mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Adding text to pdf file SDK control service wpf azure web page dnn 92015006322-part1593

normal tissue remodelling [12] and cause excessive tibial
femoral compressive force [10].
The present study showed that severe graft degeneration
at the intra-articular mid-substance may contribute to the
lower knee stiffness at 2 weeks post-operation. As graft
degradation is presumably mediated by infiltrating healing
cells, we speculate that the tension-induced changes in col-
lagen fibrillar ultrastructure[6] andthetissuereorganization
associated with Poisson contraction [13] may retard the
infiltrationof healingcellsandbetter preservegraftintegrity.
At 6 weeks post-operation, significant graft remodelling
(ligamentization) occurred and the effect of initial graft
tensioning became insignificant. It suggests that graft ten-
sioning may only affect early stages of graft healing.
In contrast to previous animal studies which used bone–
patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) grafts, this study investigates
the effect of graft tension on interface healing in ACLR
using free tendon graft. Although graft degeneration inside
femoral tunnel was similar in both tensioning groups, peri-
graft bone changes manifested as bone intrusions into graft
wereonlypresentin2 Nbutnotin 4 Ngroup(Fig.5).Initial
graft tensioning appeared to affect the graft-to-bone inter-
actions, and adverse peri-graftbone changes may negatively
affect the strength of graft-to-bone attachment in ACLR
[15].
Though the small size of rat may cause some technical
difficulties on the precision of the surgical procedures, rat
modelof ACLR wasstillusedbyotherresearchers[4]. Inour
study, the variations of failure parameters and laxity mea-
sures were not particularly large as compared to ACLR
studiesinlarger animals [1,8]. Our choiceof grafttension(2
or 4 N) corresponded to 5–10 % of ultimate strength of rat
ACL (*40 N), which is similar to the rangeused in clinical
practice (80–150 N) [3] thatcorrespondedto4–7 %of intact
human ACL (2,160 N) [16]. Thus, the use of a rat model is
still valuablefor investigation into initial grafttensioning in
ACLR. In our study, the measurement of A-P knee laxity
entailed larger random variations as compared to the knee
stiffness data, probably due to the variations in defining
neutral position in knee laxity test. Further improvement in
standardizationof the neutralposition willbe favourable. As
6weeks in adult rat was roughly equivalent to 4 years in
human[14],themaximumobservationtimeinthis studywas
similar to the follow-up periodinprevious clinicalstudiesof
graft pre-tensioning [7911]. Yet, further study with a
longer follow-up may be necessary for studies of ligamen-
tization and chondral lesions.
Conclusion
In ACLR using free tendon graft, a higher initial graft
tension not only favoured the restoration of knee laxity, but
also enhanced graft incorporation into the bone tunnels in
early healing stage in the rat model. It suggests that early
mobilization will be safer for post-operative rehabilitation
in ACLR with a higher initial graft tension.
Acknowledgments This studywas supportedbythe Innovationand
Technology Fund (Ref: ITS/444/09) from the Innovation and Tech-
nology Commission of the government of Hong Kong SAR.
References
1. Abramowitch SD, Papageorgiou CD, Withrow JD, Gilbert TW,
Woo SL (2003) The effect of initial graft tension on the biome-
chanical properties of a healing ACL replacement graft: a study
in goats. J Orthop Res 21(4):708–715
2. AndersonK,Seneviratne AM,Izawa K, AtkinsonBL, Potter HG,
Rodeo SA (2001) Augmentation of tendon healing in an intra-
articular bone tunnel with use of a bone growth factor. Am J
Sports Med 29(6):689–698
3. Arneja S, McConkey MO, Mulpuri K, Chin P, Gilbart MK,
Regan WD, Leith JM (2009) Graft tensioninginanterior cruciate
ligament reconstruction: a systematic review of randomized
controlled trials. Arthroscopy 25(2):200–207
4. Bedi A, Kawamura S, Ying L, Rodeo SA (2009) Differences in
tendon graft healing between the intra-articular and extra-artic-
ular ends of a bone tunnel. HSS J 5(1):51–57
5. Brady MF, Bradley MP, Fleming BC, Fadale PD, Hulstyn MJ,
Banerjee R (2007) Effects of initial graft tension on the tibio-
femoral compressive forces and joint position after anterior cru-
ciate ligament reconstruction. Am J Sports Med 35(3):395–403
6. Guillard C, Lintz F, Odri GA, Vogeli D, Colin F, Collon S,
Chappard D, Gouin F, Robert H (2012) Effects of graft preten-
sioning in anterior cruciate ligament Reconstruction. Knee Surg
Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. doi:10.1007/s00167-011-1833-1
7. Kim SG, Kurosawa H, Sakuraba K, Ikeda H, Takazawa S (2006)
The effect of initial graft tension on postoperative clinical out-
come in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with semiten-
dinosus tendon. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 126(4):260–264
8. Labs K, Perka C, Schneider F (2002) The biological and bio-
mechanical effect ofdifferent graft tensioning in anterior cruciate
ligament reconstruction: an experimental study. Arch Orthop
Trauma Surg 122(4):193–199
9. Mae T, Shino K, Matsumoto N, Natsu-Ume T, Yoneda K,
Yoshikawa H, Yoneda M (2010) Anatomic double-bundle ante-
rior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendons
with minimally required initial tension. Arthroscopy 26(10):
1289–1295
10. Mae T, Shino K, Nakata K, Toritsuka Y, Otsubo H, Fujie H
(2008) Optimization of graft fixation at the time of anterior
cruciate ligament reconstruction. Part I: effect of initial tension.
Am J Sports Med 36(6):1087–1093
11. Nicholas SJ, D’Amato MJ, Mullaney MJ, Tyler TF, Kolstad K,
McHugh MP (2004) A prospectively randomized double-blind
study on the effect of initial graft tension on knee stability after
anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Am J Sports Med
32(8):1881–1886
12. Pen˜a E, Martı´nez MA, Calvo B, Palanca D, Doblare´ M (2005) A
finite element simulation of the effect of graft stiffness and graft
tensioning in ACL reconstruction. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
20(6):636–644
13. Reese SP, Maas SA, Weiss JA (2010) Micromechanical models
of helical superstructures in ligament and tendon fibers predict
large Poisson’s ratios. J Biomech 43(7):1394–1400
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
Adding text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text box to pdf
Adding text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert pdf into email text; how to insert text in pdf reader
14. Ruth EB (1935) Metamorphosis of the pubic symphysis. I. The
white rat (Mus norvegicus albinus). Anat Rec 64:1–7
15. Wen CY,QinL, Lee KM, Chan KM (2009)Peri-graft bone mass
and connectivity as predictors for the strength of tendon-to-bone
attachment after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Bone
45:545–552
16. Woo SL-Y, Hollis JM, Adams DJ, Lyon RM, Takai S (1991)
Tensile properties of the humanfemur-anterior cruciate ligament-
tibia complex: the effects of specimenage and orientation. Am J
Sports Med 19(3):217–225
17. Yoshiya S, Andrish JT, Manley MT, Bauer TW (1987) Graft
tension in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. An in vivo
study in dogs. Am J Sports Med 15(5):464–470
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
123
Appendix IIIA
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add text to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
adding text field to pdf; add text pdf reader
Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model
of osteoarthritis
1
S.C. Fuyz**, Y.C. Cheukyz, L.K. Hungyz, K.M. Chanyz*
yDepartment ofOrthopaedicsand Traumatology, Facultyof Medicine, The Chinese UniversityofHong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
zThe Hong Kong Jockey ClubSportsMedicine and HealthSciencesCentre, FacultyofMedicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
a r t i c l e i n f o
Article history:
Received 27 February 2012
Accepted 2 August 2012
Keywords:
Osteoarthritis
Pain
Gait
Cartilage
Rat
s u m m a r y
Objectives: Mechanicalallodynia during ambulation inosteoarthritis (OA)animal models can be assessed
as decreased extentof loading or decreasedduration of loading. We propose to measure gaitadaptation
topain byboth mechanisms with the developmentof Limb Idleness Index (LII) in aratmodel of kneeOA.
Methods: Rats were assigned to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT), Sham, or Normal group
(n ¼ 6). Gait data were collected at pre-injury, 1, 2, 3 and 6 months post-injury. Ratios of target print
intensity, anchor printintensity, andswing duration werecombinedtoobtain LII. The association of gait
changes withpainwasassessed by buprenorphine treatmentat3and6monthspost-injury. At6months,
OA-related structural changes in knee joints were examined by mCT and results fromhistological scoring
were correlated with LII.
Results: As compared to pre-injury level (range 0.75e1.20), LII in ACLT group was increased at 6months
post-injury, which was significantly higher than that in Sham and Normal groups (P ¼ 0.024). The
increase in LII in ACLT group was effectively reversed by buprenorphine treatment (P ¼ 0.004). ACLT
group exhibited a significantly higher maximum Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI)
scoreas comparedtoSham (P¼ 0.005)and Normal(P ¼0.006)groups. Significantcorrelationwas found
between LII and side-to-side difference in OARSI score (r ¼ 0.893, P < 0.001).
Conclusions: LII presents a good measurement for OA-related knee pain in rat model.
2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Introduction
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating progressive disease man-
ifested as pain in joints. The etiology and pathogenesis of OA is
not completely understood. Animal models for investigations of
OA are established to replicate the pathological changes
observed in clinical cases by genetic modification, intra-articular
injections of chemicals such as mono-iodoacetate or surgical
destabilization of the joint
1,2
;yet there is no one gold standard
model for OA that sufficiently represent human etiology. OA
models induced by transection of anterior cruciate ligament
(ACLT) or menisectomy may represent a good mimic of post-
traumatic OA in humans, in spite of a faster disease progres-
sion
3
.In order to investigate new therapeutic strategies for OA,
we need to assess both symptom-modifying and disease-
modifying effects in these animal models.
Apart from histological and biochemical assessment, measure-
ment of pain is regarded as one of the major outcome measures,
which are available in several animal models,
2
in which half of
them OA changes are chemically induced
4e6
. These methods
successfully utilize paw elevation time
4
or weight-bearing
5,6
of
injured limbs to measure OA pain based on avoidance of pain-
triggering activities on the affected limbs (mechanical allodynia).
Because the avoidance mechanisms of mechanical allodynia could
be achieved by either decreasing duration of loading (increased
paw elevation time) or re-distribution of loading (decreased
weight-bearing), it is advisable to assess both mechanisms simul-
taneously.We propose to measure limb idleness by combining the
information of swing time of target limb (increased paw elevation
1
Part of the content in this paper has been presented (Paper#54) in the 58th
Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, 4e7th Feb, 2012, San
Francisco, CA, USA.
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: K.M. Chan, Department of
Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of
Wales Hospital, Shatin, NewTerritories,Hong KongSpecialAdministrative Region.
Tel: 852-26322728; Fax: 852-26377889.
** Address correspondence and reprint requests to: S.C. Fu, Department of
Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of
Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong. Tel: 852-26323311; Fax: 852-
26377889.
E-mail addresses: bruma@cuhk.edu.hk (S.C. Fu), kaimingchan@cuhk.edu.hk
(K.M. Chan).
1063-4584/$ esee front matter 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Allrights reserved.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
OsteoarthritisandCartilage xxx(2012) 1e8
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
how to insert text box in pdf document; adding text to pdf document
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
acrobat add text to pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
time to avoid loading), paw intensity on target limb (decreased
weight-bearing to avoidloading) andpaw intensity onanchor limb
(increased sharing of weight from target limb), using a Catwalk
animal gait analysis system. Because walking speed will affect all
gait parameters and the rats are allowed to walk freely without
constraint on speed, internal control for run-to-run variations in
walking speed can be achieved by normalization to contralateral
side. A Limb Idleness Index (LII) is calculated as a product of the
ratios of target paw print intensity,anchor paw print intensity and
swing duration. We hypothesize that LII is useful to detect limb
idlenessrelatedto OA pain.Inthepresentstudy,wemeasuredLII in
arat model of knee OA induced by ACLT and determined its rela-
tionship to pain by analgesic reversal test. Moreover, whether the
pain-related limb idleness was contributed by OA changes was
evaluated by histological examination and micro-computed
tomography (mCT).
Methods
Rat OA model induced by ACL transection
The animal experiments were approved by the Animal Ethics
andExperimentationCommitteeof TheChineseUniversityofHong
Kong(Reference No:11/008/DRG) andall animalsreceivedhumane
care.Eighteen female SpragueeDawley rats,12 weeks old, with an
averagebody weight of220 g,wereusedinthe present study. The
rats were randomly assigned to Normal, Sham and ACLT groups
(n ¼ 6). In the ACLT group, a well-established protocol of ACL
transectionwasadaptedto inducekneeOA
7,8
.Inbrief,theratswere
anaesthetized by intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine and xyla-
zine (75 and 10 mg/kg body weight respectively) A medial para-
patellar arthrotomy was made, followed by a lateral displacement
of patella and full flexion of the knee to expose the intra-articular
joint space. The ACL was then transected with micro-scissors and
successful ACL transection was assured by a positive anterior
drawer test. After rinsing the joint space with saline, the joint
capsuleandtheskinwereclosedinlayers.IntheSham group,sham
operation was performed with the same procedures except ACL
transection. The rats were allowed free cage movement immedi-
ately after surgery. In the Normal group, no operation was
performed.
Catwalk animal gait analysis
Animal gait analysis was performed by Catwalk XT 9.0 (Nol-
dus Information Technology, Wageningen, The Netherlands) at
pre-injury, 1, 2, 3 and 6 months post-injury. The animals were
put on the walkway to familiarize with the settings 1e2 days
before the day of assessment. The camera was set at 60 cm
from the walkway and the region of interest (ROI) (8  20 cm)
for image capture was defined and calibrated. All rats were
weighed before gait analysis, and the rat with a body weight
closest to the average value was used to set thresholds to pick
up the illuminated contact prints [Fig. 1(A)]. The rats were
allowed to walk voluntarily back and forthinside the walkway in
the dark; video recording of paw prints [Fig. 1(B)] was auto-
matically triggered when the rats entered the ROI.Recorded runs
[Fig. 1(C)] with a steady walking speed (variation <30%) were
accepted as compliant runs for paw print auto-classification as
left front (LF), right front (RF), left hind (LH) and right hind (RH)
by the built-in software and the correctness of classification
was further checked manually. Stance duration was detected as
the time of paw contact [colored bar in Fig.1(D)] and swing
duration was detected as the time between consecutive paw
contacts. Only runs with normal alternate footfall pattern
(LF 0 RH 0 RF 0 LH) [Fig. 1(E)] were included for further
analysis. Three to five runs were kept for calculation of gait
parameters for every trial.
Calculation of LII
Gait parameters were presented as ratios between target
(injured) side and contralateral side to control for run-to-run and
individual variations. The extent of limb loading during walking
was evaluated by the paw print intensities. In the present study
with injured RH in ACLT and Sham groups, if RH was idled during
walking, the loading on target limb (RH) might be decreased with
adimmer or even smaller paw print; alternatively, the loading on
theanchor limb (LF)might be increasedto sharetheloadingon RH.
Thus the target print ratio (LH/RH) and the anchor print ratio (LF/
RF) were increased in case of limb idleness on RH. Because a paw
print is composedof a series of contact prints during stance phase
[Fig.1(F)], paw print intensity was calculated as the integration of
Fig.1. Limbloadingduringwalkingisevaluatedbycapturingilluminated pawprintsbyCatwalksystem(A).The pawprintsare automaticallyclassifiedafterimagecapture (B).The
resultingpaw printpatterns(C)areusedtomeasure parameterssuch asprintarea,printintensityand swingdurationforall four limbs.Arunwithsteadyspeedhaslittle variations
in stance and swingdurationsasshownbythe lengthsofcolor bar in(D),which isqualifiedfor further analysis.Normallyratswalkinan alternate footfallpattern(E)andonlythe
runswiththisfootfallpatternareincludedforcalculation ofLII.Apawprint iscomposed ofa seriesofcontactprints(F)duringstance phase.Pawprintintensityiscalculatedasthe
integration ofcontactprint intensitiesfor all capturedtime framesduringstance phase.Contactprint intensityfor everytime frame iscalculatedbymultiplyingthemeanintensity
duringcontactwith the contactprint area(asshownin F).Normalized pawprintintensity(G) iscalculatedbydividingthe paw printintensitywith pawprintarea (asshowninB),
which is then used to calculate the target print ratioand anchor print ratiofor consecutive pairsof front pawsand hind pawsrespectively.
S.C. Fuetal. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
2
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text box to pdf file; adding text to pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add text to pdf file reader; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
contact print intensities for all captured time frames during stance
phase. Contact print intensity for every time frame was calculated
by multiplying the mean intensity during contact with the contact
print area (from the raw data output of the Catwalk software). The
paw print intensity was normalized with paw print area to take
accountfor thevariationsinthesizedifferencesintheleftandright
paws. The normalized paw print intensity was then used to
calculate target print ratio and anchor print ratio for consecutive
pairs of front paws and hind paws respectively [Fig.1(G)]. Apart
from decreased loading during stance phase, limb idleness during
walking could be achievedby increasing the swing duration. Thus
the swing duration ratio (RH/LH) also reflects limb idleness on
targetlimb.Becausetargetprint ratio, anchor print ratio andswing
duration ratio are three inter-dependent parameters representing
different aspects of gait adaptation for an idled limb, a product of
these three ratios will better reflect the extent of limb idleness
regardless of the idling mechanisms, and we call this quantity LII.
Wehavedevelopedthecalculation ofLII withapilot studyonACLT
andsham-operatedrats (datanot shown). The result ofthepresent
studywas avalidation oftheuseofLII to measurepain-related gait
changes in arat OA model as comparedto sham operation and un-
traumatized normal rats.
Reversal test by buprenorphine injection
After collection of gait data at 3 months and 6 months post-
injury, reversal test by a single intra-peritoneal injection of
buprenorphine (0.025 mg/kg body weight) was performed
9
.Gait
analysiswas performedagain at0.5 and24 h after buprenorphrine
administration.
mCT analysis
After the last session of gait analysis, the rats were euthanized
by intra-peritoneal injection ofoverdose pentobarbital (20% w/v).
Theharvestedkneejointsegments werescannedwithmCT (VivaCT
40, Scanco Medical AG,Brüttisellen,Switzerland) at aresolution of
35 mm. Analysis was performed by built-in software with opti-
mized Gaussianfilter (sigma: 0, support: 2) andthreshold(>255).
In brief, rectangular volume ofinterest inthe dimensions of 2 mm
(L)  1 mm (W) 0.5 mm (D) was put in the subchondral bone at
medial and lateral tibial epiphysis
10
.Trabecular indices including
bone volume/ tissue volume (BV/TV), connectivity density,
trabecular thickness,trabecular number andtrabecular separation
were determined. The knee samples were then fixed in 10%
buffered formalin solution overnight for subsequent histological
processing.
Histological examination
The formalin-fixed knee samples were decalcified in 9% formic
acid for 2 weeks. Frontal sectioning was performed to obtain six
5mm sections at approximately 200 mm steps
11
.Hematoxylin and
Eosin staining was performed for scoring of osteoarthritic changes
according to the cartilage OA histopathology grading system from
OsteoarthritisResearchSociety International (OARSI)
12
.Inbrief,the
grade (0e6) and stage (0e4) of OA on the medial and lateral
articular compartments (revealing both femoral and tibial surface
in frontal sections) were scored by two-independent investigators
in a single-blinded fashion. A semi-quantitative OARSI score was
calculated by multiplying OA grade and OA stage, and the
maximum OARSI score among four ROIs (medial/lateral side of
femur/tibia) in the articular compartments in sampled frontal
sectionswas consideredas the most pathological regions for group
comparisons. Toluidine blue staining was also performed to
facilitate the examination of cartilage loss as one of the criteria of
OARSI score.
Statistical analysis
Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social
Science (SPSS) 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago,USA).Because the ratio data
follow alognormaldistribution,gait datawerelog-transformedfor
parametric tests. The coefficient of variation (CV) for LII measure-
mentwascalculatedfromtheaverage ofthevariancesofeachsetof
repeatedmeasurement(V),accordingto theequationCV ¼(e
v
1)
1/2
for log-transformed data. Repeated measure Analysis of Variance
(ANOVA) was used to analyze the log-transformed gait data with
respect to temporal changes/buprenorphine treatment (within-
subject factor) and experimental groups (between-subject factor).
Comparisons ofgait databeforeandafter buprenorphinetreatment
in each experimental group were performed by paired t test if the
within-subjecteffectwasstatisticallysignificant.For comparisonsof
end-point measurement at 6 months post-injury, mCT data were
analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post-hoc Turkey’s test after
checking for data normal distribution; while gait data and OARSI
scores were analyzed by non-parametric KruskaleWallis test, and
post-hoc two-group comparison by ManneWhitney test with
Bonferroni correction if necessary. Correlation between LII and
OARSI scores was performed by Spearman’s rho test. Significant
difference was determined at P < 0.05.
Results
Among the 18 rats,1 rat from Sham group died at 1 week post-
injury due to post-surgical infection. Gait data for this rat were
collected at pre-injury only.
Gait changes in ACLT rat model
The average of the variances of each set of repeated measure-
ment for log-transformed LII was 0.018. The CV for LII was calcu-
latedas 13.3%,indicatingacceptablereliabilityofthemeasurement.
At pre-injury time point (n ¼ 18), the mean LII was 0.97 with
a range of 0.75e1.20. Although the between-subject effect
(different experimental groups) on LII was not statistically signifi-
cant (repeated measure ANOVA with between-subject effects,
P ¼ 0.273), the within-subject effects of time post-injury
(P ¼ 0.042) and time/group interaction (P ¼ 0.024) was signifi-
cant, indicating the temporal changes of LII were different among
the experimental groups. Target print ratio, anchor print ratio and
swing duration ratio did not show significant differences with
respect to within-subject effects (P ¼ 0.100, 0.816, 0.051, respec-
tively) and between-subject effects (P ¼ 0.213, 0.397, 0.201,
respectively).Although there wereobvious individual variations in
the gait data, LII in ACLT group was significantly increased
(Repeated measure ANOVA within-subject effect only, P ¼ 0.024)
until 6 monthspost-operation(Fig.2),withall ACLT rats gothigher
LII as comparedto pre-injurylevels. One rat (rat54) inSham group
and two rats in Normal group (rat62, 63) also exhibited increased
LII, but the temporal gait changes in Sham and Normal groupwere
not significant (P ¼ 0.214, 0.147, respectively). In ACLT group, the
significanttemporal gaitchangeinLII wascontributedmainly byan
increased target print ratio (P ¼ 0.008) and swing duration ratio
(P ¼ 0.010), but not by anchor print ratio (P ¼ 0.180). When
comparisons were made at 6 months post-operation by Kruskale
Wallis test, ACLT group exhibited a higher LII as compared to Sham
and Normal groups (P ¼ 0.029), while no significant difference was
detected in target print ratio (P ¼ 0.081), anchor print ratio
(P ¼ 0.134) andswing duration ratio (P ¼ 0.066).
S.C. Fuet al. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
3
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
adding text fields to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
how to add text field to pdf; add text block to pdf
Detection of pain-related gait changes in response to analgesic
treatment
At 3 months post-injury, buprenorphine treatment did not
significantly alter LII in all experimental groups (within-subject
effect P ¼ 0.922). At 6 months post-injury, buprenorphine treat-
ment effectively decreased LII (within-subject effect P ¼ 0.004) in
ACLT groupat 0.5 h after injection(paired ttest,P ¼ 0.041), andLII
wasincreasedat 24 hafter injection (P ¼0.014).Sham andNormal
groups did not respond to buprenorphine treatment (within-
subject,P ¼0.750,0.555, respectively).The responses of individual
rats to buprenorphine treatment with respect to different gait
parameters were showninFig.3. The LII ofall ACLT ratsresponded
to buprenorphine treatment, but target print ratio, anchor print
ratio and swing duration ratio failed to reveal the analgesic
response in some ACLT rats. The rats with high LII in Sham group
(rat54) and Normal group (rat62,63) also responded to buprenor-
phine treatment.
mCTanalysis of subchondral bone changes and correlation with LII
In mCT measurements on tibial subchondral bone, BV/TV
(Turkey’stest,P ¼0.026)andtrabecular thickness(P ¼0.006)inthe
lateral compartment was significantly lower in ACLT group as
compared to Normal group, while the differences between Sham
and ACLT was not statistically significant in these parameters
(P ¼ 0.406, 0.079, respectively). In the medial compartment, the
trabecular thickness (P ¼ 0.018) was also lower in ACLT group as
compared to Normal group, but connectivity density was signifi-
cantly higher (P ¼0.012). The differences betweenSham and ACLT
were not statistically significant in these parameters (P ¼ 0.167,
0.085, respectively). There was no significant difference between
different groups withrespect to trabecular number and trabecular
separation (TableI).
Histological scoring for OA changes and correlation with LII
Histological scoring based on OARSI system showed that ACLT
group exhibiteda significantly higher maximum score among four
ROIs (medial/lateral side of femur/tibia) on the target side, as
compared to both Sham (ManneWhitney test, P ¼ 0.005) and
Normal (P ¼ 0.006) group (TableI); while the difference of OARSI
scores on the contralateral side was not significant (ACLT vs Sham
P ¼ 0.260; ACLT vs Normal P ¼ 0.042) (Bonferroni correction of
ManneWhitney U test for three comparisons, statistical signifi-
cancewasacceptedatP<0.0167).Themostpathologicalsiteinthe
target limb in ACLT group was the medial femur. It was character-
ized by complete erosion of hyaline cartilage with formation of
sclerotic bone that involved 25e50% of articular surface in the
observed sections [Fig.4(A)]. The contralateral side in ACLT group
Fig. 2. The temporal changesoftarget print ratio (A),anchor print ratio (B), swing duration ratio (C) and LII(D) for individual rats are shownwith reference lines indicatingthe
normal range of the pre-injury levels.
S.C. Fuetal. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
4
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
also exhibited significant osteoarthritic changes [Fig. 4(D)]. The
OARSI scoresinbothtargetandcontralateralsides(P¼0.825,0.112,
respectively) were not significantly different betweenSham group
andNormal group.Sham groupshowedpathological changesinthe
lateral tibia in both target and contralateral sides; which was
characterized by mid zone excavationor abnormal cysts
13
in <10%
ofarticular surface[Fig.4(B andE)].InNormal group,osteoarthritic
change was detected in some rats. In rat64, mid zone excavation
was found in medial tibia in the target side [Fig. 4(C)], while
mild osteoarthritic change was noticed in the contralateral side
[Fig.4(F)]. The OARSI scores of target and contralateral sides of
individualratswereshowninFig.5(A).Therelationshipofbetween
LII and the side-to-side difference of OARSI scores (target to
contralateral sides) was examined in a scatter plot [Fig. 5(B)].
Significant correlation was detected with (r ¼ 0.862, P < 0.001) or
without (Spearman’s rho r ¼ 0.893, P < 0.001) the outlier datum
fromrat48,inwhichtendoncalcificationwasobservedinthetarget
side in addition to osteoarthritic changes [Fig.5(C)]. The contra-
lateral side of rat48 also got significant osteoarthritic changes
without tendon calcification [Fig.5(D)].
Table I
Results ofmCTmeasurementsand OARSIscores at 6 monthspost-injury
Parameters
Side
Normal(n ¼6)
Sham (n ¼5)
ACLT(n¼ 6)
Pvalues
BV/TV
Medial
0.454 (0.398e0.509)
0.399 (0.345e0.454)
0.386(0.296e0.476)
0.201
Lateral
0.359 (0.302e0.416)
0.303 (0.247e0.359)
0.254(0.173e0.335)
0.033
Connectivitydensity(1/mm3)
Medial
23.4 (13.4e33.5)
30.2 (20.5e39.8)
48.3(29.4e67.2)
0.014
Lateral
40.4 (27.9e52.9)
36.3 (23.7e48.9)
52.7(30.1e75.2)
0.222
Trabecularnumber (1/mm)
Medial
8.44 (8.14e8.74)
8.89 (7.83e9.95)
8.48(7.93e9.03)
0.398
Lateral
9.05 (8.47e9.62)
8.55 (7.89e9.21)
8.48(7.90e9.06)
0.185
Trabecularthickness(mm)
Medial
0.128 (0.115e0.141)
0.120 (0.111e0.129)
0.105(0.090e0.121)
0.022
Lateral
0.104 (0.092e0.117)
0.096 (0.082e0.110)
0.079(0.066e0.092)
0.007
Trabecularseparation (mm)
Medial
0.149 (0.136e0.163)
0.155 (0.143e0.167)
0.152(0.139e0.1
0.709
Lateral
0.161 (0.145e0.176)
0.161 (0.148e0.173)
0.163(0.150e0.177)
0.929
Maximum OARSIscore
Target
3.5 (1e12)
4(0e4.5)
18(6e20)
0.005
Contra-lateral
1(0e4)
4(1e4.5)
4.5(0e9)
0.069
Data arepresented asmean (lower andupperboundsof 95% confidence interval) for mCTdata andmedian (minimumtomaximum) for OARSIscore. Pvalues for one-way
ANOVAareshown for themCTmeasurement; whilePvaluesfor KruskaleWallistest areshown forOARSI scores.Bold valuessignify P< 0.05.
Fig.3. The target print ratio(A), anchor print ratio(B), swingdurationratio(C) and LII(D)for individual rats at 6monthspost-operationbefore buprenorphine injection, at 0.5h
and at 24 h after injection are shownwith reference linesindicating the normal range ofthe pre-injurylevels.
S.C. Fuet al. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
5
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
Discussion
Our results showed that LII is useful to reveal OA-related pain.
The CV for LII is 13.3%, indicating acceptable reliability of the
measurement. LII is in essence a measure of symmetry inwalking
gait.LII >1 means that thetarget limb wasidled;in contrast,LII <1
reflects less activity in the contralateral limb. At pre-injury time
point (n ¼ 18),the mean LII was 0.97 with a range of 0.75e1.20. In
the reversal test with buprenorphine injection, all rats with LII
1.20 were responsive to analgesic treatment, indicating limb
idleness on the target sides was associated with pain. On the
contrary,one rat from Sham group(rat59) with LII 0.75 indicated
significant limb idling on the contralateral side. Rat59 also
responded to buprenorphine in a reversed way as compared to
other painful cases in target limbs (Fig.3). Examination on histo-
logical samples from rat59 showed that the OARSI score in
contralateral side (4.5) was higher than the target side (1). It
indicates that rat59 might experience pain associated with
osteoarthritic changes onthecontralateralside.Theseobservations
suggest that LII is sensitive to detect the relative mechanical allo-
dyniaofbothlimbs.Thusitis necessaryto consider bothtargetand
contralateral sides whenwe examinetherelationshipofLII andOA
changes. The significant correlation between LII and the side-to-
side difference of OARSI scores supports that LII is capable of
detecting the relative severity of OA changes in both knees in the
rat model of ACLT.
This is thefirst study measuring OA painina surgically induced
OA animal model with a long follow-up (6 months), while all
previous animal studies of OA pain were carriedout ina relatively
shorter duration (maximum follow-up ranging from 2 weeks
5
to
10 weeks
14
).In thosestudieswithshorter follow-uptime, paindue
to acute joint inflammation rather than chronic arthritic changes
wasmeasured.
2
Ontheother hand,ascomparedto previousstudies
on rat ACLT model of knee OA,
15,16
our data showed a slower
development of OA (symptomatic at 6 months post-operation),
whichmight bedue tothe use offemale rats (221.5 11.9 g at pre-
Fig.4. H&Estainingoffrontalsectionsofthe rat kneesfromACLT(A,D),Sham(B,E) andNormal(C,F)groups(representativesampleswithmedianmaxOARSIscoresonthetarget
side) were shown.In ACLTrat(rat52),severe osteoarthriticchangeswith denudation wasobserved in the operate side (A); while mildsuperficial zone delamination wasfound in
the contralateral knee (D).In Shamrat(rat55),mild cavityformationina circumscribedcartilage volume (excavation) wasnoticed in the lateral tibia (B),andsimilarlesions were
alsoobserved inthecontralateral side(E).InNormalrat(rat64),excavationwasalsoobserved inmedial tibia(C),while mild osteoarthriticchange wasobservedinthe contralateral
side (F).The grade and stage of OARSIscoresare shown in the figuresandthe pathological sites are marked by: (optical magnification: 50).
S.C. Fuetal. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
6
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
injury and 286.4  23.0 g at 6 months post-operation), as heavier
andmoreactivemalerats(around300g at 8 weeksold)areusedin
previous studies
16
.Yet we also detected similar subchondral bone
changes
10
and cartilage degeneration
15,16
.With such alongfollow-
up time, some spontaneous OA
17
were observed in the un-
traumatized knees. The observed outcomes in ACLT group were
probably contributedby both post-traumatic and primary OA. The
significant intra-group variations in our data may affect the
detection of between-subject group differences. However, these
variations helped to explore the relationship of the painful
responses as detected by gait adaptation and the osteoarthritic
changes as revealed by histology. The correlation of LII to OARSI
scores suggested that the gait adaptation to pain was associated
with the OA-specific joint degeneration, with an outlier (rat48)
which was also explainable by the co-existence of OA and tendon
calcification. As abnormal LII was responsive to buprenorphine
treatment, the use of LII in ACLT rat model may be helpful for the
development of pain medication for OA patients, together with
examination of OA changes by histology.
Gait analysis has been used to measure this movement-evoked
pain in OA using Catwalk system
6
.All the built-in gait parameters
did not show significant association with OA pain except for the
percentageof ipsilateral paw intensity at standing,whichis similar
to the calculation ofanchor print ratio andtarget print ratio in this
study. We calculated mean integrated paw print intensity to esti-
mate theextent oflimb loadingduring ambulation,whichmightbe
more representative than maximum or mean print intensities at
any time point during the stance phase (built-in gait parameters).
As limb idleness can also result from decreasing time of loading
(increasing paw elevation time) in addition to reducing loading
during stance phase, LII presents a new parameter that integrates
both mechanisms to avoid mechanical allodynia. The three
component ratios of LII are chosen because they represent three
differentaspectsto idleatarget limb during walking,thusLIIwould
be able to detect “limb idleness” when one of these ratios was
increased. For example, rat53 would be regarded as “no change in
limb idleness”ifweaccessedanchor print ratio andswing duration
ratio; but with a higher target print ratio, we concluded that rat53
also experienced limb idleness on target limb at 6 months post-
injury as revealed by LII (Fig.2), which also responded to bupre-
norphine treatment (Fig. 3). Alternatively, false-positive cases of
“limb idleness” detected by single ratio could be excluded when
other ratios were changed in different directions. For example,
rat55 got a high target print ratio but a low swing duration ratio,
thus it would be difficult to judge whether rat55 was idling its
target limb if we only based on single ratio. By combining these
component ratios to yield LII, rat55 was still within the normal
range and it did not respond to buprenorphine treatment (Fig.3).
This may explain why individual component ratios cannot detect
the group difference at 6 months post-injury in contrast to LII,
because the rats in one group may not use the same strategy to
achievelimb idleness.Nevertheless,individual ratios shouldstill be
Fig.5. Calcificationofpatellartendonwasdetected intheoperatedsideofrat48(LII:3.64)bymCTimagingin additiontoosteoarthriticchangesasshowninhistological section(A),
while noectopiccalcificationwasfoundinthe contralateral side butsignificantosteoarthriticchangewasalsoobserved (B).Ascatter plotbetweenLIIandside-to-sidedifferencein
maximumOARSIscore(C) suggesteda positive correlationbetweenpain-related gaitadaptationandosteoarthriticchanges.Reference linesare drawntoindicatethe normalrange
of the pre-injurylevels ofLII.MaximumOARSI scoresfor individual rats were shown in (D).
S.C. Fuet al. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
7
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
presentedalong withLII inthegait patternanalysisto measureOA-
related pain development in the ACLT model.Ifthere is aswitch of
limb idling strategies or compensatory changes, evaluations on
individual ratios and LII will provide more information.
There are several limitations for the use of LII to measure
symptomatic OA in animal model. Firstly, it is only applicable for
unilateral injury. Any unanticipated changes on the contralateral
limb would have chance to confound the assessment of limb idle-
ness, such as spontaneous development of primary OA.
Buprenorphine-sensitivechanges inLII may mean changes inpain
levels in target side or contralateral side. Therefore, it is important
toassessthestatusofcontralateral sidewhenLII isusedtomeasure
painful responses in animal model of unilateral injury. Secondly,
although we detected significant correlations between LII and
osteoarthritic structural changes, the mere co-existence of OA
changes and gait changes at one single time point might not
provide strong evidence for association. Longitudinal studies that
include data from more time points would be more appropriate.
Thirdly, LII only reveals activity-related pain,whilepaininOA may
have other elements which are not activity-related
18
.Thus LII may
reveal only parts ofthe whole picture for the development ofpain
medication in animal model. Finally, other functional changes
which are not related to pain may also affect limb idleness, for
example, knee stiffness, extension deficit or altered limb coordi-
nationmay leadto changesin gait parameters andaffectsymmetry
in walking gait. Although LII cannot differentiate different painful
conditions (OA vs tendinopathies) that trigger limb idleness, it is
possible to extend the use of LII for evaluation of functional
recovery as a restoration of gait symmetry after unilateral injury,
such as tendon injuries, muscle weakness or some neural injuries.
Further exploration on the use of LII to monitor limb functional
recovery in animal models is possible.
Conclusion
LII isauseful parameterto measureOA-relatedkneepaininarat
model.
Author contributions
Experimental design and intellectual input: SCF, KMC,LKH.
Data acquisition, analysis, manuscript writing: SCF, YCC.
Final approval ofmanuscript: All authors.
Role of funding source
This study was supported by the Direct Grant (Reference No.:
2010.2.041) from The Chinese University of Hong Kong.
Conflicts of interest
All authors declare no conflicts of interest.
References
1. Little CB, Smith MM. Animal models of osteoarthritis. Curr
Rheumatol Rev 2008;4:175e82.
2. Little CB, Zaki S. What constitutes an “animal model of oste-
oarthritis” e the need for consensus? Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2012;20:261e7.
3. Smith M, Ghosh P. Experimental models of osteoarthritis. In:
Moskowitz R, Howell D, Altman R, Buckwalter J, Goldberg M,
Eds. Osteoarthritis. 3rd edn. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders;
2001:171e99.
4. Tonussi CR, Ferreira SH. Rat knee-joint carrageenan incapaci-
tation test: an objective screen for central and peripheral
analgesics. Pain 1992;48:421e7.
5. Bove SE, Calcaterra SL, Brooker RM, Huber CM, Guzman RE,
Juneau PL, et al. Weight bearing as a measure of disease
progression and efficacy of anti-inflammatory compounds in
a model of monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis.
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2003;11:821e30.
6. Ferreira-Gomes J, Adães S, Castro-Lopes JM. Assessment of
movement-evoked pain in osteoarthritis by the knee-bend
and CatWalk tests: a clinically relevant study. J Pain 2008;9:
945e54.
7. Stoop R, Buma P, van der Kraan PM, Hollander AP, Clark
Billinghurst R, Robin Poole A, et al. Differences in type II
collagen degradation betweenperipheral and central cartilage
of rat stifle joints after cranial cruciate ligament transection.
Arthritis Rheum 2000;43:2121e31.
8. Castro RR, Cunha FQ, Silva Jr FS, Rocha FA. A quantitative
approachto measurejoint paininexperimental osteoarthritise
evidence of a role for nitric oxide. Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2006;14:769e76.
9. Fu SC, Chan KM, Chan LS, Fong DT, Lui PY. The use of motion
analysis to measure pain-related behaviour in a rat model of
degenerative tendon injuries. J Neurosci Methods 2009;179:
309e18.
10. Koh YH, Hong SH, Kang HS, Chung CY, Koo KH, Chung HW,
et al. The effects of bone turnover rate on subchondral
trabecular bone structure and cartilage damage in the osteo-
arthritis rat model. Rheumatol Int 2010;30:1165e71.
11. Gerwin N, Bendele AM, Glasson S, Carlson CS. The OARSI
histopathology initiative - recommendations for histological
assessments ofosteoarthritisin the rat.Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2010;18(Suppl 3):S24e34.
12. Pritzker KP, Gay S, Jimenez SA, Ostergaard K, Pelletier JP,
Revell PA, et al. Osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology:
grading and staging. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2006;14:13e29.
13. Roemhildt ML, BeynnonBD,Gardner-Morse M. Mineralization
of articular cartilage in the spragueedawley rat: character-
ization and mechanical analysis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2012,
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.04.011.
14. Li N, Rivéra-Bermúdez MA, Zhang M, Tejada J, Glasson SS,
Collins-Racie LA,etal.LXR modulation blocksprostaglandin E2
production and matrix degradation in cartilage and alleviates
pain in a rat osteoarthritis model. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
2010;107:3734e9.
15. Galois L, Etienne S, Grossin L, Watrin-Pinzano A, Cournil-
Henrionnet C, Loeuille D, et al. Dose-response relationship for
exercise on severity of experimental osteoarthritis in rats:
apilot study. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2004;12:779e86.
16. Chou MC, Tsai PH, Huang GS, Lee HS, Lee CH, Lin MH, et al.
Correlation between the MR T2 value at 4.7 T and relative
water content in articular cartilage in experimental osteoar-
thritis induced by ACL transection. Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2009;17:441e7.
17. Pritzker K. Animal models for osteoarthritis: processes, prob-
lems and prospects. Ann Rheum Dis 1994;53:406e20.
18. Felson DT. Developments in the clinical understanding of
osteoarthritis. Arthritis Res Ther 2009;11:203.
S.C. Fuetal. /Osteoarthritis and Cartilage xxx (2012) 1e8
8
Please cite this article in press as: Fu SC, et al., Limb Idleness Index (LII): a novel measurement of pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis,
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2012.08.006
Appendix IIIB
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested