mvc view to pdf itextsharp : How to add text to a pdf document software application dll windows winforms asp.net web forms 9509text1-part1622

H
'
f(HG,HP,V)
%
e
C
#
C
L
#
L
C
'
(P,w,Y,E,D,G,B,
C,
L)
HP
'
HP (P,w,Y,E,D,G,B,
C,
L)
H
'
(P,w,Y,E,D,G,B,
C,
L,V)
%
e
10
Here Y is unearned income
;
C is the consumption vector
;
w is a vector of wage rates which are
assumed to depend on the vector of educational levels E
;
and L is labour supplied to the market.
This form of budget constraint assumes either that there is no subsistence production or that the
family farm can be modelled as a price-taker in labour and product markets which buys family and
outside labour indifferently. While this assumption is not true in Uganda (see Appleton and
Mackinnon 1995), the crucial separability in what follows is between production and child health,
and this seems a reasonable approximation. Separability between adult health and production would
be more problematic, though Pitt and Rosenzweig (1985) find it an acceptable approximation in
Indonesia.
(3)
Here health depends in a stochastic fashion on vectors of marketed health goods, HG
;
these are
a subset of consumption C and would include both food and medical services
:
on HP, health
practices within the household, and on V, a vector of environmental variables.
(4)
and 
(5)
(4) and (5) represent quantity constraints on consumption, notably of health services, and on
marketed labour supply. Note that since the model can be interpreted intertemporally, the quantity
constraints may include a liquidity constraint
;
this justifies the use of data on informal insurance as
a determinant of demand.
The maximisation problem yields demand functions for goods and services as follows
:
(6)
(7)
These demand functions and the health production function (3) yield the reduced form model of
health
:
(8)
The presence of education in the reduced form is justified, in the above argument, by its effect on
the budget constraint (2). There are, however, a number of alternative interpretations of the
coefficient of education in the reduced form. (a) Education affects the relative bargaining strength
of men and women. In this case the signs of female and male education should be opposite. (b)
Education directly inculcates habits connected with health practices such as hand-washing. (c)
Children's education affects the household's returns to successfully rearing them. All these effects,
in the current model, could be represented by making education an argument in the utility function
and hence in the reduced form. (d) Education affects the cost of parental time. Finally, (e)
education may affect beliefs
;
however, if beliefs are adequately measured, this should be picked up
by the coefficient on beliefs and does not warrant the inclusion of education in the reduced form
How to add text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
How to add text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf online; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
11
one beliefs are included. However, education is in practice likely to pick up some information about
any unobserved component of beliefs.
In the estimated model, it is assumed that income in (2) and child health are separable, so
that permanent income can be treated as an exogenous variable. Thus Y (unearned income) and
E can be replaced in the reduced form by permanent income. For adult health, this would raise
problems of exogeneity, but for children's health it seems reasonable. Permanent income is then
proxied by current expenditure and by indicators of housing quality - the number of rooms in the
household and whether the dwelling is self-standing. Reasons for not instrumenting income with
assets (as is often done) are discussed in the next section. The use of income, rather than assets,
removes the primary justification for including education in the reduced form, which was that
education confers the power to earn income. However, the other justifications listed under (a) to
(e) in the last paragraph remain plausible
;
hence it seems reasonable to retain education in the
reduced form.
The vector of environmental variables V includes the prevailing forms of sanitation, water
and garbage disposal in the community. However, the exogeneity of these variables is not altogether
clear since the choices prevailing in the community reflect the choices of people in the sample. At
the same time, individual health practices might themselves be exogenous if, for instance, latrine
building is compulsory. Moreover, it is of interest to find out how much of the influence of beliefs
and education is coming through identifiable health practices. In view of these difficult issues of
causal structure, four versions of each model are estimated
:
with beliefs, education and community-
level practices
:
with beliefs, education and individual-level data on practices
:
with education and
beliefs
:
and with only education. A very similar approach to the (slightly different) problem of
modelling education and information use is taken by Thomas 
e
t a
l
(1991).
A further possible problem of endogeneity concerns beliefs, since one would expect parents
whose children have died from a particular condition to have acquired some knowledge as a result.
This could produce a spurious negative correlation between beliefs and health. However, the very
strong positive link actually found suggests that this form of endogeneity is not important.
5. Measu
r
ement Issues
Health is measured by the survival ratio of children ever born and two standard anthropometric
measures, height-for-age and weight-for-height. The survival ratio is of acute intrinsic interest and,
with the exception of paediatric AIDS where mothers may not long survive their children, is
probably fairly well measured. It has the drawback that observations on current clauses of
explanatory variables are being used to explain past events. The anthropometric measures do refer
to current or recent events, but they are probably measured with more error than mortality, are
subject to possibly insignificant short-run fluctuations, and are of less intrinsic interest then
mortality. 
Income was measured, as mentioned above, by real expenditure and by the quality of
housing (number of rooms in the dwelling, and whether the household is self-contained). The
measure of real expenditure was constructed for this dataset by Appleton (1994)
;
regional poverty
lines were calculated based on the cost of a food basket, and expenditure per adult equivalent using
the following scales was divided by the poverty line to get real expenditure per adult equivalent. The
measure of housing quality raises the problem that it might be a direct input into the health
production function, since malaria in particular may well be carried between people sleeping in the
same room. The possibility of instrumenting permanent income with assets (widely used in the
literature) was rejected partly because the most important asset, land, may not be exogenous (we
have information on land used rather than land owned, and land in some parts of Uganda seems
to be 'lent' on criteria of need or personal loyalty)
:
partly because land is missing for a number of
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text pdf files
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text to pdf in preview
12
households, especially many urban households
:
and partly because the relation with land is complex
;
those with no land at all are better off that those with a little land (for more discussion see Appleton
and Mackinnon 1995).
The use of a per-adult equivalent measure, whether of income or assets, raises problems of
endogeneity, since the denominator of such a measure is automatically reduced by the death of a
child. One solution would be to regress separately on income and household size
;
but this would
lead to a confusion between the cost effects of household size and other effects of varying
demographic structure. On balance, the use of real expenditure per adult equivalent seemed the
simplest and most satisfactory available measure.
Education is measured by separate dummies on each grade achieved, allowing complete
freedom in the functional form of the relation between years of schooling and health. One
important caveat is selectivity bias
;
the attainment of a limited level of education may reflect the fact
that the person has dropped out and hence be an indicator of low ability or discipline. In the
equations for nutrition, parental education was used
;
the data here is less finely disaggregated.
The data on beliefs were discussed in Section 3
;
dummies for 'good' and 'some'
understanding of the causation of diarrhoea and malaria were used. Paediatric Aids is likely to be
relatively unimportant among children of surviving mothers. 
A selection of prices for major food items, divided by the regional poverty line, was used
;
also, charges for some medical services were included. The vector of quantity constraints is proxied
by variables which measure the availability of services and markets, and by variables in the
community questionnaire on whether long-term support and short-support is available to
households in dire need. The availability of services was measured by the distance from the nearest
clinic and the nearest hospital and the presence of a nurse and a doctor in the nearest clinic. 
Health environment was measured by the health practices (form of sanitation, water and
garbage disposal prevalent in the community, and mean age at weaning and the presence of a
nursery) and also by the prevalence of fuelwood as the main energy source (this may have a direct
impact on children's respiratory systems). As noted above, the community variables on sanitation,
water and garbage were used only in one version of the models
;
in another version household-level
data was used instead. Also, a vector denoted by 'Practices' includes the average age at weaning and
the number of meals for adults and children
;
this turned out not to be significant in any model
(perhaps because extended breastfeeding is almost universal in Uganda).
A full list of the variables used is given in Table 8. The focus on the mortality equations is
on the mother, whereas in the nutrition equations it is on the particular child
;
so there are some
differences between the equations. Also, nutrition is assumed to have a seasonal component.
In a significant proportion of cases, the data do not allow a household to be precisely
matched with a community. Rather than halving the sample size or omitting the very valuable
community data, a dummy was used for missing observations on particular variables and the
relevant variable set to an arbitrary constant in these cases. The effect of this is to remove any
influence of these observations on the coefficient on the missing variable, while retaining the other
information from the observations.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to add text to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text box to pdf file; add text field to pdf acrobat
13
Table 8
:
V
a
r
iab
les
U
se
d in th
e
Nut
r
iti
o
n Equati
o
n
s
WHZ
Z-score, weight-for-height
HAZ
Z-score, height-for-age
ONE
etc.
dummy for age of child (12-17 months)
ONE5 etc.
dummy for age of child (18-23 months)
SEX
=0 if male, 1 if female
WELFARE
spending per equivalent adult
/
regional poverty line
WELFSQ
WELFARE squared
NROOMS
number of rooms
INDDWELL
=1 if independent dwelling, 0 otherwise
GCHILD
=1 if grandchild of head of household
SERVANT
=1 if servant
NOTREL
=1 if not related to head of household
KIDRATIO
proportion of children in household
KIDORDER
=1 if oldest child in household, 2 if second, etc.
FEB92 etc.
seasonal
FLIT
/
MLIT  
father
/
mother literate but no education
FPRIM
/
MPRIM father
/
mother had lower primary education (but no more)
FP7
/
MP7
father
/
mother had upper primary education
FSEC
/
MSEC
father
/
mother had lower secondary education (but no more)
FALEVEL
/
MALEVEL
father
/
mother had A-levels
FFUR
/
MFUR
father
/
mother had further education
MALEMAL
/
FEMMAL
average score for males
/
females in HH on knowledge of malaria
causation (2=good, 1=some 0=none)
MALEDIA
/
FEMDIA
average score for males, diarrhoea causation
URBAN  
=1 if urban
EAST  etc.
region
RMATPR
matooke price
RMZPR  
maize price
RCASPR 
cassava price
RPOTPR  
sweet potato price
RMILPR 
millet price
RMLKPR 
milk price
RBFPR   
beef price
RBNPR   
bean price
RSOPPR
soap price
RASPPR 
aspirin price
FMFARMW
ratio of female
/
male farm wage 
MFARMW   
male farm wage
MALPRICE  
price of malaria drugs in clinic
ANTPRICE  
price of antibiotics in clinic
CONSPRIX 
consultation fee in clinic
DISTCLIN
distance to clinic
SUPPLIES 
=1 if regular supplies to clinic
DOCTOR   
=1 if doctor regularly present
NURSE   
=1 if nurse regularly present
HOSPCOST
cost of hospital stay
GOVHOSP
=1 if hospital is government-owned
INGOHOSP 
=1 if hospital is run by international NGO
LNGOHOSP
=1 if hospital is run by local NGO
cont ..
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF document file, edit selected text content, and export extracted text with customized format. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary
add text pdf file acrobat; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text block to pdf; add editable text box to pdf
14
Table 8 cont ...
TAP     
=1 if main water supply is tap (Community)
HTAP etc.
=1 if main water supply is tap (Household)
VENDOR   
main water supply vendor 
RAIN     
main water supply rain
PWELL    
main water supply protected well
NPWELL   
unprotected well
COLLECT   
rubbish collected
BURN    
rubbish burnt
BURY     
rubbish buried
MANURE   
rubbish used as green manure
BUCKET   
main form of toilet a bucket
FLUSH    
main form of toilet a flush
LATRINE   
main form of toilet a latrine
SSUPPORT
support available in short term
LSUPPORT 
support available in short term
NURSERY   
nursery available
WEANAGE   
usual age at weaning
ADMEALS   
usual number of meals for adults
CHMEALS
number of extra meals for children
WOOD     
=1 if wood the main source of fuel
AVAILDIF  
index for female-male differential in job opportunities
AVAIL   
index for male job opportunities
DISTCMKT  
distance to nearest consumer market
DISTMMKT  
distance to main consumer market
DISTTRAD 
distance to trader
DISTPMKT  
distance to product market
NO...
dummies for missing observations on particular variables
Additional va
r
iables in the mo
r
tality equation
:
RATIO
ratio of children who have died to children ever born
AGE   
age of woman
EDUC1
educated but 1st grade not completed
EDUC11-1
primary grade 1-7 completed
EDUCJUN
junior schooling
EDUCSEC
secondary schooling
EDUCFUR
further education
BIRTHG   
female births
BIRTHB   
male births
GOODDIA 
good knowledge of diarrhoea causation
SOMEDIA 
some knowledge of diarrhoea causation
GOODMAL 
good knowledge of malaria causation
SOMEMAL 
some knowledge of malaria causation
SINGLE  
=1 if single
COHABHH  
=1 if unmarried cohabiting with household head
COHABOTH 
=1 if unmarried cohabiting with other
DIVORCE 
=1 if divorced
WIDOW 
=1 if widow
HEAD   
=1 if household head
OTHREL  
=1 if relative other than child, grandchild, wife or servant of household
head
WIVES   
number of wives of household head in the household
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add a text box in a pdf file; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
add text to pdf document in preview; how to add text to pdf
15
6. Results
A general model was estimated in four versions for each dependent variable. For simplicity, OLS
was used for the estimation of mortality at this stage. In each model, block F-tests were used on
groups of variables to simplify the models. Tables 9 to 11 show the F-tests in each model. The
models were then simplified using F-tests to justify the deletion of blocks of variables at each stage.
Tables 12, 14 and 15 show the models finally selected, and Table 13 shows a variant of the models
for mortality concentrating on married couples to test for the flow of information within the
household. Because hypothesis-testing, rather than prediction, is the purpose of the modelling
exercise, even the simplified models are large (also further restrictions were rejected by block F-
tests).
Mortality is more satisfactorily modelled than nutrition
;
the hypothesis tests turn out to be
more powerful for mortality than for nutrition. The differences in results between the equations,
discussed below, may reflect the differences in date of the events being explained or differences
between the phenomena of malnutrition and mortality
;
it is very hard to distinguish these in a cross-
section data set. What is clear is that weight-for-height seems to respond most to short-term
factors, as one would expect on either view. Weight-for-height is more satisfactorily modelled than
height-for-age, somewhat surprisingly. 
The block F-tests for mortality, as well as the coefficients in the simplified model, show that
mortality, show very clearly that beliefs have a strong causal role even when conditioning on
education and on community-level or household-level practices. Moreover, the coefficients are high.
Note that about half the observations of mortality are censored at 0 or 1 (4912 were censored at
0 and 298 at 1), so that the effect of improvement in knowledge on mortality is only about half the
size of the coefficients. Compared to the control group of mothers with no understanding of the
causation of malaria and diarrhoea, mothers with good knowledge have a reduced mortality rate
reduced by roughly (.07+.02)
/
2=.045 
;
this compares with an average mortality rate of about .2 and
represents a very significant improvement as a result of increased understanding. 
In Table 13, the sample is restricted to spouses of the household head (to avoid possibly
perverse effects from the death of a spouse on the measure of male education and beliefs) to test
for differential effects of beliefs and education of men and women. It turns out to be difficult to
distinguish effects by gender
;
high multicollinearity is not surprising, given that spouses may have
been interviewed together. So whereas we can be sure that beliefs do matter, it is not clear from this
dataset that women's beliefs matter more than men's.
Education also matters in explaining mortality and height-for-age. However, primary
education has relatively weak effects
;
it becomes significant in explaining mortality only when we
remove practices from the equation, and more so when beliefs are removed (see the relevant line
of Table 9). This may suggest that the effects of primary education come mainly through beliefs and
practices (though the coefficients on education do not change much across the four versions of the
model in Table 12). Also, the coefficients on particular grades show that there is no strong evidence
of any beneficial effect of education until about the fifth grade of primary schooling. It would be
useful to understand more about exactly what is being taught in schools at different grades (Strauss
1990 reports rather similar results in Cote d'Ivoire). The results help to explain why the increase in
enrolment rates during a period of economic disruption did not deliver any improvement in
mortality.
Practices associated with sanitation, water source and garbage disposal matter more for
current nutrition than for past mortality. Some of these variables, for instance the dummy for
having garbage collected, may pick up unmeasured aspects of wealth. Since practices are measured
currently and may change more over time than beliefs, it is understandable that they should be
more powerful in the nutrition than the mortality equations. (The control groups are households
or communities which have no toilet, dump their garbage at will, and get their water from the river).
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text box to pdf document; add text to pdf acrobat
16
The coefficients have the expected signs and are quite large. The use of fuelwood as the main
source of energy at a community level worsens health outcomes
;
once again, this might be a
measure of wealth at the community level, but it may also reflect a direct effect on health.
Economic status, measured by real expenditure and housing, matters in most cases. The
long-run indicator, the number of rooms in the house, affects mortality (as noted above this could
reflect a direct environmental effect) whereas weight-for-height responds to the short-run indicator,
real expenditure (WELFARE). The effects of expenditure they seem to be concave (so that a more
equal distribution would improve health) but the quadratic term is not significant in most cases.
Similarly, relative food prices matter only in the equations for weight-for-height (they became
significant in block F-tests as the size of the model was reduced), though even here many
coefficients are insignificant and price effects do not seem to be very convincingly modelled,
perhaps because observations are missing in many cases.
Gender differentials in the labour market were not found to be significant (as noted above,
their sign is theoretically ambiguous but higher female wages were expected to benefit child health).
However, the sex of the child does matter, both in mortality (where the coefficient on BIRTHB
is much bigger than that on BIRTHG) and in weight-for-height
;
girls do better than boys. The age
of the child matters as expected for nutrition, but in contrast to the bivariate data presented earlier
there is no sign that weight-for-height is worse in the second year of life than in subsequent years.
The reason for this is not clear. The marital status of the mother matters a great deal for mortality
;
children from polygamous households, or whose mothers are divorced or widowed, are at much
greater risk (though some of these variables might be endogenous). The relations of children to the
household head, however, do not show specific problems for children who are not being looked
after by their parents
;
this is of great interest given the large number of orphans in the population.
It is often anecdotally suggested that orphans are discriminated against within the household
;
these
results do not support this view. However, orphans do suffer because their mothers are widowed,
and they may suffer when their mothers die because they move to poorer households.
Some aspects of services do seem to matter, more for nutrition than for mortality. In
particular, the presence of a doctor has a powerful positive effect on weight-for-height. Prices for
services, in some cases, seem to have perverse effects
;
there is no support here for the view that
user charges are damaging to health. However, the official prices reported in the dispensary may
be a poor proxy for actually imposed charges. Isolation has a perverse beneficial effect
;
distance
from traders and from the main market seems to improve nutrition, It is possible this reflects a
conflict between commercialisation and nutrition, but this suggestion is highly tentative. The
presence of short-term support does seem to benefit the short-term nutritional indicator, weight-
for-height.
In the nutrition equations, season is highly significant as a block (even though none of the
t-ratios are significant) and the coefficients show a clear pattern across the year of the survey. This
may reflect either a normal seasonal pattern or the drought which was at its worst in mid-to-late
1992.
7. Conclusions
The most important results of this paper concern the impact of beliefs and education on mortality.
The statistical evidence for the importance of beliefs is stronger than might have ben expected
given their close association with levels of education (and is possible to demonstrate partly because
of the very large sample size). The evidence in the paper supports the view that public health and
education programmes need, above all else, to improve people's own understanding of how they
can combat disease. Children die because their parents are not fully informed about the actions they
could take to save them. For public health services, this has the implication that the doctor or the
nurse should see themselves as communicators rather than technicians. A sign that this is much
17
misunderstood is the widespread observation, in a number of African countries, of very short
consultation times (often associated with extravagant drug prescriptions). It also suggests that there
is potentially an enormous role for carefully designed public awareness campaigns. In the case of
AIDS, public awareness of the existence of the disease is almost universal and this certainly reflects
public action to some extent. 
Secondly, the results suggest that although education is a powerful way of increasing
people's understanding, early primary education has in the past not succeeded in achieving very
much benefit. Whether this reflects curriculum design, quality of schools, or the intrinsic difficulty
of communicating complicated concepts such as the germ theory of disease in early primary
education, is hard to say. The Ugandan authorities are acting on the design of the curriculum,
including health education at an early stage for both sexes
;
the results here strongly support this
policy. Educational policymakers also need to think about exactly what a person needs to
understand in order to protect their children, or themselves, from disease. To understand health,
we need to understand information.
Table 9
:
L
evels
of
Si
g
ni
f
i
c
an
ce
of
B
loc
k F
-
t
es
t
s
in th
e
G
e
n
er
a
l
OLS M
o
d
el
of
M
or
ta
l
it
y
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Food prices
.8
.31
.81
.88
Medical prices
.11
.12
.08*
.10*
Education
.0001***
.0002***
.0001*** .0001***
Primary education
.07*
.16
.06*
.02**
Beliefs
.0001***
.0001***
.0001*** .0001***
Facilities
.17
.13
.11
.09*
Water (household)
.6
Garbage (household)
.24
Toilet (household)
.08*
Water (community)
.11
Garbage (community)
.02**
Toilet (community)
.23
Support
.55
.41
.50
.37
Weaning and meals
.75
.82
Job market
.08*
.10
.10*
.14
Gender differentials
.59
.38
.21
.21
Distance
.12
.06*
.09*
.05*
Economic status
.0001***
.0001***
.0001*** .0001***
Relations
.0001***
.0003***
.0001*** .0001***
Region
.06*
.03**
.01**
.01**
Note
:
the numbers in each cell give the probability of observing as high an F-statistic under the null that the group of
variables has no influence on mortality
*** significant at the 1% level
;
** significant at the 5% level 
* significant at the 10% level
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
18
Table 10
:
L
evels
of
Si
g
ni
f
i
c
an
ce
of
B
loc
k F
-
t
es
t
s
in th
e
G
e
n
er
a
l
OLS M
o
d
el
of
H
e
i
g
ht
-for-
A
ge
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Food prices
.04**
.02**
.03**
.03**
Medical prices
.09*
.08*
.09*
.08*
Father's education
.38
.25
.19
.19
Mother's education
.32
.27
.20
.16
Parental education
.08*
.03**
.01***
.005***
Beliefs, both
.81
.83
.81
Male beliefs
.74
.81
.82
Female beliefs
.53
.55
.52
Facilities
.49
.44
.35
.36
Water (household)
.01**
Garbage (household)
.14
Toilet (household)
.004***
Water (community)
.07*
Garbage (community)
.22
Toilet (community)
.01**
Support
.71
.47
.41
.41
Weaning and meals
.59
.55
Job market
.31
.46
.34
.34
Gender differentials
.13
.17
.27
.26
Distance
.83
.96
.87
.85
Economic status
.00***
.0001***
.0001***       .0001***
Region
.01**
.008***
.009***
.008***
Relations
.02**
.04**
.03**
.03**
Season
.04**
.21
.02**
.02
Note
:
the numbers in each cell give the probability of observing as high an F-statistic under the null that the group of
variables has no influence on height-for-age
*** significant at the 1% level
;
** significant at the 5% level *significant at the 10% level
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
Table 11
:
L
evels
of
Si
g
ni
f
i
c
an
ce
of
B
loc
k F
-
t
es
t
s
in th
e
G
e
n
er
a
l
OLS M
o
d
el
of
W
e
i
g
ht
-for-
H
e
i
g
ht
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Food prices
.20
.17
.19
.16
Medical prices
.04**
.03**
.02**
.02**
Father's education
.82
.83
.80
.89
Mother's education
.08*
.08*
.10
.13
Parental education
.25
.27
.32
.49
Beliefs, both
.01**
.01**
.01**
Male beliefs
.07*
.06*
.05**
cont ...
19
Table 11 cont ...
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Female beliefs
.42
.43
.48
Facilities
.02**
.03**
.02**
.03**
Water (household)
.04**
Garbage (household)
.08*
Toilet (household)
.86
Water (community)
.03**
Garbage (community)
.001***
Toilet (community)
.003***
Support
.07*
.13
.06*
.05*
Weaning and meals
.42
.51
Job market
.28
.31
.15
.12
Gender differentials
.51
.45
.49
.47
Distance
.02**
.04**
.01**
.01**
Economic status
.27
.44
.11
.04**
Region
.0001***
.00***
.00***
.00***
Relations
.0009***
.00***
.00***
.00***
Season
.02**
.01**
.02**
.01**
Note
:
the numbers in each cell give the probability of observing as high an F-statistic under the null that the group of
variables has no influence on weight-for-height
*** significant at the 1% level
;
** significant at the 5% level *significant at the 10% level
Source
:
author's calculations from the 1992
/
3 Integrated Household Survey
Table 12
:
T
o
bit E
s
timati
o
of
th
e
Simp
l
i
f
i
e
d M
o
d
els
of
M
or
ta
l
it
y
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
CONST
-.35(.04)***
-.34(.04)***
-.4(.04)***
-.4(.06)***
EDUC1
-.02(.06)
-.05(.07)
-.02(.06)
-.02(.06)
EDUC11
.06(.04)
.06(.05)
.06(.04)
.06(.04)
EDUC12
.006(.05)
.03(.03)
.004(.03)
.002(.026)
EDUC13
.039(.02)*
.02(.03)
.037(.023)
.032(.023)
EDUC14
-.02(.02)
-.03(.03)
-.026(.022)
-.033(.022)
EDUC15
-.046(.02)**
-.06(.03)**
-.048(.022)**
-.06(.022)***
EDUC16
-.01(.02)
-.003(.03)
-.012(.02)
-.027(.02)
EDUCJUN
-.22(.08)***
-.19(.10)**
-.22(.08)***
-.25(.08)***
EDUCSEC
-.14(.02)***
-.14(.03)***
-.15(.025)***
-.17(.02)***
EDUCFUR
-.24(.04)***
-.23(.04)***
-.25(.04)***
-.27(.04)***
GOODDIA
-.02(.02)
.001(.03)
-.02(.02)
SOMEDIA
.046(.02)***
-.03(.02)
-.05(.02)***
GOODMAL
-.070(.02)***
-.11(.03)***
-.07(.02)***
cont ...
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested