mvc view to pdf itextsharp : How to add text field to pdf control software utility azure windows html visual studio 9220-part1618

Submitted 22 October 2014
Accepted 9 April 2015
Published 5 May 2015
Corresponding author
GMcArthur,
genevieve.mcarthur@mq.edu.au
Academic editor
Claire Fletcher-Flinn
Additional Information and
Declarations can be found on
page 19
DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
Copyright
2015 McArthur etal.
Distributed under
Creative Commons CC-BY 4.0
OPEN ACCESS
Replicability of sight word training and
phonics training in poor readers: a
randomised controlled trial
GMcArthur, S Kohnen, K Jones, P Eve, E Banales, L Larsen and
ACastles
Department ofCognitiveScience,ARC Centre ofExcellenceinCognitionand its Disorders,
Macquarie University,NSW, Australia
ABSTRACT
Given the importance of effective treatments for children with reading impairment,
pairedwith growing concern aboutthe lack of scientific replication in psychological
science, the aim of this study was to replicate a quasi-randomised trial of sight
word and phonics training using a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. One
group of poor readers (N = 41) did 8 weeks of phonics training (i.e., phonological
decoding) and then 8 weeks of sight word training (i.e., whole-word recognition).
Asecond group did the reverse order of training. Sight word and phonics training
each had a large and significant valid treatment effect on trained irregular words
and word reading fluency. In addition, combined sight word and phonics training
hada moderate and significant valid treatment effecton nonword readingaccuracy
and fluency. These findings demonstrate the reliability of both phonics and sight
word training in treating poor readers in an era where the importance of scientific
reliabilityis under close scrutiny.
Subjects
Clinical Trials, CognitiveDisorders
Keywords
Reading, Poor readers, Dyslexia, Sight words, Phonics, Randomised controlled trial
INTRODUCTION
Around 5% of children have a significant reading impairment despite normal reading
instruction, normalintelligence, and the absence of anyknown neurologicalor psychologi-
cal problems. This condition—often called developmental dyslexia (Hulme&Snowling,
2009)—notonlyaffectsachild’sacademicachievements,butincreasestheirriskfor
anxiety, depression, conduct disorder, and hyperactivity (Carrolletal.,2005). Thus, it is
criticalto discover how to treatpoor readers as earlyandeffectivelyas possible.
To date, most treatment trials done with poor readers have looked at the effects of
“phonics” reading programs, which teach children to learn toexplicitly “phonologically
decode” words by converting graphemes (i.e., letters or letter clusters; e.g., SH, I, P)
into sounds (e.g., sh as in cash, i as in in, and p as in pin) and then blend those sounds
into a word (ship). Since the turn of the century, at least three systematic reviews and
meta-analyses have examined the effect of phonics training in poor readers. In 2001,Ehri
et al. (2001)reportedthatphonicstraining,administeredeitheraloneorincombination
with other types of training (e.g., phoneme awareness), had a moderate effect on poor
How to cite this articleMcArthuretal.(2015),Replicabilityofsightwordtrainingandphonicstraininginpoorreaders:arandomised
controlledtrial. PeerJ 3:e922; DOI10.7717/peerj.922
How to add text field to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text field pdf
How to add text field to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text boxes to pdf document; add text to pdf in preview
readers’ explicitphonological decoding, buta small effecton their word reading. In 2012,
McArthur et al. (2012)reportedthat“specific”phonicstraining,whichfocusedonexplicit
phonological decoding with minimal training in other skills, had a large effect on poor
readers’ explicit phonological decoding, a moderate effect on their word reading, and a
small-to-moderateeffect on their grapheme-phoneme correspondence(GPC) knowledge.
In 2014,Galuschkaetal.(2014)reported that specific phonics training had a small but
significant effect on readingmeasures averaged across different reading tests. Considered
together, the outcomes of these reviews suggest that phonicstrainingin poor readers might
have significant and large effects on reading measures that depend heavily on explicit
phonological decoding, butweaker effects on reading measures thatdependonother skills,
such as “sightword reading” (i.e., recognizing whole words from orthographic memory)
and“reading comprehension” (i.e., understandingthemeaningof written texts).
The outcomes of these systematic reviews align with the two widely used cognitive
models of word reading: the dual route model and the triangle model (e.g.,Coltheartet
al., 2001; Plaut et al., 1996).Accordingtobothmodels,printedletterstriggercognitive
processes relating to letter identification, the outputs of which are fed through to two
pathways: (1) a “sublexical route” (dualroute model)/ “phonological pathway” (triangle
model); and (2) a “lexicalroute” (dualroute model)/“semantic pathway” (triangle model).
The sublexical/phonological pathway, which includes links between orthography and
phonology, makes a greater contribution to reading “regular” words (i.e., realwords that
can be read correctly via explicit phonological decoding, e.g., ship) and “nonwords”
(i.e., nonsense words that can be read accurately via explicit phonological decoding,
e.g., shap). In contrast, the lexical/semantic pathway, which has linksbetweenorthography,
phonology, and semantics, makes a greater contribution to reading “irregular” words
(i.e., words that cannot be read accurately via explicit phonological decoding alone,
e.g., yacht).
Both the dual route and triangle models predict that phonics training should have
its largest impact on the sublexical/phonological pathway, and hence the ability to
read regular words and nonwords. This prediction is supported by the aforementioned
systematic reviews byEhrietal.(2001),McArthuretal.(2012)andGaluschkaetal.(2014)
thatsuggestphonics trainingin poor readers has its largesteffecton readingmeasures that
depend most heavily on explicit phonological decoding (e.g., reading regular words and
nonwords).
The dual route and triangle models further predict that training sight word reading
(i.e., recognizing wholewords from orthographic memory) should have its largest effect on
the lexical/semantic pathway, and hence the ability toread irregular words. Unfortunately,
there is little empirical data to test this prediction since most studies that examined the
effects of sightwordtrainingon readinghave included both regular and irregular words as
training stimuli. The inclusion of regular words is problematic because, as hypothesizedby
the dual route and triangle models, regular words can be read with the sublexical/lexical
pathway. Thus, the inclusion of regular words in sight word training obscures the true
effectof training the lexical/semantic pathway. In order to test this effect, itis importantto
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
2/21
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
add text to pdf reader; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. with this sample VB.NET code to add an image PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf file online; add text to pdf in acrobat
employ“specificsightwordtraining” that focuses trainingonrecognizingwrittenirregular
words “bysight” (i.e., from orthographicmemory).
To our knowledge, onlyone controlled trial has investigated the effect of specific sight
word training in poor readers.McArthuretal.(2013a)gave three groups of children with
poor reading different orders of sight word and phonics training. Group 1 (N = 36)
received 8 weeks of “specific phonics training” (i.e., training reading via grapheme-
phoneme correspondence (GPC) rules alone) followed by 8 weeks of specific sight word
training (trainingthe recognition of irregular words from orthographic memory). Group
2(N = 26) receivedthe same training in reverse order. Group3 received “mixed” training
that comprised the phonics training and sight word training on alternate days for two
8-week periods (N = 32). The outcomes revealedthat: (1) specific sightwordtraininghad
large andsignificant valid treatmenteffects on trained irregular words, untrained irregular
words, word reading fluency, and word reading comprehension, as well as a moderate
andsignificanttreatment effect on nonword reading accuracy, andno treatmenteffect on
nonword reading fluency; (2) specific phonics training had large and significant “valid”
treatment effects (i.e., significantly larger thantest-retesteffects) on trained and untrained
irregular words, wordand nonword reading fluency, and reading comprehension, as well
as a moderate-to-large effect on nonword reading accuracy; and (3) order of training
(i.e., phonics-then-sight words; sight words-then-phonics; mixed) had an effect on
untrained irregular word reading (significantly better after phonics-then-sight word
training, than the reverse) butnoton trainedirregular words, nonword reading accuracy
or fluency, wordreading fluency, or reading comprehension (seeTable1for a summaryof
theeffects found byMcArthur etal. compared tothecurrentstudy).
Finding (1) was exciting because it showed, for the first time in a controlled group
trial (albeit quasi-randomised), that specific sight word training has significant and
large treatment effects in children with poor reading. Finding (2) was reassuring since
it supported conclusions of the aforementioned meta-analyses that reported moderate
to large phonics effects on some reading skills in poor readers. Finding (3) was puzzling
since itappears to be often assumed by clinicians and researchers (despite the absence of
empirical evidence) that poor readers should be taught explicit phonological decoding
prior tosightwordreading (Chall,1967).
Given the importance of finding reliably effective treatments for poor readers, paired
with growing concern about lack of replication in psychological and cognitive scientific
research (e.g.,Drotar,2010;Ioannidis,2012;Pashler&Harris,2012;Wagenmakerset
al., 2012),theaimofthecurrentstudywastotestthereplicabilityofMcArthuretal.’s
quasi-randomised controlled reading treatment trial. To this end, we used randomised
controlled trial (RCT) that closely replicated the methods of McArthur et al. to test the
replicabilityof keyfindings (1)–(3) outlined above.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
The Macquarie University Human Research Ethics Committee (Ref: 5201200852)
approved the methods outlined below. All children and their parents gave their informed
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
3/21
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to insert text box in pdf document; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text block to pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
Table1 TrainingeffectsinMcArthuretal.(2013a)andthecurrentstudyforGroup1andGroup2.T1T2,T1T3andT1T4representgainsinraw
scores from Test1(beforetraining) to Test2(after 8weeks ofnotraining), Test3(after thefirst8weeks ofphonics inGroup 1 or sightwordtraining
in Group 2), and Test 4 (after 16 weeks of training), respectively. Effect sizes (ES; Cohen’s d) inbold indicate training gains significantly larger than
T1T2. ESs of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8wereconsidered small (S),medium (M), and large(L),respectively.
Group 1
Group 2
McArthuretal. (N = 36)
Current(N = 41)
McArthur etal.(N = 36)
Current (N = 44)
M
SD
ES
M
SD
ES
M
SD
ES
M
SD
ES
Trainedirregularwordaccuracy
T1T2
1.06
1.72
0.6(M)
0.59
2.90
0.2 (S)
1.31
2.54
0.5 (M)
0.98
2.37
0.4(S-M)
T1T3
2.67
2.12
1.3(L)
2.08
2.98
0.7 (M-L)
5.25
3.52
1.5 (L)
2.73
2.61
1.0(L)
T1T4
5.14
3.32
1.6(L)
3.39
3.25
1.0 (L)
5.14
4.26
1.2 (L)
3.39
2.44
1.4(L)
Untrainedirregularwordaccuracy
T1T2
1.08
1.57
0.7(M-L)
1.34
2.55
0.5 (M)
1.31
1.80
0.7 (M-L)
1.39
2.01
0.7(M-L)
T1T3
2.08
1.76
1.2(L)
2.23
2.81
0.8 (L)
2.53
2.02
1.2 (L)
2.11
2.42
0.9(L)
T1T4
3.69
2.51
1.5(L)
2.68
2.35
1.1 (L)
2.39
2.35
1.0 (L)
2.86
2.61
1.1(L)
Nonwordaccuracy
T1T2
1.28
3.70
0.4(S-M)
0.07
4.33
0.0 (S)
0.17
3.79
0.0 (S)
−0.88
4.26
−0.2 (S)
T1T3
2.75
4.12
0.7(M-L)
1.78
6.21
0.3 (S)
1.42
3.96
0.4 (S-M)
−0.37
3.55
−0.1 (S)
T1T4
3.00
3.96
0.8(L)
2.17
5.14
0.4 (S-M)
3.64
4.89
0.7 (M-L)
1.23
3.26
0.4(S-M)
Nonwordfluency
T1T2
2.03
4.55
0.4(S-M)
−0.66
3.98
−0.2 (S)
1.78
4.70
0.4 (S-M)
0.48
4.32
0.1(S)
T1T3
3.72
4.69
0.8(L)
1.17
4.85
0.2 (S)
3.08
4.11
0.8 (L)
1.00
3.94
0.2(S)
T1T4
4.17
4.78
0.9(L)
1.44
4.66
0.3 (S)
3.03
5.05
0.6 (M)
2.86
4.28
0.7(M-L)
Sightwordfluency
T1T2
3.97
5.41
0.7(M-L)
2.66
6.28
0.4 (S-M)
3.25
7.38
0.4 (S-M)
2.64
4.83
0.6(M)
T1T3
6.69
5.70
1.2(L)
5.22
5.85
0.9 (L)
4.42
5.03
0.9 (L)
6.61
4.77
1.4(L)
T1T4
7.33
7.68
1.0(L)
8.83
4.99
1.8 (L)
9.53
11.26
0.8 (L)
6.73
5.81
1.2(L)
Readingcomprehension
T1T2
1.83
2.96
0.6(M)
1.17
2.19
0.5 (M)
1.89
3.00
0.6 (M)
1.23
2.53
0.4(S-M)
T1T3
3.53
3.13
1.1(L)
1.98
2.43
0.8 (L)
3.56
3.97
0.9 (L)
1.39
2.13
0.6(M)
T1T4
4.78
4.32
1.1(L)
2.51
2.48
1.0 (L)
4.22
4.28
1.0 (L)
1.98
2.62
0.8(L)
consent to participate in this RCT. Children were continuously recruited into the study
between January2011 and June 2013 (i.e., children were not all tested and trained atthe
same point in time). Since it took 6 months for a child to complete the study, the last
child completed the last test session (Test 4) in December 2013. This trial is registered
with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR; 12608000454370).
Methodological differences (all minor) betweenMcArthuretal.(2013a)and the current
study are outlinedin parentheses.
Trial design
All children completed screening and outcome measuresatTest 1(seeFig.1). After 8 weeks
of notraining, theyreturnedto do the outcome measures (Test2) toindex“non-treatment
gains” (i.e., due to test-retest effects, test situation familiarity, regression to the mean,
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
4/21
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to enter text in pdf form
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to a pdf; how to add text field to pdf form
Figure1 Testingandtrainingphasesforeachgroup.Theorderoftestingandtrainingphasescompleted
by the two groups.
maturation, and a “test-related Hawthorne effect” resulting from an awareness of being
tested multiple times on similar outcome measures). Group 1 did 8 weeks of phonics
training (and then Test 3) followed by 8 weeks of sight word training (and then Test 4).
Group 2 did the same training in the reverse order. In the analysis, we controlled for
non-treatment gains when comparing phonics training to sightword training, andwhen
comparing phonics-then-sight word training versus sight word-then-phonics training.
(Note: unlikeMcArthuretal.(2013a), we didnotinclude a “mixed” group since this group
showednoadvantageover groups1 and 2in McArthur etal.)
Participants
In line withMcArthuretal.(2013a), this studyrecruiteda typical “mixed” sample of poor
readers from the community. Children were agedfrom 7 to 12; scored below the average
range for their age (i.e., had a z score lower than −1.0, which represents the lowest 16% of
readers) on the Castles andColtheart 2 (CC2) irregular-wordreadingtestand/or nonword
reading test (Castlesetal.,2009; see below); had no history of neurological or sensory
impairmentas indicatedona backgroundquestionnaire; andused Englishas their primary
language at school and at home (see Screening Tests below). This resulted in a sample
that was very similar in age, nonverbal IQ, and irregular word reading as McArthur et
al. (seeTable2). However, the mean CC2 nonword reading scores for groups 1 and 2 in
McArthur et al. (−1.50 and −1.27, respectively) were higher than in the current study
(−1.66 and −1.62, respectively). Similarly, the mean CC2 regular word reading scores
for groups 1 and 2 in McArthur et al. (−1.41 and −1.29, respectively) were higher than
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
5/21
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
By using RaterEdge .NET PDF package, you can add form fields to existing pdf files, delete or remove form field in PDF page and update PDF field in VB.NET
how to add text to a pdf file; how to insert text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text to pdf reader
Table 2 Screeningandoutcomemeasures.Means(M)andstandarddeviations(SD)forthescreening
and outcome measures.
Group 1
Group 2
M
SD
M
SD
Age (years)
9.53
1.51
9.58
1.45
Non-verbal IQ(s)
97.02
15.75
97.57
16.45
CC2Irregular words (z)
−1.42
0.65
−1.37
0.75
CC2Nonwords (z)
−1.66
0.57
−1.62
0.67
Screening
CC2Regular words (z)
−1.61
0.54
−1.57
0.46
Sightword training (h)
14.46
3.66
14.89
3.66
TT
Phonics training (h)
14.53
3.29
14.37
2.90
Trained irregular accuracy (r)
12.59
7.28
13.64
8.06
Untrained irregular accuracy (r)
11.34
7.31
12.59
8.44
Nonword reading accuracy (r)
9.93
7.11
12.65
7.05
Nonword reading fluency (r)
11.34
8.16
11.82
8.53
Word reading fluency (r)
42.88
16.79
43.16
18.65
Test1
Reading comprehension(r)
12.32
5.21
12.32
6.12
Trained irregular accuracy (r)
13.17
7.87
14.61
8.23
Untrained irregular accuracy (r)
12.68
7.80
13.98
8.77
Nonword reading accuracy (r)
10.00
7.18
12.02
7.65
Nonword reading fluency (r)
10.68
7.72
12.30
8.48
Word reading fluency (r)
45.54
15.82
45.80
19.00
Test2
Reading comprehension(r)
13.49
5.06
13.55
5.57
Trained irregular accuracy (r)
14.90
7.38
16.36
8.34
Untrained irregular accuracy (r)
13.82
7.82
14.70
8.48
Nonword reading accuracy (r)
11.71
7.83
12.45
7.73
Nonword reading fluency (r)
12.51
8.44
12.82
8.96
Word reading fluency (r)
48.10
16.39
49.77
18.81
Test3
Reading comprehension(r)
14.29
4.56
13.70
5.50
Trained irregular accuracy (r)
15.98
7.02
17.02
8.02
Untrained irregular accuracy (r)
14.02
7.63
15.45
8.67
Nonword reading accuracy (r)
12.10
7.90
14.16
7.95
Nonword reading fluency (r)
12.78
8.58
14.68
8.49
Word reading fluency (r)
51.71
16.80
49.89
19.32
Test4
Reading comprehension(r)
14.83
4.49
14.30
5.16
Notes.
CC2,CastlesandColtheart readingtests(Castlesetal.,2009);TT,time training;s,standardscore;z,z score;r,rawscore;
h,hours.
in the current study (−1.61 and −1.57, respectively). Thus, on average, children in the
current studyhad slightlypoorer explicitphonological decoding abilities than children in
McArthuret al. (2013a).
Interventions
Specific sight word training
Children were asked to do five 30-minute sight-word training sessions per week for 8
weeks in their homes. The sight word training used an online reading program called
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
6/21
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text box in pdf file
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
add text box to pdf file; add text to pdf online
Literacy Planet(www.literacyplanet.com) todeliver exercises (see below) to teachchildren
torecognise the same irregular words (see below) used byMcArthuretal.(2013a)(Note:
McArthur et al. used only two exercises to teach irregular words: one administered by
computer (DingoBingo by Macroworks) and the other by a parent). Children received
immediate feedback on the accuracy of their responses, whichearned them points tospend
on games or clothing their avatar on the LiteracyPlanet site. LiteracyPlanet also provided
online access to the progress of the children in training time and performance level. This
allowed the research team to detect when a child was failing to complete the required
amount of training, in which case the parents were contacted to discuss how the children
could better continue training.
The irregular words used inthe specific sightword training delivered byLiteracy Planet
were selected using the following procedure: (1) REGCELEX in the CELEX database
of children’s written words was used to compute the rule-based pronunciations of each
wordin said database; (2) these pronunciations were compared to each word’s dictionary
pronunciation; (3) any word with a mismatch between its computer pronunciation and
dictionary pronunciation was selected; (4) from this list we removed proper nouns and
rude words, low frequency words that would seldom be encountered by children, and
words included in CC2; (5) we ordered the words in terms of difficulty based on their
writtenfrequency, whichrangedfrom 507073 (for of) down to8 (for scone).
The irregular words were trained across 56 levels in Literacy Planet. Each level used
eight or nine exercises to train a list of words. The lists for levels 1–30, 31–48, and 49–56
comprised 8, 14, and 24 words, respectively. The exercises for levels 1–9 included: Flash
Card, AlphabeticalWord Monster, StaticWords, WordSnap, Floating Words, WordFinder,
Word Builder 2, Spell This Word, andWord Builder 1. Levels 10–56 usedthe same exercises
exceptfor Word Finder. For eachexercise, children were required to reach anachievement
level of 80% before progressingtothe nextexercise. This was lower than the achievement
level required by the phonics training (i.e., 100%, see below) since some of the exercises
were more difficult than those in the phonics training, and we wanted the children tobe
able toachieve pass-rate status ata reasonable rate, andwithoutfrustration.
In the FlashCard exercise, children were asked to spell a written wordthatwas presented
on the screen and then covered. In Alphabet Monster, children were instructed to drag
words presented in a list into a monster’s mouth in alphabetical order. In Static Words,
children were shown a static array of written words, and askedtoclick on a word that they
heard. In FloatingWords, theydidthe same thing exceptthatthe selection of words floated
around the screen. In Word Snap, childrenwereshown twowords, andaskedtoclick SNAP
when the two words matched. InWord Finder, children were shown a matrix of letters and
asked to select the first and last letter of a word that they heard. In the two Word Builder
exercises, children were presented with the letters of a spoken word in mixed order, and
asked to spellthat word. In Spell This Word, children clicked on one of a number of bush
flies onthescreen, whichtriggereda spoken word. Theywere askedto spell the word.
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
7/21
Specific phonics training
LiteracyPlanet was also used to deliver phonics training to the children for 30 min per
day, 5 days per week, for 8 weeks in their homes. We taught phonics using nine exercises
(see below) across 220 levels that increasedin difficultytotrain the explicitphonological
decoding and encoding of consonants, short vowels, long vowels, blends, digraphs, the
bossye rule, plurals, soft ‘c’ and ‘g,’dipthongs, ‘r’sounds, and Silent Letters. Noexercises
included irregular words, sentences, or paragraphs of text (Note:McArthuretal.(2013a)
useda similar number of CDROM-basedcomputer games from Lexia Strategies for Older
Students toteach children to decode and encode the same stimuli). In line with the sight
word training, children received immediate feedback on the accuracy of their responses,
which earned them points to spend on games or their avatar; we had online access to
children’s progress, allowing us to contact parents to discuss motivational strategies
if children were failing to complete their training. Children were required to reach an
achievement score of 100% on an exercise before movingontothe next exercise. If this was
notachieved, the child repeatedthe exercise until theyreached100%.
In the introductory exercise—the “Movie” exercise—childrenwereintroduced toletters
or letter clusters and taught their corresponding letter sound. In an “I Spy” exercise,
children were presented with a number of pictures, a written letter, and a spoken letter
sound. Theywere told thattheycould click on the letter tohear the letter sound, andwere
askedtoclickon the picture thatstarted with the letter sound. In a “Letter-SoundPosition”
exercise, children were shown a written word and presented a spoken letter sound. They
were asked to indicate whether the letter sound occurred at the beginning or end of the
written word. Intwo“Missing Letters” exercises, children were asked totype inthe missing
letter of a written word. In a “Click On Words” exercise, children were shown a number
of regular words, and asked to click on the word that matched a picture. In a “Bingo”
exercise, children were shown a number of regular words in a matrix and were presented
aspoken word. They were asked to click on the written version of the spoken word. In a
“Spelling” exercise, children were asked to type in a regular word indicated by a picture.
Andin a “Blending” exercise, theywere askedto click onlettersthatrepresentthe sounds in
apicture(e.g., theyclick on“LK” corresponding toa pictureof SILK).
Screening tests
CC2 reading test
The CC2 comprises 40 nonwords (e.g., GRENTY), 40 irregular words (e.g., YACHT), and
40 regular words (e.g., MARSH) thatincrease in difficulty. The three types of stimuli were
presented in aninterleavedfashion on indexcards. Testing for anytype of item (nonwords,
irregular words, regular words) was discontinued when a child made five consecutive
errors for a particular type of item, or when the child reached the end of the test. A child
was given 5 s to readeach word before being promptedtotrythe next word. Scores were z
scores thathada mean of 0 and SD of 1.
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
8/21
Nonverbal IQ
This was indexed with the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test 2 (KBIT-2) Matrices subtest
(Kaufman&Kaufman,2004). Scores were standardised with a mean of 100 and an
SD of 15.
Developmental history
We used a parent questionnaire to determine if children had any known problems with
their hearing, vision, neurology, or psychology, as well as establish if the children used
Englishas their primarylanguage atbothschooland home.
Primary outcomes
Trained and untrained irregular words
Children were asked to read aloud 58 irregular words printed on flashcards. Half of the
words were included in the sight word training program (“trained irregular words”) and
half were not(“untrained irregular words”). Untrained irregular words were matched to
thetrainedirregular words interms of their written frequency, lengthin letters, andrelative
irregularity(i.e., the proportion of irregular GPCs in a wordrelative tothe total number of
GPCs in thatword). Scores were total correcttrained irregular words (out of 29) and total
correctuntrainedirregular words (out of 29; Note: This is the same testused byMcArthur
et al.lesstwoitems).
Nonword reading accuracy
This was tested using 39 untrained nonwords. A child was asked to read each nonword
aloud. Allitems were monosyllabic, comprised 3or 4 letters (e.g., vib, golk), andtranslated
to two, three or four sounds. Half the items contained digraphs (e.g., th, sh), and half
single-letter correspondences (e.g., t, h). Scores were total correct out of 30 (Note:
McArthur etal. report that their untrained nonword testcomprised 20 items but we have
confirmed this was an error, and this test comprised 30 items, which were allincluded in
thecurrenttest).
Nonword reading fluency
We indexednonwordreadingfluencyusing the Test of Word ReadingEfficiency(TOWRE)
nonwordsubtest(Torgeson,Wagner&Rashotte,1999). This comprised63 increasingly dif-
ficultnonwords thatcan be readcorrectlyusingthe letter-sound rules. A child was asked to
readas manynonwords as possible in45 s. Scores were the totalresponses correctoutof 63.
Word reading fluency
This was tested with the TOWRE sight word subtest that comprised 104 words that
increased in difficulty(Torgeson,Wagner&Rashotte,1999). A child was asked to read as
many words as possible in 45s. Scoreswere thetotalresponsescorrectout of 104.
Reading comprehension
This was tested using the Test of Everyday Reading Comprehension (TERC) which
included 10 “everyday” reading stimuli, such as a text message, a medicine label, or a
shopping list(McArthuretal.,2013b). For each stimulus, children were asked twoliteral
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
9/21
questions based on information in the text. Scores were the total responses correct out of
20. (Note:McArthuretal.(2013a)used a previous version of this test that comprised an
additional 3stimuli and 6questions.)
Sample size
Aflow diagram of the number of participants in each stage of the studyis shown inFig.2.
At the endof the study, there were 41 children in Group1 and 44childrenin Group2.
Sequence generation
Children were allocated to groups using minimisation randomization (balanced 1:1 for
age, CC2 nonword reading, CC2 irregular word reading; executed using MINIMPY;
Saghaei, 2011),whichisconsideredthemostappropriatesequenceallocationprocedure
for trials comprising fewer than 100 participants. It is considered methodologically
equivalent to randomization by CONSORT (Schulz,Altman&Moher,2010; Note:
McArthuret al. (2013a))usedaquasi-randomisedallocationprocedure).
Allocation concealment and implementation
The lead research assistanton the projectallocated children to each group and arranged
their training. They concealed group allocation from research assistants whoconducted
the test session. All training was done online at home. All instructions to parents were
provided via written documents. Parents contacted the lead research assistant if unclear
aboutanyaspectof thetraining.
Blinding
Unlike drugtrials, it is difficulttoguarantee double blinding in cognitive treatmentstudies.
However, parents and children were not told their group allocation, and all children
received exactly the same type of training(in different orders). Most parents and children
lack the expertise to discriminate between different types of reading. In addition, no tester
assessed the same child twice, and no tester was aware of the child’s group allocation
(i.e., the tester was blind to group allocation). Thus, it is highly likely this study used a
double-blindprocedure.
RESULTS
Participant flow
Aflow diagram of the number of participants in each stage of the studyis shown inFig.2.
41 successfullycompletedthephonics-then-sight wordtraining(Group 1), and44 success-
fullycompleted the sightword-then-phonics training(Group 2). We included all children
in the finalanalysis whocompletedtheir training, bar one child whose mother admittedat
the endof the studythather child hadbeen participatingin another reading intervention.
Participants whowithdrew from the trainingdid sofor various personal reasons. Thus, the
dropout rate in this study was low, and reasons for drop outappearedrandom.
McArthur et al. (2015), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.922
10/21
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested