open byte array pdf in browser c# : Adding text fields to a pdf software SDK dll winforms windows wpf web forms 9789241564854_eng3-part1682

Chapter 1. Global target 1
11
monitoring framework that monitors progress in 
attaining this target by 2025 (4) (see Annex 1). 
周  e probability of dying from one of the four 
main NCDs between ages 30 and 70 by WHO 
region in shown in Fig. 1.4. 周  e probability of dying 
from one of the four main NCDs between ages 30 
and 70 by country is shown in Fig. 1.5a and Fig. 
1.5b. In 2012, a 30-year-old individual had a 19% 
chance of dying from one of the four main NCDs 
before his or her 70
th
birthday. 周  is represents an 
improvement over 2000, when the same 30-year-
old individual would have had a 23% chance of 
dying from these diseases. 周  is probability varied 
by region, from 15% in the Region of the Americas 
to 25% in the South-East Asia Region (see Fig. 1.4), 
and by country, from greater than 30% in seven 
low- and middle-income countries to less than 10% 
in seven countries (Australia, Israel, Italy, Japan, 
Republic of Korea, Sweden and Switzerland) (see 
Fig. 1.5a and Fig.1.5b).
Over three quarters of deaths from cardiovascu-
lar disease and diabetes, and nearly 90% of deaths 
from chronic respiratory diseases, occur in low- and 
middle-income countries. More than two thirds of 
all cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income 
countries (see Fig. 1.6) (6). Lung, breast, colorectal, 
stomach and liver cancers together cause more than 
half of cancer deaths. In high-income countries, the 
leading cause of cancer deaths among both men 
Fig. 1.4 Probability of dying from one of the four main 
noncommunicable diseases between the ages of 30 and 
70 years, by WHO region, comparable estimates, 2012 
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Probability of dying from one of the four main NCDs  
(both sexes: aged 30 to 70 years in %)
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, 
SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, 
EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, WPR=Western 
Pacific Region
AMR
EMR
EUR
SEAR
WPR
AFR
Fig. 1.5a Probability of dying from the four main noncommunicable diseases between the ages of 30 and 70 years, 
comparable estimates, 2012 
Probability of dying from four main NCDs* (%)
* Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes
<15
15–19
20–24
≥ 25
Data not available
Not applicable
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Adding text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
acrobat add text to pdf; how to add text to pdf file
Adding text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text in pdf reader; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
Global status report on NCDs 2014
12
Equatorial Guinea 23.4
A
u
s
t
r
i
a
1
2
.
0
B
a
h
a
m
a
s 1
3
.8
B
ah
rein
 13.3
Barbados 13.8
Belgium 12.2
Brunei Darussalam 16.8
Canada 10.7
Chile 11.9
Croatia 17.7
Czech Republic 17.0
Denmark 13.3
Estonia 18.8
       Finland 11.2
France 11.4
Germany 12.3
Greece 12.9
Iceland 10.2
Ireland 11.1
Israel 9.5
Ita
ly 9.8
J
a
p
a
n
 9
.3
K
u
w
a
i
t
1
1
.
8
Latvia 24.1
L
i
t
h
u
a
n
i
a
2
2
.
4
L
u
x
e
m
b
o
u
rg
 1
1
.4
M
alta 11
.6
Netherlands 12.2
New Zealand 10.7
Norway 10.7
Oman 17.8
Poland 20.0
Portugal 11.9
Qatar 14.2
Republic of Korea 9.3
Russian Federation 29.9
Saudi Arabia 16.7
Singapore 10.5
Slovakia 19.4
Slovenia 12.6
Spain 10.8
Sweden 9.9
Switzerland 9.1
Trinidad and Tobago 26.2
United Arab Emirates 18.9
U
nite
d
 Kin
g
d
o
m
 12
.0
U
n
it
e
d
 S
t
a
t
e
s o
f
 A
m
e
r
i
c
a
 1
4
.3
U
r
u
g
u
a
y
1
7
.
1
Australia 9.4
Cyprus 9.5
0%
45%
10%
5%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
High-income
Low-income
Fig. 1.5b Probability of dying from the four main noncommunicable diseases between the ages of 30 and 70 years (%), 
by individual country, and World Bank income group, comparable estimates, 2012
A
f
g
h
a
n
is
t
a
n
 3
0
.5
Z
i
m
b
a
b
w
e
1
9
.
3
U
nite
d
 R
ep
u
b
lic o
f T
an
zan
ia
 1
6.1
Uganda 21.2
Togo 20.2
Tajikistan 28.8
South Sudan 19.8
Somalia 19.1
Sierra Leone 27.5
Rwanda 19.1
Niger 19.6
Nepal 21.6
Myanmar 24.3
Mozambique 17.3
Mali 25.6
Malawi 18.7
Madagascar 23.4
L
ib
e
ria
 2
1
.2
K
y
r
g
y
z
s
t
a
n
2
8
.
5
Kenya 18.1
H
a
it
i 2
3
.9
Guinea-Bissau 22.4
Guinea 20.9
Gambia 19.1
Ethiopia 15.2
Eritrea 24.2
Democratic Republic of the Congo 23.6
Democratic Peole’s Republic of Korea 27.1
Comoros 23.5
Chad 23.2
Central African Republic 18.5
Cambodia 17.7
Burundi 24.3
Burkina Faso 23.8
Benin 22.1
B
ang
lad
e
sh 17
.5
0%
45%
10%
5%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to insert text into a pdf; add text boxes to pdf document
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add text to pdf file with reader; adding text to a pdf document
Chapter 1. Global target 1
13
A
r
m
e
n
ia
2
9
.
7
Z
a
m
b
i
a
1
8
.
1
Y
e
m
e
n
 2
3
.1
Viet N
am
 17.4
Uzbekistan 31.0
Ukraine 28.2
Timor-Leste 23.7
Syrian Arab Republic 19.1
Swaziland 21.4
Sudan 17.4
Sri Lanka 17.6
Solomon Islands 24.1
Senegal 16.7
Republic of Moldova 26.5
Philippines 27.9
Paraguay 18.5
Papaua New Guinea 26.4
Pakistan 20.5
Nigeria 19.8
N
ic
a
r
a
g
u
a
 1
9
.4
Morocco 22.8
Mongolia 32.0
L
e
s
o
t
h
o
 2
4
.2
Lao
 Pe
op
le
’s D
em
ocratic R
epu
b
lic 24
.2
Indonesia 23.1
India 26.2
Honduras 15.7
Guyana 37.2
Guatemala 13.5
Ghana 20.3
Georgia 21.6
El Salvador 16.9
 Egypt 24.5
Djibouti 18.8
Côte d’Ivoire 23.3
Congo 19.8
Cameroon 19.9
Cabo Verde 15.1
Bolivia (Plurinational State of) 18.3
Bh
u
tan
 2
0.5
45%
0%
10%
5%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
A
l
b
a
n
i
a
1
8
.
8
V
e
n
e
z
u
e
l
a
(
B
o
l
i
v
a
r
i
a
n
R
e
p
u
b
l
i
c
o
f
)
1
5
.
7
T
u
r
k
m
e
n
i
st
a
n
 4
0
.8
Turke
y 18.4
Tunisia 17.2
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 22.1
Thailand 16.2
Suriname 13.6
South Africa 26.8
Serbia 24.5
Romania 22.6
Peru 11.2
Panama 12.5
Namibia 20.0
Montenegro 22.2
Mexico 15.7
Mauritius 24.0
Maldives 15.9
Malaysia 19.6
Libya 17.6
Lebanon 12.4
K
a
za
k
h
s
ta
n
 3
3
.9
J
o
r
d
a
n
1
9
.
8
Jamaica 17.0
I
r
a
q
2
3
.
7
I
ra
n
 (I
sla
m
ic
 R
e
p
u
b
lic
 o
f
) 1
7
.3
H
ungary 24.0
Gabon 15.0
Fiji 30.8
Ecuador 11.9
Dominican Republic 14.8
Cuba 16.5
Costa Rica 12.2
Colombia 12.4
China 19.4
Bulgaria 24.0
Brazil 19.4
Botswana 20.9
Bosnia and Herzegovina 17.5
Belize 14.4
Belarus 26.2
Azerbaijan 23.3
Argentina 17.5
Angola 24.2
A
lg
e
ria
 2
2
.1
45%
0%
10%
5%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf using preview
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text field pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
14
and women is lung cancer, followed by breast can-
cer among women and colorectal cancers among 
men. In low- and middle-income countries, cancer 
levels vary according to the prevailing underlying 
risks, with cervical cancer, liver cancer and stom-
ach cancer all causing a larger proportion of cancer 
deaths than in high-income countries. In sub-Sa-
haran Africa, for instance, cervical cancer remains 
the leading cause of cancer death among women.
Population growth and improved longevity are 
leading to increasing numbers and proportions of 
older people in many parts of the world. As pop-
ulations age, annual NCD deaths are projected to 
rise substantially to 52 million in 2030 (3). Annual 
cardiovascular disease mortality is projected to 
increase from 17.5 million in 2012 to 22.2 million 
in 2030, and annual cancer deaths from 8.2 million 
to 12.6 million. 周  ese increases will occur despite 
projected decreases in NCD death rates.
Key barriers to 
attaining this target 
Key barriers to attaining this target include, the lack 
of a well-functioning civil/vital registration system 
for monitoring, weak health system infrastructure 
and inadequate funding for prevention and control 
of NCDs. 
Fig. 1.6 Global cancer mortality, by World Bank 
income group, 2012 (crude mortality rate per 100 000 
population) (6)
250
200
150
100
50
0
Crude Cancer death rates
 (per 100 000 population)
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
Fig. 1.7 Civil registration coverage of cause of death, 2005−2011 (7)
Civil registration coverage (%)
<25
25–49
50–79
80–89
90–100
Data not available
Not applicable
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Status of civil/vital registration systems 
A vital registration system that records deaths with 
su  cient completeness is required to allow estima-
tion of all-cause death rates. Results of the 2013 
global survey on assessment of national capacity 
indicate that 19% of countries (n=178) do not have 
a system in place for reporting cause-speci c mor-
tality in their national health information systems 
(5). Across income groups, 98% of high-income and 
92% of upper-middle-income countries reported 
having  a system  for  reporting cause-specific 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text box to pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text fields to pdf
Chapter 1. Global target 1
15
mortality, while 70% of lower-middle-income 
countries and only 45% of low-income countries 
indicated such capacity. Across WHO regions, a 
system for generating cause-specifi c mortality was 
reported in all countries in the European Region. 
In all other regions, some of the countries did not 
have such a system. Seventy four per cent (74%) of 
countries indicated that cause of death was certifi ed 
by a medical practitioner. While 77% of countries 
indicated that hospital-based deaths were included 
in the reporting registration system, only 72% of 
countries reported that their registration system 
also included deaths occurring outside medical 
facilities. 
In all, 119 Member States (61%) have reported 
cause-of-death information to WHO since 2000, 
and only 97 Member States (50%) report their data 
regularly (8). Only 34 countries – representing 15% 
of the world’s population – produce high-quality 
cause-of-death data, meaning that more than 90% 
of deaths are registered and fewer than 10% of 
deaths are coded to ill-defi ned signs and symptoms 
(9). As shown in Fig. 1.7, civil registration coverage 
is less than 50% in many low- and middle-income 
countries.
Status of health system infrastructure and 
funding for noncommunicable diseases 
According to the results of the 2013 NCD country 
capacity assessment survey, some 94% of 178 coun-
tries had a unit, branch, division or department 
with responsibility for NCDs within the ministry 
of health or equivalent (5). In all, 80% of countries 
had at least one full-time sta  member working 
on NCDs; thus, 14% of countries have a unit for 
NCDs in their health ministry but no full-time sta  
member dedicated to NCDs. 
Results showed that 84% of countries reported 
having funding available for early detection and 
screening for  NCDs,  while 89%  of countries 
reported that funding was available for providing 
health care for NCDs, as well as for primary pre-
vention and health promotion. Funding for sur-
veillance, monitoring and evaluation was reported 
by a comparatively lower proportion of countries 
(74%), and was particularly low in the African 
Region (49%) and Eastern Mediterranean Region 
(48%) (see Fig. 1.8). Across all countries, only 74% 
reported having funding for capacity-building, and 
the availability of funding for rehabilitation services 
was also moderately low across all regions, with 
Fig. 1.8 Percentage of countries with funding for NCD activities, by function, 2013, by WHO region and by World Bank 
income group (5)
Q
Primary prevention & health promotion 
Q
Early detection/screening
Q
Health care and treatment 
Q
Surveillance, monitoring and evaluation
Q
Capacity-building 
Q
Rehabilitation services
100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Percentage of countries with funding                                  
for NCD activities, by function  (% of countries)
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
add text box in pdf document; how to add text to pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add
add text pdf file acrobat; add text to pdf file reader
Global status report on NCDs 2014
16
only 64% of countries surveyed having funding. 
Overall, 6% of countries (i.e. 10 countries) reported 
no funding stream for NCD activities. 周  ere was 
a signi cant lack of funding available for NCD 
activities in low-income countries (18% reported no 
funding) versus the lower-middle-income (7%) and 
upper-middle-income and high-income countries 
(2%). Major sources of funding included govern-
ment revenues (90%), international donors (64%), 
health insurance (54%) and earmarked taxes on 
alcohol and tobacco (32%). 
Low-income countries reported receiving less 
funding for NCD activities from all sources: 66% 
of low-income countries received government rev-
enues, compared to more than 90% of countries in 
other income groups. Similarly, although 28% of 
low-income countries received funds from health 
insurance, this still remains markedly lower than 
in countries in other income groups. Use of ear-
marked taxes to fund NCD activities was reported 
by 32% of countries. 
A comparison of the 172 countries that responded 
to questions about funding in capacity assessment 
surveys, conducted in both 2010 (10) and 2013 (5), 
reveals an improvement since 2010. 周  ere was an 
increase in the percentage of low-income countries 
receiving funds from international donors in 2013 
(75%) relative to 2010, when the  gure was 57%. 
Similarly, there was an increase in the percentage 
of countries that reported using earmarked taxes 
to fund NCD activities (20% in 2010 versus 32% in 
2013). 周  e percentage of countries using earmarked 
funds has increased across all regions except Africa.
Various  scal interventions could be used to raise 
funds for prevention and control of NCDs. Results 
of the 2013 NCD country capacity assessment sur-
vey (5), show that there is room for improvement 
(see Fig 1.9). Only about one third of countries had 
 scal interventions to raise funds for health. Taxes 
on tobacco and alcohol were reported by 85% and 
76% of countries respectively. Only 11% of countries 
reported taxation on food with high sugar content, 
and non-alcoholic beverages, and only 3% reported 
taxation on high-fat foods. Only in 39% of coun-
tries were such policies and interventions intended 
to raise general revenues. In 34% of countries, they 
were intended to in uence health behaviour. In a few 
countries,  scal interventions were intended to raise 
funds for health, and most of these (5 of the 11 coun-
tries) were in the lower-middle-income grouping.
Fig. 1.9 Fiscal interventions to address NCD risk factors, 2013, by WHO region and by World Bank income group. 
Q
Taxation on alcohol 
Q
Taxation on tobacco
Q
Taxation on high sugar content food and non-alcoholic beverages 
Q
Taxation on high fat foods
Q
Price subsidies for healthy foods 
Q
Taxation incentives to promote physical activity
100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Fiscal interventions to address 
NCD risk factors (% of countries)
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
Chapter 1. Global target 1
17
Actions required 
toattain this target 
The “25×25” target  was  based on analysis of 
trends in the indicator over recent decades. 周  e 
experience of high-performing countries during 
1980−2010 showed that very substantial declines 
in NCD death rates can be achieved and that the 
proposed target is achievable. Based on their past 
performance, high-income countries may wish to 
set a national target for reducing premature mor-
tality that is higher than the global target. Coun-
tries with good-quality cause-of-death data from 
a complete registration system may also wish to 
establish more detailed national targets for speci c 
NCDs. 
All actions that are required to attain the other 
eight targets discussed in chapters 2−9, will con-
tribute to the attainment of this target on prema-
ture mortality. 周  e risk factor and mortality tar-
gets were chosen independently from one another, 
largely based on experiences of countries that had 
been successful in reducing any one of the corre-
sponding indicators (11). As policy attention and 
resources are mobilized towards NCD prevention 
and control, it is useful to know if selected risk 
factor targets discussed in subsequent chapters, 
if achieved, would contribute towards reducing 
NCD mortality, to achieve the “25×25” target (12). 
A modelling analysis has been done to answer this 
important question (13). 周  e results show that, 
achieving six targets (tobacco, harmful use of 
alcohol, salt, raised blood pressure, raised blood 
glucose and obesity) by 2025 together, will reduce 
premature mortality from the four main NCDs to 
levels that are close to the 25 x 25 target ( 22% in 
men and 19% in women). 
周  e multifaceted nature of the drivers, causes 
and determinants of NCDs requires implemen-
tation of comprehensive multisectoral policies to 
reduce premature mortality from NCDs (see Chap-
ter 10). 
周  e following 10 key actions will be critical in 
dismantling barriers and paving the way to attain 
this target:
1. Obtain explicit high-level/head-of-state com-
mitment, establish/strengthen the NCD unit in 
the ministry of health, and ensure that NCDs 
are accorded due consideration in national stra-
tegic health planning.
2. Develop a national multisectoral plan, as out-
lined in Chapter 10, taking into account the 
WHO Global NCD Action Plan 2013−2020 (14) 
and regional frameworks and action plans.
3. Establish a high-level interministerial platform/
commission to facilitate and endorse multisec-
toral collaboration for prevention and control 
of NCDs.
4. Set national NCD targets, consistent with 
the nine global targets, covering risk factors, 
national systems performance, and mortality, 
based on national situations.
5. Strengthen national surveillance systems for 
NCDs, including vital registration that is capa-
ble of reporting cause of death, cancer registries, 
and risk factor surveillance, and ensure these 
are integrated into national health information 
systems, to enable regular reporting/auditing/
benchmarking and monitoring of progress.
6.  De ne,  nance, prioritize and take to scale the 
implementation of very cost-e ective interven-
tions (see Box 1.1).
7.  Strengthen the health system at all levels, with 
emphasis on primary care, and define and 
 nance a national set of NCD interventions/
services for health promotion/prevention and 
curative, rehabilitative and palliative care, to 
achieve universal health coverage dynamically 
and incrementally.
8. Protect the implementation of public health 
policies for NCD prevention and control from 
interference by vested interests, through com-
prehensive  legislation  and enforcement of 
national laws and regulations.
9. Strengthen training of the health workforce and 
the scienti c basis for decision-making, through 
partnerships and NCD-related research.
10. Mobilize and track domestic and exter-
nal  resources  for  NCD  prevention  and 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
18
control, including through innovative financing 
mechanisms.
A range of policies will be required to strengthen 
the implementation capacity of countries to attain 
the voluntary global targets. 周ey are summarized 
in the Global NCD Action Plan (14). A combination 
of population-wide and individual interventions 
need to be selected and implemented, based on 
the availability of resources (14–16). 周e selection 
should be guided by impact, feasibility of implemen-
tation, cost-effectiveness and affordability. Com-
plementing population-wide interventions with 
individual interventions is essential, since high-
risk individuals will not be adequately protected 
by the population-level interventions. Although 
Box 1.1 WHO “best buys” – (very cost-effective interventions that are also high-impact 
and feasible for implementation even in resource-constrained settings) (14–16)
Tobacco
Reduce affordability of tobacco products by increasing tobacco excise taxes
Create by law completely smoke-free environments in all indoor workplaces, public places and public transport
Warn people of the dangers of tobacco and tobacco smoke through effective health warnings and mass media 
campaigns
Ban all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship
Harmful use of alcohol
Regulate commercial and public availability of alcohol
Restrict or ban alcohol advertising and promotions
Use pricing policies such as excise tax increases on alcoholic beverages
Diet and physical activity
Reduce salt intake
Replace trans fats with unsaturated fats
Implement public awareness programmes on diet and physical activity
Promote and protect breastfeeding
Cardiovascular disease and diabetes 
Drug therapy (including glycaemic control for diabetes mellitus and control of hypertension using a total risk 
approach) and counselling to individuals who have had a heart attack or stroke and to persons with high risk 
(≥ 30%) of a fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular event in the next 10 years
Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for acute myocardial infarction
Cancer 
Prevention of liver cancer through hepatitis B immunization
Prevention of cervical cancer through screening (visual inspection with acetic acid [VIA] linked with timely 
treatment of pre-cancerous lesions)
individual interventions can have relatively high 
costs compared to population-wide interventions, 
the investment in at least the limited set of “best 
buys” that are recommended in this report can yield 
a good return.
周e average annual cost of implementing the 
very cost-effective interventions (“best buys”, see 
Box 1.1) is estimated be US$ 11.2 billion (15). On 
the other hand, the cumulative economic losses 
due to NCDs in low- and middle-income countries 
between 2011−2025 under a “business as usual” 
scenario have been estimated to be a staggering 7 
trillion (17). 周e cost of taking action amounts to 
an annual investment of under US$ 1 per capita 
in low-income countries, US$ 1.50 per capita in 
Chapter 1. Global target 1
19
lower-middle-income countries and US$ 3 per cap-
ita in upper-middle-income countries. Expressed as 
a proportion of current health spending, the cost 
of implementing such a package amounts to 4% in 
low-income countries, 2% in lower-middle-income 
countries and less than 1% in upper-middle-income 
countries (15). 
In all countries, an increase in investment in 
NCD prevention and control will be necessary to 
attain this target. Strengthening surveillance sys-
tems, including vital registration, plus multisectoral 
engagement, population-wide prevention policies, 
proactive case-fi nding, and strengthening of health 
systems with a special focus on primary health care 
are important goals for all countries. Countries with 
good economic growth, sound governance, strong 
NCD policies and health institutions, could achieve 
the “25×25” target, by scaling up their expenditures 
on cost-e ective programmes in proportion to cur-
rent allocations. All resource-constrained settings 
could give priority to targeting additional govern-
ment spending on very cost-e ective high-impact 
interventions (14,15).
Low- and middle-income countries that spend 
less than what they can afford on health need 
to explore means of mobilizing more domestic 
resources for health from general revenues and 
social insurance contributions (18). In low-income 
countries, simply increasing health spending along 
the lines of past expenditure patterns may not be 
adequate, because the amounts required to address 
NCDs, in addition to other health priorities such 
as communicable diseases and maternal and child 
health, may be beyond any realistic expectation 
of the fi nancial resources these countries will be 
able to generate. Development agencies and inter-
national partners have a distinct role to play in 
supporting these countries.
Global status report on NCDs 2014
20
References
1. World Health Organization. Global Health Estimates: 
Deaths by Cause, Age, Sex and Country, 2000-2012. 
Geneva, WHO, 2014.
2.  World Health Organization. Projections of mortality 
and causes of death, 2015 and 2030 (http://www.who.
int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/projections/
en/ http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/mortality_
morbidity/en/, accessed 4 November 2014).
3. Mathers CD, Loncar D projections of global mortality 
and burden  of disease 2002–2030.  PLoS  Med. 
2006;3(11):e442. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0030442
4. NCD global monitoring framework indicator 
defi nitions and specifi cations. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
5. Assessing national capacity for the prevention and 
control of  noncommunicable  diseases. Report 
of the 2013 global survey. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
6. GLOBOCAN 2012: Estimates Cancer Incidence, 
Mortality  and Prevalence  Worldwide in 2012, 
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon 
http://globocan.iarc.fr/Default.aspx, accessed 16 
December 2014).
7.  Global Health Observatory, Civil registration of 
deaths, coverage of registration. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2014 http://www.who.int/gho/
mortality_burden_disease/registered_deaths/en/
accessed 16 December 2014.
8. World health statistics 2014. Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2014  (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/112738/1/9789240692671_eng.pdf
accessed 4 November 2014).
9. World Health Statistics 2012. Geneva, World 
Health Organization; 2012. (http://www.who.int/
gho/publications/world_health_statistics/2012/en/
accessed 16 December 2014). 
10. Assessing national capacity for the prevention and 
control of  noncommunicable  diseases. Report 
of the 2010 global survey. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2011 (http://www.who.int/cancer/
publications/national_capacity_prevention_ncds.pdf
accessed 4 November 2014).
11. Di Cesare M, Bennett JE, Best N, Stevens GA, Danaei 
G, Ezzati M.   e contributions of risk factor trends to 
cardiometabolic mortality decline in 26 industrialized 
countries. Int J  Epidemiol. 2013;42(3):838−48. 
doi:10.1093/ije/dyt063.
12. Peto R, Lopez AD, Norheim OF. Halving premature 
death. Science. 2014;345(6202):1272. doi:10.1126/
science.1259971.
13. Kontis V, Mathers CD, Rehm J, Stevens GA, 
Shield KD, Bonita R et al. Contribution of six risk 
factors to achieving the 25×25 noncommunicable 
disease mortality reduction target; a modelling 
study. Lancet. 2014;384(9941):427−37. doi: 10.1016/
S0140-6736(14)60616-4.
14. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 3 November 2014).
15. Scaling up action against noncommunicable diseases: 
how much will  it  cost? Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2011  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2011/9789241502313_eng.pdf, accessed 
4 November 2014).
16. Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 
2010. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011 (http://
www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd_report_full_
en.pdf, accessed 3November 2014).
17. From burden to “best buys”: reducing the economic 
impact of non-communicable diseases in low- and 
middle-income countries. Geneva: World Health 
Organization and World Economic Forum; 2011 
(www.who.int/nmh/publications/best_buys_
summary, accessed 3 November 2014).
18. Evans DB, Etienne C. Health systems fi nancing and 
the path to universal coverage. Bull World Health 
Organ. 2010;88(6):402. doi:10.2471/BLT.10.078741.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested