mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Add text to pdf document online software Library cloud windows asp.net html class 9783540884149-c10-part1654

Microbial Transformation of Nitriles  
to High-Value Acids or Amides
Jing Chen, Ren-Chao Zheng, Yu-Guo Zheng, and Yin-Chu Shen
Abstract
Biotransformation of nitriles mediated by nitrile-amide converting 
enzymes has attracted considerable attention and developed tremendously in the 
recent years in China since it offers a valuable alternative to traditional chemical  
reaction which requires harsh conditions. As a result, an upsurge of these promising 
enzymes (including nitrile hydratase, nitrilase and amidase) has been taking place. This 
review aims at describing these enzymes in detail. A variety of microorganisms 
harboring nitrile-amide converting activities have been isolated and identified in  
China, some of which have already applied with moderate success. Currently, a wide  
range of high-value compounds such as aliphatic, alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic 
amides and their corresponding acids were provided by these nitrile-amide degra-
ding organisms. Simultaneously, with the increasing demand of chiral substances, the 
enantioselectivity of the nitrilase superfamily is widely investigated and exploited in 
China, especially the bioconversion of optically active a-substituted phenylacetamides, 
acids and 2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxamide and 2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecar-
boxylic acid by means of the catalysts exhibiting excellent stereoselectivity. Besides 
their synthetic value, the nitrile-amide converting enzymes also play an important 
role in environmental protection. In this context, cloning of the genes and expression 
of these enzymes are presented. In the near future in China, an increasing number of 
novel nitrile-amide converting organisms will be screened and their potential in the 
synthesis of useful acids and amides will be further exploited.
Keywords
Amidase, Application, Nitrilase, Nitrile, Nitrile hydratase
J. Chen, R.-C. Zheng, Y.-G. Zheng (), and Y.-C. Shen
Institute of Bioengineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014,  
People’s Republic of China 
e-mail: zhengyg@zjut.edu.cn
Adv Biochem Engin/Biotechnol (2009) 113: 33-77
DOI: 10.1007/10_2008_25
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009
Published online: 26 May 2009 
Add text to pdf document online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf online; adding text to pdf reader
Add text to pdf document online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; add text pdf acrobat professional
34 
J. Chen et al.
1  Introduction
Biotransformation and biocatalysis have gained increasing interest in recent years 
due to their mild conditions (physiological pH and ambient temperature), environ-
mentally attractive  catalysts, high activities and inherent excellent selectivities 
including chemo-, regio- and enantio- selectivities [1, 2]. Biocatalysis is now an 
established method in the synthesis of organic compounds and is especially useful 
for the production of chiral substances. By virtue of these obvious advantages, 
biotransformation is becoming a promising alternative to the traditional acid- or 
base-catalysed reactions, so is the case of nitrile hydrolysis. Nitriles, as the sub-
strates, are widespread in the environment and they are produced by plants in various 
forms, such as cyanoglycosides, cyanolipids, ricinine, phenylacetonitrile, etc. [3]. 
Despite the fact that a majority of nitriles are highly toxic, mutagenic and carci-
nogenic in nature [4, 5], they are an important class of compounds for their ability 
to afford significant intermediates in the synthesis of acids, amides, amines, amidine, 
esters,  aldehydes, ketones  and  so on  by  chemical and  enzymatic  hydrolysis. 
Chemical hydrolysis of nitriles was extensively applied to synthesize amides and 
acids previously; however, these applications may not be suitable for the hydrolysis 
of nitriles in the presence of sensitive groups. In sharp contrast, enzymatic hydrolysis 
of nitriles could alleviate this problem ascribed to the mild reaction conditions. 
Besides, three enzymes, namely nitrile  hydratase  (EC 4.2.1.84), nitrilase  (EC 
3.5.5.1) and amidase (EC 3.5.1.4) involved in the transformation of nitriles or 
amides exhibit great potential of chemo-, enantio- and regioselective synthesis [6].
Contents
 Introduction ..........................................................................................................................  34
  Description of Three Classes of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzymes .................................  35
2.1  Nitrile Hydratase .........................................................................................................  35
2.2  Nitrilase .......................................................................................................................  37
2.3  Amidase ......................................................................................................................  39
 The Isolation and Identification of the Nitrile-Amide Converting  
Organisms in China..............................................................................................................  41
 Factors Affecting the Activity and Enantioselectivity 
of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzyme..................................................................................  42
4.1  Inducer ........................................................................................................................  43
4.2  Metal Ions ...................................................................................................................  43
4.3  Effect of Light on Nitrile Hydratase ...........................................................................  44
4.4  Amidase Inhibitor .......................................................................................................  44
4.5  Temperature and pH ....................................................................................................  44
4.6  Organic Solvents .........................................................................................................  45
4.7  Steric and Electronic Factors ......................................................................................  46
 Applications of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzymes ...........................................................  48
5.1  Bioconversion of Various High-Value Amides and Acids ..........................................  48
5.2  Biodegradation and Bioremediation ...........................................................................  69
  Cloning and Expression of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzymes .........................................  70
 Conclusions and Future Prospects .......................................................................................  72
References ..................................................................................................................................  73
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text to a pdf in reader; add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text box in pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
35
As a result, these enzymes have evoked substantial attention and they are becoming 
more and more demanding. These enzymes operate either by direct hydrolysis of 
nitrile to the corresponding acid (by a nitrilase enzyme) or by sequential action of an 
enzyme that hydrates the nitrile to the amide and the latter is transformed to the acid 
(by an amidase enzyme) (Scheme 1[7, 8]. To date, various nitrile-amide converting 
organisms isolated from bacteria, fungi and plant have been described [9, 10]. 
Among them, most of them have been derived from bacterial species by enrichment 
strategies with nitriles as the sole nitrogen source [11]. Some reactions mediated by 
nitrile-converting enzymes have been applied on a large scale in industry. Productions 
of acrylamide [12] and nicotinic acid [13] on an industrial scale have proved the 
commercial value of these enzymes. With the fast development of these enzymes, an 
upsurge of biotransformation of nitriles has been taking place in China as well. 
According to the statistical data, an increasing number of reports have appeared and 
several institutes and universities have taken part in this research in recent years. As 
a result, a variety of microorganisms harboring nitrile-amide converting activities 
have been isolated, identified and characterized in various places, some of which 
have already applied with moderate success. Moreover, much work has focused on 
the organization and regulation of the genes encoding for nitrile metabolism. For 
example, research on the expressions of nitrile-degradation enzymatic system in 
recombinant strains has been carried out in China in recent years.
2   Description of Three Classes of Nitrile-Amide  
Converting Enzymes
2.1  Nitrile Hydratase
Nitrile hydratase, known as metalloenzyme, is a vital enzyme in the bienzymatic 
hydrolysis of nitriles to acids, which transforms nitriles to the corresponding amides. 
Asano et al. first reported the occurrence of nitrile hydratase from Rhodocococcus 
rhodochrous J-1 (formerly identified as Arthrobacter sp. J-1) to degrade acetonitrile, 
which was later applied with excellent success to the production of acrylamide from 
Scheme 1
The pathways of nitrile compounds by nitrile-amide converting enzymes
R-CN
R-CONH
2
R-CO
2
H
nitrilase
amidase
nitrile
hydratase
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
on the client side without additional add-ins and Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document HTML5 Document Viewer Developer Guide. To see
adding text to a pdf form; adding text to a pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text field pdf
36 
J. Chen et al.
acrylonitrile on an industrial scale [14]. These findings promoted the intensive inves-
tigation of nitrile hydratase including physiochemical properties, substrate specifici-
ties and the reaction mechanism. According to the presence of metal co-factor, nitrile 
hydratase can be classified into two kinds: ferric nitrile hydratase and cobalt nitrile 
hydratase. The existence of metal ions in the active site of the enzyme is presumably 
effective in enhancing the folding or stabilization of the subunit that is dominantly 
consisted of a and b subunits. NHase can also be classified into high and low molecular 
weight (H- and L-NHases) on the basis of molecular weight of the enzyme. So far, a 
considerable number of microorganisms were successfully screened (Table 1).
Additionally, two new bacterial strains, Pseudomonas marginales MA32 and 
Pseudomonas putida MA113, containing nitrile hydratase resistant to cyanide were 
isolated from soil samples by an enrichment procedure [40]. In contrast to known 
nitrile hydratases, which rapidly lose activity at low to moderate cyanide concentra-
tions,  the enzymes tolerated up to 50  mM cyanide. Cyanide-resistant nitrile 
hydratase will find great application in the hydration of a-hydroxynitriles for the 
production of a-hydroxyamide because cyanide is always present in aqueous solu-
tions of a-hydroxynitriles due to their tendency to decompose to the respective 
carbonyl compound and prussic acid.
Table 1
Some previously reported microorganisms with nitrile hydratase activity
Microorganisms
Substrates specificity
Agrobacterium tumefaciens d3 [15]
Arylnitriles, arylalkylnitriles, acrylonitrile
Arthrobacter sp. J-1 [16]
Alipatic nitriles
Bacillus cereus [17]
Acrylonitrile
Bacillus sp. BR 449 [18]
Acrylonitrile
Bacillus smithii SC-J05-1 [19]
Arylnitriles
Brevibacterium imperialis CBS 489-74 [20]
Acrylonitrile
Pseudomonas chlororaphis B23 [21]
Alkylnitrile
Pseudomonas putida [22]
Acetonitrile
Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 [23]
Acrylonitrile
Rhodococcus rhodochrous J-1 [24, 25]
Alkylnitrile, heterocyclic nitriles, arylnitriles
Rhodococcus rhodochrous R312 [26]
Alkylnitrile, benzonitrile
Rhodococcus rhodochrous LL 100-21 [27, 28] Alkylnitriles, acrylonitrile, arylalkylnitriles, 
3-cyanopyridine
Rhodococcus erythropolis BL1 [29]
Alkylnitriles, arylalkylnitriles
Rhodococcus rhodochrous A4 [30, 31]
Alkylnitriles, arylnitriles, cycloalkylnitriles, 
arylnitriles, heterocyclic nitriles,  
arylalkylnitriles
Rhodococcus sp. AJ270 [32]
Wide spectrum nitrile hydratase
Rhodococcus sp. SHZ-1 [33]
Acrylonitrile
Nocardia sp. 108 [34]
Acrylonitrile
Rhodococcus sp. ZJUT-N595 [35]
Acrylonitrile, glycolonitrile, 2,2-dimethylcy-
clopropanecarbonitrile
Rhodococcus sp. N 774 [36]
Aliphatic nitriles
Candida guilliermondii CCT 7207 [37]
Cycloalkylnitriles, arylnitriles, heterocyclic 
nitriles
Candida famata [38]
Alkylnitriles
Cryptococcus flavus UFMG-Y61 [39]
Isobutyronitrile
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text box in pdf document; add text to pdf document in preview
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
versions. Users can add sticky note to PDF document. Able to Highlight PDF text. Able to underline PDF text with straight line. Support
add text box to pdf file; add text boxes to pdf document
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
37
To date, many studies focused on the mechanism of NHase mediated catalysis. 
Kobayashi et al. put forward a possible mechanism as follows. A water molecule 
was activated by the metal-bound hydroxide ion after the combination of the metal 
ion and water molecule. Imidate as an intermediate was initially formed via attack-
ing on nitrile carbon by the activated water molecule. The imidate were then tau-
tomerized to form the amide form (Fig. 1) [41].
2.2  Nitrilase
Nitrilase, the first nitrile-converting enzyme, was discovered in barley approxi-
mately 40 years ago and famous for the ability to convert indole-3-acetonitrile to 
the auxin indole-3-acetic acid [42]. From then on, several microorganisms harbor-
ing nitrilase activity have been screened, purified and characterized. Bacteria, fungi 
as well as plants provide excellent source of nitrilase, with bacterial species as the 
main source (Table 2), which are generally derived using enrichments from envi-
ronmental samples. In the case of plants, numerous studies were carried out with 
Arabidopsis thaliana, from which four kinds of nitrilase were separated numbered 
NIT1, NIT2, NIT3 and NIT4. Although it was found that these enzymes were capable 
of transforming indole-3-acetonitrile to indole-3-acetic acid, recent results have 
indicated that NIT1, NIT2, NIT3 showed significant preference for 3-phenylpropi-
onitrile, whose product, phenylacetic acid, is found in nasturtium. NIT4, however, 
was effective in hydrolyzing b-cyano-l-alanine [45].
Depending on the substrate specificity, nitrilase is differentiated into three sub-
classes: aliphatic nitrilase, aromatic nitrilase that shows preference for aromatic and 
heterocyclic nitriles and arylacetonitrilase which is highly specific for arylace-
tonitriles [61].
Fig. 1
Catalytic reaction mechanism of nitrile hydratase
N
S
N
S
Cys
109
Cys
109
M
+x
M
+x
S
O
O
O
O
O
O
Cys
112
Cys
112
Ser
113
Ser
113
Cys
114
Cys
114
OH
RCN
HB
H
2
O
R
C
NH
NH
OH
C
O
O
C
N
S
N
S
S
OH
C
C
R
C
Rearrangement
+
Amide
O
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
NET programming language, you may use this PDF Document Add-On for With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf document
38 
J. Chen et al.
Numerous investigations have provided insights into the mechanism of nitrilase 
catalyzed reaction. All nitrilases studied contain a cysteine residue in their catalytical 
center. The mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack by a thiol group in cysteine 
residue on the nitrile C-atom, forming an enzyme-linked tetrahedral thiomidate 
intermediate which is then attacked by H
2
O and nitrogen atom is released as NH
3
Further addition of H
2
O results in the production of acid and a regenerated enzyme 
(Fig. 2[68].
Table 2
Some previously reported microorganisms with nitrilase activity
Bacteria
Fungi
Plants
Acidovorax facilis 72W [43]
Fusarium solani IMI196840 
[44]
Arabidopsis thaliana [45]
Bacillus pallidus Dac521 [46]
Fusarium oxysporum [47]
Barley [42]
Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 [48]
Cryptococcus sp. UFMG-Y28 
[49]
Chinese cabbage [50]
Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC8750 
[51]
Aspergillus niger [52]
Brassica rapa [53]
Rhodococcus rhodochrous J-1 [54] Penicillium multicolor [55]
Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 
11216 [56]
Exophiala oligosperma R1 
[57]
Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 
[58]
Rhodococcus rhodochrous K22 
[59]
Comamonas testosterone [60]
Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 
7155 [61]
Rhodococcus rubber [62]
Acinetobacter sp. AK 226 [63]
Klebsiella ozaenae [64]
Arthrobacter sp. J1[65]
Streptomyces sp. MTCC 7546 [66]  
Bacillus subtilis ZJB-063 [67]
Fig. 2
Mechanism of nitrilase-catalysed reaction
Enz-SH + R-C
N
Enz-S-C-R
NH
H
2
O
H
2
O
Enz-S-C-R
NH
3
Enz-S-C-R
O
Enz-S-C-R
O
Enz-SH + R-C-OH
O
Thiomidate
intermediate
NH
2
OH
OH
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in
add text to pdf file online; add text pdf professional
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to add text field to pdf form; add text pdf acrobat
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
39
2.3  Amidase
Amidase, amide bond-cleaving enzymes, exists ubiquitously in nature in both 
prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms. To the best of our knowledge, amidase-mediated 
processes have been extensively investigated, especially, the hydrolysis of amides 
to the corresponding carboxylic acid and ammonia. Additionally, hydroxamic acids 
were formed owing to the acyl transfer activity of amidase in the presence of 
hydroxylamine. Two reactions involved are shown in Scheme 2.
Besides, amidase is also capable of catalyzing diverse reactions such as ester 
hydrolysis, hydroxamic acid hydrolysis, acid hydrazide hydrolysis, amide transfer on 
hydrazine, ester transfer on hydroxylamine, ester transfer on hydrazine and so on [69].
Therefore, amidase turns out to be efficient and promising tools for the synthesis 
of various compounds. In addition, with regard to nitrile hydratase in Gram-positive 
bacterium, its enantioselectivity was always combined with the amidase’s. Namely, 
their cooperation gave rise to the excellently pure products. However, the former 
usually displayed almost no stereoselectivity with the amidase being a major con-
tributor. Consequently, significant attention has been paid to the isolation and dis-
covery of amidase-producing organisms including bacteria, yeasts, fungi, plants 
and animals (Table 3).
Although amidase catalyzes many reactions, some of them proceed at a 
comparative low rate employing esters or carboxylic acids as acyl donors. In 
sharp contrast, high amidase activity is achieved in the presence of water 
(H
2
O) and hydroxylamine (NH
2
OH) as the cosubstrates when amide is used as 
the substrate, indicating that these two compounds functions as efficient acyl 
acceptors [69].
Both the amidase-catalyzed hydrolytic reaction and the acyl transfer reaction 
share the same reaction mechanism. In view of this, study on the mechanism of 
the acyl transfer reaction shed light on that of hydrolytic reaction, in which 
case, there is difficulty in investigating the mechanism where water is the 
cosubstrate. A possible mechanism suggested the reaction belonged to Ping 
Pong Bi Bi type: The carbonyl group of amide undergoes a nucleophilic attack 
by the enzyme, leading to the formation of a tetrahedral intermediate, which is 
consequently converted to an acyl–enzyme intermediate with the release of 
Scheme 2
The pathways of hydrolysis and transfer of amide Amide hydrolysis: RCONH
2
+ H
2
 
→ RCOOH + NH
3
Amide acyl transfer reaction: RCONH
2
+ NH
2
OH → RCONHOH + NH
3
Amide hydrolysis: 
RCONH
+ H
2
O
RCOOH + NH
3
Amide acyl transfer reaction: 
RCONH
+ NH
2
OH
RCONHOH + NH
3
40 
J. Chen et al.
ammonia. The acyl–enzyme complex in turn is subjected to attack by water or 
hydroxylamine (Fig. 3[9, 90].
Importantly, a majority of amidases bear enantioselectivity, which contributed to 
the synthesis of chiral carboxylic acid via nitrile hydratase and amidase. However, 
these nitrile-hydratase-associated amidases are, surprisingly, mostly S-stereospecific. 
R-Enantioselective amidases are gaining more and more interest because of their 
potential application in the production of d-amino acids and other optically active 
compounds. Hydroxamic acids, products of the acyl transfer reactions, can be 
detected easily and fairly specifically by the addition of acidic ferric chloride solu-
tion, which results in the production of a deep magenta color [91]. Therefore, this 
Table 3
Some previously reported microorganisms with amidase activity
Microorganisms
Substrate specificity
Rhodococcus erythropolis MP50 [70]
Aromatic amide
Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 [71]
Aliphatic amide
Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 [72]
Aromatic amide
Delftia acidovorans [73]
d-Amino acid amide
Arthrobacter sp. J-1 [74]
Aliphatic amide
Rhodococcus rhodochrous M8 [75]
Aliphatic amide
Xanthobacter flavus NR303 [76]
l-Amino acid amide
Brevibacterium sp Strain R312 [77]
Aryloxypropionamides
Variovorax paradoxus [78]
d-Amino acid amide
Pseudonocardia thermophila [79]
Aliphatic, aromatic and amino acid amide
Pseudomonas sp. MCI3434 [80]
Heterocyclic amide
Klebsiella oxytoca [81]
Aliphatic amide
Brevibacillus borstelensis BCS-1 [82]
Aromatic and aliphatic amide
Ochrobactrum anthropi SV3 [83]
Amino acid amide
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia [84]
Peptide amide
Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain d3 [85]
Aromatic amide
Sulfolobus solfataricus MT4 [86]
Aliphatic and aromatic amide
Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTR1 [87]
Aliphatic amide
Bacillus stearothermophilus BR388 [88]
Wide spectrum amidase
Delftia tsuruhatensis ZJB-05174 [89]
2,2-Dimethylcyclopropanecarboxamide
R-C-NH
2
O
R-C
R-C-XE
NH
H
2
O
H
2
O
H
2
O
R-C-NH
2
XE
O
H
NH
3
R-C-XE
O
R-C-OH + EXH
O
EXH
N
Fig. 3
Mechanism of amidase-catalysed reaction
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
41
acyl transfer reaction can be employed in a colorimetric screening procedure for 
active and enantioselective amidases. By employing the amidase-catalyzed acyl 
transfer reaction, Delftia tsuruhatensis producing R-enantioselective amidase was 
screened in our lab [89, 92].
3   The Isolation and Identification of the Nitrile-Amide 
Converting Organisms in China
Biotransformation of nitriles is of great potential in organic synthesis and it pro-
vides green access to various carboxylic acids and amides; thus nitrile-amide con-
verting enzymes are of broad use and commercial interest. Recently, biotransformation 
of carboxylic acids and amides via these enzymes has been a hot issue in China. 
The scarcity of appropriate nitrile-amide converting biocatalysts and the difficulty 
in commercial availability of these enzymes promoted the screening and discovery 
of the novel nitrile-amide converting organisms in China. So far, a series of organ-
isms producing nitrile-amide degrading enzymes were isolated, identified and 
characterized, some of which were purified. Among the obtained organisms, it was 
observed that some harbored nitrile hydratase, some produced nitrilase and others 
could form amidase. It was also found that the existences of nitrile hydratases were 
always accompanied by amidases, so amides and acids were formed in different 
proportions in such kinds of microbes mediated reactions. A prominent example is 
Rhodococcus sp. AJ270, which is a powerful and robust nitrile hydratase/amidase-
containing microorganism isolated by Wang et al. Later, its broad applications in 
transforming various nitriles were substantially explored [32]. Rhodococcus sp. 
AJ270 as well as other nitrile-amide converting organisms was dominantly obtained 
by enrichment strategies where nitriles were employed as the sole nitrogen source 
ascribed to the highly toxic nature. Owing to the fact that screening a desired organism 
for a particular biocatalytic process is always a time-consuming and tedious 
job, some direct and sensitive readouts of the nitrile-amide converting enzyme 
activity have to be considered and developed. Conventional routes employ high-
performance liquid chromatography, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, 
capillary electrophoresis, or gas chromatography to determine the enzyme activity, 
where determinations have to carry out one by one. Furthermore, those traditional 
enrichment strategies usually result in the isolation of a rather restricted group of 
microorganisms. A successful instance of application of high throughput screening 
method in our research was the isolation of Delftia tsuruhatensis, a R-stereospecific 
amidase producing bacterium. R-Enantioselective amidases are of considerable 
industrial interest due to potential applications in the production of optically active 
compounds [92]. More recently, Zhu et al., driven by the attempt to find a fast, 
convenient and sensitive method, reported a more accurate and innovative high 
throughput  route.  In  their  paper,  a  novel  time-resolved  luminescent  probe: 
o-hydroxybenzonitrile derivatives could be applied to detect the activity of the 
nitrilases. By the action of nitrilases, o-hydroxybenzonitrile derivatives could be 
42 
J. Chen et al.
transformed to the corresponding salicylic acid derivatives, which, upon binding 
Tb
3+
, served as a photon antenna and sensitized Tb
3+
luminescence. Because of the 
time-resolved property of the luminescence, the background from the other proteins 
(especially in the fermentation system) in the assay could be reduced and, therefore, 
the sensitivity was increased. Moreover, because the detection was performed on a 
96- or 384-well plate, the activity of the nitrilases from microorganisms could be 
determined quickly [93].
Moreover, some other high throughput methods have been reported as alterna-
tives to conventional screening methods. A critical review on selection and screen-
ing strategy for enzymes of nitrile metabolism based on spectrophotometric and 
fluorimetric methods has been published [94]. Recently, convient screening meth-
ods have been developed on the basis of the color variation of indicators which are 
added to the mixture in advance. Once the acid formed, the color would have a 
dramatic change [95]. Additionally, a new method for nitrilase screening has been 
developed to detect nitrilase activity. The ammonia product of nitrilase mediated 
conversion of nitriles forms a complex with the cobalt ion results in a color change, 
which can readily be quantified using a spectrophotometer at 375 nm. The assay 
has the potential to be used for the real-time monitoring of nitrilase-catalyzed reac-
tons [96]. More noticeably, Hu et al. introduced a simple and rapid high-throughput 
screening method based on a colorimetric reaction of glycolic acid with b-naphthol 
in sulfuric acid solution to isolate glycolonitrile-hydrolyzing microorganisms. Four 
strains able to convert glycolonitrile to glycolic acid were isolated from soil sam-
ples using this screening method, among which Rhodococcus sp. ZJUT-N595 dis-
played the highest hydrolytic activity [35].
These soil-derived nitrile-amide hydrolyzing organisms have been currently under 
active development and some have even achieved with small to moderate success. 
The advantage of applying whole cell biocatalysts lies in that they can be relatively 
easily and cheaply prepared and the whole cell catalyzed reactions can be operated 
much more easily. Nevertheless, some small aliphatic nitriles, hydroxyl- and amino-
substituted nitriles give lower yields and appear to be alternatively metabolized when 
whole cell biocatalysts were applied [32]. Hence, on one hand, careful monitoring of 
the reaction is strongly recommended to achieve the maximal desired product. On the 
other hand, the use of purified enzymes is of substantial significance and benefit in 
case that substrate or product utilization by whole cells exists. Due to this, the purifi-
cation and characterization of nitrile-amide converting are under progress in China.
4   Factors Affecting the Activity and Enantioselectivity  
of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzyme
Numerous factors, such as some culture conditions like carbon source, nitrogen 
source, inducer and conversion conditions like temperature, pH, reaction time, 
cosolvent and so on, turn out to affect the activity and enantioselectivity, and con-
sequently the biomass production.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested