
c
e
iv
e
counts from th
e
U.S. C
e
nsus Bur
e
au.
R
e
districting. 
Districts are redrawn.
El
e
ctions.
N
e
w districts s
e
nd th
e
ir 
r
e
pr
e
s
e
ntativ
e
s to
Washington, D.C.
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add text box to pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text field to pdf acrobat
Lesson 4 
Activity Worksheet
Thinking Critically 
(continued)
Drawing districts so that they have equal populations means that some districts have larger or
smaller land areas than others. It also means that these districts can divide or cross municipal bound-
aries. A neighborhood may be part of two or more voting districts! What if federal districts were
drawn according to county, city, town, or neighborhood boundaries? How would that affect our rep-
resentation in Congress? Would it compromise the “one person, one vote” principle upon which our
democracy is based? Should voting districts be based on municipal boundaries and not population
counts? Read the debate statement below.
District 
Decisions
(continued)
14
D-3273HTG
You may wish to visit these Web sites while 
preparing for your debate:
http:
//
www.ncsl.org
/
statevote98
/
redis1.htm 
The National Conference of State Legislature’s 
Web site has information on redistricting issues.
www.ncinsider.com
//
redistrict
/
redistrict.html
This site provides additional information about redis-
tricting rulings involving North Carolina’s 12th district.
http:
//
www.senate.leg.state.mn.us
/
departments
/
scr
/
redist
/
red907.htm
This site, developed by the Senate Counsel to
Minnesota, contains information on recent Supreme
Court decisions regarding redistricting.
http:
//
www.ncsl.org
/
statevote98
/
statesites.htm
This site contains district maps for some states.
Debate Statement: Congressional districts should be based on 
municipal boundaries, not population counts.
Yes or No.
Debate Prep Questions
Conduct research to find the answers to these questions. If necessary, use a separate piece of paper. 
1. How many voting districts are there in your state? Do any of them cross municipal boundaries?
____________________________________________________________________________________
2. How often has your state redrawn voting districts over the past 50 years?____________________
3. Based on your state’s population distribution, would a change to municipal voting districts mean
that some representatives represented twice as many people as others? How often might this
occur? ______________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
4. How might your state’s districts be redrawn to conform to municipal boundaries? ? ____________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Tips for Your Debate
1. Do the research.Find out all you
can about the redistricting process.
2. Use examples.Look for specific
instances from the past that will sup-
port your claim, like court cases.
3. Get organized.Create a list of
factors that the proposed change
would affect. Then create an outline
that addresses them.
4. Be prepared.The winning side in
a debate is usually the one that has
done more preparation.
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
adding text to pdf in preview; how to insert text box on pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
how to insert text in pdf file; add text pdf
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will identify different sampling methods.
l
Students will design and conduct surveys using 
sampling methods.
SAMPLES AND 
STATS
Managing Data
Suggested Groupings: 
Partners, small groups
Getting Started:
l
Have students share any prior knowledge of
samplingthey may have. Discuss the idea that 
sampling makes it possible to gather information
about a population when surveying every member
is impossible or impractical. Educators, advertisers,
and policymakers all use information gathered
through sampling. The U.S. Census Bureau also
develops and uses sampling techniques to gather
information about the U.S. population. For 
example, while the Census Bureau distributes both
a short and long census questionnaire, only one in
six households will get a long form for Census
2000. This sample is large enough to provide the
data to accurately describe the U.S. population. 
l
Explain to students that this activity will introduce
them to a variety of sampling methods and the 
multiple steps involved in the process of conducting 
a survey to gather statistical information. Make sure
they understand that the sampling process they will
use to obtain data is much simpler than the methods
used by the U.S. Census Bureau and others.
Using the Activity Worksheets:
l
Distribute copies of pages 16 and 17 to students.
Have them read and complete the activity on page 16.
Alternatively, you may wish to do this activity as 
a class.
l
Then have students read and discuss the section 
on bias at the top of page 17. Ask: Can you come up
with your own example of a biased sample? (For
example, if you conduct a survey of your classmates
by e-mail, you will automatically exclude all class
members who do not have access to e-mail.) What
steps can researchers take to ensure that the studies
they design are not biased?
l
Before students begin, discuss the difference
between the type of survey the Census Bureau con-
ducts and a poll. The Census Bureau uses surveys to
collect and analyze social, economic, and geographic
data. A pollis a 
survey that is used to
measure attitudes
and opinions. Go
over these steps with
them. 1. Choose a
survey question.
Make sure students
choose a question
that asks for factual
information, like age
or education level,
rather than an attitude or opinion. 2. Identify the 
target population and sample size. 3. Decide on the
sample method. 4. Conduct the survey and interpret,
tabulate, and graph or map results.
l
To demonstrate, choose your own question and do
a quick survey with your students.
Wrapping Up:
l
Have each group present their surveys and results.
Ask a spokesperson for each group to discuss the tar-
get population, sample size, and sample method used
in the survey. Have students share their conclusions.
l
Have students conduct further research about 
the sampling methods presented here. Have the class
agree on one survey question. Divide the class into
three groups, and have each group use a different
sampling method. Be sure each group uses the same
size sample. Then invite the groups to compare
results. Alternatively, student groups could use the
same sampling method on different sample sizes.
l
Students can visit the U.S. Census Bureau Web site
(www.census.gov) to get information from surveys
conducted on such subjects as computer use, crime,
education, etc. Click on “Subjects A-Z” and choose
“S” then “Surveys.” 
Answers:
Page 16:
1.Cluster sampling. 
2.Random sampling. 
3.Systematic sampling.
15
Chalkboard
Definitions
sampling:using a finite part
of a statistical population 
for study, in order to gain
information about the whole.
survey:a set of questions
asked of a specific popula-
tion to collect data for 
analysis.
poll:a survey that measures
attitudes and opinions. 
Lesson 5 
Activity Worksheet
Understanding Statistics
Samples and 
Stats
Samplingis a scientific technique used to obtain as accurate a figure or measurement as 
possible, when an exact count cannot be taken. By measuring a scientifically selected portion of a
population, it is possible to describe the characteristics of the entire population. 
Below is a chart describing three different scientific sampling methods. The U.S. Census Bureau’s
long form is an example of systematic sampling. For Census 2000, a systematic sampling of 
approximately 1 in every 6 households will receive the long form, and an average of 5 out of every
6 households will receive the short form.Although the long form doesn’t go to every household,
information from these forms can be used to accurately describe the entire U.S. population.
Here are three different sampling methods:
Test your understanding of different sampling techniques. Draw lines to match the sampling
methods with their types. 
1.
Choose any three pages from the telephone 
book at random, and call everyone on those pages.
2.
Choose 100 telephone numbers at random 
from the entire book.
3.
Choose every 100th listing in the 
telephone book.
a.
Random Sampling
b.
Systematic Sampling
c.
Cluster Sampling
16
Each individual in the 
population has an equal
chance of being selected.
Example: 
To take a random 
sample of students in your
school, you could write the
name of each student on a
slip of paper, then choose 
slips at random.
Groups, rather than 
individuals, are randomly
selected. 
Example: 
You might randomly 
select certain classes, then
interview every student in
only those classes.
A rule, or pattern, that
applies to a population is
used to make selections.
Example: 
Using an alphabetical list
of students, count off by
6, and select every 6th
student on the list.
Systematic
Sampling
Cluster
Sampling
Random 
Sampling
D-3273HTG
Lesson 5 
Activity Worksheet
Understanding Statistics 
(continued)
Samples and 
Stats
(continued)
When choosing a sampling method, you need to beware of hidden biases. For example, imagine 
that you want to know if teenagers today are taller than teenagers in the past. You’ve found information
about the average height of students in your school in 1940 and 1970. Now you need to 
find out the average height of students in your school today. You probably don’t want to get the height
data from a sample consisting of members of the school basketball team! Why not?
1.
Acting as your school’s census bureau, identify a characteristic of interest or importance to
your school and choose a survey question. (Topic examples: transportation to and from
school, team sports or other extracurricular activities, foreign languages studied, etc.) For
some of these topics, you may be able to check the accuracy of your survey results against
actual tallies your school keeps. Be sure not to ask questions about attitudes or opinions. 
Write your topic and survey question here:
2.
Choose your target population. The target population is the group of people to whom you
want the sample survey to apply. For instance, a survey about a school-related question
could apply to the students in your grade or to the whole student body. Make sure you 
survey a good sample of your target population. (For example, if your survey applies to 
a student body of 400, you might want to talk to at least 10%, or 40 people.) 
Write your target population and sample size here: __________________________________
3.
Based upon the steps above, which sampling method would you choose for your survey? Why?
4.
Now conduct your sample survey and tabulate the results. Then organize your results into 
a graph or table and add a narrative summary. Share your graph, or table and summary,
with the class.
Design your own sample survey.
17
D-3273HTG
Skills and Objectives:
l
Students will learn about population estimates and population projections.
l
Students will compare population projections based on numerical (arithmetic)
growth and on percent (geometric) growth.
Managing Data
Grades 11-12
Getting Started:
l
Introduce the lesson by discussing the
following terms that are defined in the
lesson as they relate to population: 
enumerations, estimates, projections,
components of population change,
births, deaths, and net migration. Help
the students understand that information
about the U.S. population is important
for a variety of purposes, including
planning in both the public sector (e.g.,
where to build schools and hospitals)
and the private sector (e.g., store 
location and marketing), and that pop-
ulation figures are used in determining
federal and state fund allocations.
Using the Activity
Worksheets:
Distribute copies of pages 19 and 20 to
students and discuss the problems with them. 
Have students individually, or in pairs, calculate 
the answers to questions 1 through 11. Then 
with the entire class, discuss answers to questions
12 through 16.
Population estimates and 
projections:
Discuss with students how U.S. Census Bureau
population estimates and projections are actually
done, and explain that the methodology used by
Census Bureau demographers is more complicated
than the hypothetical examples given here. There
can be many assumptions and variables involving
the set of components (fertility, mortality, and net
migration) that contribute to the population
growth estimates and projections the U.S. Census
Bureau publishes. 
For further information on population estimates:
www.census.gov/population/www/estimates/
concepts.html
For further information on population 
projections: www.census.gov/population/www/
projections/aboutproj.html
Answers:
1.32,621,613. 2.254,899 and 8.4 
percent. 3.568,996 and 14.9 percent.
4.895,990 and 34.6 percent. 
5.1,889,829 and 106.4 percent. 
6.Answers will vary.
7.3,542,015 and 3,563,234. 
8.4,944,095 and 5,026,989. 
9.4,382,693 and 4,693,102.
10.5,555,057 and 7,565,031. 
11.Answers will vary.
12.Because the percent increase is
applied to a larger population in 1990
than in 1970.
13.Arizona. Because Arizona had the
highest percent increase in population
during the 1970–1990 period, it has the
largest proportionate difference between
a population projection for the year
2010 based on numerical growth versus
percent growth.
14.The population projection based on percent
change would be larger because the percent decline
would be applied to the smaller 1990 population. 
15.Calculate one-half the numerical growth of the
1970–1990 period and then add it to the 1990
population.
16.Calculate the ratio of the 1990 to the 1970
population (to six decimal places to minimize
rounding error), then take the square root of the
ratio and convert it to a percent increase. Multiply
the percent increase by the 1990 population, then
add the product to the 1990 population. You can’t
assume one-half of the percent growth for the
1970–1990 period because of the compounding
effect of a geometric rate of increase — an analogy
would be compound interest rates. Taking South
Carolina as an example, the ratio of its 1990 to its
1970 population is 1.345847. The square root of
1.345847 is 1.160, yielding a 16 percent increase in
population in the 1990-2000 decade. The increase
of 557,872 added to the 1990 population of
3,486,703 yields a population projection for 
the year 2000 of 4,044,575. 
Chalkboard
Definitions
rate:a standard amount
used to calculate a total,
as in a percentage
change in population
over the course of a year.
population estimate:
a conclusion about 
the past or present 
population based on
existing data.
population projection:
computation of future
changes in population
size based on assump-
tions about births,
deaths, and migration.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested