mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Adding text to pdf file Library control class asp.net azure windows ajax 9789241564854_eng12-part1663

Chapter 8. Global target 8
101
diabetes as entry points (9,10). A comprehensive 
approach is required to increase staffi  ng ratios, shi  
certain NCD tasks to lower cadres, and improve the 
performance of health workers in general practice 
and family medicine, to address NCDs. Essential 
technologies (e.g. accurate devices for blood pres-
sure measurement, risk-assessment charts, weigh-
ing scales, height measuring equipment, blood 
sugar and blood cholesterol measurement devices 
with strips, and urine strips for albumin assay) 
and, medicines (e.g. at least aspirin, a statin, a thi-
azide diuretics, an angiotensin-converting enzyme 
inhibitor, a long acting calcium-channel blocker, 
a beta-blocker, metformin and insulin ) have to 
be available and a ordable. E orts are required 
to make progress on attaining the NCD target, on 
availability and a ordability of these, and other 
essential NCD medicines and basic technologies 
(see Chapter 9). Adherence to simpli ed guidelines, 
evidence-based protocols and evidence-based sup-
port for self-care (10,11,30) needs to be ensured. 
Health-information and referral systems require 
strengthening, to improve follow-up of patients, to 
monitor inequalities, and to coordinate between 
health-care providers, primary care facilities and 
secondary and tertiary hospitals.
Learning lessons from experience, 
innovation and adaptation, 
to resource limitations
Systematic screening for total cardiovascular risk 
(including hypertension, diabetes and other risk 
factors), with access to diagnosis and treatment, 
can advance progress towards attaining this tar-
get. Targeted screening for total cardiovascular 
risk, with blood glucose testing and blood pressure 
and blood cholesterol measurement, is more cost 
e ective than screening the whole population, and 
is more likely to identify individuals at high car-
diovascular risk, for lower cost (31). WHO tools are 
available to estimate the costs of widening coverage; 
the rate of expansion can be adjusted according to 
the availability of resources (11).
  e quality of services provided, particularly 
in primary care, requires monitoring. Pay-for-per-
formance programmes have been  adopted  by 
policy-makers and service providers, to improve 
the quality of health care, including for NCDs. 
However, studies that have directly examined the 
impact of  nancial incentives on improving health-
care processes and outcomes have reported mixed 
results.   e role of provider and patient incentives 
in improving quality of care and clinical outcomes 
in persons with raised cardiovascular risk needs to 
be explored and evaluated.
A structured and standardized external audit 
process could be important for monitoring the 
expanding role of primary care in preventing 
heart attacks, strokes and complications of dia-
betes. Audits of primary care centres to analyse 
databases on coverage of essential NCD interven-
tions, together with review of physical conditions 
of the premises and of referral links and patient 
records chosen at random, could provide useful 
information for developing context-speci c solu-
tions to de ciencies in service delivery. Facility-level 
quality-improvement audits carried out by primary 
care teams could also gather information for team-
based analysis of performance problems and joint 
solutions to problems.
Adding text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
acrobat add text to pdf; adding text to a pdf form
Adding text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to a pdf; add text field pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
102
References 
1. World Health Organization. Global Health Estimates: 
Deaths by Cause, Age, Sex and Country, 2000-2012. 
Geneva, WHO, 2014.
2. O’Flaherty M, Buchan I, Capewell S. Contributions of 
treatment and lifestyle to declining CVD mortality: 
why have CVD mortality rates declined so much 
since the 1960s? Heart. 2013;99:159−62. doi:10.1136/
heartjnl-2012-302300.
3. Yusuf S, Rangarajan S, Teo K, Islam S, Li W, Liu L 
et al; PURE Investigators. Cardiovascular risk and 
events in 17 low-, middle-, and high-income countries. 
N Engl J Med. 2014;371(9):818−27. doi:10.1056/
NEJMoa1311890.
4. World health statistics 2014. Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2014  (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/112738/1/9789240692671_eng.pdf
accessed 4 November 2014).
5. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 3 November 2014).
6. Prevention of cardiovascular disease. Guideline for 
assessment and management of cardiovascular risk. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2007 (http://
www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/publications/
Prevention_of_Cardiovascular_Disease/en/, accessed 
6 November 2014).
7. Prevention of recurrent heart attacks and strokes in 
low and middle income populations: evidence-based 
recommendations for policy makers and health 
professionals. Geneva: World Health Organization; 
2003 (http://www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/
resources/pub0402/en/, accessed 6 November 2014).
8. Package of essential noncommunicable (PEN) 
disease  interventions  for primary  health  care 
in low-resource settings. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2010  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2010/9789241598996_eng.pdf, accessed 
6 November 2014).
9. Prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases: 
guidelines for primary health care in low-resource 
settings. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2012.
10. Implementation tools: package of essential 
noncommunicable (WHO-PEN) disease interventions 
for primary health care in low-resource settings. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2013 (http://
www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/publications/
implementation_tools_WHO_PEN/en/, accessed 5 
November 2014).
11. Scaling up action against noncommunicable diseases: 
how much will  it  cost? Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2011  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2011/9789241502313_eng.pdf, accessed 
4 November 2014).
12. NCD global monitoring framework indicator 
defi nitions and specifi cations. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
13. Lim SS, Gaziano TA, Gakidou E, Reddy KS, Farzadfar 
F, Lozano R et al. Prevention of cardiovascular disease 
in high-risk individuals in low-income and middle-
income countries: health e ects and costs. Lancet. 
2007;370:2054–62.
14. Wald NJ, Law MR. A strategy to reduce cardiovascular 
disease by more than 80%. BMJ. 2003;326:1419.
15. Castellano JM, Sanz G, Fuster V. Evolution of 
the polypill concept and ongoing clinical trials. 
Can J Cardiol.  2014;30(5):520−6. doi:10.1016/j.
cjca.2014.02.016.
16. Assessing national capacity for the prevention 
and control of noncommunicable diseases report 
of the 2013 global survey. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
17. Gyberg V, Kotseva K, Dallongeville J, Backer GD, 
Mellbin L, Rydén L et al.; EUROASPIRE Study 
Group. Does pharmacologic treatment in patients 
with established coronary artery disease and diabetes 
fulfi l guideline recommended targets? A report from 
the EUROASPIRE III cross-sectional study. Eur J Prev 
Cardiol. 1 April 2014 (Epub ahead of print).
18. Heuschmann PU, Kircher J, Nowe T, Dittrich R, 
Reiner Z, Ci ova R et al. Control of main risk factors 
a er ischaemic stroke across Europe: data from the 
stroke-specific module of the EUROASPIRE III 
survey. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 19 August 2014 Aug 19. 
pii: 2047487314546825 (Epub ahead of print).
19. Mendis S, Abegunde D, Yusuf S, Ebrahim S, Shaper 
G, Ghannem H et al. WHO study on prevention 
of recurrences of myocardial infarction and stroke 
(WHOPREMISE).  Bull  World  Health  Organ. 
2005;83(11):820–9.
20. Yusuf S, Islam S, Chow CK, Rangarajan S, 
Dagenais G, Diaz R et al; Prospective Urban Rural 
Epidemiology (PURE) study investigators. Use of 
secondary prevention drugs for cardiovascular 
disease in the community in high-income, middle-
income, and  low-income  countries (the PURE 
Study):  a  prospective  epidemiological  survey. 
Lancet.  2011;378(9798):1231−43.  doi:10.1016/
S0140-6736(11)61215-4.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
add text to pdf in preview; how to enter text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf
Chapter 8. Global target 8
103
21. Mendis S, Al Bashir I, Dissanayake L, Varghese C, 
Fadhil I, Marhe E et al. Gaps in capacity in primary 
care in low-resource settings for implementation of 
essential noncommunicable disease interventions. 
Int  J  Hypertens.  2012;2012:584041.  doi: 
10.1155/2012/584041.
22. Package of essential noncommunicable (PEN) 
disease  interventions  for primary  health  care 
in low-resource settings. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2010  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2010/9789241598996_eng.pdf, accessed 
6 November 2014).
23. Towards healthy islands: Pacifi c noncommunicable 
disease response. In: Tenth Pacifi c Health Ministers 
meeting, Apia, Samoa, 2–4 July 2013. Manila: World 
Health Organization Western Pacifi c Region; 2013 
(PIC10/3; http://www.wpro.who.int/southpacifi c/pic_
meeting/2013/documents/PHMM_PIC10_3_NCD.
pdf, accessed 7 November 2014).
24. Health Annual Report Palestine 2012. Nablus: 
Ministry of Health, Palestinian Health Information 
Center; 2012 (http://www.moh.ps/attach/502.pdf, 
accessed 7 November 2014).
25. Regional consultation on strengthening 
noncommunicable  diseases  (NCD)  prevention 
and  control  in  primary  health  care.  Beijing 
China, 14–17 August 2012. Manila: World Health 
Organization Western Pacifi c Region; 2012 (WPR/
DHP/NCD(1)/2012; http://www.wpro.who.int/
noncommunicable_diseases/documents/RegCon_
StrengtheningNCDinPHC.pdf, accessed 7 November 
2014).
26. Schmidt MI, Duncan BB, Silva GA, Menezes AM, 
Monteiro CA, Barreto SM et al. Chronic non-
communicable diseases in Brazil: burden and current 
challenges. Lancet. 2011;377:1949–61. doi:10.1016/
S0140-6736(11)60135-9.
27. Lagomarsino G, Garabrant A, Adyas A, Muga R, 
Otoo N. Moving towards universal health coverage: 
health insurance reforms in nine developing countries 
in Africa and Asia. Lancet. 2012;380(9845):933−43. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61147-7.
28. Jamison DT, Summers LH, Alleyne G, Arrow 
KJ, Berkley S, Binagwaho A et al. Global health 
2035: a world converging within a generation. 
Lancet.  2013;382(9908):1898−955.  doi:10.1016/
S0140-6736(13)62105-4.
29. Making fair choices on the path to universal health 
coverage. Final report of the WHO Consultative Group 
on Equity and Universal Health Coverage. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2014 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/112671/1/9789241507158_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 6 November 2014).
30. Self-care of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer 
and chronic respiratory disease. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2013.
31. Screening for cardiovascular risk and diabetes. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014.
32. Adoption of the Philippine Package of essential 
noncommunicable disease interventions (PHIL PEN) 
in the implementation of the Philippine Health`s 
primary care benefi t package (http://www.philhealth.
gov.ph/circulars/2013/circ20_2013.pdf, accessed 7 
November 2014).
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
how to enter text in pdf file; add text box to pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
add text to pdf file reader; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
周  e national health strategy should include access to health 
technologies and essential medicines as an objective and should 
specify a mechanism for monitoring, evaluation and review of 
the availability and a ordability of basic health technologies and 
NCD medicines.
Achieving this target requires sustainable health-care  nancing, 
to ensure adequate procurement of basic health technologies and 
essential NCD medicines.
Country e orts to improve access should  rst focus on basic 
health technologies and essential medicines for NCDs, and 
the national essential medicines list should be the basis for 
procurement, reimbursement and training of health-care workers.
Reliable procurement and distribution systems are needed 
to guarantee the supply of essential NCD medicines and 
technologies to all levels of health care, including primary care, 
and to regional and remote communities.
Mechanisms must be in place to ensure that quality-assured 
generic medicines are procured; prescribers and consumers need 
to have con dence in the generic medicines in circulation.
Evidence-based treatment guidelines and protocols should be 
promoted and implemented, to support the appropriate use of 
essential NCD medicines.
周  e attainment of this target will contribute to attainment of 
targets on reducing the prevalence of hypertension, on improving 
coverage of treatment for prevention of heart attacks and strokes 
and, ultimately, on reducing premature mortality from NCDs.
Key  points
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text pdf file acrobat; how to add text fields in a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text boxes to pdf; adding text to a pdf
105
Availability and aff  ordability of 
basic technologies and medicines 
Eff ective delivery of individual interventions for NCDs requires strengthening of 
the health system at all levels of care. Weaknesses and ine  ciencies are currently 
encountered in all components of health systems, including supply of essential med-
icines and technologies (1−4). Priority actions for addressing the NCD crisis include 
delivering cost-eff ective and aff ordable essential medicines and technologies for 
all priority disorders, and strengthening health systems to provide patient-centred 
care across diff erent levels of the health system, starting with primary care (4,5).
  is target includes the basic requirement of medicines and technologies for 
implementing cost-eff ective primary care interventions and for addressing car-
diovascular disease, diabetes and asthma (6).   e core essential medicines include 
at least aspirin, a statin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a thiazide 
diuretic, a long-acting calcium-channel blocker, a beta-blocker, metformin, insulin, 
a bronchodilator and a steroid inhalant.   e basic technologies include, at least, a 
blood pressure measurement device, a weighing scale, height measuring equipment, 
blood sugar and blood cholesterol measurement devices with strips, and urine strips 
for albumin assay.   ese are minimum requirements for implementing essential 
NCD interventions in primary care. Availability is de ned as the percentage of 
public and private primary health-care facilities that have all of these medicines 
and technologies, indicated above.
Cancer medicines are not included in this indicator because of the di  culty of 
implementing treatment interventions for cancer in primary care in resource-con-
strained settings. However, this should not undermine eff orts to improve access 
to essential medicines for treating cancer. Treatment interventions and protocols 
for cancer should be identi ed, specifying the level of care at which these cancer 
medicines can be safely administered.
Progress achieved 
Substantial information exists on availability and aff ordability of essential medi-
cines, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. A large number of country 
studies have been conducted using a standard validated methodology developed by 
9
Global target 9: An 80% availability of the 
affordable basic technologies and essential 
medicines, including generics, required to 
treat major noncommunicable diseases in 
both public and private facilities
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to add text to a pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
adding text to pdf in reader; adding text to pdf document
Global status report on NCDs 2014
106
WHO and Health Action International (HAI) (7). 
周  e availability and prices of medicines are inves-
tigated through visits to public and private-sector 
facilities in each country, and availability is reported 
as the percentage of facilities where a product is 
found on the day of data collection.
A summary of the results of medicine-availability 
studies conducted between 2007 and 2012 using 
WHO/HAI survey methods is shown in Fig. 9.1 (8). 
周  ere is a consistent pattern of lower availability of 
medicines in public sector facilities compared to the 
private sector, and lower availability in low-income 
and lower-middle-income countries. While the bas-
ket of medicines surveyed in each country is not the 
same, the basket of medicines in each case is a mix 
of medicines used to treat communicable diseases 
and NCDs, as well as to provide symptomatic and 
pain relief.
Further analysis of these WHO/HAI studies in 40 
low- and middle-income countries has compared 
the availability of 15 medicines used for acute 
Fig. 9.1 Median availability of selected lowest-priced generic medicines, in the public and private sector, by World 
Bank income group, 2007−2012 
median
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Median % availability
54.1
max
min
68.0
56.1
70.0
59.7
69.1
70.0
60.0
Upper-middle-income
HIgh-income
Lower-middle-income
Low-income
Source: World Health Organization/Health Action International, using data from medicine price and availability surveys conducted 
between 2007 and 2012 using the WHO/HAI methodology (http://www.haiweb.org/medicineprices). 
n = number of countries. Baskets of survey medicines differ between countries. 
Public
(n = 10)
Private
(n = 12)
Public
(n = 14)
Private
(n = 14)
Public
(n = 11)
Private
(n = 11)
Public
(n = 2)
Private
(n = 3)
conditions with 15 medicines for chronic diseases 
(see Table 9.1) (9).
周  ese summary measures across a selection of 15 
medicines conceal the extent of some of the prob-
lems of availability of speci c medicines for the 
prevention and treatment of NCDs.
An analysis of the availability of selected cardiovas-
cular medicines (atenolol, captopril, losartan and 
nifedipine) in 36 countries concluded that availabil-
ity in the public sector was poor (26.3%) compared 
to the private sector (57.3%) (10).
A survey of the availability of asthma medicines 
listed on the WHO model list of essential medicines 
(11) found that, while salbutamol inhalers were 
available in 82.4% of private pharmacies, 54.8% of 
national procurement centres and 56.3% of public 
hospitals, the availability of beclometasone 100 μg 
pu  inhalers, a cornerstone of the management of 
asthma, was much lower (41.7%, 17.5% and 18.8% 
respectively) (12).
Chapter 9. Global target 9
107
Table 9.1  Mean availability of medicines used for acute and chronic conditions in 40 low- and middle-income 
countries
Sector and product type 
(number of countries)
Mean availability (%) of medicines
Diff erence (%) in 
mean availability
(95% CI)
P
Acute conditions 
(95% CI)
Chronic conditions 
(95% CI)
Public sector
Generic products (n = 35)
53.5 (46.2–60.8)
36.0 (27.4–40.6)
17.5 (6.5–28.6)
0.001
Private sector 
Generic products (n = 40)
66.2 (60.4–72.1)
54.7 (47.6–61.9)
11.5 (2.4–20.6)
0.007
CI: confi dence interval.
Source: see reference (9).
Access to insulin is problematic in many countries, 
complicated by the cost of syringes and diagnostic 
tools for initial diagnosis and follow-up that are 
essential for monitoring and adjusting treatment 
(13). Gaps in availability and aff ordability of basic 
technologies and medicines are particularly severe 
at the primary care level (14) and are major barriers 
to implementation of essential NCD interventions.
  e results of these studies demonstrate the lower 
availability of key NCD medicines in the public 
sector.   e consequence is that patients are forced to 
obtain medicines in the private sector, where prices 
are generally higher and may be unaff ordable for 
many. WHO/HAI surveys have also addressed the 
prices patients must pay for medicines and whether 
these are aff ordable (8).   e measurement of aff ord-
ability is not straightforward (15).   e approach 
used in the WHO/HAI surveys is to use the salary 
of the lowest-paid unskilled government worker to 
establish the number of days’ wages needed to pur-
chase courses of treatment for common conditions. 
Because chronic diseases need ongoing treatment, 
the aff ordability of a 30-day supply of medicines is 
used to indicate monthly medicine expenditures.
Data from WHO/HAI surveys between 2007 and 
2012 (8) were used to compare the aff ordability of 
two medicines used in managing NCDs – salbu-
tamol inhaler 100 μg per dose for asthma (assum-
ing one inhaler per month) and captopril tablets 
for hypertension (assuming 25 mg twice daily per 
month).   e results (see Fig. 9.2) illustrate wide 
variability between studies. If one day’s salary is 
deemed a measure of aff ordability of a medicine, 
then, in many cases, medicines are unaff ordable. 
  e situation is o en worse in countries where a 
large proportion of the population earns much less 
than the lowest-paid government worker.
Monitoring the availability 
and aff  ordability of 
basic technologies and 
essential medicines
  e indicator for monitoring this target in the 
global monitoring framework (see Annex 1) is the 
availability and aff ordability of quality safe and e  -
cacious essential noncommunicable disease medi-
cines, including generics and basic technologies in 
both public and private facilities. 
Many  countries have  already  collected  ad 
hoc facility-based information about prices and 
availability, using the WHO/HAI methodology 
(8,9). However, assessing progress towards targets 
requires regular measurement and the collection 
of valid and reliable data.
Routine monitoring systems should be estab-
lished, in order to provide regular facility-based 
assessments of the availability of key medicines and 
health technologies.   ese systems need to provide 
information from the public and private sectors 
and from urban and rural locations, so that equity 
of access to these essential commodities can be 
assessed. For routine monitoring to be feasible, data 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
108
Fig. 9.2  Number of days’ wages needed by the lowest-paid unskilled government worker to pay for 30 days’ 
treatment for hypertension and asthma, private sector, 2007–2012 
Q
Captopril tablets*    
Q
Salbutamol inhaler*
Republic of Moldova LPG
Republic of Moldova OB
Afghanistan LPG
Afghanistan OB
United Republic of Tanzania LPG
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
China (e) LPG
China (e) OB
India (d) LPG
Oman LPG
Bolivia (Plurinational State of) OB
Bolivia (Plurinational State of) LPG
Nicaragua LPG
Congo LPG
Congo OB
Mauritius LPG
Mauritius OB
Colombia LPG
Colombia OB
Haiti LPG
Haiti OB
Russian Federation (c) LPG
Russian Federation (c) OB
Ecuador LPG
Ecuador OB
Brazil (b) OB
Mexico (a) LPG
Kyrgyzstan OB
Kyrgyzstan LPG
Indonesia OB
Burkina Faso LPG
Burkina Faso OB
Sao Tomé and Principe OB
Democratic Republic of the Congo LPG
Democratic Republic of the Congo OB
Number of days’ wages**
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
***
35
Source: World Health Organization/Health Action International, using data from medicine price and availability surveys conducted between 2007 and 2012 using 
the WHO/HAI methodology (http://www.haiweb.org/medicineprices). 
* Captopril 25mg tab x 2/day; Salbutamol 100 mcg/dose inhaler, 200 doses. 
** Number of days’ wages needed by the lowest-paid unskilled government worker to pay
*** If one days’ wages of a  lowest-paid government worker is deemed as a measure of aff ordability of medicine, then in many cases medicines are unaff ordable.
(a) Rio Grande do Sul State, (b) Tatarstan Province, (c) Delhi (National Capital Territory), (d) Shaanxi Province.
OB=Originator Brand, LPG= Lowest-Priced Generic 
Chapter 9. Global target 9
109
collection needs to be simple, focusing on a smaller 
number of key medicines and adding minimal cost 
to the health system. 周  is monitoring is important, 
not only to assess progress towards the target of 
80% availability, but also to identify potential prob-
lems in procurement and in-country distribution of 
medicines and to develop interventions to address 
any system failures identi ed.
WHO’s Service Availability and Readiness Assess-
ment (SARA) is another mechanism for assessing the 
availability of key medicines and health commodities 
(16). 周  is extensive survey uses statistically represen-
tative samples of country health facilities. Analyses 
are strati ed by location (urban, rural) and facility 
type (dispensary, clinic, health centre, hospital), 
allowing detailed assessment of in-country di er-
ences in medicines availability. However, the scope 
of SARAs and the large numbers of health facilities 
surveyed make these surveys resource intensive and 
expensive. To date, SARAs have largely been con-
ducted in Africa and, where SARA data exist, they 
should be used to inform decision-making and to 
identify areas where interventions are required to 
improve access to medicines.
Assessing the a ordability of medicines requires 
regular measurement of the prices patients must 
pay for medicines in both public and private sec-
tors. A ordability can be computed by using the 
daily wage of the lowest-paid unskilled government 
worker for each country and the cost of a year’s 
supply of medicines. In measuring a ordability, 
financing arrangements for medicines in each 
country may need to be considered. Some countries 
may make medicines freely available in the public 
sector or have health insurance systems in place. 
周  e out-of-pocket costs for NCD medicines should 
be monitored.
It is also important to consider those who are 
unable to access care or purchase medicines. House-
hold surveys remain an important tool for under-
standing the sources of care in the community 
and the barriers to accessing care and treatments, 
including essential NCD medicines and health 
technologies. WHO has standardized methods for 
conducting household surveys to measure access to 
and use of medicines (17).
Actions required 
to attain this target 
Commitment to this target, and regular public 
reporting of progress – regionally, nationally and 
globally – will hold governments accountable for 
meaningful progress in improving access to, and 
affordability of, essential NCD medicines and 
health technologies (18).
Health-care fi nancing
Achieving this target requires adequate and sus-
tainable health-care  nancing. 周  e ministry of 
health has a pivotal role in promoting access to 
quality-assured, affordable essential medicines 
and should work with the ministry of  nance to 
secure adequate funding for health care in general, 
and essential NCD medicines and technologies in 
particular.
Regulatory systems
Strong regulatory systems are necessary to ensure 
the availability of quality-assured NCD medicines. 
E ective regulatory authority performance requires 
an appropriate legislative framework, commitment 
to good governance, administrative structures sup-
ported by technical capacity, and political commit-
ment to enforce compliance with established norms 
and standards for manufacture, distribution and 
supply of medicines and health technologies.
周  e a ordability of NCD medicines for both 
government and patients depends heavily on the 
use of generic products. Policies that promote the 
use of a ordable generic medicines are important, 
as is ensuring the quality of generic medicines in 
circulation in the country. Quality-assurance sys-
tems and educational campaigns promoting the 
use of generic medicines are needed to reassure 
prescribers, patients and consumers that low price 
does not mean inferior medicines.
Rational selection and use 
In addition, there should be rational selection of 
cost-e ective NCD essential medicines and tech-
nologies, e  cient and e ective procurement and 
distribution systems for quality-assured products, 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
110
and implementation of evidence-based guidelines 
to support rational use of these medicines and tech-
nologies at all levels of care. 周  ese essential medi-
cines should be available at the primary health-care 
level. While treatment may be initiated at higher 
levels of health care, patients need easy access to 
these medicines if they are to adhere to long-term 
treatment regimens.
E orts to improve the availability of quality-as-
sured products in the market should be supported 
by programmes to promote their use. 周  e evi-
dence-based treatment guidelines and protocols for 
primary care should be disseminated and imple-
mented (6,19). Relatively little is known of rational 
use of medicines and adherence of prescribing to 
national treatment protocols in the private sector, 
so this is an important area for further research. 
While attention o en focuses on procurement, sup-
ply, availability and pricing measures for essential 
medicines (supply side), rational use of medicines 
is critical to cost-e ective and appropriate use. 
Health-care professionals and consumers need 
accurate information on medicines. Setting-spe-
ci c studies are required to understand why pre-
scribers and consumers choose particular medi-
cines (demand side) and to assess the adherence of 
prescribing practices to evidence-based treatment 
guidelines.
Procurement systems and pricing policies 
Along with e ective and e  cient procurement 
systems, pricing policies can promote a ordable 
access to treatment. Countries need to consider 
regulation of the mark-ups and fees in the pharma-
ceutical supply chain, not only for distributors and 
wholesalers but also for retail outlets. Supported by 
policies to allow generic substitution, dispensing 
fees should encourage the use of low-price generic 
medicines. Tax exemptions or reductions can be 
considered – particularly for essential medicines 
and health technologies – to enhance the a ord-
ability of medicines for consumers (20).
Multi-stakeholder action
Local stakeholders in the pharmaceutical sector 
include the pharmaceutical industry, health-care 
professionals and civil society. 周  e pharmaceutical 
industry has the responsibility to produce and sup-
ply medicines, including those for NCDs, meeting 
appropriate standards of quality, promoting use 
in line with marketing approval, and providing 
balanced and truthful information to health-
care professionals. Health-care professionals have 
responsibility for the optimal care of patients and 
for judicious use of scarce resources in managing 
them. Medicines must be prescribed appropriately, 
in accordance with evidence-based treatment pro-
tocols, and the costs of treatments should be con-
sidered. Consumers have a responsibility to use 
medicines wisely and in accordance with recom-
mendations from health-care professionals.
In some settings, international stakeholders play 
an important role in supporting the strengthening 
of country health systems, through strengthening 
of drug-manufacturing capacities of countries; 
training and strengthening of procurement and 
supply systems; monitoring of prices, availability 
and a ordability of medicines; and promoting 
interventions to improve access. Donations of med-
icines must be appropriate, targeted and consistent 
with WHO guidelines. Medicines bene t packages 
must include essential NCD medicines. Countries 
may require support to develop sustainable  nanc-
ing mechanisms, including targeted subsidies or 
health insurance systems that ensure a ordable 
access to NCD medicines and technologies.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested