mvc view to pdf itextsharp : How to insert text in pdf file application Library utility azure .net wpf visual studio 9783540884149-c11-part1655

Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
43
4.1  Inducer
Nitrile hydratase and nitrilase are generally inducible, with a paucity of them being 
constitutive. Namely, the activity could be detected only in the presence of suitable 
inducers. Substrate, product, or their analogs are usually functioned as inducers, 
with the exception  of  some  extremely  toxic  nitriles, such  as  mandelonitrile,  in 
which case, the growth of the microorganism was completely inhibited. Urea and 
e-caprolactam,  potential  nitrile  hydratase  inducers,  play  important  roles  in  the 
induction  of  nitrile  hydratase  activity.  Moreover,  with  the  addition  of  different 
inducers,  microorganism harboring  versatile  nitrile-converting  enzyme  activities 
exhibited  various  activities. A distinguished  instance  was  R. rhodochrous J-1, a 
currently utilized organism in commercial synthesis of acrylamide in Japan, which 
was found to contain two inducible nitrile hydratases, one of which was specific for 
aliphatic nitriles induced by urea and the other for aromatic nitriles with cyclohex-
anecarboxamide  and  crotonamide  as  the  inducers [24, 97].  Similar  phenomena 
were found  in  Nocardia Rhodochrous LL100–21 [98], R. rhodochrous NCIMB 
11216 [99, 100],  Bacillus  pallidus  DAC521 [46, 101]  and  Nocardia  globerula 
NHB-2 [102]. Bacillus subtilis ZJB-063, a newly isolated strain in our research, 
exhibited nitrilase activity without addition of inducers, indicating that the nitrilase 
in  B.  subtilis  ZJB-063  is  constitutive.  Interestingly,  the  strain  exhibited  nitrile 
hydratase and amidase activity with the addition of e-caprolactam. The versatility 
of this strain in the hydrolysis of various nitriles and amides makes it a potential 
biocatalyst in organic synthesis [67]. In a word, selecting a suitable inducer is of 
great  significance  in  the  formation  of  nitrile-amide converting enzymes,  and  in 
enhancing the activity as well.
4.2  Metal Ions
As far as nitrile hydratases are  concerned, metal ions predominantly including 
Fe
3+
and Co
2+
are essential in the exhibition of its activity. In case of Fe
3+
type 
nitrile hydratase, only with the addition of Fe
3+
in the nutrient broth acted as 
co-factor could nitrile hydratase activity be observed, so is the Co
2+
type nitrile 
hydratase [24]. Nitrile hydratase from the fungus Myrrothecium verrucaria even 
has Zn
2+
in the active site and in such case Zn
2+
is necessary for the formation of 
the enzyme [103].
Unlike nitrile hydratases, nitrilases show no requirement of any metal co-factor. 
Instead, they are proved to have cataltically essential cysteine residues. Effect of 
metal ions on the nitrilase activity in many studies indicated that thiol binding rea-
gents like CuCl
2
and AgNO
3
were strong inhibitors of the nitrilase activity [61, 63, 
67]. The high sensitivity to these metal ions suggested that one or more thiol resi-
dues were necessary for this enzyme and these ions should not be involved in the 
nutrient broth or reaction mixture.
How to insert text in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text box to pdf; adding a text field to a pdf
How to insert text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text fields to pdf; adding text to a pdf in preview
44 
J. Chen et al.
4.3  Effect of Light on Nitrile Hydratase
As mentioned earlier, the activity of nitrile hydratase displayed unique features 
with the exposure to light. A nitrile hydratase producing strain Rhodococcus sp. 
N-771 exhibited extremely low activities when the cultivation was carried out in 
the dark.  However,  recovery  of  activity  occurred with the  irradiation  of  light 
[104, 105].
4.4  Amidase Inhibitor
As for amidase, it is a generally accepted fact that urea would have a negative effect 
on the activity, which is an important feature, especially in the production of some 
valuable  amides  via  organisms  with  nitrile  hydratase  and  amidase  activity. 
Undesired acid would form by the cleavage on the amide by accompanying ami-
dase. However, addition of urea could not only protect the amide from serious acid 
contamination, but also keep the amount of amide constant. Previous research also 
demonstrated the inhibitory effect derived from the competitive inhibition for active 
site of amidase between urea and the reactive amide [74, 106]. With that exception, 
no significant inhibition effect of urea on amidase catalyzed acyl transfer activity 
and hydrolytic activity from D. tsuruhatensis ZJB-05174 was observed, indicating 
that the inhibition effect of urea was not exclusive [89]. Bauer et al. indicated that 
diethyl  phosphoramidate  was  also  an  excellent  inhibitor  of  the  amidase  from 
Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain d3 [15]. In the presence of urea or chloroacetone, 
amidase activity in  Bacillus  spp. was inhibited and  the amide intermediate was 
accumulated [106]. Bearing this in mind, we can procure amides in high yields and 
with excellent purity.
4.5  Temperature and pH
Temperature and pH significantly affect the enzyme activity, and sometimes enan-
tioselectivity. Nitrile-converting biocatalysts mediated reactions are often operated 
in a narrow pH range, neutral or slightly alkaline. These enzymes mostly exhibit 
comparatively low activity in too acid or alkaline environments. Therefore, addition 
of HCl is employed to stop the reaction. With the exception, a nitrile hydrolyzing 
acidotolerant black yeast Exophiala oligosperma R1 was isolated in order to con-
vert a-amino- and a-hydroxynitriles whose enzymatic conversion was hampered 
by their low stability under neutral conditions [107].
Besides, pH could sometimes affect enantioselectivity to a certain extent. Attempts 
were made by Wang et al. to improve the enantioselectivity of nitrile of the biotrans-
formation of phenylglycine nitrile by altering the buffer pH from 7.62 to 7.13.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File in C#. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET.
how to enter text in pdf; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
add text to pdf using preview; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
45
Results indicated that the enantioselectivity of the transformation was enhanced 
and both the amide and acid form were obtained with ee values over 99% at a pH 
of 7.13 within 8 h though slower rate was observed [108].
The  effect  of  temperature  on  the  enzyme  activity  is  duple.  On  one  hand,
according to Arrhenius’s equation 
(
)
Ea
RT
k Ae
=
, enhancement of the activity occurs 
with an increase of temperature. On the other hand, enzyme inactivation accompa-
nies  an  increase  of  temperature.  A  large  portion  of  nitrile-amide  converting 
enzymes are not thermal stable and they are usually inactive above 50 °C. A small 
alteration in temperature may lead to substantial change in enzyme activity. B. subtilis 
ZJB-063, for example, displayed an abrupt decrease at 40 °C and only 13.36% of 
the activity at 32 °C was inspected, indicating that enzyme activity are sensitive 
to temperature [109]. Enzymes of good thermostability are of significant impor-
tance in pharmaceutical industry. The discovery of thermophilic nitrile-metabolizing 
microorganisms enables nitrile conversion at high temperature above 50 °C. Zheng 
et al. succeeded in screening an amidase producing bacterium with excellent thermo-
stability [89].
Along with enzyme activity, enantioselectivity is also influenced by tempera-
ture. Wang and coworker observed that lowering the reaction temperature from 30 
to 20 °C would lead to increased enantioselectivity of Rhodococcus sp AJ270 medi-
ated synthesis of optically active 2, 2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid [110].
More interestingly, temperature played an unexpected role in the stereoselectivity 
of amidase in D. tsuruhatensis ZJB-05174. It was detected that enzyme underwent 
an unusual temperature-dependent reversal of stereospecificity. With the increase in 
the reaction temperature, the E-value dropped from 27 (30 °C) to 5 (46 °C). When 
the  reaction  temperature  reached  56  °C,  it  exhibited  reversal  stereospecificity, 
though with a comparatively low E value of 0.03 [89]. This phenomenon can be 
interpreted by temperature variation caused change on the difference in activation 
free energy ∆∆G
, which can be divided into its enthalpic ∆∆H
and entropic ∆∆S
components [111].
4.6  Organic Solvents
As is generally accepted, organic solvents are widely applied in the lipase or este-
rase mediated reactions because of the hydrophobic nature of esters. Most nitriles 
also exhibit low solubility in aqueous solutions. Supplementing organic cosolvents 
to the reaction mixture containing a nitrile-amide converting biocatalyst is consid-
ered to be a useful way to increase the availability of the substrate. However, addi-
tion  of  organic  solvents  might  lead  to  the  inactivation  of  enzyme.  Hence,  the 
amount and suitable kind of the solvents should be carefully evaluated in terms of 
activity and the availability of soluble substrates. There is only a limited portion of 
p-methoxyphenylacetonitrile available to the enzyme in aqueous solution when fed 
to B. subtilis ZJB-063 due to its low solubility, which in turn resulted in low activity. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
how to add text box to pdf document; how to enter text into a pdf form
46 
J. Chen et al.
DMSO and methanol of 5 vol.% in the reaction mixture, as the cosolvents, resulted 
in  approximately 62.7% and  15.2%  enhancement  of activity,  respectively,  com-
pared to the control where there was no cosolvent. Further increase in concentration 
of the two solvents, on the contrary, caused a loss of activity, implying that protein 
denaturation occurred at concentrations above 5 vol.% [109].
Besides,  some  foreign  researches  indicated  that  high  percentages  of  organic 
solvents were also acceptable by some nitrile-amide converting enzymes. A puri-
fied nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus equi A4 showed high resistance to organic 
solvents and it could tolerate up to 90 vol.% isooctane or pristine [112].
Organic cosolvent showed an effect not only on the activity but also the enanti-
oselectivity  of  nitrile-amide  converting  enzymes.  Hydrocarbons  and  methanol 
(5 vol.%) increased the enantioselectivity of the nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus 
equi for the conversion of 2-(6-methoxynaphthyl)propionitrile from moderate  to 
good (E = 14.8–41) [112].
4.7  Steric and Electronic Factors
Both steric  and  electronic factors  dramatically  affected  the  reactivity  and  more 
importantly,  the  enantioselectivity.  Considerable  investigations  concerning  the 
effect of substituents have been carried out. Both the kind and position of substitu-
ents  have  much  to  do with enzyme activity.  Wu  and Li  conducted a successful 
asymmetric hydrolysis of a,a-disubstituted malonamides to afford enantiopure (R) 
-a,a-disubstituted malonamic acids employing the strain Rodococcus sp. CGMCC 
0497 (Scheme 3). In their study, it seemed that the results were not only influenced 
by steric hindrance but by an electronic effect of the substrates as well. Among the 
substrates bearing aromatic ring substituents in the ortho-, meta-, and para-positions, 
all para-substituted ones gave products with excellent ee values, slightly higher 
R-C-NH
2
O
R-C
R-C-XE
NH
H
2
O
H
2
O
H
2
O
R-C-NH
2
XE
O
H
NH
3
R-C-XE
O
R-C-OH + EXH
O
EXH
N
Scheme  3
Asymmetric  hydrolysis  of  a,a-disubstituted  malonamides  by  Rhodococcus  sp. 
CGMCC 0497
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
adding text to pdf document; how to insert text into a pdf file
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
47
than  ortho-  and  meta-substituted  ones(Table 4[113].  More noticeably,  when 
a-substituted  phenylacetonitriles  and  phenylacetamides  were  subjected  to  the 
Rhodococcus sp. AJ270 catalyzed hydrolysis, the reaction outcome was remarkably 
affected by the nature of a-substituent  (Scheme 4). As shown in Table 5, small 
groups appeared to have no obvious effect on enzyme activity, whereas introduction 
Table 4
Enantioselective hydrolysis of various a-substituted-a-methylmalonamides by 
Rhodococcus sp. CGMCC 0497
Substrate (R)
Yield (%)
e.e. (%)
C
6
H
5
94
97
o-ClC
6
H
4
94
97
m-ClC
6
H
4
94
95
p-ClC
6
H
4
92
>99
p-CH
3
C
6
H
4
97
>99
p-MeOC
6
H
4
95
>99
p-FC
6
H
4
95
>99
p-BrC
6
H
4
97
>99
C
6
H
5
CH
2
94
>99
C
3
H
7
94
91
Table 5
Enantioselective hydrolysis of a-substituted phenylacetonitriles by Rhodococcus sp. AJ270
Substrate 
(R)
Time 
(h)
nNtrile 
(%)
Configuration 
e.e.(%)
Amide 2 
(%)
Configuration 
e.e. (%)
Acid 3 
(%)
Configuration 
e.e. (%)
Me
10
-
-
42
R, >99
48
S, 90
Me
13.5 -
-
36
R, >99
58
S, 67
Et
70
-
-
58
R, 35
39
S, >99
Et
96
-
-
34
R, 96
40
S, >99
n-Pr
150
55
S, 24
27
S, 41
8
S, >99
n-Pr
214
33
S, 28
40
S, 13
13
S, >99
i-Pr
120
-
-
47
R, >99
46
S, >99
n-Bu
300
36
S, 36
34
S, 20
23
S, 98
MeO
46
-
-
78
0
-
MeO
72
-
-
56
0
-
-
MeS
120
-
-
64
R, 15
10
S, 96
R
CN
CN
R
CONH
2
R
R
+
Rhodococcus
sp.AJ270
phosphate buffer
pH 7.0
racemic nitrile
S-nitrile
R-or S-amide
S-acid
CO
2
H
+
(R=Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, MeO, MeS)
Scheme 4
Enantioselective biotransformations of racemic a-substituted phenylacetonitriles and 
phenylacetamides by Rhodococcus sp. AJ270
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
adding text to pdf file; adding text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
how to add text fields in a pdf; add text in pdf file online
48 
J. Chen et al.
of bulky and conformationally flexible groups such as n-propyl and n-butyl resulted 
in  a  much  slower  rate.  Surprisingly,  polar  group  like  methoxy  and  methylthio 
exhibited no effect on the rate of hydration step. In sharp contrast, both electronic 
and  steric factors displayed  detrimental  effects on amidase  in  Rhodococcus  sp. 
AJ270. Enantioselectivity of the strain, determined by the combination of selectivi-
ties of nitrile hydratase and of amidase, with the latter being a major contributor, 
seemed to be extremely sensitive to electronic factor too [114].
Rhodococcus sp. AJ270 also showed highly preference for aromatic and heter-
oaromatic nitriles, in which case the first step, hydration of the linear nitrile sub-
stituent,  is  not  significantly  hindered  by  steric  or  electronic  factors,  while  the 
second  amidase-mediated  step  showed  high  sensitivity  to  steric  factors.  It  was 
observed that para- and meta-substituted benzonitriles were converted to the cor-
responding  acids  at  a comparatively  rapid  rate in high yield  irrespective  of  the 
electronic nature of the substituent. Nevertheless, benzonitriles with substituent at 
the ortho-position were rapidly and efficiently converted to amides, while conver-
sion of amides to acids proceeded slowly, suggesting that the first step, is not sig-
nificantly hindered by steric or electronic factors, while the second amidase-mediated 
step showed high sensitivity to steric factors [32].
It was evident that electronic nature showed a great effect on initial rate of nitri-
lase mediated hydrolysis of para-substituted phenylacetonitriles. The reaction was 
accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents while slowed down by electron-
donating substituents [67]. Similar results were achieved by Geresh et al. in whose 
study a Hammett-type linear free energy correlation with a r value (reaction con-
stant) of 0.96 well described the relationship between the initial rates of the nitrilase 
catalyzed hydrolysis and the para-substituents [115].
5  Applications of Nitrile-Amide Converting Enzymes
Recently, a considerable number of products serving as the intermediates of phar-
maceutical,  fine  chemical  and  food  additives  have  been  derived  from  enzyme-
dependent reactions [116]. Biotransformation of amides or acids provides a feasible 
and valuable route. In fact, some have been successfully applied to industrial pro-
duction, meanwhile, some are under active development.
5.1  Bioconversion of Various High-Value Amides and Acids
5.1.1   Industrial Production of Acrylamide and Enzymatic Manufacture  
of Acrylic Acid
Acrylamide, an important fine chemical with broad uses, is mainly applied in the 
synthesis of polyacrylamide. Achievements in bioconversion of acrylonitrile made it 
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
49
possible that enzyme-based manufacture would substitute its traditional production 
mode. R. rhodochrous J-1 nitrile hydratase has been well investigated as a powerful 
biocatalyst for the  production of acrylamide, and was currently utilized in com-
mercial synthesis of acrylamide in Japan [97]. In China, Nocardia sp. 163, a soil 
derived organism from Taishan Mountain in the 1980s, harbors nitrile hydratase 
activity active on acrylonitrile. Later it became the isolate with the highest NHase 
activity  after optimization of culture  conditions by Shanghai Pesticide Research 
Insititute. After that, a tens of thousand tons per year scale acrylamide production 
facility was set up [117].
As mentioned earlier, nitrile hydratase and amidase always coexist in the organ-
ism which leads to the formation of amides and acids in a certain portion. Due to 
this,  a  comparatively  high ratio of nitrile  hydratase/amidase  activity  is  of great 
necessity to avoid contamination of the acrylamide by acrylic acid. In other words, 
effective measures should be taken to inhibit the amidase activity to a significant 
extent.  Addition  of  urea,  chloroacetone  and  phosphoramidate  could  sometimes 
efficiently inhibit the amidase activity, which in turn resulted in the accumulation 
of acrylamide [15, 74, 106].
As far as acrylic acid is concerned, it is a commodity chemical with an estimated 
annual production capacity of 4.2 million metric tons. Acrylic acid and its esters can 
be used in paints, coatings, polymeric flocculants, paper and so on. It is convention-
ally  produced  from  petrochemicals.  Currently,  most  commercial  acrylic  acid  is 
produced by partial oxidation of propene which produces unwanted by-products and 
large amount of inorganic wasters [118]. Nowadays, there has occurred an innova-
tive manufacture method using nitrile-amide converting enzymes. Being different 
from manufacture of acrylamide, its manufacture requires microorganisms with an 
excess of amidase over nitrile hydratase, namely the rate of amidase-mediated step 
markedly exceeds the first step. Alternatively, nitrilase possessing microorganisms 
affords acids as well. In our research, a nitrilase-producing strain Arthrobacter nitro-
guajacolicu ZJUTB06-99 was newly isolated from soil sample in order to develop a 
production process of acrylic acid by biotranformation of acrylonitrile. According to 
previous reports, e-caprolactam induced R. rhodochrous J-1 cells containing abun-
dant nitrilase were used in the manufacture of acrylic acid, 390 g L
−1
of which were 
obtained under a periodic substrate feeding system [119].
5.1.2  Biotransformation of Aliphatic and Arylaliphatic Amides and Acids
Aliphatic and arylaliphatic amides  and  acids  are  readily available from the corre-
sponding nitriles by the nitrile hydratase/amidase systems or nitrilase. A  series of 
aliphatic nitriles, whether saturated or unsaturated, could be efficiently hydrolysed to 
the  corresponding  acids  by  the  use  of  whole  cells  of  Rhodococcus  sp.  AJ270. 
However, it was unsuitable for the preparation of amides, since the rate of the amide 
hydrolysis by amidase was greater than that of nitrile hydration. With one exception, 
unlike acrylonitrile and cinnamonitrile, methacrylamide was isolated after short activity 
due to the effect of adjacent subsistutent on the amidase-catalysed step [32].
50 
J. Chen et al.
In our study, a nitrilase from B. subtilis ZJB-063 was predominantly active on 
arylacetonitriles. It was observed that electronic nature had a great effect on the 
initial rate of nitrilase mediated hydrolysis of para-substituted phenylacetonitriles. 
The reaction was accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents (Cl, NO
2
) while 
slowed down by electron-donating substituents (OH, CH
3
, OCH
3
[67]. Moreover, 
aliphatic and arylaliphatic amides could be provided by purified nitrile hydratase to 
avoid contaminated acids [19, 25].
5.1.3  Biosynthesis of Aromatic Acids and Amides
In previous studies there existed a hypothesis that aromatic nitriles were acceptable 
substrates for nitrilases while aliphatic nitriles were the same for nitrile hydratases. 
This hypothesis, however, was proved to be contradictory to many later observa-
tions  which  provided  the  evidence  for  the  existence  of  nitrilases  effective  for 
aliphatic nitriles [120] and nitrile hydratases active on benzonitrile, its mono- or 
disubstituted derivatives [30, 32, 121, 122].
R. rhodocrous AJ270, a nitrile hydratase and amidase-containing microorgan-
ism, efficiently hydrolyzed all the seleceted aromatic nitriles including para-, meta- 
and  ortho-substituted  ones.  Among  these  compounds,  those  with  para-, 
meta-substituents gave acids at a fast rate, whereas conversion of aromatic nitriles 
bearing adjacent substituents almost ceased at the step of amides, and subsequent 
conversion of amides to acids proceeded rather slowly. The above finding clearly 
indicated that amidase was more sensitive to the electronic nature of the substituents. 
Disubstitution of benzonitrile with methoxy at positions 2 and 6 displayed a signifi-
cantly  adverse  effect  on  nitrile  hydratase.  Displacement  of  methoxy  by  fluorin 
decreased the effect on nitrile hydratase but the step of hydrolysis of amides to acids 
still proceeded extremely slowly. This adjacent disubstitution phenomenon further 
confirmed that amide hydrolysis is stringently dependent on adjacent steric factors 
while nitrile hydration has a slight steric limitation [32].
5.1.4  Bioconversion of Heterocyclic Nitriles
In the past decades, commercial productions of acrylamide, nicotinamide and nico-
tinic  acid  have  witnessed  the  significant  use  of  nitrile-converting  enzymes. 
Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid belong to heteroaromatic compounds. Nicotinamide 
and its acid are water-soluble B-complex vitamins (Vitamin B
3
or PP) used in phar-
maceutical formulations, and  as additives in food and animal feed; furthermore, 
their deficiency leads to pellagra. Moreover, nicotinic acid and its ester and amide 
derivatives have medical applications as antihyperlipidemic agents and peripheral 
vasodilators [123]. Currently, they are produced by chemical synthesis at high tem-
peratures and pressures. Alternatively, they can be prepared under mild conditions 
by the bioconversion of 3-cyanopyridine with nitrile-converting containing micro-
organisms or enzymes.
Microbial Transformation of Nitriles to High-Value Acids or Amides 
51
R.  rhodochrous  J-1, a  versatile  nitrile-converting  enzymes containing micro-
organisms, had high activity toward 3-cyanopyridine in the presence of crotonamide 
as an inducer (Fig. 4). This process straightforwardly transferred to industrial level 
and was soon developed into an industrial production scale of nicotinamide for the 
following reasons. First, 3-cyanopyridine could be converted to nicotinamide without 
formation of nicotinic acid. Namely, the strain displayed considerably high nitrile 
hydratase activity and it is noteworthy that nicotinamide is not contaminated by 
nicotinic acid, since nicotinamide is almost inert to the low amidase activity in this 
strain. Second, there seemed no occurrence of substrate inhibition as compared to 
conversion of acrylonitrile. Finally, the fermentation mode turned out to be pseu-
docrystal fermentation (namely, crystalline substrate, solution of substrate, solution 
of product, crystalline product). From the synthetic point of view, various useful 
amides other than nicotinamide and acrylamide can be obtained by using the 
Fig. 4
Biotransformation of heterocyclic nitriles by the whole cells of A. niger K10 (1, 2, 6–8, 
16, 17, 20), Rhodococcus sp. AJ270 (3–12, 16–19), R. rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 (6, 11, 12), 
R. rhodochrous J-1 (5, 13–15), Rhodococcus sp. strain YH3-3 (18, 19) and R. equi A4 (5, 13–15)
S
R
N
H
R
N
COOH
N
COOH
N
CONH
2
(R=CONH
2
, COOH)
N
H
COOH
N
COOH
N
CONH
2
S
COOH
O
COOH
N
N
COOH
N
N
COOH
N
CONH
2
(13)
(17)
(18)
(12)
(16)
(11)
(15)
(10)
(14)
(19)
(9)
(8)
(7)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(1)
(R=CONH
2
, COOH)
(2)
N
CONH
2
N
N
CONH
2
N
CH
3
CONH
2
CH
3
N
COOH
O
CONH
2
S
CONH
2
52 
J. Chen et al.
R. rhodochrous J-1 cells cultured in the presence of crotonamide. Isonicotinamide 
and  pyrazinamide,  useful tuberculostatics,  can  be  produced  in  this  way as  well 
[124]. As for nicotinic acid, a thermostable nitrilase produced by the thermophilic 
bacterium B. pallidus DAC521 catalyzed the direct hydrolysis of 3-cyanopyridine 
to nicotinic acid without detectable formation of nicotinamide [125].
In recent years, investigation was carried out on the preparation of nicotinamide 
with Corynebacterium  glutamicum in  China [126, 127]. As  a robust bacterium, 
Rhodococcus sp. AJ270 showed high nitrile hydratase activity against heterocyclic 
nitriles.  The  adjacent  substituent  impact  existing  in  the  hydrolysis  of  aromatic 
nitriles  was  encountered  in  the  cases  of  heterocyclic nitriles. Those  bearing an 
adjacent C=O/C=N remained intact after a long conversion time (Fig. 4[32].
Our lab also provided an enzymatic route for the manufacture of nicotinamide. 
In addition, biosynthesis of 2-choloronicotinic acid is currently in active progress, 
which is a useful agricultural and pharmaceutical intermediate. Various other het-
eroaromatic amides and carboxylic acids procured currently via chemical synthesis 
could be produced biocatalytically from their nitriles. A cobalt-containing nitrile 
hydratase purified from Rhodococcus sp. strain YH3–3 was able to convert 2-cyan-
othiophene and 2-cyanofuran along with cyanopyrazine [128]. The nitrile hydratase 
from R. equi A4 also showed capacity for some heterocyclic nitriles, and similar 
results were observed that 2-cyanopyridine was transformed with a lower rate than 
3- and 4-cyanopyridine (Fig. 4[30]. In addition, bioconversion of some heterocy-
clic amides and acids could also be accomplished by R. rhodochrous J-1, R. rhodo-
chrous NCIMB 11216 and Aspergillus niger K10 (Fig. 4) [25, 129].
5.1.5  Bioconversion of Alicyclic Nitriles
In the past few decades, a considerable amount of research concerning biotransfor-
mation of amides and acids has been carried out, the majority of which focused on 
the bioconversion of aromatic nitriles to its equivalent amides and acids and a pau-
city of which was concerned with the hydrolysis of alicyclic nitriles. Matoishi et al. 
conducted the hydrolysis of alicyclic mono- and dinitriles and amides mediated by 
R. rhodochrous IFO 15564, from which a variety of six-membered alicyclic cyano 
carboxylates, amido carboxylates, dicarboxylates from the corresponding nitriles 
were obtained (Fig. 5). The formation of these compounds was presumably ascribed 
to the stereochemistry of the substrate, the nature of substituents and presence of 
double  bonds in alicyclic  rings. These  factors resulted in the  rate  difference  of 
nitrile hydratase and amidase between enantiomers or enantiotopic groups, which 
in turn enabled kinetic resolution or asymmetrization [130].
Much attention has been  paid in recent years to the preparation of enantiopure 
cyclopropyl compounds owing to the fact that enantiomers of these compounds often 
exhibit different biological activities. Hence, Wang and his coworker undertook the 
study of Rhodococcus sp. AJ270  mediated biotransformation  of  trans-2-arylcyclo-
propanecarbonitriles, by which not only optically active acids but also the amides were 
obtained (Scheme 5). In addition, bioconversions of 2-arylcyclopropanecarbonitriles 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested