mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Acrobat add text to pdf software SDK dll winforms wpf asp.net web forms 9201500631-part1579

ix 
Abbreviations 
ACL 
Anterior Cruciate ligament 
ACLR 
Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction 
ACLT 
Anterior cruciate ligament transection 
AM 
Anteromedial 
ANOVA 
Analysis of Variances 
A-P 
Anterior-posterior 
APR 
Anchor print ratio 
BPTB 
Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone 
BTB 
Bone-Tendon-Bone 
BTJ 
Bone Tendon Junction 
GHK 
Glycyl-Histidyl-Lysine tripeptide 
GHK-Cu 
Glycyl-Histidyl-Lysine tripeptide copper (II) chelated form 
H&E 
Haematoxylin and Eosin 
HT 
Hamstring tendon 
IL-1 
Interleukin-1 
LCL 
Lateral Collateral Ligament 
LII 
Limb Idleness Index 
MCL 
Medial Collateral Ligament 
MMP 
Matrix Metalloproteinase 
MSC 
Mesenchymal Stem cell 
OA 
Osteoarthritis 
OARSI 
Osteoarthritis Research Society International 
PCL 
Posterior cruciate ligament 
PDGFBB 
Platelet-Derived Growth factor BB 
PL 
Posterolateral 
PRP 
Platelet-Rich Plasma 
ROI 
Region of Interest 
ROM 
Range Of Motion 
ROS 
Reactive oxygen species 
S.E. 
Standard error 
SWR 
Swing Time ratio 
TGF-β 
Transforming Growth factor-β 
TPR 
Target print ratio 
VEGF 
Vascular-Endothelial Growth Factor 
Vit.C 
Vitamin C 
Acrobat add text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf file; add text field pdf
Acrobat add text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text box in pdf; add text pdf file
Figure list 
Figure 0 
Grafting in plants 
Figure 1.1 
Diagram illustrated AM and PL bundles of ACL 
11 
Figure 1.2 
Histological examination of rat ACL 
14 
Figure 2.1 
Diagram illustrated different healing stages for ACL injury 
24 
Figure 2.2 
Diagram  illustrated  inherent  insufficiencies  of  graft 
incorporation at graft-tunnel interface 
32 
Figure 3 
Diagram illustrated the search results for systematic review on 
studies of biological modulation of graft healing in ACLR 
38 
Figure 4.1 
Statistics of published animal studies on ACLR 
56 
Figure 4.2 
Anatomical study of rat knee as compared to human knee 
58 
Figure 5.1 
Experimental design for the study of determination of optimal 
initial graft tension for ACLR in a rat model 
66 
Figure 5.2 
Anterior drawer test to confirm the success of ACL transection  68 
Figure 5.3 
Experimental  design  for  the  study  of  the  effect  of 
intra-operative  supplementation  of  vitamin  C  to  promote 
healing in ACLR 
69 
Figure 5.4 
Experimental  design  for  the  study  of  the  effect  of 
post-operative intra-articular injection of GHK-Cu 
70 
Figure 5.5 
Surgical procedure for ACLR in rat 
72 
Figure 5.6 
Schematic diagram for the set-up of graft tensioning for ACLR 
surgery in rat 
72 
Figure 5.7 
Intra-articular injection of GHK-Cu or saline in rat 
74 
Figure 5.8 
Trimming of rat knee 
80 
Figure 5.9 
Positioning of femur and tibia shafts 
80 
Figure 5.10 
Mounting of rat knee joint segment into testing jigs 
82 
Figure 5.11 
Force displacement curves for knee samples 
82 
Figure 5.12 
Force  displacement  curves  for  knee  samples  (modified 
method)
85 
Figure 5.13 
Force  displacement  curve  and  regression  curve  (modified 
method)
86 
Figure 5.14 
Set-up of mechanical testing jig for load-to-failure test 
87 
Figure 5.15 
Pictures for Catwalk analysis 
89 
Figure 6.1 
Validation of anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity test 
94 
Figure 6.2 
Effect of initial graft tensioning on knee A-P laxity 
95 
Figure 6.3 
Histological  examination of rat  knees with  ACLR under 2N or 
4N initial graft tensioning at 2 weeks post operation 
99 
Figure 6.4 
Histological  examination of rat  knees with  ACLR under  2N  or 
4N initial graft tensioning at 6 weeks post operation 
100 
Figure 6.5 
Histological  examination  of  intra-articular  mid-substance  of 
graft in rat knees 
101 
Figure 6.6 
Histological  examination  of  rat  knees  with  ACLR  (low 
magnification) 
104 
Figure 6.7 
Histological examination of intra-articular graft mid-substance 
in rat knees with ACLR 
105 
Figure 6.8 
Histological examination of graft in femoral tunnel in rat knees   
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
add text to pdf online; adding text fields to a pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. If you need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to
adding text to pdf; add text pdf acrobat
xi 
with ACLR 
106 
Figure 6.9 
Histological  examination  of  graft  in  tibial  tunnel  in  rat  knees 
with ACLR 
107 
Figure 6.10 
Histological  picture  showed  typical  cases  of  tunnel 
enlargement 
108 
Figure 6.11 
Results of gait analysis 
111 
Figure 6.12 
Results of  pain-related  gait  changes  in  response  to  analgesic 
treatment 
112 
Figure 6.13 
Histological examination of rat knees from ACLT 
114 
Figure 6.14 
Results of maximum OARSI scores 
115 
Figure 7.1 
Temporal changes of serum CRP 
118 
Figure 7.2 
Effect of vitamin C irrigation saline on anterior-posterior knee 
laxity 
119 
Figure 7.3 
Histological  examination  on  ACLR  rat  knees  at  Day  1  post 
operation 
122 
Figure 7.4 
Histological  examination  on  ACLR  rat  knees  at  Day  4  post 
operation 
123 
Figure 7.5 
Histological  examination  on  ACLR  rat  knees  at  Day  7  post 
operation 
124 
Figure 7.6 
Histological  examination  on  ACLR  rat  knees  at  Day  42  post 
operation 
125 
Figure 7.7 
Effect of vitamin C irrigation saline on gait parameters 
127 
Figure 7.8 
Effect of GHK-Cu on anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity 
129 
Figure 7.9 
Effect of GHK-Cu on failure load of femur-graft-tibia complex 
130 
Figure 7.10 
Effect of GHK-Cu on stiffness of femur-graft-tibia complex 
131 
Figure 7.11 
Histological examination of femoral tunnel for GHK study 
133 
Figure 7.12 
Histological examination of intra-articular graft mid-substance 
for GHK study 
134 
Figure 7.13 
Histological examination of tibial tunnel for GHK study 
135 
Figure 7.14 
Effect of GHK-Cu on gait parameters 
136 
Figure 8.1 
Diagrammatic presentation of graft-tunnel 
142 
Figure 8.2 
Anterior-posterior  force  displacement  curves  of  human  and 
rat knee 
151 
Figure 8.3 
Anterior-posterior  force  displacement  curves  of  human  and 
rat knee with repositioning of neutral position 
152 
Figure 9.1 
Combined Effect of  intra-operative vit.  C irrigation  saline  and 
GHK (laxity test and load-to-failure test)
161 
Figure 9.2 
Combined Effect of  intra-operative vit.  C irrigation  saline  and 
GHK (Histology) 
162 
Figure 9.3 
Combined Effect of  intra-operative vit.  C irrigation  saline  and 
GHK (gait analysis) 
164 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you create a watermark that consists of text or image users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text boxes to pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf; how to add text to pdf
xii 
Table list 
Table 1 
Major milestones in the history of understanding in ACL 
Table 2 
Experimental  evidences  for  biological  enhancement  of  BTJ 
healing 
11 
Table 3.1 
Assessment  criteria  of  methodological  quality  of  animal 
studies of ACLR 
40 
Table 3.2 
Search  Results  of  Studies  Investigating  Biological  Modulation 
of Healing in ACL Reconstruction 
41 
Table 5.1 
Experimental procedure of H&E staining 
76 
Table 5.2 
Histological  scoring  system  for  examination  of  ACL 
reconstruction in rat knee joint samples with sample pictures 
77 
Table 6.1 
Failure mode of rat femur-graft-tibia composite 
96 
Table 6.2 
Histological scoring of the extent of  matrix  degeneration and 
interface at graft-tunnel interface 
97 
Table 6.3 
Histological scoring on graft healing  in ACLR at different time 
points post operation 
109 
Table 7.1 
Failure mode of rat femur-graft-tibia complex 
120 
Table 7.2 
Results  of  histological  scoring  of  the  study  of  the  effect  of 
vitamin C 
120 
Table 7.3 
Results  of  histological  scoring  of  the  study  of  the  effects  of 
GHK-Cu 
132 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add text pdf reader; add editable text box to pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
add text box in pdf document; add text box to pdf
Preface 
Can a tendon graft become a ligament? 
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a very common sport injury. As ruptured 
ACL  does not heal, ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is  now the  standard treatment  to 
restore knee functions. The surgical procedure of ACLR involves the use of a tendon 
graft to replace the ruptured ACL. Although the surgical procedure is successful to 
restore knee functions  to a certain  extent, as the biological healing of the tendon 
graft  in  the  ligament’s  anatomical  niche  is  poor
,  long  term  morbidity  may  be 
resulted. 
The  use  of  tendon  graft  to  reconstruct  ACL  is  primarily  due  to  biomechanical 
considerations as an equally strong substitute is necessary. Some tendons are even 
stronger (i.e. patellar tendon) than ACL in terms of ultimate tensile stress and they 
also  exhibit  considerable  stiffness  at  high  load;  however,  the  low  load  region 
mechanical  properties of tendon  graft are more  important for  the  knee  movement 
after  ACLR,  and  tendons  appear  to  have  mechanical  properties  with  toe  regions 
ended at a higher strain as compared to ACL [1]. It may explain why graft tensioning 
is essential to enable the tendon graft to operate in a similar elastic region as in ACL, 
and  structural  remodeling  of  the  tendon  graft  is  necessary  to  cope  with  the 
mechanical requirements of ACL. In order to evaluate the success of a tendon to take 
over  the  functions  of  a  ligament  in  ACLR,  it  is  better  to  have  a  fundamental 
understanding of the similarities and differences between tendon and ligament. 
In spite of being very similar in structure and appearance, tendon and ligament are 
probably  homomorphic  rather  than  homophylic.  From  evolutionary point  of  view, 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe Users need to add following implementations to your
how to add text box to pdf; adding text to a pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf file
primordial ligament first appeared in bivalves in a form analogous to hinge [2] while 
tendinous structures first appeared in urochordates [3]. During embryogenesis, trunk 
tendon originates from a special sclerotomoal compartment called syndetome, while 
limb tendon originates from lateral  plate and requires ectoderm  [4]. Both types of 
tendons  require  signals  from  muscle  for  tenogenic  differentiation.  In  contrast, 
ligament is formed in the joint interzone after condensation of primordial cartilage 
without overt participation of myotome [5]. Both myotendinous and osteotendinous 
functions  are  developed  after  generation  of  the  primordial  fibrous  mid-substance 
during  embryonic  development.    Scleraxis  expression  is  specific  for  tendon  and 
ligament  development,  which  regulates  the  expression  of  a  number  of 
tendon-specific markers. It is possible that scleraxis mainly control the development 
of  dense  fibrous  mid-substance  tissues  which  are  essential  for  both  tendons  and 
ligaments.   
There  are  some  fundamental  differences  between  tendons  and  ligaments  which 
affects  the  ways  of  injuries  and  repair.  Although  both  tissues  are  composed  of 
fascicles  with  type  I  collagen  fibrils,  the  fibre  alignments  are  more  regular  and 
unidirectional in tendons, while collagen bundles arranged in different directions are 
common in ligaments. It is primarily due to the directionality of the applied forces on 
these tissues, as tendons transmit force from muscle to bone, while ligaments may 
restrict movements from more than one direction. The different mechanical needs of 
tendons and ligaments result in structural differences in terms of collagen fibres, cells 
and junctional structures [6]. 
The  difficulties  of a  tendon graft to  become  an  ACL  are  defined  by the  inherent 
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
how to add text to pdf file; how to enter text in pdf form
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text fields to pdf
differences  in  structures  and  hence  mechanical  properties  between  tendons  and 
ligaments. A 
perfect
ACLR could not only be stable surgical fixation of the graft, 
but  also  the  acquisition  of  ligament
s  properties  by  the  tendon  graft,  which  is 
described  as 
ligamentization
[7].  But  the  ligamentization  process  may  never  be 
completed spontaneously, rendering a full functional recovery a distant goal. The use 
of tendon graft in ACLR may be currently the best approximate substitute for ACL, 
yet biological modulation shall be considered to safeguard graft survival, to promote 
graft incorporation and to facilitate the ligamentization process. It is analogous to the 
grafting in plant in which the graft survival and incorporation is the key to success 
Figure 0
In this background, the present doctorial study aims at exploring the possibilities of 
biological modulation to improve healing outcomes in ACLR. 
Figure 0   
Grafting in plants 
The  idea  of  ACLR is  to  use  a  tendon  graft  to  replace  a torn  ligament, 
which  is  analogous  to  grafting  in  plants  in  which  the  success  is 
determined by the extent of incorporation. 
Chapter 1  Background   
1.1      Definition of ligament 
The  word ligament  is  originated from  Latin ligamentum   which  means "band, tie, 
ligature,"  [8]  in  late  14
th
century,  it  reflects  our  primordial  understanding  of 
ligament
s nature as the ability to connect. A ligament is now defined as a biological 
structure that connects two bones.  In contrast to tendon (originated from Medieval 
Latin tendonem ,  means 
to  stretch
)  which  attaches  muscle  to  bone  and  allows 
movement of the joint, ligament maintains the stability of the joint by enabling and 
constraining their motions. A broader term 
sinew
(etymologically means 
to bend
includes  both  tendons  and  ligaments.  Its  analogous  term  in  Chinese 
“筋”
also 
conceives  both  tendon  and  ligament  as  similar  structures.  In  traditional  Chinese 
Medicine, a number of treatments are targeted to 
“筋”
without distinguishing tendons 
and ligaments, as the treatments are based on the clinical signs. 
The  sizes  and  shapes  of  ligaments  vary  a  lot  according  to  their  anatomical  sites. 
Yellow ligaments (Ligamentum flavum  in spine) allow elastic movement in contrast 
to the white ligament (anterior cruciate ligament,  ACL) that is relatively inelastic. 
Only a few ligaments are intra-capsular (ACL, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)) in 
contrast to most extra-capsular ligaments (Medial collateral ligament (MCL), Lateral 
collateral  ligament  (LCL)).  Some  loose  connective  tissues  are  associated  with 
ligaments as a continuum, such as joint capsule that enclose the articulations. In a 
broader  sense,  there  are  some  other  ligament-like  structures  in  our  body.  For 
examples,  a number  of  so-
called  “ligaments”  in fact do not connecting  bones  but 
various types of tissues (Cooper's ligament maintains structural integrity  of breast, 
periodontal ligament connects tooth and alveolar bone) [9]. 
In  summary,  ligaments  represent  distinctive  biological  structures  that  facilitate 
movements  and  maintain  mechanical  stability  of  a  joint.  Their  niches require  not 
only the  fibrous  mid-substances,  but  also  the  junctions and  other  assistive tissues, 
with  adaptive  changes  in  the  composition  and  organization  of  the  ligamentous 
mid-substances.  As  a  typical  ligament,  ACL  draws  much  attention  because  of  its 
vulnerability to injuries.  Further information about  ACL is  given in  the following 
sections. 
1.2   
History 
The major milestones in the history of understanding in ACL is summarized in Table 
1.1, mainly based on the historical review by Snook GA [10], Ross BR [11] and 
Schindler OS [12]. 
Table 1 
Major milestones in the history of understanding in ACL 
When 
Who 
Discoveries about ACL 
Discoveries about ACL injury 
Milestones of ACL treatment 
460
370 
BC 
Hippocrates of the 
Greek island of 
Kos 
First to suggest that knee 
instability following trauma may 
be attributable to torn 
internal ligaments 
131-201AD  Claudius Galen of 
Pergamon, Snook 
Coin the name as 
ligamenta genu cruciata
1836 
Wilhelm Weber   
and Eduard Weber 
AM,PL bundles of ACL 
1837 
Robert Adams 
First clinical records of ACL 
rupture 
1845 
Amedée Bonnet 
Described the subluxation 
phenomenon now known as the 
pivot-shift 
1850 
James Stark 
Treat ACL injury with brace 
1858 
Karl Langer 
First detailed description 
of cruciate kinematics and 
the ligaments torsional 
behavior pattern 
1875 
Georgios C. Noulis   
Detailed description of what is 
now known as the Lachman test 
1876 
Leopold Dittel 
ACL most commonly tore close to 
its femoral insertion, but 
occasionally avulsed with a 
fragment of bone off the tibia 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested