mvc view to pdf itextsharp : How to insert text in pdf using preview Library control class asp.net azure windows ajax 9789241564854_eng11-part1662

Chapter 7. Global target 7
91
周  e agenda for attaining this target could imple-
ment and evaluate the following:
multisectoral population-based policies to in u-
ence production, marketing and consumption of 
healthy foods;
 scal policies to increase the availability and 
consumption of healthy food and reduce con-
sumption of unhealthy ones;
promotion of breast feeding and healthy com-
plementary feeding according to WHO recom-
mendations (12);
policies and interventions to attain the target on 
reducing physical inactivity;
education and social  marketing campaigns 
focused on impacting dietary and physical activ-
ity behaviour in both children and adults;
implementation of restrictions on marketing of 
foods and beverages that are high in sugar, salt 
and fat to children;
measures to create healthy eating environments 
in settings (schools, workplaces, universities, reli-
gious settings, villages, cities) and communities, 
including disadvantaged communities;
research to generate evidence on the e ectiveness 
of individual and population-wide interventions 
to prevent and control obesity and diabetes.
To be e ective, proposed actions need to be spe-
ci c to the country or region and should take into 
account the available resources and the cultural and 
ethnic di erences. It is important to make decisions 
regarding policy options and priority areas locally, 
and to engage all relevant stakeholders. WHO has 
developed a tool to identify and prioritize childhood 
obesity-prevention policies and interventions (48).
References 
1. Lim SS, Vos T, Flaxman AD, Danaei G, Shibuya K, 
Adair-Rohani H et al. A comparative risk assessment 
of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk 
factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990–2010: 
a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 
Study 2010. Lancet. 2012;380(9859):2224−2260. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61766-8. 
2. Obesity: preventing and managing the global 
epidemic. Report of a WHO consultation. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2000 (WHO Technical 
Report Series, No. 894; http://www.who.int/nutrition/
publications/obesity/WHO_TRS_894/en/, accessed 5 
November 2014).
3. WHO Global Database on Child Growth and 
Malnutrition. 2013 joint child malnutrition estimates 
– levels and trends (http://www.who.int/nutgrowthdb/
estimates2013/en/, accessed 5 November 2014).
4. UNICEF-WHO-The World Bank. Joint child 
malnutrition estimates (http://apps.who.int/gho/data/
node.main.ngest?lang=en)
5. Resolution WHA65.6. Maternal, infant and young 
child nutrition. In: Sixty-  h World Health Assembly, 
Geneva, 21−26 May 2012. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2012 (http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/
pdf_files/WHA65/A65_R6-en.pdf, accessed 5 
November 2014).
6. Levitan B, Song Y, Ford ES, Liu S. Is nondiabetic 
hyperglycaemia a risk factor for cardiovascular 
disease? A meta-analysis of prospective studies. Arch 
Intern Med. 2004;164:2147−55.
7. Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 
2010. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011 
(http://www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd_report_
full_en.pdf, accessed 3 November 2014).
8. Finucane MM, Stevens GA, Cowan MJ, Danaei G, 
Lin JK, Paciorek CJ et al.; Global Burden of Metabolic 
Risk Factors of Chronic Diseases Collaborating 
Group (Body Mass Index). National,  regional, 
and global trends in body-mass index since 1980: 
systematic analysis of health examination surveys 
and epidemiological studies with 960 country-years 
and 9.1 million participants. Lancet. 2011;377:557−67. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62037-5.
9. de Wilde JA , Verkerk PH , Middelkoop BJ. Declining 
and stabilising trends in prevalence of overweight and 
obesity in Dutch, Turkish, Moroccan and South Asian 
children 3−16 years of age between 1999 and 2011 in 
the Netherlands. Arch Dis Child. 2014;99(1):46−51. 
doi:10.1136/archdischild-2013-304222.
10. Murer SB, Saarsalu S, Zimmermann MB, Aeberli I. 
Pediatric adiposity stabilized in Switzerland between 
1999 and 2012. Eur J Nutr. 2014;53(3):865−75.
How to insert text in pdf using preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf; add text field to pdf acrobat
How to insert text in pdf using preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf file; add text block to pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
92
11. NCD global monitoring framework indicator 
defi nitions and specifi cations. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
12. WHA resolution 65/6. Maternal, infant and young 
child nutrition. In: Sixty-fi  h World Health Assembly, 
Geneva, 21–26 May 2012. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2012 (http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/
pdf_files/WHA65/A65_R6-en.pdf, accessed 6 
November 2014).
13. de Onis M, Lobstein T. Defi ning obesity risk status 
in the general childhood population: Which cut-o s 
should we use? Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010;5(6):458−60. 
doi:10.3109/17477161003615583.
14. World Health Organization. Chronic diseases and 
health promotion. STEPwise approach to surveillance 
(STEPS) (http://www.who.int/chp/steps/en/, accessed 
5 November 2014).
15. World Health Organization. Global school-based 
student health survey (GSHS) (http://www.who.int/
chp/gshs/en/, accessed 6 November 2014).
16. Beagley J, Guariguata L, Weil C, Motala AA. Global 
estimates of undiagnosed diabetes in adults. Diabetes 
Res Clin Pract. 2014;103(2):150−60. doi:10.1016/j.
diabres.2013.11.001.
17. Wallinga D. Agricultural policy and childhood 
obesity: a food systems and public health commentary. 
Health A  (Millwood). 2010;29(3):405−10. doi:10.1377/
hltha .2010.0102.
18. Waterlander WE, de Mul A, Schuit AJ, Seidell JC, 
Steenhuis IH. Perceptions on the use of pricing 
strategies  to  stimulate  healthy  eating  among 
residents of deprived neighbourhoods: a focus 
group study. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010;7:44. 
doi:10.1186/1479-5868-7-44.
19. Phipps EJ, Braitman LE, Stites SD, Wallace SL, 
Singletary SB, Hunt LH.   e use of fi nancial incentives 
to increase fresh fruit and vegetable purchases in 
lower-income households: results of a pilot study. J 
Health Care Poor Underserved. 2013;24(2):864−74. 
doi:10.1353/hpu.2013.0064.
20. Mytton OT, Clarke D, Rayner M. Taxing 
unhealthy food and drinks to improve health. BMJ. 
2012;344:e2931−8. doi:10.1136/bmj.e2931.
21. Sharma A, Hauck K, Hollingsworth B, Siciliani L. 
The effects of taxing sugar-sweetened beverages 
across di erent income groups. Health Econ. 2014 
Sep;23(9):1159-84. doi:10.1002/hec.3070.
22. Villanueva T. European nations launch tax attack 
on unhealthy foods. CMAJ. 2011;183(17):E1229–30. 
doi:10.1503/cmaj.109-4031.
23. Mexico enacts soda tax in e ort to combat world’s 
highest obesity rate.   e Guardian, 16 January 2014 
(http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/16/
mexico-soda-tax-sugar-obesity-health, accessed 5 
November 2014).
24. Cecchini M1, Sassi F, Lauer JA, Lee YY, Guajardo-
Barron V, Chisholm D. Tackling of unhealthy diets, 
physical inactivity, and obesity: health e ects and 
cost-e ectiveness. Lancet. 2010;376(9754):1775−84. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61514-0.
25. Act CIII of 2011 on the Public Health Product Tax. 
. Budapest: Hungarian National Institute for Health 
and Development; 2013 (http://www.oefi .hu/NETA_
hatasvizsgalat.pdf, accessed 6 November 2014).
26. Snowdon W,  ow AM. Trade policy and obesity 
prevention: challenges and innovation in the Pacifi c 
Islands. Obes Rev. 2013;13(Suppl 2):150−8. doi:10.1111/
obr.12090.
27.  Uusitalo U, Feskens EJ, Tuomilehto J, Dowse G, Haw 
U, Fareed D et al. Fall in total cholesterol concentration 
over fi ve years in association with changes in fatty 
acid composition of cooking oil in Mauritius: cross 
sectional survey. BMJ. 1996;313:1044−6.
28. Set of recommendations on the marketing of foods 
and non-alcoholic beverages to children. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2010 (http://www.who.
int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/recsmarketing/
en/, accessed 5 November 2014).
29. Capacci S, Mazzocchi M, Shankar B, Macias JB, 
Verbeke W, Pérez-Cueto FJ et al. Policies to promote 
healthy eating in Europe: a structured review of policies 
and their e ectiveness. Nutr Rev. 2012;70(3):188−200. 
doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2011.00442.x.
30. School policy framework: implementation of the WHO 
global strategy on diet, physical activity and health. 
Geneva: World Health Organization 2008 (http://
www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/SPF-en-2008.pdf, 
accessed 1 December 2014).
31. Branca F, Nikogosian H, Lobstein T, editors.  e 
challenge of obesity in the WHO European Region 
and the strategies for response. Copenhagen: World 
Health Organization Regional O  ce for Europe; 
2007  (http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/
pdf_fi le/0008/98243/E89858.pdf?ua=1, accessed 5 
November).
32. Health promoting schools. A healthy setting for 
living, learning and working. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 1998 (http://www.who.int/school_
youth_health/media/en/92.pdf, accessed 6 November 
2014). 
33. World Health Organization. Nutrition-friendly 
schools initiative (http://www.who.int/nutrition/
topics/nutrition_friendly_schools_initiative/en/
accessed 6 November 2014).
34. Fraser B. Latin American countries crack down on 
junk food. Lancet. 2013;382:385−6.
35. State of school feeding worldwide. Rome: World 
Food Programme; 2013 (http://documents.wfp.org/
stellent/groups/public/documents/communications/
wfp257481.pdf, accessed 6 November 2014) (34).
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Word to preview document content without loading
adding text fields to pdf; adding text to pdf form
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint to preview document content without
add text fields to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
Chapter 7. Global target 7
93
36. Task Force on Community Preventive Services. A 
recommendation to improve employee weight status 
through worksite health promotion programs targeting 
nutrition, physical activity, or both. Am J Prev Med. 
2009;37(4):358−9. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2009.07.004.
37. Preventing noncommunicable diseases in the 
workplace  through  diet  and physical  activity. 
WHO/World Economic Forum report of a joint 
event. Geneva: World Health Organization/World 
Economic Forum; 2008 (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2008/9789241596329_eng.pdf?ua=1
accessed 5 November 2014).
38. Uglem S, Stea TH, Raberg Kjøllesdal MK, Frölich W, 
Wandel M. A nutrition intervention with a main focus 
on vegetables and bread consumption among young 
men in the Norwegian National Guard. Food Nutr Res. 
2013 Oct 21:57. doi:10.3402/fnr.v57i0.21036 (http://
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3805840/
accessed 5 November 2014).
39. Package of essential noncommunicable (WHO PEN) 
disease interventions for primary health care in low-
resource settings. Geneva: World Health Organization; 
2013  (http://www.who.int/nmh/publications/
essential_ncd_interventions_lr_settings.pdf, accessed 
5 November 2014).
40. Tuomilehto J, Lindström J, Eriksson JG, Valle TT, 
Hämäläinen H, Ilanne-Parikka P et al; Finnish 
Diabetes Prevention Study Group. Prevention of 
type 2 diabetes mellitus by changes in lifestyle among 
subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. N Engl J 
Med. 2001;344(18):1343−50.
41. Uusitupa M, Tuomilehto J, Puska P. Are we really 
active in the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes 
at the community level? Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 
2011;21(5):380−9. doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2010.12.007. 
42. Franco M, Bilal U, Orduñez P, Benet M, Morejón 
A, Caballero B et al. Population-wide weight loss 
and regain in relation to diabetes burden and 
cardiovascular mortality in Cuba 1980−2010: repeated 
cross sectional surveys and ecological comparison of 
secular trends. BMJ. 2013;346:f1515. doi:10.1136/bmj.
f1515. 
43. Black RE, Victora CG, Walker SP, Bhutta ZA, Christian 
P, de Onis M et al; Maternal and Child Nutrition 
Study Group. Maternal and child undernutrition 
and overweight in low-income and middle-income 
countries. Lancet. 2013;382(9890):427−51. doi:10.1016/
S0140-6736(13)60937-X.
44. Hawkes C, Jewell J, Allen K. A food policy package 
for healthy diets and the prevention of obesity 
and diet-related non-communicable diseases: the 
NOURISHING framework. Obes Rev. 2013;14 (Suppl 
2):159−68. doi:10.1111/obr.12098.
45. Interventions on diet and physical activity: what works. 
Summary report. Geneva: World Health Organization; 
2009 (http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/
summary-report-09.pdf, accessed 5 November 2014).
46. Global recommendations on physical activity for 
health. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2010 
(http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_
recommendations/en/, accessed 5 November 2014).
47. Population-based approaches of childhood 
obesity  prevention.  Geneva:  World  Health 
Organization;  2012  (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/80149/1/9789241504782_eng.pdf
accessed 1 December 2014).
48. Prioritizing areas for action in the fi eld of population-
based prevention of childhood obesity. A set of 
tools for Member States to determine and identify 
priority areas for action. Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2012  (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/80147/1/9789241503273_eng.pdf
accessed 5 November 2014).
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF last page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using C# .NET
add text in pdf file online; adding a text field to a pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview.
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
Cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of NCD deaths in 
2012 and was responsible for 17.5 million deaths.
Heart attacks and strokes can be prevented if high-risk individuals 
are detected early and treated.
A very cost-eff ective intervention, which can be implemented in 
primary care even in resource-constrained settings, is available for 
prevention of heart attacks and strokes.
Prevention of heart attacks and strokes through a total 
cardiovascular risk approach is more cost-eff ective than treatment 
decisions based on individual risk factor thresholds only, and 
should be part of the basic bene ts package for pursuing universal 
health coverage.
Integrated programmes based on a total-risk approach need to 
be established in primary care, using hypertension, diabetes and 
other cardiovascular risk factors as entry points.
Achieving this target requires strengthening of the key 
components of the health system including sustainable health-
care  nancing, to ensure access to basic health technologies and 
essential NCD medicines.
  e attainment of this target will contribute to attainment of the 
target on reducing premature mortality from NCDs.
Key  points
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Features about PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to enter text into a pdf form; add text pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Excel to preview document content without loading
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; add text pdf file
95
Cardiovascular disease: heart disease and stroke 
Of the 17.5 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease in 2012, an estimated 
7.4 million were due to heart attacks (ischaemic heart disease) and 6.7 million 
were due to strokes (1). 
Over the last four decades, the rate of death from cardiovascular diseases has 
declined in high-income countries, owing to reductions in cardiovascular risk factors 
and better management of cardiovascular disease (2). Recent studies indicate that, 
although the risk-factor burden is lower in low-income countries, the rates of major 
cardiovascular disease and death are substantially higher in low-income countries 
than in high-income countries (3). Currently, over 80% of cardiovascular deaths 
occur in low- and middle-income countries. In 2012, heart disease and stroke were 
among the top three causes of years of life lost due to premature mortality globally (4).
周  e current high rates of premature cardiovascular death are unacceptable because 
very cost-e ective interventions are available to prevent heart disease and stroke (5−7).
周  e target to reduce heart attacks and strokes aims to improve the coverage 
of drug treatment and counselling to prevent heart attacks and strokes in people 
with raised cardiovascular risk and established disease. It is an a ordable inter-
vention that can be delivered through a primary health-care approach, even in 
resource-constrained settings (8−12).
What are the cost-eff  ective policies 
and interventions to prevent 
heart attacks and strokes? 
First heart attacks and strokes can be prevented if high-risk individuals are detected 
early and treated (6). For eligible persons aged 40–79 years, a regimen of aspirin, 
statin and two agents to lower blood pressure has been estimated to avert about 
one   h of cardiovascular deaths, with 56% of deaths averted in people under 70 
years (13). 周  is intervention can be delivered to persons with raised cardiovascular 
risk (including those with hypertension, diabetes and other cardiovascular risk 
factors with medium-to-high cardiovascular risk) through integrated primary care 
programmes (9−11).
8
Global target 8: At least 50% of eligible 
people receive drug therapy and 
counselling (including glycaemic control) 
to prevent heart attacks and strokes
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF
how to add a text box in a pdf file; how to add text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf file online; add text to pdf file
Global status report on NCDs 2014
96
Fig. 8.1 WHO/ISH risk prediction chart
Age 
(years)
Male
Female
SBP
(mm Hg)
Non-smoker
Smoker
Non-smoker
Smoker
70
180
160
140
120
60
180
160
140
120
50
180
160
140
120
40
180
160
140
120
4 5 6 7 8
4 5 6 7 8
4 5 6 7 8
4 5 6 7 8
Cholesterol
(mmol/l)
An approach that addresses total cardiovascular 
risk is more cost eff ective than approaches that make 
treatment decisions based on individual risk-factor 
thresholds only (e.g. hypertension, hypercholestero-
laemia) (6,9). A total-risk approach recommended by 
WHO enables integrated management of hyperten-
sion, diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors 
in primary care, and targets available resources at 
persons most likely to develop heart attacks, strokes 
and diabetes complications (10,11).
In addition to  rst attacks, recurrent heart attacks 
and strokes also need to be prevented in those with 
established disease (secondary prevention).   ese 
persons face considerably greater risk of recurrent 
vascular events and are much more likely to die 
in a recurrent event. Aspirin, beta-blockers and 
angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, together 
with smoking cessation, could prevent up to three 
quarters of recurrent heart attacks and strokes (7). 
However, a sole focus on secondary prevention is 
insu  cient to attain this target, as a considerable 
number of heart attacks and strokes are  rst attacks 
and many persons do not survive the  rst attack, 
particularly in low- and middle-income countries 
with weak emergency health services.
It has been proposed that administration of a 
 xed-dose combination of aspirin, statin and anti-
hypertensive medications (polypill) to all individuals 
aged over 55 years, regardless of cardiovascular risk 
status, is a suitable approach for preventing heart 
attacks and strokes (14). However, there is no de nite 
evidence to support such mass drug treatment, and 
the e  cacy, long-term risks, sustainability and cost 
eff ectiveness of the polypill remain to be proven. 
Overall, results of clinical trials conducted to date 
show that  xed-dose combination therapy is asso-
ciated with modest increases in adverse events, but 
better adherence to treatment, compared to multiple 
single agents (15). As yet, there are no clinical trials 
with any  xed-dose combinations that are powered 
to show diff erences in morbidity and mortality. Fur-
ther research, including cost-eff ectiveness studies, 
is necessary before considering widespread use of 
 xed-dose combinations. Furthermore, the use of a 
Chapter 8. Global target 8
97
polypill should not undermine comprehensive public 
health approaches to NCD prevention and control, 
or eff orts to strengthen health systems in low- and 
middle-income countries.
Monitoring coverage 
to prevent heart 
attacks and strokes 
  e indicator for monitoring this target in the 
global monitoring framework (12, see Annex 1) is 
the proportion of eligible persons receiving drug 
therapy and counselling (including glycaemic con-
trol) to prevent heart attacks and strokes.
Eligible persons are those aged 40 years and older 
with a 10-year cardiovascular disease risk ≥30% 
(based on WHO/ISH risk-prediction charts, see Fig 
8.1), including those with existing cardiovascular 
disease. Drug therapy is de ned as taking medica-
tions for primary and secondary prevention of heart 
attacks and strokes, based on WHO recommenda-
tions (6,7,9,10).   is includes medications for con-
trolling diabetes, hypertension, blood cholesterol and 
blood coagulation, based on WHO recommenda-
tions. Counselling is de ned as receiving advice from 
a doctor or other health worker to quit using tobacco 
or not start, reduce salt in the diet, eat at least  ve 
servings of fruit and/or vegetables per day, reduce fat 
in the diet, start or do more physical activity, main-
tain a healthy body weight, or lose weight. Data on 
monitoring coverage of this essential health service 
should be gathered from a population-based (pref-
erably nationally representative) multiple risk factor 
survey, that also records the history of cardiovascular 
disease, and counselling and drug therapy to reduce 
cardiovascular risk including the use of statins.
Progress achieved 
In the global capacity assessment survey conducted 
in 2013, 85% of countries reported off ering risk-fac-
tor and disease management in their primary health-
care systems (16). Low-income countries were less 
likely to have these services at the primary care level. 
Overall, 94% of countries indicated that they were 
able to screen for diabetes, with 92% having staff  gen-
erally available to do the testing, but the availability 
of tests and staff  was low in low-income countries. 
For instance, while 80% of all countries reported 
having tests and procedures to assay cholesterol, only 
34% of low-income countries reported having these 
available, compared to 77% of lower-middle-income 
countries and 100% of high-income countries. While 
the majority of countries (76%) reported having 
guidelines for management of cardiovascular dis-
ease, only about one third reported having fully 
implemented the guidelines.
More detailed studies reveal significant gaps 
in the provision of interventions to prevent heart 
attacks and stroke, even in high-income countries. 
In a study conducted in 22 European countries, the 
proportion of patients with heart disease and preva-
lent diabetes reaching the treatment targets was 20% 
for blood pressure, 53% for low-density lipoprotein 
cholesterol and 22% for haemoglobin A
1c
(HbA
1c
(17). In another European study on secondary pre-
vention and risk-factor control in patients a er isch-
aemic stroke, 50% of patients did not achieve opti-
mal risk-factor targets (18). Not surprisingly, a much 
worse situation has been documented in low- and 
middle-income countries (19,20). In one study, the 
percentage of those with heart attacks who received 
beta-blockers was 48%, angiotensin-converting 
enzyme inhibitors 40%, and statins only 21% (19). 
In a more recent study in three countries in South-
East Asia, over 80% of patients received no eff ective 
drug treatment a er heart attacks and strokes (20). 
Poor access to basic services in primary care, lack 
of aff ordability of laboratory tests and medicines, 
inappropriate patterns of clinical practice, and poor 
adherence to treatment were some of the main rea-
sons for the treatment gaps.
In low- and middle-income countries, the primary 
care level of the health system, which has to play a 
critical role in delivering these interventions, is o en 
the weakest. An evaluation of the capacity of primary 
care facilities to implement interventions to prevent 
heart attacks, strokes and other NCD complications 
in eight low- and middle-income countries showed 
major de cits in health  nancing, service delivery, 
access to basic technologies and medicines, medical 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
98
Box 8.1  
Phased
scale-up of total-risk approach for prevention of heart attacks and 
strokes in primary care
In order to attain this health-system target on prevention of heart 
attacks and strokes, several low- and middle-income countries (e.g. 
Bahrain,  Benin,  Bhutan,  Democratic  People’s  Republic  of  Korea, 
Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Fiji,  Guinea,  Indonesia,  Kiribati,  Kyrgyzstan,  Le-
banon, Myanmar, Philippines, Republic of Moldova, Samoa, Sierra 
Leone, Solomon islands, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, 
Turkey, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam) have taken steps to strengthen pri-
mary care for integration of NCD services. They have assessed the 
capacity of primary care for implementing a total-risk approach. Pri-
mary care workers, including family practitioners, are being trained 
to assess and manage cardiovascular risk, using tools of the WHO 
Package of essential noncommunicable (PEN) disease interventions for primary health care in low-resource settings 
(22). Some countries have planned national scale-up through a phased approach, as outlined below:
Phase 1: Conduct situation analysis
Create a conducive policy environment: include prevention of heart attacks and strokes through the total-risk 
approach in the essential services package and set national targets
Phase 2: Address key gaps and strengthen the health system as far as possible
Phase 3: Achieve optimum NCD care within the constraints of the situation
Estimate the cost of scale-up and track resources
Identify/correct missed opportunities
Integrate vertical disease-specifi c primary care programmes (e.g. on hypertension, diabetes)
Phase 4: Systematic scale-up and monitoring
Strengthen supply and quality of services, with emphasis on primary care
Improve demand for primary care
Find innovative solutions to overcome barriers to improving supply and demand
Monitor performance and progress towards attaining the target
Sources: see references (22-25,32).
information systems, and the health workforce (21). 
Overall, in most low- and middle-income countries, 
coverage of this essential individual intervention for 
prevention of heart attacks and strokes is low, with 
very slow progress in scaling up. However, as many 
country examples demonstrate (see Boxes 8.1−8.4), 
if there is suffi  cient political commitment and sus-
tainable action, the current situation can be changed 
gradually, by strengthening the health system, with 
a special focus on primary care. 
Actions required to 
attain this target 
A comprehensive set of policy options for attaining 
this target is listed under objective 4 (Strengthen 
and orient health systems to address the prevention 
and control of NCDs) of the Global NCD Action 
Plan (5). Many challenges need to be overcome in 
implementing these policy options. One challenge 
is to give priority and wider coverage to this very 
cost-e ective high-impact NCD intervention (“best 
buy”), in moving towards universal health coverage. 
A second is to address health-system gaps through 
mechanisms that are sensitive to speci c contexts. 
A third is to develop innovative approaches to 
expand coverage and track progress as health sys-
tems gain capacity in service delivery. Informed 
decisions need to be made about the sequence of 
action and the pace at which services are expanded, 
on the basis of a situation analysis.
Chapter 8. Global target 8
99
Box 8.2  High-level commitment to strengthen primary care for prevention of heart 
attacks and strokes in Pacifi c Island countries
At a joint meeting in July 2014, Economic and Health Ministers of Pacifi c 
Island countries agreed to improve the effi  ciency and impact of existing 
health budgets, by reallocating scarce health resources to targeted pri-
mary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, 
including implementation of WHO PEN (22). 
Sources: see references (23).
Box 8.3  Health-system strengthening to improve NCD outcomes: 
Bahrain, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Philippines
Bahrain’s ministry of health has taken steps to improve NCD services 
through a primary health-care approach. In line with the protocols 
of WHO PEN  (22), primary care clinics have been strengthened to 
address NCDs. The clinics are run by teams consisting of a certifi ed 
family physician, a trained NCD nurse and a health educator. Clinics 
cover a wide range of activities, including assessment of risk factors, 
early detection and management of NCDs and complications, and 
provision  of  counselling  on  diet,  physical  activity, weight control, 
smoking cessation and self-care. This approach has improved cove-
rage of key NCD interventions and patient satisfaction.
The ministry of health of the Palestinian Authority adopted WHO PEN (22), in an attempt to move away from a 
vertical approach. The programme has been piloted in two districts in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Reviews have 
included a register review, clinical audit and staff  satisfaction surveys, and routine service data have been used to 
engage staff  in analysing trends and quality of performance. Results indicate that on-site training, backed with 
regular structured supervision and clinical audits, are key elements in improving the quality of care and promo-
ting a sense of accountability.
In Pateros, Metro Manila, Philippines, key activities to introduce the 
WHO PEN package (22) have been implemented, including: baseline 
assessment of capacity, consultation with stakeholders, procurement 
of essential technologies and medicines, training of health-care pro-
viders and computerization of the health information system. Car-
diovascular risk assessment has been integrated with other public 
health programmes. The referral system has been strengthened by 
involving referral doctors during training and drafting a referral pro-
tocol. High-visibility NCD days were organized by community health 
volunteers, to improve community awareness of the availability of services and to promote compliance.
Sources: see references (22,24,25).
Give priority to attaining this 
target in moving towards 
universal health coverage
Attainment of this target requires priority to be 
accorded to the prevention of heart attacks and 
strokes, along the route to attaining universal 
health coverage. Many low- and middle-income 
countries are making progress in advancing the 
universal health coverage agenda (see Box 8.5). 
周  ey are increasingly recognizing that NCD pro-
grammes that are focused on inpatient care may 
neither fully protect against  nancial risk nor cover 
services that improve health cost e ectively, and 
that coverage of essential interventions in primary 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
100
Box 8.4. Expansion of access to primary health care in Brazil
Progress on prevention and control of NCDs reported from Brazil can be ascri-
bed largely to political commitment, a focus on social determinants of health, 
implementation of a comprehensive national health system with strong social 
participation, and expansion of access to primary health care. Age-adjusted NCD 
mortality is falling by 1.8% per year, with declines primarily for cardiovascular 
and chronic respiratory diseases. The prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and 
obesity, however, is rising, owing to unfavourable changes in diet and physical 
activity.
Source: see reference (26).
Box 8.5  Coverage of NCD services in the context of progressive realization of universal 
health coverage
Some  low-  and middle-income countries  are  making  progress 
towards providing the entire population with universal access to a 
benefi t package that includes essential NCD interventions. Other 
countries have introduced reforms  to expand  health insurance 
coverage to include essential NCD services. Diff erent approaches 
are used for raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing 
services. Progress can be seen in increasing enrolment in govern-
ment health insurance, a movement towards expanded benefi ts 
packages, and decreasing out-of-pocket spending, accompanied 
by an increasing government share of spending on health.
Source: see reference (27,32).
care will yield greater impacts on population health 
than inpatient services.
Various  pathways  for  achieving  universal 
health coverage have been described (28,29). Cov-
erage of the entire population for a defi ned set 
of very cost-e ective high-impact interventions 
– addressing NCDs, injuries, infectious diseases, 
and maternal and child health – could be the fi rst 
step. To attain the target, this publicly fi nanced 
basic benefi t package must include very cost-ef-
fective interventions, namely prevention of heart 
attacks and strokes through a total-risk approach 
(10,11). A more advanced approach could provide 
an expanded package of interventions, such as 
the expanded list of cost-e ective interventions 
in the Global NCD Action Plan (5) (see Appen-
dix 3 of the plan).   is second package could be 
fi nanced through a broader range of traditional 
and innovative fi nancing mechanisms, including 
general taxation revenue, payroll taxes, mandatory 
premiums and co-payments. Exempting the poor 
(at least those earning less than US$ 1.25 a day) 
from contributing to both packages should be con-
sidered, not only because health is a human right 
but also because it is a smart approach to equitable 
distribution of national wealth.
Address gaps and reorient health systems 
to address noncommunicable diseases
As alluded to above, context-specifi c strategies will 
be required to address multiple gaps in health sys-
tems related to fi nancing, access to basic technol-
ogies and medicines, the health workforce, service 
delivery, health information and referral. Special 
attention should be given to strengthening primary 
care coverage and improving the quality of services 
at primary level. Health workers require training in 
assessing and managing total cardiovascular risk, 
based on evidence-based clinical protocols and 
risk-assessment tools, and using hypertension and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested