mvc view to pdf itextsharp : How to insert text box in pdf control Library platform web page asp.net html web browser 92015006321-part1592

C
RITICAL 
A
PPRAISAL 
S
KILLS 
P
ROGRAMME 
(CASP):  Making Sense of Evidence  
10 Questions to Help You Make Sense of  
Randomised Controlled Trials  
How to Use This Appraisal Tool 
Three broad issues need to be considered when appraising the report of a randomised controlled trial:  
 Is the trial valid?  
 What are the results?  
 Will the results help locally?  
The 10 questions on the following pages are designed to help you think about these issues 
systematically.  
The first two questions are screening questions and can be answered quickly. If the answer to both is 
“yes”, it is worth proceeding with the remaining questions.  
You are asked to record a “yes”, “no” or “can’t tell” to most of the questions.  
A number of hints are given after each question. These are designed to remind you why the question is 
important. There may not be time in the small groups to answer them all in detail! 
A.
Are the results of the study valid? 
Screening Questions  
1.  Did the study ask a clearly-focused question? 
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider if the question is ‘focused’ in terms of:  
 the population studied  
 the intervention given  
 the outcomes considered  
2.  Was this a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and 
was it appropriately so?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
 why this study was carried out as an RCT  
 if this was the right research approach for the 
question being asked  
Is it worth continuing?  
Detailed Questions  
3.  Were participants appropriately allocated to 
intervention and control groups?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
 how participants were allocated to intervention and 
control groups. Was the process truly random?  
 whether the method of allocation was described. 
Was a method used to balance the randomization, 
e.g. stratification?  
 how the randomization schedule was generated and 
how a participant was allocated to a study group  
 if the groups were well balanced. Are any differences 
between the groups at entry to the trial reported?  
 if there were differences reported that might have 
explained any outcome(s) (confounding)  
4.  Were participants, staff and study personnel ‘blind’ 
to participants’ study group?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
 the fact that blinding is not always possible  
 if every effort was made to achieve blinding  
 if you think it matters in this study  
 the fact that we are looking for ‘observer bias’  
5.  Were all of the participants who entered the trial 
accounted for at its conclusion?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
 if any intervention-group participants got a control-
group option or vice versa  
 if all participants were followed up in each study 
group (was there loss-to-follow-up?)  
 if all the participants’ outcomes were analysed by the 
groups to which they were originally allocated 
(intention-to-treat analysis)  
 what additional information would you liked to have 
seen to make you feel better about this  
6.  Were the participants in all groups followed up and 
data collected in the same way?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
if, for example, they were reviewed at the same time 
intervals and if they received the same amount of 
attention from researchers and health workers. Any 
differences may introduce performance bias.  
Appendix I
How to insert text box in pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf reader; adding text fields to pdf
How to insert text box in pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text pdf files; add text pdf file acrobat
7.  Did the study have enough participants to 
minimise the play of chance?  
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider:  
if there is a power calculation. This will estimate how 
many participants are needed to be reasonably sure of 
finding something important (if it really exists and for a 
given level of uncertainty about the final result). 
B. What are the results? 
8.  How are the results presented and what is the 
main result?  
HINT: Consider:  
 if, for example, the results are presented as a 
proportion of people experiencing an outcome, such 
as risks, or as a measurement, such as mean or 
median differences, or as survival curves and 
hazards  
 how large this size of result is and how meaningful it 
is  
 how you would sum up the bottom-line result of the 
trial in one sentence  
9.  How precise are these results?  
HINT: Consider:  
 if the result is precise enough to make a decision  
 if a confidence interval were reported. Would your 
decision about whether or not to use this intervention 
be the same at the upper confidence limit as at the 
lower confidence limit?  
 if a p-value is reported where confidence intervals 
are unavailable  
10. Were all important outcomes considered so the 
results can be applied? 
Yes  
Can’t Tell 
No 
HINT: Consider whether:  
 the people included in the trail could be different from 
your population in ways that would produce different 
results  
 your local setting differs much from that of the trial  
 you can provide the same treatment in your setting  
 Consider outcomes from the point of view of the:  
 individual  
 policy maker and professionals  
 family/carers – wider community  
 Consider whether:  
 any benefit reported outweighs any harm and/or cost. 
If this information is not reported can it be filled in 
from elsewhere?  
 policy or practice should change as a result of the 
evidence contained in this trial  
© Public Health Resource Unit, England (2006). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, 
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission 
of the Public Health Resource Unit. If permission is given, then copies must include this statement together with the words “© Public Health 
Resource Unit, England 2006”. However, NHS organisations may reproduce or use the publication for non-commercial educational purposes 
provided the source is acknowledged. © Public Health Resource Unit, England (2006). All rights reserved.  
Appendix I
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to add text box to pdf document
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf
Appendix II
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text to pdf form
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
add text pdf; add text box in pdf document
Appendix II
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF.
add text to pdf without acrobat; adding text to a pdf document
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
adding text box to pdf; add text in pdf file online
EXPERIMENTAL STUDY
Effect of graft tensioning on mechanical restoration in a rat
model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free
tendon graft
Sai-Chuen Fu
Wai-Hang Cheng
Yau-Chuk Cheuk
Tsui-Yu Mok
Christer G. Rolf
Shu-Hang Yung
Kai-Ming Chan
Received: 26September 2011/Accepted: 15 March2012
Springer-Verlag2012
Abstract
Purpose Initial graft tensioning is important in anterior
cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but its effect on
graft healing is still not clear. Since all previous animal
studies on graft tensioning used bone–patellar tendon–
bone, this study aimed to investigate the effect of initial
graft tensioning on ACLR using tendon graft.
Methods Fifty-five Sprague–Dawley rats underwent
ACLR using flexor digitorum longus tendon graft. A con-
stant force of 2or 4 Nwas appliedduringgraft fixation. At
0,2,and6 weeks,kneesampleswereharvested(n = 6) for
static knee laxity test and graft pull-out test. Histological
examination was performed at 2 and 6 weeks post-injury
(n = 4).
Results At time zero, knee laxity was restored by ACLR
with 2 or 4 N tensioning as compared to ACL-deficient
group (p\0.001), and the 4 N group exhibited a better
restorationas comparedto2 Ngroup(p = 0.031).Atweek
2 post-operation, the 4 N group still exhibited a better
restoration in knee laxity (p = 0.001) and knee stiffness
(p = 0.002) than the 2 N group; the graft pull-out force
(p = 0.032) and stiffness (p = 0.010) were alsohigher. At
week 6 post-operation, there was no significant difference
between the 2and 4 Ngroupin knee laxityandgraftpull-
out strength. Histological examination showed that the
beneficial effect of higher initial graft tension may be
contributed by maintenance of graft integrity at mid-sub-
stance and reduction inadverse peri-graft bone changes in
the femoral tunnel region.
Conclusions A higher initial graft tension favours the
restoration of knee laxity and promotes graft healing in
ACLR using free tendon graft in the rat model.
Keywords Anterior cruciate ligament  Reconstruction 
Graft tensioning  Healing  Tendon
Introduction
An optimal graft tensioning during fixation in anterior
cruciateligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgeryis always
of primary interest for orthopaedic surgeons, but there is
disagreement on the effects of initial graft tension on the
graft healing. Biomechanics studies showed that recon-
struction with bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) graft at
40–60 N graft tension may be sufficient to restore knee
laxity [12]. However, overtension may lead to excessive
tibial femoral compressive force, which might increasethe
risk of cartilage injury for BPTB graft [5] and hamstring
tendon graft [10]. An optimal graft tension may exist for
different typesof ACLR, suchasBPTB[11], singlebundle
[7] and double bundle [9] using free tendon grafts.
S.-C. Fu (&)  W.-H. Cheng  Y.-C.Cheuk  T.-Y. Mok 
S.-H. Yung K.-M. Chan(&)
Department ofOrthopaedics and Traumatology,
Faculty of Medicine,The Chinese Universityof Hong Kong,
Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin,New Territories,
Hong Kong SAR,China
e-mail: bruma@cuhk.edu.hk
K.-M.Chan
e-mail: kaimingchan@cuhk.edu.hk
S.-C. Fu W.-H.Cheng  Y.-C.Cheuk T.-Y. Mok 
S.-H. Yung K.-M. Chan
TheHongKongJockeyClubSports Medicine andHealth
Sciences Centre,FacultyofMedicine, The Chinese University
ofHongKong, HongKongSAR, China
C.G. Rolf
Department ofOrthopaedic Surgery, Huddinge University
Hospital, CLINTEC,Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sweden
123
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
DOI 10.1007/s00167-012-1974-x
Appendix IIIA
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
adding text to a pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
how to add text to a pdf file; add text pdf file
However, a recent systematic review[3] showed that such
optimal graft tensions were still undetermined, except in
ACLR with hamstring tendon graft that showed best out-
comes with 80 N initial graft tension. Apart from the
concerns in mechanical stability and stress, the effects of
grafttensioningonthebiologicalprocessesof grafthealing
were investigated in animal models, but the findings were
inconsistent. A study in dog [17] suggested that a higher
Fig.1 Experimental designfor
studies onthe effects ofinitial
graft tension on knee antero-
posterior (A-P)laxity
Fig.2 Experimental set-ups
atoapplyinitial graft
tensioningduringsurgical
operation of ACLR and b to
measure A-P knee laxityand
knee stiffness by mounting the
rathindlimbs onacustom-made
jig connectingtoa mechanical
testingmachine. Knee stiffness
was calculatedas the slope of
the linearregionofthe force–
displacement curves
KneeSurg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
initialtension (39 N) was detrimental tohealing, while the
studies in rabbit [8] showed improvements in healing
outcomes with a higher initial graft tensioning. On the
other hand, a study in goat did not report difference in
long-term healing outcomes [1]. Since all these animal
studiesusedBPTBgrafts, thereis noinformationaboutthe
effects of graft tension on the healing process in ACLR
using free tendon graft, in which thegraft–tunnel interface
healing presents a major challenge for further improve-
ment. Our purpose is to evaluate the effect of initial graft
tensioningonthehealingoutcome ina ratmodelof ACLR
using flexor tendon graft. It is hypothesized that a higher
initial tensioning favours restoration of knee laxity and
improves biological healing.
Materials and methods
Theanimalexperiments inthis studywereapprovedbythe
Animal ExperimentationEthicsCommitteeinThe Chinese
University of Hong Kong (Ref No. 10/077/MIS). Experi-
mentaldesignof the present studywasillustratedinFig.1.
The procedures of ACLR were adapted from our previous
studies in rabbit [15] with the introduction of controlled
initial graft tensioning. Fifty-five male Sprague–Dawley
rats (12 weeks old, 400–450 g) were used. Unilateral
operation was performed on the right knee. The flexor
digitorum longus tendon (25 mm in length and 1 mm in
diameter) was harvested from right heel. The knee joint
capsule was opened, and native ACL was excised. Tibial
and femoral tunnels of 7 mm in length and 1.2 mm
diameter (by 1.1 mm drill bit) were created from the
footprints of thenative ACL tothe medialside of tibiaand
the lateral femoral condyle, respectively. The tendon graft
was inserted through both bone tunnels and fixed to the
tibial periosteum [24] first. Through a pulley system, a
freely suspended weight was used to provide a constant
tensioning force of 2 or 4 N tothe graft during its fixation
totheneighbouringfemoral periosteum (Fig.2a). Animals
were given 0.05 ml Temgesic once after operation and
were allowed free cage movements. At 2 and 6 weeks
post-operation, knee samples were harvested for static
knee laxity test and graft pull-out test (n = 6) and histo-
logical examination with H&E staining (n = 4). For vali-
dation of laxity test at time 0, a group of 15 rats were
operated on both limbs, which were randomly assigned to
‘‘sham’’ group (with medial parapatella arthrotomy),
‘‘intact’’ group (with non-operated knees), ‘‘deficient’’
group (with ACL transected without repair), 2 N pre-ten-
sioning and 4 N pre-tensioning group (6 knees in each
group). Intact and sham group served as positive controls,
while deficient group served as negative controls for the
laxity test.
Static antero-posterior (A-P) knee laxity test
The laxity test protocol is developed with reference to the
Lachman test and KT-2000 knee arthrometer. Fresh knee
samples weretrimmedtoexpose 1.5 cm of tibia andfemur
shafts for fixation in adhesive polymer (1:1:2 of UREOL
5202-1A, UREOL 5202-1B, Filler DT-082. Ciba Specialty
Chemicals, Cambridge, UK). The samples were then
mounted to custom-made jigs by a mechanical testing
machine(H25KM,TinusOlsen,PA,USA),witha50 Nload
cell (H25KM, Tinus Olsen) (load measurement accuracy:
?0.5 %ofmax. load).Thejigs werepositionedtokeepthe
knee inneutralA-P position (forcezero) withnaturalvarus
of rat kneeat approximately 10. Witha pilotstudyondif-
ferent applied shear loads (2 or 3 N) and different knee
flexion angles (55, 70, 85, 100) (data not shown), we
found that a shear load of 2 N was safe to prevent graft
failureduringlaxitytest, whilepositioningatakneeflexion
angle of 70 can reveal the largest difference in A-P
Table 1 Histological scoringsystem
Score
Graft degeneration
a
Nodegenerative changes
0
Minimaldegenerationinside graftand/orattunnelinterface 1
Significant degeneration inside graft and/or at tunnel
interface
2
Extensive degenerationinside graftand/orat tunnel
interface
3
Interfacehealing and adverse peri-graft bonechanges
b
Direct graft incorporation
c
without adverse peri-graft bone
changes
0
Direct graft incorporation with adverse peri-graft bone
changes
1
Indirectgraftincorporation
d
withoutadverseperi-graft bone
changes
2
Indirect graft incorporation with adverse peri-graft bone
changes
3
Nograft incorporation
4
a
Graftdegenerationwasscoredinmicrographsunderbrightfieldand
polarizedillumination.‘‘Nodegeneration’’wasscoredtosamples that
did not reveal anytraits of matrixdegeneration. ‘‘Minimal degener-
ation’’ referred to a lack of cell infiltration into graft with bright
collagen birefringence. Cell infiltration intograft with a loss of col-
lagenbirefringencewasscoredas‘‘significantdegeneration’’(\50%
ofregionof interest) or ‘‘extensive degeneration’’ ([50% of region
ofinterest)
b
Adverse peri-graft bone changes were defined as the presence of
bone intrusion into the tendon graft, peri-graft bone erosion or the
presence of cysts in peri-graft interface
c
Directgraftincorporationwas definedasdirectconnectionbetween
boneandtendonwithoutafibrousinterface(includingSharpey’sfibre
andfibrocartilage zone)
d
Indirect graft incorporation was defined as connection between
bone andtendon graft with a loose fibrous interface
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
displacementbetween sham and ACL-deficient group. The
knees were thus maintained70 flexed from fullextension
whenananterior pullingforce(2 N)wasappliedtothetibia
atacrossheadspeedof 20 mm/min(Fig.2b). Theresultant
displacement from neutral position was recorded in mm
(position resolution of the machine: 0.001 mm), and the
kneestiffnesswascalculatedastheslopeatthelinearregion
of the force–displacement curve. Repeated tests were per-
formed in 17 specimens across the groups to examine the
test–retest reliability.The Cronbach’salpha was 0.936,and
the intra-class correlation coefficient with single measures
was0.879, indicatinga goodrepeatability.
Load-to-failure test
After the laxity test, the specimens were kept at -20 C
andthawedatroom temperaturefor 2 h beforetheload-to-
failure test [15]. The femur–graft–tibia complexes were
positioned to align the femur and tibia tunnels with the
graft vertically along the direction of applied force. The
tensile test for failure load was carried out at a cross head
speed of 40 mm/min with a 50 N load cell until an abrupt
dropin loadingwas detected.Failure loadwas measuredas
the maximum force until graft failure the mode of failure
was recorded. The stiffness of the femur–graft–tibia com-
plex was measured as the slope at linear region of the
force–displacement curve.
Histological analysis
At 2 and 6 weeks post-operation, the rats were killed
(n = 4) and the knee joints were fixed, decalcified and
embedded. Five-micrometer-thick paraffin sections along
thesagittalplaneofthekneewerecollectedingroupsof20
consecutive sections. 2–3 sections from each group were
chosen for histological examination of femoral tunnels,
intra-articular graft mid-substance or tibial tunnels. As the
healing responses varied along the tunnel from intra-
articular to extra-articular exits [4], sections from the
epiphyseal region was chosen for comparison of graft
healing inside tunnels. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E)
stained sections were examined under bright field and
polarized illumination (Leica Microsystems, Germany).
Histologicalevaluationwas carriedout bytwoindependent
examiners according to a scoring system developed by our
group, based on the extent of matrix degeneration of the
tendon graft and the healing responses in the graft–tunnel
interface (Table1).
Statistical analysis
Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for
Social Science (SPSS) 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA).
After checking of normal distribution by Kolmogorov–
Smirnov test, data of laxity tests on time zero data were
analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Turkey’s HSD, while
the effects of tensioning and time on knee laxity andpull-
out strength were analysed by 2-way ANOVA. For asso-
ciation between graft tensioning and failure mode of
femur–graft–tibia complex, likelihood ratio test was used.
For histological scoring, non-parametric Mann–Whitney
Utestswere usedforcomparisonsbetweentimepointsand
between tensioning groups. Significant difference was
determined at p\0.05.
Fig.3 Resultsofkneeantero-posterior(A-P)laxitytestfortime 0samples,showingaknee laxityandb kneestiffness.Differenceswithnon-
significant pvalues were indicatedby‘‘ns’’
KneeSurg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
Results
Results of knee laxity test at time 0 after operation was
shown in Fig.3. ACLR with 2 or 4 N graft tensioning
reduced knee A-P displacement as compared to ACL-
deficient group (Fig.3a), but knee stiffness was only sig-
nificantly increased in the 4 N group (Fig.3b). The knee
A-P displacement in 4 N group was significantly lower
than the 2 N group.
Regardless of the applied graft tensioning, there was a
temporary increase in knee A-P displacement and
decrease in knee stiffness at 2 weeks post-operation. As
compared to 2 N group, 4 N group resulted in a better
restoration in laxity and stiffness (Fig.4a, b), as well as
graft pull-out force and stiffness of femur–graft–tibia
complex (Fig.4c, d). However, the difference became
insignificant at 6 weeks post-operation. The failure mode
shifted from femoral pull-out to tibial pull-out or ruptures
at mid-substance from 2 to 6 weeks post-operation
(Table2).
The results of histological scoring were shown in
Table3. As compared to week 2 post-operation, graft
degeneration became less severe at week 6 post-operation
in 4 N group in femoral tunnel region, but the graft
degeneration at mid-substance became more severe. In
contrast, no significant temporal change in graft degener-
ation was observed in 2 Ngroup. The interface healing in
femoral and tibial tunnel regions was significantly
Fig.4 ResultsofmechanicaltestsonACLRsamplesattime0,2and6 weekspost-operation,showingakneelaxity,bkneestiffnessoftheknee
jointsegment;andcfailureload,dstiffnessofthefemur–graft–tibiacomplex.Differenceswithnon-significantpvalueswereindicatedby‘‘n.s.’’
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
improved from 2 weeks to 6 weeks post-operation in both
tensioning groups, with a transition from indirect to direct
graft incorporation. At 2 weeks post-operation, 4 N group
showed better matrix integrity at mid-substance and a
better interface healing at femoral tunnel as compared to
2Ngroup, inwhichadverse peri-graft bone reactions were
observed (Fig.5). At 6 week post-operation, 4 N group
stillmaintaineda better interface healingat femoraltunnel
as comparedto2 Ngroup inwhich adverse peri-graft bone
changes were still evident.
Discussion
We found that higher initial graft tensioning is more
favourable for graft healing in ACLR using free tendon
graft. Our findings echoed previous animal studies using
BPTB grafts in the ways that higher initial tensioning was
beneficial [8] and that the effect of initial tensioning was
diminishedatlater healing stages ascomparedtotime zero
[1]. However, our finding is contrary to a study in dog
ACLR model [17]. As bilateral operation with different
graft tensions on each limb was performed in this study
[17], a compensatory redistribution of loading may con-
foundthe results. Moreover, as compared tothe studies in
rat(4 N), rabbit (17.5 N) andgoat (35 N), thegrafttension
used in dog model (39 N) might be too high even
accounting for the size of the animal, which may hamper
Table2 Failure mode of rat femur–graft–tibia composite 2 and
6weeks after ACLRat aninitial graft tensioning of 2or 4N
Time post-
operation
(week)
Initial graft
tensioningat (N)
Failure mode
Femur
Mid-substance
Tibia
2
2
6
0
0
4
5
0
1
6
2
0
5
1
4
0
2
4
Table3 Histological scoring of the extent of matrix degeneration
andinterface at graft–tunnel interface
Time post-operation
2weeks
6weeks
Initial graft tensioningat
2N
4N
2N
4N
Matrix degeneration
Femoral tunnel
3
3
2
1.5
#
Mid-substance
1.5
0*
2.5
2.5
#
Tibial tunnel
1.5
2
2
1.5
Interface healing
Femoral tunnel
3
2*
1
#
0*
#
Tibial tunnel
3
3
0
#
0.5
#
*p\0.05 when compared between 2 and 4N groups within the
same time point
#
p\0.05 when compared between 2 and 6weeks groups within
the same tensioning group
Fig.5 H&E(Optical
Magnification: 950)andthe
correspondingpolarized(9400)
micrographs showingtendon
graft (T)and peri-graft bone
(B) infemoral tunnels captured
from sagittal sections of the
ACL-reconstructedknees at
2weekpost-operation. Graft
incorporation in2 N group was
hamperedby the presence of
adverseperi-graft bone changes
suchas bone intrusionintograft
(markedbyasterisk).The green
boxes for the examinationof
graft incorporationwere shown
at a higher magnification in
polarizedview. Graft
incorporation (markedby
invertedtriangle)was noticed
as indirect connections through
afibrous interface
KneeSurg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested