mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Add text to pdf reader SDK software API .net winforms wpf sharepoint 9789241564854_eng10-part1661

Chapter 7. Global target 7
81
to 6% in 2010 and 6.3% in 2013 (4). 周  e prevalence 
of childhood overweight is increasing worldwide, but 
especially in Africa and Asia. Between 2000 and 2013, 
the prevalence of overweight in children aged under 
5 years increased from 11% to 19% in some countries 
in southern Africa and from 3% to 7% in South-East 
Asia (UN region). In 2013, there were an estimated 
18 million overweight children aged under 5 years 
Fig. 7.3  Age-standardized prevalence of obesity in adults aged 18 years and over (BMI ≥30 kg/m
2
), by WHO region 
and World Bank income group, comparable country estimates, 2014 
Q
Males    
Q
Females
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
% of population
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
in Asia, 11 million in Africa and 4 million in Latin 
America and the Caribbean. 周  ere was little change 
in the prevalence of overweight in children in Latin 
America and the Caribbean over the last 13 years, 
but countries with large populations had levels of 
7% and higher. It is estimated that the prevalence of 
overweight in children aged under 5 years will rise to 
11% worldwide by 2025 if current trends continue (4).
Fig. 7.4 Age-standardized prevalence of overweight in children under fi ve years of age, comparable estimates, 2013 
Prevalence of overweight (%)*
* Percentage of overweight (weight-for-height above +2 standard deviations of the WHO Child Growth Standards median).
<5
5–9.9
10–14.9
15–19.9
≥20
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Add text to pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text box to pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
Add text to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text field pdf; how to add text box to pdf document
Global status report on NCDs 2014
82
U
r
u
g
u
a
y
 2
6
.7
Un
ited
 State
s o
f Am
erica 33
.7
United Kingdom 28.1
United Arab Emirates 37.2
Trinidad and Tobago 31.1
Switzerland 19.4
Sweden 20.5
Spain 23.7
Slovenia 25.1
Slovakia 25.7
Singapore 6.2
Saudi Arabia 34.7
Saint Kitts and Nevis 28.3
Russian Federation 24.1
Republic of Korea 5.8
Qatar 42.3
Portugal 20.1
Poland 25.2
Oman 30.9
Norway 23.1
New Zealand 29.2
Netherlands 19.8
M
alta 26
.6
L
u
x
e
m
b
o
u
r
g
 2
3
.1
Lithuania 25.9
Latvia 23.7
K
u
w
a
i
t
3
9
.
7
J
a
p
a
n
 3
.3
Italy 21
.0
Israel 25.3
Ireland 25.6
Iceland 22.8
Greece 22.9
Germany 20.1
France 23.9
Finland 20.6
Estonia 22.6
Equatorial Guinea 17.5
Denmark 19.3
Czech Republic 26.8
Cyprus 23.8
Croatia 23.3
Chile 27.8
Canada 28.0
Brunei Darussalam 18.1
Belgium 20.2
Barbados 31.3
Bahrain 35.1
Baham
as 36.2
A
u
stria 1
8.4
A
u
s
t
r
a
lia
 2
8
.6
Antigua and Barbuda 30.9
Andorra 29.5
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
Z
im
b
a
b
w
e 1
0.5
United Republic of Tanzania 7.1
Uganda 4.9
Togo 7.5
Tajikistan 13.6
Somalia 4.6
Sierra Leone 7.6
Rwanda 4.0
Niger 4.3
Nepal 3.3
Myanmar 2.9
Mozambique 5.3
Mali 6.8
Malawi 5.3
M
a
d
a
g
as
c
ar 5
.4
L
i
b
e
r
i
a
6
. 6
Kenya 7.0
H
a
it
i 1
1
.9
G
uinea-Bissau 7.2
Guinea 6.8
Gambia 10.9
Ethiopia 4.0
Eritrea 4.1
Democratic Republic of the Congo 4.4
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 2.4
Comoros 6.6
Chad 8.1
Central African Republic 5.1
Cambodia 3.2
Burundi 2.6
Burkina Faso 6.3
Benin 9.3
B
a
n
g
la
d
e
s
h
 3
.6
Afghanistan 2.9
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
High-income
Low-income
Fig. 7.5  Age-standardized prevalence of obesity in adults aged 18 years and over, (BMI ≥30 kg/m
2
) (%), 
by individual country, and World Bank Income group, 2014
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
adding text to pdf form; adding text to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to insert text in pdf file
Chapter 7. Global target 7
83
Z
a
m
b
ia
 8
.9
Yem
e
n 1
7.2
Viet Nam 3.6
Vanuatu 35.4
Uzbekistan 15.5
Ukraine 20.1
Timor-Leste 2.2
Syrian Arab Republic 23.5
Swaziland 17.7
Sudan 7.5
Sri Lanka 6.5
South Sudan 7.5
Solomon Islands 27.7
Senegal 9.8
Sao Tome and Principe 12.3
Samoa 43.4
Republic of Moldova 14.9
Philippines 5.1
Paraguay 16.3
Papua New Guinea 27.9
Pa
kis
ta
n
 5.4
N
ig
e
r
i
a
 1
1
.0
Nicaragua 17.1
Morocco 22.3
M
o
n
g
o
li
a
 1
6
.7
M
ic
ro
n
es
ia (Fe
d
e
rate
d
 Sta
tes
 o
f) 3
7
.2
M
auritania 9.7
Lesotho 14.2
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 3.5
Kyrgyzstan 14.4
Kiribati 40.6
Indonesia 5.7
India 4.9
Honduras 18.2
Guyana 22.9
Guatemala 18.6
Ghana 12.2
Georgia 20.8
El Salvador 21.8
Egypt 28.9
Djibouti 9.6
Côte d’Ivoire 9.2
Congo 11.0
Cameroon 11.4
Cabo Verde 1
3.0
B
o
liv
ia
 (P
lu
r
in
a
t
i
o
n
a
l S
t
a
t
e
 o
f
) 1
7
.1
B
h
u
t
a
n
6
.
7
Armenia 19.5
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
V
e
n
e
z
u
e
la
 (
B
o
liv
a
r
ia
n
 R
e
p
u
b
lic
 o
f
) 2
4
.8
Tuv
alu
 4
0.3
Turkm
enistan 20.1
Turkey 29.5
Tunisia 27.1
Tonga 43.3
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 19.6
Thailand 8.5
Suriname 26.1
South Africa 26.8
Seychelles 26.3
Serbia 19.5
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 24.3
Saint Lucia 26.9
Romania 21.7
Peru 21.1
Panama 26.8
Palau 47.6
Niue 43.2
Nauru 45.6
Namibia 18.9
Montenegro 20.0
Mexico 28.1
M
auritius 17.9
M
a
rsh
a
ll Isla
n
d
s 4
2
.8
M
a
ld
iv
e
s
 7
.9
Malaysia 13.3
Libya 33.1
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
3
1
.
9
K
a
z
a
k
h
s
ta
n
 2
3
.4
Jo
rd
an
 3
0.5
Jamaica 27.2
Iraq 23.8
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 26.1
Hungary 24.0
Grenada 26.2
Gabon 17.6
Fiji 36.4
Ecuador 18.7
Dominican Republic 23.9
Dominica 25.8
Cuba 25.2%
Costa Rica 24.3
Cook Islands 50.8
Colombia 21.0
China 6.9
Bulgaria 23.2
Brazil 20.0
Botswana 22.4
Bosnia and Herzegovina 17.9
Belize 22.5
Belarus 23.4
Azerbaijan 22.5
A
rg
e
n
tin
a
 2
6
.3
A
n
g
o
la
1
0
.
2
Algeria 24.8
Albania 17.6
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text box on pdf; how to add text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to insert text in pdf using preview
Global status report on NCDs 2014
84
周  ere has been an increasing global recognition of 
the need for e ective strategies to prevent and con-
trol childhood overweight and obesity. In 2012, the 
World Health Assembly agreed a target of no increase 
in childhood overweight by 2025 (5). To accelerate 
WHO’s e orts to address the issue, in May 2014 the 
Director-General of WHO established a high-level 
Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity.
Diabetes/raised 
blood glucose and its 
impact on health
Diabetes is a well-recognized cause of premature 
death and disability, increasing the risk of car-
diovascular disease, kidney failure, blindness and 
lower-limb amputation (6). People with impaired 
glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glycaemia 
are also at risk of future development of diabetes 
and cardiovascular disease (7). In recent decades, 
the prevalence of diabetes has been increasing 
globally, and has been particularly accelerated in 
low- and middle-income countries. 周  is rise is 
largely driven by modi able risk factors – particu-
larly physical activity, overweight and obesity (8). 
A few high-income countries have documented a 
levelling-o  of obesity prevalence in children (9,10), 
although the bene cial e ect of this on diabetes 
risk will take time, unless a similar change occurs 
in adults. Population ageing is also an important 
factor, as glucose intolerance increases with age. 
Much of the diabetes burden can be prevented or 
delayed by behavioural changes favouring a healthy 
diet and regular physical activity.
Diabetes was directly responsible for 1.5 million 
deaths in 2012 and 89 million DALYs. 周  e global 
prevalence of diabetes (de ned as a fasting plasma 
glucose value ≥7.0 mmol/L [126 mg/dl] or being on 
medication for raised blood glucose) was estimated 
to be 9% in 2014. 周  e prevalence of diabetes was 
highest in the WHO Region of the Eastern Mediter-
ranean Region (14% for both sexes) and lowest in the 
European and Western Paci c Regions (8% and 9% 
for both sexes, respectively) (see Figs. 7.7 and 7.8).
In general, low-income countries showed the 
lowest prevalence and upper-middle-income coun-
tries showed the highest prevalence of diabetes for 
both sexes (see Fig. 7.9).
Monitoring the rates of 
obesity and diabetes 
Indicators in the global monitoring framework (11) 
for monitoring progress in attaining this target are:
Fig. 7.6  Prevalence of overweight in children aged under 5 years, by WHO region and World Bank income group, 
comparable estimates, 2013 
14%
12%
10%
8%
6%
4%
2%
0%
% of population
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
WPR
Low-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
HIgh-
income
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text box in pdf document; how to add text to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text boxes to pdf document; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Chapter 7. Global target 7
85
1. age-standardized prevalence of raised blood 
glucose/diabetes among persons aged 18+ years, 
or on medication for raised blood glucose;
2. age-standardized prevalence of overweight and 
obesity in persons aged 18+ years;
3. prevalence of overweight and obesity in 
adolescents.
周  e measurement of overweight in children 
under 5 years is included in the global monitoring 
framework on maternal, infant and young child 
nutrition (12). Overweight is de ned as having a 
weight-for-height above two standard deviations 
from the median.
WHO de nes overweight in school-aged chil-
dren and adolescents (persons aged 10–19 years) 
Fig. 7.8  Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes (Fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or on medication for raised blood 
glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes), in women aged 18 years and over, comparable estimates, 
2014 
Prevalence of diabetes/raised blood glucose (%)*
* Defined as fasting blood glucose ≥ 7 mmol/l or on medication for raised blood glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes.
≤8
8.1–10
10.1–15
15.1–17
≥17.1
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Fig. 7.7  Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes, (Fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or on medication for raised blood 
glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes), in men aged 18 years and over, comparable estimates, 2014 
Prevalence of diabetes/raised blood glucose (%)*
* Defined as fasting blood glucose ≥ 7 mmol/l or on medication for raised blood glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes.
≤8
8.1–10
10.1–15
15.1–17
≥17.1
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to insert text into a pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
how to insert pdf into email text; how to insert text box in pdf file
Global status report on NCDs 2014
86
Fig. 7.9 Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes in adults aged 18 years and over, (Fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or 
on medication for raised blood glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes) (%), by individual country, and World 
Bank Income group, 2014  
U
ru
g
u
a
y
 9
.0
U
nite
d
 States o
f A
m
erica 8
.4
United Kingdom
 7.8
United Arab Emirates 18.6
Trinidad and Tobago 16.8
Switzerland 5.5
Sweden 6.4
Spain 7.5
Slovenia 9.3
Slovakia 8.9
Singapore 8.5
Saudi Arabia 18.3
Saint Kitts and Nevis 15.9
Russian Federation 9.0
Republic of Korea 7.9
Qatar 23.0
Portugal 7.2
Poland 8.9
Oman 16.4
Norway 6.7
New Zealand 7.9
Netherlands 5.6
M
o
n
aco
 0
.0
M
a
lt
a
 7
.3
L
u
x
e
m
b
o
u
r
g
6
.
9
Lithuania 9.4
L
a
t
v
i
a
7
.
6
K
u
w
a
it
 2
0
.1
Jap
a
n
 7
.5
Italy 6.6
Israel 6.3
Ireland 8.0
Iceland 6.6
Greece 7.1
Germany 6.2
France 6.3
Finland 6.7
Estonia 8.0
Equatorial Guinea 15.8
Denmark 5.2
Czech Republic 8.1
Cyprus 8.2
Croatia 7.8
Chile 10
Canada 7.1
Brunei Darussalam 11.6
Belgium 5.1
Barbados 15.0
Bahrain 17.3
Baham
as 12.8
A
u
stria 5
.7
A
u
s
t
r
a
lia
 6
.6
A
n
t
i
g
u
a
a
n
d
B
a
r
b
u
d
a
1
3
.
7
Andorra 8.4
0%
30%
15%
10%
5%
20%
25%
Z
im
b
ab
w
e 6.9
United Republic of Tanzania 7.6
Uganda 6.2
Togo 8.3
Tajikistan 12.1
Somalia 6.8
Sierra Leone 8.0
Rwanda 6.1
Niger 7.5
Nepal 9.4
Myanmar 7.1
Mozambique 7.8
Mali 8.6
M
alawi 8.0
M
a
d
a
g
a
sc
a
r 6
.8
Liberia 7.8
Kenya 7.6
H
a
i
ti 7
.9
G
uinea-Bissau 8.0
Guinea 7.5
Gambia 9.9
Ethiopia 7.4
Eritrea 6.7
Democratic Republic of the Congo 6.1
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 5.6
Comoros 9.1
Chad 9.9
Central African Republic 8.3
Cambodia 8.2
Burundi 5.1
Burkina Faso 8.2
Be
n
in 9
.0
B
a
n
g
la
d
e
s
h
 9
.4
Afghanistan 9.6
0%
30%
15%
10%
5%
20%
25%
High-income
Low-income
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
adding text to a pdf in reader; how to add text field to pdf form
Chapter 7. Global target 7
87
Z
a
m
b
ia
 8
.3
Yem
e
n 1
5.5
Viet Nam 6.5
Vanuatu 19.0
Uzbekistan 12.0
Ukraine 8.0
Timor-Leste 7.4
Syrian Arab Republic 13.9
Swaziland 12.7
Sudan 10.0
Sri Lanka 9.7
South Sudan 10.0
Solomon Islands 16.8
Senegal 9.1
Sao Tome and Principe 9.1
Samoa 25.2
Republic Moldoava 9.4
Philippines 7.3
Paraguay 7.4
Papua New Guinea 15.9
Pa
kis
ta
n
 10
.8
N
ig
e
r
i
a
 7
.9
Nicaragua 10.0
Morocco 13.5
M
o
n
g
o
li
a
 1
1
.5
M
ic
ro
n
es
ia (Fe
d
e
rate
d
 Sta
te
s o
f) 2
2
.5
M
auritania 9.7
Lesotho 10.5
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 8.6
Kyrgyzstan 11.1
Kiribati 21.4
Indonesia 8.7
India 9.5
Honduras 9.5
Guyana 11.8
Guatemala 10.5
Ghana 8.3
Georgia 13.9
El Salvador 10.5
Egypt 18.9
Djibouti 8.7
Côte d’Ivoire 7.7
Congo 9.4
Cameroon 9.0
Cabo Verde 9.8
B
o
liv
ia
 (P
lu
r
in
a
t
io
n
a
l S
t
a
t
e
 o
f
)
 7
.6
B
h
u
t
a
n
1
2
.
4
Armenia 11.5
0%
30%
15%
10%
5%
20%
25%
V
e
n
e
z
u
e
la
 (B
o
l
iv
a
r
i
a
n
 R
e
p
u
b
lic
 o
f
) 9
.0
T
u
v
alu
 20
.5
Turkm
enistan 15.1
Turkey 13.4
Tunisia 13.3
Tonga 26.0
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 7.7
Thailand 9.7
Suriname 12.0
South Africa 12.9
Seychelles 14.9
Serbia 7.8
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 10.6
Saint Lucia 15.2
Romania 7.3
Peru 8.2
Panama 10.4
Palau 23.0
Niue 27.6
Nauru 24.5
Namibia 10.4
Montenegro 7.0
Mexico 10.7
M
auritius 11.9
M
a
rsh
all Islan
d
s 1
9.9
M
a
ld
iv
e
s
 1
0
.4
M
a
l
a
y
s
i
a
1
1
.
1
Libya 17.0
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
1
2
.
6
K
a
z
a
k
h
a
s
t
a
n
 1
3
.2
Jo
rd
an
 14
.9
Jam
aica 11.5
Iraq 16.8
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 12.2
Hungary 8.0
Grenada 11.9
Gabon 12.0
Fiji 17.7
Ecuador 8.2
Dominican Republic 10.0
Dominica 9.9
Cuba 8.8
Costa Rica 9.0
Cook Islands 29.1
Colombia 8.5
China 9.5
Bulgaria 8.4
Brazil 7.8
Botswana 11.9
Bosnia and Herzegovina 9.6
Belize 12.4
Belarus 8.8
Azerbaijan 15.0
A
rg
e
n
tin
a
 9.1
A
n
g
o
la
 1
2
.1
A
l
g
e
r
i
a
1
4
.
2
Albania 8.0
0%
30%
15%
10%
5%
20%
25%
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
Global status report on NCDs 2014
88
as one standard deviation BMI-for-age (equivalent 
to BMI 25 kg/m
2
at 19 years), and obesity in the 
same group as two standard deviations BMI-for-age 
(equivalent to BMI 30 kg/m
2
at 19 years) from the 
median (13).
周  e WHO STEPwise approach to Surveillance of 
NCD Risk Factors (STEPS) is used by many coun-
tries to track national prevalence data for obesity 
and raised blood glucose in adults (14). In some 
countries, demographic and health surveys also 
collect data on BMI. WHO’s Global school-based 
student health survey (15) is used in many countries 
to measure and monitor overweight and obesity in 
adolescents; while data in children aged under 5 
years are collected routinely through demographic 
and health surveys, multiple indicator cluster sur-
veys, and other surveys.
周  e national target can be  xed according to 
the epidemiological pro le of each country and 
what might be achievable. 周  e national target can 
aim to halt the epidemic and ultimately reverse the 
trend. Countries may consider an immediate focus 
on reducing the incidence of obesity in children and 
adolescents, and a longer-term target of reducing 
the prevalence in adults.
A zero increase in diabetes incidence rather than 
prevalence would be con rmation that modi able 
risk factors are being controlled successfully. How-
ever, this is a much stricter target and measurement 
of the number of new cases would be too complex, 
since diabetes is asymptomatic and undiagnosed 
in 30−80% of cases (16).
What are the cost-eff  ective 
policies and interventions 
for reducing the prevalence 
of obesity and diabetes ? 
Although evidence on what works as a package 
of interventions for obesity prevention is limited, 
much is known about promotion of healthy diets 
and physical activity, which are key to attaining the 
obesity and diabetes targets. Evidence of popula-
tion-wide policies and settings-based and individu-
al-based interventions that have worked in di erent 
countries is described below.
Population-wide policies
Evidence suggests that changes in agricultural 
subsidies to encourage fruit and vegetable produc-
tion could be bene cial in increasing the consump-
tion of fruits and vegetables and improving dietary 
patterns (17). Evidence strongly supports the use 
of such subsidies and related policies to facilitate 
sustained long-term production, transportation 
and marketing of healthier foods (17).
Price is o en reported as a barrier to the pur-
chase and consumption of healthy foods (18). Pric-
ing strategies that increase incentives for purchasing 
healthier food options also increase the purchase of 
those options (19). Taxation schemes that produce 
large changes in price can change purchasing habits 
and are likely to improve health (20,21).
Hungary introduced a “junk food tax” on foods 
high in sugar, salt and ca eine (see Box 7.1), and 
Box 7.1 Hungary − impact assessment of the Public Health Product Tax
On 19 July 2011 Hungary passed the law “Act CIII of 2011 on the 
Public Health Product Tax” related to tax on food and drink compo-
nents with a high risk for health. The tax liability of a product de-
pends on its sugar, salt and caff eine content. One year later, an im-
pact assessment was conducted, based on surveys of the public and 
manufacturers. Results show that 40% of responding manufacturers 
changed the product formula to reduce the taxable ingredient. The 
sale of products subject to tax decreased by 27% and people consu-
med 25−35% fewer products subject to tax than one year earlier. 
Sources: see references (25).
Chapter 7. Global target 7
89
France introduced a tax on sweetened drinks (22). 
In 2013, the Mexican congress passed taxes on soda 
and junk food (23). Several other countries are also 
considering such taxes (24).
Trade  and regulatory measures have  also 
proven eff ective in reducing the availability of 
unhealthy foods and changing population dietary 
patterns (26,27). In 2000, Fiji banned the supply 
of mutton  aps (high in fat) under the Trading 
Standards Act (26). In Mauritius, the focus of reg-
ulation was the reduction of saturated fatty acids 
in cooking oil and its replacement with soybean 
oil.   e policy is estimated to have changed con-
sumption patterns favourably and reduced average 
total cholesterol levels (27). Measuring the impact 
of these approaches on obesity and diabetes is of 
utmost importance.
  ere is ample evidence that marketing of foods 
and non-alcoholic beverages in uences children’s 
knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and preferences. Based 
on this evidence, WHO has developed a set of rec-
ommendations and an implementation framework 
on the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic bev-
erages to children (28).   is aims to assist Mem-
ber States to design and implement new policies, 
or strengthen existing ones, on food-marketing 
communications to children. To facilitate imple-
mentation, WHO has developed a regional nutrient 
pro le model in the European Region, to guide the 
marketing of food and non-alcoholic beverages to 
children. Other WHO regions are developing their 
own nutrition pro le models.
Nutrition labelling can be useful in orienting 
consumers to products that contribute to a healthier 
diet.   ere is evidence that simple, front-of-pack 
labels on packaged foods, or point-of-purchase 
information in grocery stores, cafeterias or restau-
rants, can be bene cial, as can menu labelling to 
support healthier options (29–31).   ere is also 
evidence that combining nutrition labelling with 
environmental and/or nutrition education mea-
sures can be even more eff ective in changing con-
sumer behaviour and consumption patterns (30).
Consumer awareness of healthy diet and physical 
activity can be achieved through sustained media 
and educational campaigns aimed at increasing 
consumption of healthy foods, or reducing con-
sumption of less healthy ones and increasing phys-
ical activity.   ese campaigns have greater impact 
and are more cost-eff ective when used within mul-
ticomponent strategies (24).
Settings-based interventions
Settings-based interventions can be eff ective in 
preventing and controlling diabetes and obesity. A 
settings-based approach reaches families and com-
munities where they live, work and play. Settings 
include schools, universities, workplaces, commu-
nities, and health-care and religious settings.
Box 7.2 Brazil – healthy school food policy 
Brazil’s national school feeding programme,  launched in 1955, is men-
tioned in the country’s constitution and covers nearly 47 million children. 
Its  objectives are  to  contribute  to  the  growth, development  and lear-
ning capabilities of students, to support the formation of healthy habits 
through food and nutrition education, and to promote local family far-
ming through food purchase. School meals meet national nutrition stan-
dards, with mandatory inclusion of  fruits and vegetables. The  national 
programme requires that schools purchase locally grown or manufactured 
products, stimulating the local economy. Brazilian law requires that 70% 
of the food served to children in school meal programmes is unprocessed (e.g. rice, beans, meat, fi sh, fruits or vege-
tables) and 30% is locally sourced. Regular government purchases from family farms have led to improved quality of 
unprocessed food and increased availability and consumption of fruits and vegetables by school children. 
Sources: see references (34,35).
Global status report on NCDs 2014
90
周  e school is an important setting for promoting 
healthy diets and physical activity. WHO’s Health 
Promoting Schools Initiative (32) and the Nutri-
tion-Friendly School Initiative (33) were developed 
to address the double burden of undernutrition 
and overweight/obesity that many countries face. 
A “whole of school” approach focused on improv-
ing both diet and physical activity (including pro-
vision of a healthy food option in school cafeterias, 
a supportive environment for physical activity, and 
specialized educational curricula) can be very e ec-
tive in improving dietary patterns both inside and 
outside school (24,30,31). Provision of fresh fruit 
and vegetables to students at school can in uence 
dietary behaviour outside school without extra cost 
(see Box 7.2) (22).
Worksite interventions addressing diet and phys-
ical activity are e ective in changing behaviours 
and health-related outcomes (36,37). Workplace 
vending machine prompts, labels or icons can be 
successful in changing dietary patterns, when com-
bined with increased availability of healthier food 
options (24). Healthy-eating messages in cafeterias 
and restaurants have been shown to stimulate con-
sumption of healthy food − provided that healthy 
food items are made available as part of the inter-
vention (38).
Individual interventions
Diet and physical activity counselling through 
primary health care have the potential to change 
behaviours related to obesity and diabetes (39). 
周  e provision of dietary counselling, especially 
as a component of a total-risk approach, has the 
potential to be bene cial (39).
Positive results of e ective risk-factor control 
can be seen in a short time, since any reduction in 
body weight and increase in physical activity has a 
bene cial e ect on the risk of diabetes. 周  is inter-
vention has been scaled up to the whole population 
in a few high-income countries, and encouraging 
results on feasibility have been reported from Fin-
land (40). However, it has not been implemented at 
scale in low- and middle-income countries. 周  ere 
is currently no evidence on the e ectiveness of 
large-scale interventions on the whole population 
for reversing or stopping the increasing prevalence 
of overweight and obesity. 周  ere is some evidence 
that diabetes incidence, prevalence and mortality 
have been reduced where external circumstances 
imposed a lowering of the caloric intake and an 
increase in physical activity on the whole popula-
tion (41,42).
Actions required 
to attain this target 
周  e target of no increase in prevalence of obesity 
and diabetes is closely linked with the target of 
decreasing physical inactivity (see Chapter 3). To 
maintain a healthy weight, there must be a bal-
ance between energy consumed (through diet) and 
energy expended (through physical activity). Fail-
ure to breastfeed, or a shorter duration of breast-
feeding, are also associated with a higher risk of 
overweight later in life (43).
To  prevent  obesity,  multisectoral  popula-
tion-based action is required, focusing on prenatal, 
infancy and childhood health actions targeting the 
most vulnerable groups. 周  e ministry of health will 
need to take leadership and engage with other rele-
vant government sectors in a national multisectoral 
action plan (see Chapter 10). Policies should simul-
taneously address di erent sectors that contribute 
to the production, distribution and marketing of 
food, while concurrently shaping an environment 
that facilitates and promotes adequate levels of 
physical activity (44–47).
For the management of obesity, low-energy diets 
are e ective in the short term, but reducing inactiv-
ity, increasing walking, and developing an activity 
programme can increase the e ectiveness of obe-
sity therapy. Treating associated health risks and 
established complications is important. In addition, 
there needs to be strengthening of health systems 
to address obesity and diabetes as clinical entities 
through primary health-care services for early 
detection and management.
Regular monitoring of the prevalence of obesity 
and diabetes should be instituted as part of routine 
NCD surveillance.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested