mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Adding text to a pdf file Library control component .net azure web page mvc 9509text0-part1621

Health as an Info
r
mational Good
:
The Dete
r
minants of Child Nut
r
ition and
Mo
r
tality Du
r
ing Political and Economic
Recove
r
y in Uganda
WPS
/
95-9
J
ohn Mackinnon
March 1995
Centre for the Study of African Economies,
University of Oxford,
21 Winchester Road,
Oxford, OX2 6NA.
Direct dial telephone number
:
+44 (0)1865 274550
Note
:
this project was financed by the Overseas Development Administration and I am grateful for their support. I
am most grateful to the Statistics Department, Entebbe for providing the data from the Integrated Household Survey
used in this paper and for much helpful discussion of it. All the statistics presented are based on the author's
calculations based on this data. Neither the ODA nor the Statistics Department are responsible for the views expressed.
I am also grateful to colleagues at Oxford for helpful suggestions, especially Simon Appleton and Pip Bevan, and to
a number of people who provided helpful advice in Uganda and Oxford, in particular Mr. Gupta, Jackson Kanyerezi,
Tom Emwanu, Germina Ssemogerere, Arsene Balihuta, Achilles Sserwaya, Tom Barton, Jessica Jitta, Dan Mulder,
Patrick Kadama, Abby Ssebina, Francis Mwesigye, and Joanna McRae. I am particularly grateful to Simon Appleton
for letting me use his poverty index. I would like to thank seminar participants at the University of Warwick and at
the Economic Policy Research Centre, Kampala. Responsibility for all errors is mine alone. 
Abst
r
act
:
Uganda suffers from a high rate of child mortality which has improved little if at all in the last twenty years.
The paper uses data from the 1992 Integrated Household Survey to model the determinants of child mortality and
malnutrition. Parental beliefs about health have a strong and very highly significant influence on child mortality.
Education and income also play a role, partly coming through its effect on beliefs, but early primary education seems
to have little effect.
Adding text to a pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to add text box in pdf file
Adding text to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf document online; adding text to pdf
1
1
. Int
r
oduction
Many children die avoidably. It is now widely understood, thanks in part to the experience of China,
that public action can massively reduce mortality even when incomes remain low. However, many
poor countries are fiscally highly constrained
;
priorities within health and educational spending need
to be examined carefully in order to see exactly what kind of action will save most lives. Many
studies find that education reduces mortality, but few existing economic studies explain why
;
moreover, most studies impose a linear or at best (Strauss 1990) a quadratic relation between years
of schooling and health outcomes. Some studies include interesting interactions between education
and public services, and Thomas 
e
t a
l
(1991) examine the use that parents make of information as
a determinant of child height they find that the effects of education mainly come through more
active information-gathering behaviour (for instance, whether mothers read a newspaper or listen
to the radio).
The present paper uses data from Uganda, where child mortality (the probability of death
before the fifth birthday) is about 20% and has not fallen in twenty years, to shed more light on the
channels through which public action could affect child health. Unusually, both nutritional and
mortality outcomes are modelled
;
mortality is modelled with more success. Child mortality turns
out to respond very strongly to parental beliefs about the causation of disease. Education and health
practices also matter, but early primary education does not seem to make much difference. Use of
a very large sample of well-collected data overcomes the problem of multicollinearity which might
make these hypotheses seem impossible to distinguish.
The policy implication is strong. To save children, parents need to know more about health.
Education certainly has a role to play in this, but it need not be the only tool of public action and
its quality may matter as much as its quantity. Also, the advocacy of market solutions for health
problems needs to take massive informational failure into account.
Economists studying health have rarely collected or used data on beliefs (an exception is
Haddad and Bouis 1990). But medical and anthropological studies provide evidence of their
importance
:
see (among a large literature) Anokbonggo 
e
t a
l
(1990), Bukenya 
e
t a
l
.(1990),
Hilderbrand 
e
t a
l
. (1985), Khan (1986), Linskog and Lundqvist (1989), and Pielemeier (1985). For
instance, in Papua New Guinea Bukenya 
e
t a
l
(1990) used very precise information on the beliefs
and practices of a small sample of women
;
they were able to show that mothers' attitudes towards
child faeces, combined with the practice of sweeping the compound, were a critical determinant of
child diarrhoea. Similar studies in Uganda are surveyed in Barton and Wamai (1994). However, most
of these studies do not construct an economic model and use more limited socioeconomic
information than is provided by a household survey. The present paper seeks to develop a link
between the medical
/
anthropological and economic approaches.
2. Data and Context
The data analyzed in this paper come from the Ugandan Integrated Survey of 1992
/
3, conducted
by the Statistics Department of the Ministry of Economic Planning and Development with World
Bank support as part of the Social Dimensions of Adjustment project, covering a sample of about
10,000 households from all districts, and about 1,000 communities. The data were carefully collected
and checks on its quality are encouraging.
From 1972 to 1986, Uganda experienced two periods of severe political violence, the
government of Idi Amin which was overthrown by the Tanzanian army in 1979, and the civil war
of the early 1980s which ended when the National Resistance Movement took power in 1986.
Incomes collapsed and the economy retreated into subsistence. Although the economy grew from
1986 to 1992 (when the data in this paper was collected) this probably accompanied a widening
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
add text field pdf; add text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
how to insert text into a pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
2
urban-rural gap and widening inequality. Most Ugandans today are poorer than their parents or
grandparents thirty years ago.
The economic collapse accompanied a contraction in real public health spending. GFS
figures suggest that over the ten-year period 1977-86 real government spending shows no clear
trend, but the share of health in government spending falls from 8% to 2%
;
as a result real health
spending collapses. Symptoms of this collapse were very low medical salaries (nurses at one stage
got $4 a month), the emigration of medical personnel, acute drug shortages, widespread illegal
charges (see Jitta 1994), and the privatisation of medical care (see Whyte 1991). Dodge and Wiebe
(1987) document the collapse. The share of health has recovered somewhat since but all observers
agree that primary health remains fiscally very constrained
;
health is still perceived by the
government as a lower priority than security and transport.
In 1992, public services were still seen as inferior. The majority of visits to formal medical
facilities reported were in the private sector, and public services were relatively more used by the
poor. Public health measures such as the compulsory building of latrines, which were quite
important under the colonial authorities, also declined (there is some anecdotal evidence that local
authorities are reviving them). It is worth noting that the one indicator which did show some
improvement during the period of economic decline was primary school enrolment.
Uganda's aggregate health indicators reflect this grim history. In Africa, the median (across
country) probability of dying by the 5th birthday fell from .228 to .155 between 1960 and 1988
(United Nations 1992). In Uganda, this probability fell quite steeply between the 1955 and 1965,
falling below .2 by the mid-1960s, but at some point it seems to have stopped falling. Preliminary
results from the 1992 Census put under-five mortality in the 1984-8 period at 203 per thousand, and
there is as yet no firm improvement of an improvement since (AIDS and malaria are increasingly
severe problems in addition to other traditional childhood illnesses).
3. Desc
r
iptive Statistics
Table 1 shows the mortality ratios of children born to mothers with different characteristics. (All
descriptive statistics are estimated national means based on appropriate weighting of each
observation in the sample). Because their children are on average older, older women have lost a
higher proportion of their children. There is a strong difference between mothers with post-
primary education and those without, and a rather small difference between quartiles of the real
expenditure distribution (the construction of this variable is described in Section 5). Rural children
are at much more risk than urban children.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
add text box in pdf; adding text to pdf reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
add text pdf acrobat; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
3
Table 1
:
Rati
o
of
Chi
l
d
re
w
h
o
ha
ve
Di
e
d
All women
<20
21-5
26-30
31-5
36-40
>40
rural
0.24
0.12
0.15
0.18
0.20
0.20
0.31
urban
0.17
0.09
0.11
0.13
0.15
0.17
0.27
Expenditure quartiles
1st (low) 
0.25
0.13
0.17
0.17
0.19
0.19
0.33 
2nd
0.24
0.15
0.13
0.16
0.19
0.20
0.32 
3rd
0.23
0.07
0.17
0.19
0.20
0.19
0.30 
4th
0.22
0.11
0.13
0.16
0.19
0.20
0.30
Maternal education
None
0.28
0.10
0.17
0.20
0.21
0.22
0.34 
Some primary
0.19
0.11
0.15
0.16
0.20
0.18
0.25 
Some secondary
0.10
0.04
0.08
0.11
0.09
0.14
0.11 
Some further
0.07
0.00
0.03
0.07
0.05
0.08
0.09
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
Table 2 shows the proportion of children at different levels of nutritional status, measured in Z-
scores (standard deviations from the mean of the reference population) of height-for-age
:
Table
3 shows weight-for-height. 
Table 2
:
H
e
i
g
ht
-for-
a
ge:
Z
-scores
(calculated as distance from the mean of the international reference population,
in terms of standard deviations of that population).
<-3
-3 to -2
-2 to -1
-1 to +1
+1 to +2
Above +2
Total
male
23.0
20.7
24.2
24.7
4.5
2.8
female
19.0
18.7
22.6
31.1
4.3
4.3
urban
13.4
15.3
25.3
36.0
6.9
3.1
rural
22.2
20.4
23.1
26.6
4.0
3.6
cont ...
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to add text box to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
adding text to a pdf form; adding text pdf file
4
Table 2 cont ...
<-3
-3 to -2
-2 to -1
-1 to +1
+1 to +2
Above +2
Total
Expenditure quartiles
1st (lowest)
23.0
21.2
21.5
26.0
4.8
3.5
2nd
22.7
19.3
23.4
27.0
4.1
3.4
3rd
20.1
20.2
24.8
28.2
3.5
3.2
4th (highest)
18.6
18.4
23.8
30.0
5.2
4.0
Age (years)
Boys
0
13.4
22.1
26.7
31.4
4.0
2.3
1
29.4
24.8
20.7
18.0
4.3
2.8
2
23.9
18.9
22.0
24.8
4.8
5.5
3
23.1
18.9
24.5
26.2
4.4
2.7
4
23.3
19.6
27.6
24.0
5.0
0.5
Girls
0
11.0
12.7
27.5
39.6
4.9
4.2
1
20.5
20.4
25.9
26.6
2.5
3.9
2
19.6
19.9
19.1
31.2
4.7
5.5
3
19.0
20.7
22.9
28.9
4.3
4.1
4
23.0
17.8
20.9
29.1
5.2
3.9
Maternal education
Illiterate
23.4
20.6
22.1
25.5
4.3
4.0
Literate, incomplete prim
21.0
20.2
24.7
27.5
3.6
3.1
Completed prim
/
some sec
17.0
17.6
22.6
32.9
6.1
3.8
Completed further
-
7.9
12.9
79.2
-
-
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
Tables 2 and 3, which present data on nutrition, have a number of dramatic implications. First,
overall levels of wasting in Uganda are not very far from the reference population (this can be seen
from the fact that the distribution is nearly symmetrical around a Z-score of 0), but levels of
stunting are very high. Secondly, there is one age group where a high incidence of wasting is
observed, children between one and two years of age. Height-for-age also worsens dramatically
during the second year of life (a finer disaggregation shows deterioration from the age of six
months). 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text field to pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
add text field to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
5
Table 3
:
W
e
i
g
ht
-for-
h
e
i
g
ht
:
Z
-scores
(calculated as distance from the mean of the international reference population,
in terms of standard deviations of that population).
<-3
-3 to -2
-2 to -1
-1 to +1
+1 to +2
Above +2
Total
male
2.0
3.9
13.5
61.3
13.2
6.0
female
1.5
3.6
15.0
60.8
13.1
5.9
urban
3.4
3.2
12.4
58.9
13.7
8.3
rural
1.5
3.9
14.5
61.4
13.1
5.6
Expenditure quartiles
1st (lowest)
1.9
5.4
17.2
60.9
10.4
4.2
2nd
2.0
4.8
14.2
60.5
12.9
5.5
3rd
1.6
3.0
13.3
64.2
13.6
7.2
4th (highest)
1.6
2.2
12.4
61.6
15.4
6.7
Age (years)
Boys
0
3.1
3.4
8.9
48.3
20.6
15.6
1
1.7
7.1
20.9
49.8
14.7
5.6
2
2.0
2.9
10.9
70.1
11.5
2.5
3
2.3
2.3
13.1
67.5
11.7
3.1
4
1.0
4.1
13.2
65.2
10.4
6.9
Girls
0
2.4
2.7
8.3
46.6
23.0
17.1
1
1.1
8.2
17.4
52.0
13.2
8.0
2
2.5
2.1
17.3
66.4
9.4
2.2
3
1.6
2.8
13.4
68.5
10.6
3.1
4
0.5
2.7
15.8
64.0
13.3
3.5
Maternal education
Illiterate
1.9
4.0
14.3
62.1
12.1
5.6
Literate, incomplete prim
1.5
3.7
14.3
60.4
13.7
6.4
Completed prim
/
some sec
2.3
3.5
13.9
60.2
14.3
5.9
Completed further
-
-
-
76.1
10.9
12.9
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
What this seems to suggest is that children in Uganda suffer a nutritional setback in the second year
of life which permanently reduces their height. Likely explanations include increased exposure to
disease, a loss of the inherited immunity which shields children during the first few months, and
inappropriate weaning foods. Food shortage at the level of the household seems a less plausible
explanation for such an age-specific pattern of malnutrition (though the economic returns to the
survival of a child from the household's point of view increase with the child's age, because of sunk
costs, and so we might expect food-scarce households to favour older children). However, the
6
multivariate analysis does not show older children being less exposed to wasting when other factors
are controlled for.
Uganda compares poorly to other African countries in terms of stunting but well in terms
of wasting. It is also known to be in aggregate terms much more food-abundant than many African
countries. It is particularly striking that these patterns (noted in the 1989 DHS data in Jitta 
e
t a
l
.
1991) are found in 1992, which was a drought year when acute malnutrition might be expected to
be severe. 
There is no obvious gender difference (indeed girls seem to do better than boys) confirming
the evidence in Svedberg (1990). Strong urban-rural differentials and relatively weak differentials
between expenditure groups have been noted in other African data for instance by Alderman
(1990). 
Although disease, malnutrition and mortality are different things, one would expect them
to be related. Tables 4 and 5 show simple correlations. The negative correlations between
anthropometric status and illness are as expected, but the correlation coefficients are very small.
The negative correlation between height-for-age and weight-for-height is striking
;
this might reflect
measurement error in height, the experience of wasting an stunting at different ages, or a real
negative relation between tallness and plumpness at a given age. The correlations between the
mortality of a mother's children and the nutritional status of surviving children are negative but very
small and barely significant. These results suggest that while nutrition and mortality are sufficiently
different phenomena to require separate modelling.
Table 4
:
C
orrel
ati
o
n C
oeff
i
c
i
e
nt
s
B
e
t
wee
n Indi
v
idua
l
Nut
r
iti
o
na
l
Indi
c
at
ors
and Numb
er
of
Da
ys
I
ll:
Chi
l
d
re
n b
elow
5
Height-for-age with weight-for height
-0.11***
Weight-for-height with number of days lost to illness               -0.05***
Height-for-age with days lost to illness
-0.05**
*** significant at the 1% level
** significant at the 5% level but not the 1% level.
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
Tables 6 and 7 describe beliefs. People 10 years and over were asked whether they had heard of
AIDS, diarrhoea and malaria
;
if they had heard of the illness, what the source of their information
was
;
and about their knowledge of causation and prevention and their attitude to control.
Enumerators graded the quality of understanding shown.
7
Table 5
:
C
orrel
ati
o
n C
oeff
i
c
i
e
nt
s
B
e
t
wee
n Rati
o
of
D
ece
a
se
d Chi
l
d
re
n and A
ver
a
ge
Indi
c
at
ors
for
Su
rv
i
v
in
g
H
o
u
se
h
ol
d M
e
mb
ers
und
er
Fi
ve
Ratio of deceased children with mean weight-for-height
-0.02
Ratio of deceased children with mean height-for-age                            -0.03*
Ratio of deceased children with mean days ill
0.01
* significant at 10% level
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
The vast majority of people had heard of all the illnesses, with family and friends the main
source, followed by education (Table 6). Knowledge of causation was very similar to knowledge of
prevention (which is therefore not shown) and most people expressed an interest in control, rather
than a fatalistic attitude. As expected, urban people are better informed than rural people. Table 7
shows the relation between information, age and gender. There is a concave relation with age
;
the
best informed group are those between 26 and 45. There is no gap between the knowledge of
young boys and young girls, but as age increases a widening gender gap emerges. However, this
gender difference is not observed when men and women of the same educational level are
considered. 
Table 6
:
B
el
i
efs
ab
o
ut I
ll
n
esses
, b
y
R
eg
i
o
n
Region
Central
West
East
North
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Proportion who have heard of
:
AIDS
98.5
99.4
96.7
97.3
94.7
96.8
92.8
94.1
Diarrhoea
90.8
95.3
90.1
87.3
88.8
87.8
94.1
92.4
Malaria
93.5
95.6
93.8
96.1
90.2
93.1
94.7
94.1
Information source
:
AIDS               
family and friends
70.8
48.6
67.9
56.8
74.9
58.2
59.5
40.7
education
12.2
14.8
11.5
17.1
9.3
16.7
19.1
29.7
newspaper
/
poster
3.1
6.8
2.5
3.9
3.6
6.5
3.5
12.9
radio and TV
9.6
27.3
14.7
18.5
7.8
11.7
6.3
10.4
RC
/
medical profession
3.9
2.5
3.4
3.7
4.2
6.6
11.4
6.2
cont ...
8
Table 6 cont ...
Region
Central
West
East
North
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Rural
Urban
Diarrhoea
family and friends
58.7
35.6
57.7
51.3
57.7
44.1
40.7
26.3
education
25.7
40.1
23.3
33.8
15.1
29.7
33.6
52.3
newspaper
0.8
2.3
0.4
0.1
2.8
3.8
1.0
2.0
radio and TV
2.8
11.5
1.6
0.9
4.2
2.6
0.6
0.3
RC
/
medical profession
10.8
10.3
11.7
8.4
18.0
19.3
23.7
17.9
Malaria         
family and friends
53.7
33.6
56.2
50.4
48.4
38.3
39.5
25.2
education
26.1
43.9
23.1
33.1
15.5
26.1
31.8
52.4
newspaper
0.9
2.3
0.3
0.3
2.5
4.7
0.8
1.7
radio and TV
2.3
6.4
1.4
1.5
1.5
2.3
0.8
0.5
RC
/
medical profession
10.3
9.3
12.7
10.8
21.4
21.7
21.5
14.2
Knowledge of causation
AIDS            
none
9.7
5.8
19.3
12.7
9.2
5.7
20.2
17.8
some
45.8
29.0
47.6
39.1
68.4
52.7
60.3
40.2
good 
44.5
65.3
33.0
48.2
22.4
41.6
19.5
41.9
Diarrhoea
none
33.7
15.8
38.8
24.7
34.0
23.3
31.7
23.9
some
38.5
28.6
39.0
34.8
48.8
43.0
46.7
35.2
good
27.8
55.6
22.1
40.5
17.2
33.4
19.6
40.8
Malaria
none
32.5
14.8
39.1
25.2
30.1
18.2
36.7
29.3
some
36.3
25.2
36.5
33.6
50.5
45.6
45.3
31.2
good
31.2
60.0
24.4
41.2
19.5
36.2
17.9
39.4
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
4. A Model of the Determination of Health
This paper follows many other recent contributions in treating health as a good demanded by the
household, for which a household model is appropriate. However, the causal structure assumed has
some complex features which need more careful attention than they often receive.
It is assumed that the household achieves a Pareto-optimal allocation internally. At all times,
the household is therefore maximising some implicit additive function of members' utilities. utility
function. However, the relative weight placed on the utility of different members depends on those
factors which determine bargaining power. For simplicity, it is assumed that these factors can be
summarised by a vector of gender differentials, G
;
this vector can be seen as determining the form
of the utility function which the household maximises. Mathematically this is equivalent to making
G an argument in the utility function, while imposing no restrictions on functional form.
(U(D,C,H,L,G,HP)
*
B)
PC
#
w(E)L
%
Y
9
Table 7
:
B
el
i
efs
ab
o
ut I
ll
n
ess:
b
y
S
e
x and A
ge
Age
10-15
16-25
26-35
36-45
46-55
>55
Sex
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
Knowledge of cause
:
AIDS
none
27.0 29.2
6.2
8.2
4.5
9.0
6.0
12.0
6.8 20.6
19.5 32.7
some
57.4 54.0 52.7 52.7 48.2 50.1 50.1
52.6 55.9 53.9
54.4 49.9
good
15.6 16.8 41.0 39.4 47.3 38.6 43.9
35.4 37.3 25.5
26.1 17.3
Diarrhoea
none
48.5 49.7 22.0 25.2 19.9 27.0 23.8
34.4 24.0 39.4
41.7 54.5
some
39.0 38.3 45.8 44.2 42.7 44.7 40.5
40.3 44.9 44.0
40.6 36.0
good
12.5 11.9 32.2 30.6 28.3 28.3 35.6
25.2 31.1 16.6
17.7
9.5
Malaria
none
46.0 46.7 21.0 26.1 19.4 29.2 23.1
35.5 24.9 41.0
42.1 55.3
some
39.0 37.9 43.2 41.9 41.1 42.6 39.8
37.8 41.0 42.0
40.6 34.5
good
15.0 15.4 35.8 32.0 39.5 28.2 37.1
26.7 34.0 16.9
17.3 10.2
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
.
Hence the household maximises its expectation of a utility function given by 
(1)
Here D is a vector of demographic variables
;
C is consumption
;
H is health
;
and L is labour
supplied to the market. HP is a vector of health practices
;
the practice of hygiene is assumed to
affect utility directly, for instance by requiring inputs of non-marketed labour, but the way in which
it does so is left flexible. 
G is represented in what follows by including community-level data on male-female
differentials in the labour market (wages and job availability), because an improvement in the female
differentials will increase female bargaining power and hence probably improve child health.
However, an alternative possibility is that an increase in female wages will draw female time out of
child care. (It is hard to find a usable variable which captures effects on relative bargaining power
without also affecting allocation through relative prices
:
Thomas (1991) in Brazil uses unearned
female income, but this depends on the existence of state pensions. An alternative, not explored
here, is the share of female income
;
however, if this is regarded as endogenous, the search for
instruments raises the same problems). Finally, the subjective expectation of utility is conditional
on the beliefs of household members about illness, B. Note that the maximisation is modelled as
taking place ex ante, i.e. before the random component of illness is known.
(1) is maximised subject to the constraints in (2) to (5)
:
(2)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested