open byte array pdf in browser c# : How to add text fields to a pdf control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser 9789241564854_eng15-part1666

Chapter 11. The way forward to attain NCD targets: key messages
131
9. WHO Regional Committee for Africa. Resolution 
AFR/RC62/R7. Consideration and endorsement of 
the Brazzaville Declaration on Noncommunicable 
Diseases.  Brazzaville:  WHO  Regional  Office 
for  Africa;  2012  (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/80117/1/AFR-RC62-R7-e.pdf
accessed 22 October 2014).
10. 28th Pan American Sanitary Conference; 64th 
Session of the Regional Committee. Resolution 
CSP28.R13. Strategy for the Prevention and Control 
of  Noncommunicable  Diseases.  Washington 
(DC): Pan American Health Organization; 2012 
(http://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_
docman&task=doc_view&gid=19265&Itemid=721
accessed 27 May 2014).
11.  Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean. 
Resolution EMR/RC59/R2. 周  e Political Declaration 
of the United Nations General Assembly on the 
Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable 
Diseases: commitments of Member States and the 
way forward. Cairo: WHO Regional O  ce for the 
Eastern Mediterranean; 2012 (http://applications.
emro.who.int/docs/RC_Resolutions_2012_2_14692_
EN.pdf?ua=1, accessed 27 May 2014).
12. WHO Regional Committee for Europe. Resolution 
EUR/RC61/12. Action plan for implementation of the 
European Strategy for the Prevention and Control of 
Noncommunicable Diseases 2012–2016. Copenhagen: 
WHO Regional O  ce for Europe; 2011 (http://www.
euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_ le/0003/147729/
wd12E_NCDs_111360_revision.pdf?ua=1, accessed 
22 October 2014).
13. WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia. 
Resolution  SEA/RC65/R5.  Noncommunicable 
diseases, mental health and neurological disorders. 
Delhi: WHO Regional O  ce for South-East Asia; 2012 
(http://www.searo.who.int/entity/noncommunicable_
diseases/events/regional_consultation_ncd/
documents/8_3_resolution.pdf, accessed 22 October 
2014).
14. WHO Regional Committee for the Western 
Paci c. Resolution WPR/RC62.R2. Expanding and 
intensifying noncommunicable disease prevention and 
control. Manila: WHO Regional O  ce for the Western 
Paci c; 2011 (http://www2.wpro.who.int/NR/rdonlyres/
D80E593C-E7E6-4A4F-B9DF-07B76B284E5A/0/
R2Noncommunicablediseasepreventionandcontrol201112.
pdf, accessed 22 October 2014).
15. Resoution 66.10. Follow-up to the Political Declaration 
of the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on 
the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable 
Diseases. In: Sixty-sixth session of the United Nations 
General Assembly. New York: United Nations; 2011 
(WHA66.10; http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_ les/
WHA66/A66_R10-en.pdfA/67/L.36, accessed 10 
November 2014).
How to add text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add editable text box to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
How to add text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text box to pdf; how to input text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to insert a text box in pdf
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
how to add text to pdf file; adding text pdf
Annexes
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text box in pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
134
Annex 1.
Comprehensive global monitoring framework, including 25 
indicators, and a set of 9 voluntary global targets for the 
prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases
Framework element
Target
Indicator
Mortality and morbidity
Premature mortality from 
noncommunicable disease
(1) A 25% relative reduction 
in overall mortality from 
cardiovascular diseases, cancer, 
diabetes, or chronic respiratory 
diseases
(1) Unconditional probability of dying between ages 
of 30 and 70 from cardiovascular diseases, cancer, 
diabetes or chronic respiratory diseases
Additional indicator
(2) Cancer incidence, by type of cancer, per 100 000 
population
Risk factors
Behavioural risk factors
Harmful use of alcohol
1
(2) At least 10% relative reduction
in the harmful use of alcohol
2
, as
appropriate, within the national
context
(3) Total (recorded and unrecorded) alcohol per capita 
(aged 15 + years old) consumption within a calendar 
year in litres of pure alcohol, as appropriate, within the 
national context
(4) Age-standardized prevalence of heavy episodic 
drinking among adolescents and adults, as 
appropriate, within the national context
(5) Alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among 
adolescents and adults, as appropriate, within the 
national context
Physical inactivity
(3) A 10% relative reduction in 
prevalence of insuffi  cient physical 
activity
(6) Prevalence of insuffi  ciently physically active 
adolescents defi ned as less than 60 minutes of 
moderate to vigorous intensity activity daily
(7) Age-standardized prevalence of insuffi  ciently 
physically active persons aged 18 + years (defi ned as 
less than 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity 
per week, or equivalent)
Salt/sodium intake
(4) A 30% relative reduction in 
mean population intake of salt/
sodium intake
3
(8) Age-standardized mean population intake of salt 
(sodium chloride) per day in grams in persons aged 18 
+ years
Tobacco use
(5) A 30% relative reduction in 
prevalence of current tobacco use 
in persons aged 15+ years
(9) Prevalence of current tobacco use among 
adolescents
(10) Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco 
use among persons aged 18+ years
Biological risk factors
Raised blood pressure (6)
(6) A 25% relative reduction in the 
prevalence of raised blood pressure 
or contain the prevalence of raised 
blood pressure, according to 
national circumstances
(11) Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood 
pressure among persons aged 18+ years (defi ned as 
systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic 
blood pressure ≥90 mmHg) and mean systolic blood 
pressure
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
adding text to pdf in preview; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text to pdf file
135
Annex 1.
Framework element
Target
Indicator
Diabetes and obesity
4
(7) Halt the rise in diabetes and 
obesity
(12) Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood glucose/
diabetes among persons aged 18 + years (defi ned as fasting 
plasma glucose concentration ≥ 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) or 
on medication for raised blood glucose ) 
(13) Prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescents 
(defi ned according to the WHO growth reference for school-
aged children and adolescents, overweight – one standard 
deviation body mass index for age and sex, and obese – two 
standard deviations body mass index for age and sex)
(14) Age-standardized prevalence of overweight and 
obesity in persons aged 18+ years (defi ned as body mass 
index ≥ 25 kg/m² for overweight and body mass index ≥ 
30 kg/m² for obesity)
Additional indicators
(15) Age-standardized mean proportion of total energy 
intake from saturated fatty acids in persons aged 18+ years
5
(16) Age-standardized prevalence of persons (aged 18 + 
years) consuming less than fi ve total servings (400 grams) 
of fruit and vegetables per day
(17) Age-standardized prevalence of raised total cholesterol 
among persons aged 18+ years (defi ned as total cholesterol 
≥5.0 mmol/l or 190 mg/dl); and mean total cholesterol 
concentration
National systems response
Drug therapy to prevent
heart attacks and strokes
(8) At least 50% of eligible 
people receive drug therapy and 
counselling (including glycaemic 
control) to prevent heart attacks 
and strokes
18) Proportion of eligible persons (defi ned as aged 40 years 
and older with a 10-year cardiovascular risk ≥30%, including 
those with existing cardiovascular disease) receiving drug 
therapy and counseling (including glycaemic control) to 
prevent heart attacks and strokes
Essential 
noncommunicable disease 
medicines and basic 
technologies to treat 
major noncommunicable 
diseases
(9) An 80% availability of the
aff ordable basic technologies and 
essential medicines, including 
generics, required to treat major 
noncommunicable diseases in both 
public and private facilities
(19) Availability and aff ordability of quality, safe and 
effi  cacious essential noncommunicable disease medicines, 
including generics, and basic technologies in both public 
and private facilities
Additional indicators
(20) Access to palliative care assessed by morphine-
equivalent consumption of strong opioid analgesics 
(excluding methadone) per death from cancer
(21) Adoption of national policies that limit saturated 
fatty acids and virtually eliminate partially hydrogenated 
vegetable oils in the food supply, as appropriate, within the 
national context and national programmes
(22) Availability, as appropriate, if cost-eff ective and 
aff ordable, of vaccines against human papillomavirus, 
according to national programmes and policies
(23) Policies to reduce the impact on children of marketing 
of foods and non-alcoholic beverages high in saturated 
fats, trans-fatty acids, free sugars, or salt 
(24) Vaccination coverage against hepatitis B virus 
monitored by number of third doses of Hep-B vaccine 
(HepB3) administered to infants
(25) Proportion of women between the ages of 30–49 
screened for cervical cancer at least once, or more often, 
and for lower or higher age groups according to national 
programmes or policies
1.  Countries will select indicator(s) of harmful use as appropriate to national context and in line with WHO’s global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol 
and that may include prevalence of heavy episodic drinking, total alcohol per capita consumption, and alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among others.
2.  In WHO’s global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol the concept of the harmful use of alcohol encompasses the drinking that causes detri-
mental health and social consequences for the drinker, the people around the drinker and society at large, as well as the patterns of drinking that are 
associated with increased risk of adverse health outcomes.
3.  WHO’s recommendation is less than 5 grams of salt or 2 grams of sodium per person per day.
4.  Countries will select indicator(s) appropriate to national context.
5.  Individual fatty acids within the broad classifi cation of saturated fatty acids have unique biological properties and health eff ects that can have rele-
vance in developing dietary recommendations.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf form
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to insert text in pdf reader; add text to pdf document in preview
Global status report on NCDs 2014
136
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text pdf professional; add text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
adding text pdf files; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
137
Annex 2. 
Methods used for estimating 
the NCD mortality and risk factor data
周  e mortality and risk factor data presented in this 
report were estimated by WHO and collaborating 
partners using standard methods to maximize 
cross-country comparability. 周  ey are not neces-
sarily the o  cial statistics of Member States. 
Mortality
Age- and sex-speci c all-cause mortality rates were 
estimated for 2000-2012 from revised life tables, 
published in World Health Statistics 2014 (1). Total 
number of deaths by age and sex were estimated 
for each country by applying these death rates to 
the estimated resident populations prepared by the 
United Nations Population Division in its 2012 revi-
sion (2). 
Causes of death were estimated for 2000-2012 
using data sources and methods that were spe-
ci c for each cause of death (3). Vital registration 
systems which record deaths with su  cient com-
pleteness and quality of cause of death information 
were used as the preferred data source. Mortality 
by cause was estimated for all Member States with 
a population greater than 250,000. 周  ese NCD 
mortality estimates are based on a combination of 
country life tables, cause of death models, regional 
cause of death patterns, and WHO and UNAIDS 
programme estimates for some major causes of 
death (not including NCDs). Detailed information 
on methods for mortality and causes of death esti-
mates were published previously (3).
Age-standardized death rates for cardiovascular 
diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, and 
diabetes were calculated using the WHO standard 
population (4). Proportional mortality (% of total 
deaths, all ages, and of both sexes) for communica-
ble, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions; 
injuries; cardiovascular disease; cancer; chronic 
respiratory disease; diabetes; and other NCDs is 
reported for 2012 (5). 
周  e 2012 probability of dying between ages 30 
and 70 years from the four main NCDs was esti-
mated using age-speci c death rates (in 5-year age 
groups, e.g. 30-34… 65-69, for those between 30 and 
70) of the combined four main NCD categories, for 
each Member State (5). Using the life table method, 
the risk of death between the exact ages of 30 and 
70, from any of the four causes and in the absence 
of other causes of death, was calculated using the 
equation below. 周  e ICD codes used are: Cardiovas-
cular disease: I00-I99, Cancer: C00-C97, Diabetes: 
E10-E14, and Chronic respiratory disease: J30-J98. 
Five-year death rates (
5
*
M
x
) were  rst calculated:
Total deaths from four NCD causes between 
exact age x and exact age x+5
5
*
M
Total population between 
exact age x and exact age x+5
For each  ve-year age group, the probability 
of death from the four NCDs (
5
*
q
x
) was calculated 
using the following formula: 
5
*
M
x
∗ 5 
5
*
q
1 + 
5
*
M
x
∗ 2.5
周  e unconditional probability of death, for the 
30-70 age range, was calculated last:
65
40
*
q
30 
= 1 – ∏ (1 – 
5
*
q
x
)
x=30
Metabolic/biological 
risk factors
Estimates for metabolic/biological risk factors (BMI, 
overweight and obesity, blood glucose/diabetes and 
blood pressure) were produced for the standard year 
2010 to serve as baselines for reporting against the 
NCD global voluntary targets, and for the year 2014. 
周  e crude adjusted estimates in Annex 4 are based 
on aggregated data provided to WHO and Global 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
138
Burden of Metabolic Risk Factors of Chronic Dis-
eases Collaborating Group and obtained through a 
review of published and unpublished literature. 周  e 
inclusion criteria for estimation analysis included 
data that had come from a random sample of the 
general population, with clearly indicated survey 
methods (including sample sizes) and risk factor 
de nitions. Using regression modeling techniques 
, adjustments were made for the following factors 
so that the same indicator could be reported for 
a standard year (in this case 2010 and 2014) in all 
countries: standard risk factor de nition, standard 
set of age groups for reporting; standard reporting 
year, and representativeness of population. Crude 
adjusted rates and age-standardized comparable 
estimates were produced. 周  is was done by adjust-
ing the crude age-speci c estimates to the WHO 
Standard Population (4) that re ects the global age 
and sex structure. 周  is adjusts for the di erences in 
age/sex structure between countries. Uncertainty in 
estimates was analysed by taking into account sam-
pling error and uncertainty due to statistical mod-
eling. 周  e estimates included in the WHO Regional 
groupings and World Bank Income groupings are 
the age-standardized comparable estimates. Data 
reported as of October 2014 were included in the 
estimation process. Further detailed information 
on the methods and data sources used to produce 
these estimates is available from WHO.
周  e following risk factor indicators, with de -
nitions, were included:
Prevalence of raised blood pressure among per-
sons aged 18+ years (de ned as systolic blood 
pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood 
pressure ≥90 mmHg) 
Prevalence of raised blood glucose/diabetes 
among persons aged 18+ years (de ned as fast-
ing plasma glucose concentration ≥ 7.0 mmol/l 
(126 mg/dl) or on medication for raised blood 
glucose or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes)
Mean Body Mass Index (BMI).
Prevalence of overweight and obesity in persons 
aged 18+ years (defined as body mass index 
≥25 kg/m²)
Prevalence of obesity in persons aged 18+ years 
(de ned as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m²)
Physical inactivity
Estimates for adult prevalence of insufficient 
physical activity were produced by WHO for the 
standard year 2010. Insu  cient physical activity 
was de ned as the percentage of adults aged 18+ 
years not meeting the WHO recommendations on 
Physical Activity for Health (6), which is, doing less 
than 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per 
week, or equivalent. Prevalence of insu  cient phys-
ical activity was estimated from population-based 
surveys meeting the following criteria: (i) provide 
survey data for the de nition of doing less than 150 
minutes of moderate physical activity per week (or 
equivalent), or doing less than 5 times 30 minutes of 
moderate physical activity per week (or equivalent); 
(ii) survey data cover all domains of life, includ-
ing work/household, transport and leisure time; 
(iii) include randomly selected participants of the 
general population who were representative of the 
national or a de ned subnational population; (iv) 
present prevalence by age and sex, with a sample 
size of each sex-age group of at least a sample size 
of 50 participants. Countries with no surveys were 
excluded from the analysis. Regression models were 
applied to adjust for the de nition (for those coun-
tries where only the de nition of doing less than 
5 times 30 minutes of moderate physical activity 
per week (or equivalent) was available), for survey 
coverage (for those countries where only urban 
data was available), and to estimate missing age 
groups (for those countries where data did not cover 
the full age range). To further enable comparison 
among countries, age-standardized comparable 
estimates of insufficient physical activity were 
produced. 周  is was done by adjusting the crude 
estimates to the WHO Standard Population (4) that 
closely re ects the age and sex structure of most low 
and middle income countries. 周  is corrects for the 
di erences in age/sex structure between countries. 
Uncertainty in estimates was analysed by taking 
into account sampling error and uncertainty due to 
statistical modeling. 周  e estimates included in the 
WHO Regional groupings and World Bank Income 
139
Annex 2.
groupings are the age-standardized comparable 
estimates. Data reported as of October 2014 were 
included in the estimation process. Further detailed 
information on the methods and data sources used 
to produce these estimates is available from WHO.
周  e following risk factor indicator, with de ni-
tion, was included:
Prevalence of insufficiently physically active 
persons aged 18+ years (de ned as less than 150 
minutes of moderate-intensity activity per week, 
or equivalent)
Tobacco smoking
A statistical model based on a negative binomial 
regression was used to estimate the prevalence of 
tobacco smoking using information from coun-
try surveys available in WHO. Tobacco smoking 
includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, hookah, shisha, 
water-pipe and any other form of smoked tobacco. 
National surveys that report tobacco prevalence 
and were completed in countries from 1990 up to 
30 June 2014 were used for the estimation. 
An important limitation of the data is that 
information on tobacco use in a country may be 
collected from various surveys that may have dif-
ferent primary uses and at times di erent methods 
of collecting the information. 周  e model applies 
several adjustments to try to overcome these lim-
itations. Where survey data are missing for any age 
group, the model uses data from the country’s other 
surveys to estimate the age pattern of tobacco use. 
For ages that the country has never surveyed, the 
average age pattern seen in countries in the same 
geographical region is applied to the country’s 
data. 周  e model adjusts for di ering de nitions 
of tobacco use (for example, current versus daily 
use, or tobacco smoking versus cigarette smoking) 
using available data from the country’s other sur-
veys to gauge the relationship between indicators 
of tobacco use by age and sex and over time and 
derives likely values for the missing indicators. For 
tobacco use indicators that the country has never 
reported, the average relationships seen in countries 
in the same geographical region are applied to the 
country’s data. 
Despite best e orts to generate estimates for 
countries, this is not always possible and there 
are some countries with insu  cient survey data 
(whether no surveys, or too few or too old) to cal-
culate a contemporary time point estimate. 
周  e outputs from the model are tobacco smok-
ing prevalence estimates with 95% confidence 
intervals, as well as age-speci c rates by sex. 周  e 
2012 age-speci c rates were applied to the World 
Standard population to produce age-standardised 
smoking rates for WHO Regions and World Bank 
grouping of countries into High, Middle and Low 
income countries.
1
周  e WHO Standard Population 
is a  ctitious population whose age distribution is 
largely re ective of the global population age struc-
ture. 周  e age-standardized rates are hypothetical 
numbers which are only meaningful when com-
paring standardized rates from one country with 
standardized rates from another country. Further 
detailed information on the methods and data 
sources used to produce these estimates is available 
from WHO.
Harmful use of alcohol 
Total alcohol per capita (15+ years) 
consumption, in litres of pure 
alcohol, 2010 [95% CI]
周  e recorded three-year average APC for 2008–2010 
and the unrecorded consumption for 2010 were 
added to arrive at the total consumption in litres 
of pure alcohol (7). 周  e comparison of this total 
with the weighted average of the total consumption 
for each region is shown in the country pro le. For 
male and female per capita consumption, we used 
proportion of alcohol consumed by men versus 
women plus the demographics for 2010.
1.  Geographic regions as de ned by UN sub-regions ; please refer 
to pages ix to xiii of World Population Prospects: 周  e 2010 Revi-
sion published by the UN Department of Economic and Social 
A airs  in 2011  at http://esa.un.org/wpp/Documentation/pdf/
WPP2010_Volume-I_Comprehensive-Tables.pdf. Please note 
that, for the purposes of this analysis, the Eastern Africa subre-
gion was divided into two regions: Eastern Africa Islands and 
Remainder of Eastern Africa; and the Melanesia, Micronesia 
and Polynesia subregions were combined into one subregion.
Global status report on NCDs 2014
140
Recorded APC (three-year average): Using 
the recorded APC data from 2008, 2009 and 2010, 
three-year averages were computed. Tourist con-
sumption was removed to provide a better estimate 
for APC in countries with at least as many tourists 
as inhabitants. 周  e tourist consumption estimates 
are based on the following assumptions: i) Tourists/
visitors consume alcohol as they do at home (i.e. 
with the same average alcohol per capita consump-
tion); ii) 周  e average length of stay by tourists/visi-
tors was 14 days (except for Estonia, Luxembourg, 
and the Republic of Moldova, where there is a lot of 
cross-border shopping with shorter average length 
of stay).
Recorded  APC  is  defined as the  recorded 
amount of alcohol consumed per capita (15+ years) 
over a calendar year in a country, in litres of pure 
alcohol. 周  e indicator only takes into account the 
consumption which is recorded from production, 
import, export, and sales data o en via taxation. 
Recorded APC is calculated as the sum of bever-
age-speci c alcohol consumption of pure alcohol 
(beer, wine, spirits, other). 周  e “other alcoholic bev-
erages” category consists of such types as forti ed 
wine, fermented beverages, sorghum, maize, and 
ready-to-drink. 周  e  rst priority in data sources 
is given to government statistics; second are coun-
try-speci c alcohol industry statistics (Canadean, 
IWSR-International Wine and Spirit Research, 
OIV-International Organisation of Vine and Wine, 
Wine Institute, historically World Drink Trends) in 
the public domain if based on interviews in coun-
tries; third is the Food and Agriculture Organi-
zation of the United Nations’ statistical database 
(FAOSTAT); and fourth is economic operators if 
desk review. In order to make the conversion into 
litres of pure alcohol, the alcohol content (% alco-
hol by volume) is considered to be as follows: Beer 
(barley beer 5%), Wine (grape wine 12%; must of 
grape 9%, vermouth 16%), Spirits (distilled spirits 
40%; spirit-like 30%), and Other (sorghum, millet, 
maize beers 5%; cider 5%; forti ed wine 17% and 
18%; fermented wheat and fermented rice 9%; other 
fermented beverages 9%).
Unrecorded APC: Unrecorded APC in litres 
of pure alcohol in 2010 was based on empirical 
investigations and the judgement of experts. A 
special exercise to collect in-depth information on 
unrecorded alcohol from all venues (i.e., cross-bor-
der shopping, surrogate alcohol use, illegal and legal 
home production, smuggling) was conducted to 
improve the accuracy of unrecorded data.
Total alcohol per capita (15+ years) 
consumption, in litres of pure alcohol, 
projected estimates for 2012 [95% CI]
Projected estimates for total alcohol consumption 
data for 2012 took into account data that were avail-
able for that year for some countries. For other coun-
tries, they were derived using fractional polynomial 
regression models with year as independent variable. 
As data on per capita consumption change rapidly 
over time, the regression model for each country 
was chosen based on the results of regression models 
that used data from 2005 onward, 2000 onward, 
1990 onward, and 1960 onward. Models were cho-
sen based on a sensitivity analysis that assessed the 
ability of these models to predict data from 2005 
onward when these data were excluded (models 
were adjusted to use data from 2000 onward, 1995 
onward, 1985 onward, and 1960 onward respectively 
for the sensitivity analyses).
Age-standardized heavy episodic 
drinking (15+ years, population), 
past 30 days (%), 2010 [95% CI]
周  e number of males in the population multiplied 
by the percentage of heavy drinkers in the popula-
tion. 周  e number of male heavy drinkers divided 
by the number of male drinkers equals the percent-
age of male heavy episodic drinkers among male 
drinkers. Similar calculations are done for HED 
among females and the total population. Surveys 
carried out in the time period 2006–2010. HED is 
de ned as having consumed at least 60 grams or 
more of pure alcohol on at least one occasion in the 
past 30 days. Values for countries with no available 
surveys were imputed via multiple regression based 
on region, year of survey, per capita consumption, 
pattern of drinking score, demographic indicators 
(including religion) and economic wealth (GDP-
PPP) as predictors.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested