open byte array pdf in browser c# : Adding text to pdf online software Library dll windows asp.net winforms web forms 9789241564854_eng4-part1683

Chapter 1. Global target 1
21
Adding text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text box to pdf document; how to insert pdf into email text
Adding text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text pdf reader; adding text to pdf reader
周  ere is a causal relationship between harmful use of alcohol 
and the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular 
diseases, cancers and liver diseases.
In 2012, an estimated 3.3 million deaths, or 5.9 % of all deaths 
worldwide, were attributable to alcohol consumption. More than 
half of these deaths resulted from NCDs.
Implementing very cost-e ective population-based policy options 
– such as the use of taxation to regulate demand for alcoholic 
beverages, restriction of availability of alcoholic beverages, and 
bans or comprehensive restrictions on alcohol advertising – are 
key to reducing the harmful use of alcohol and attaining this 
target.
Health professionals have an important role to play in reducing 
the harmful use of alcohol, by identifying hazardous and harmful 
drinking or alcohol dependence in their patients and by providing 
brief interventions and treatment as appropriate.
Key  points
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server Support adding PDF page number.
how to add text box in pdf file; how to add a text box to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf
23
Harmful use of alcohol and its impact on health 
Harmful use of alcohol is associated with a risk of developing noncommunicable 
diseases, mental and behavioural disorders, including alcohol dependence, as well as 
unintentional and intentional injuries, including those due to road traffi  c accidents 
and violence.   ere is also a causal relationship between harmful use of alcohol 
and incidence of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Alcohol consumption 
by an expectant mother may cause fetal alcohol syndrome and pre-term birth 
complications. 
In 2012 it was estimated that 3.3 million deaths, or 5.9% of all deaths world-
wide, were attributable to alcohol consumption. More than half of these deaths 
resulted from NCDs – chie y cardiovascular diseases and diabetes (33.4%), cancers 
(12.5%) and gastrointestinal diseases, including liver cirrhosis (16.2%). An estimated 
5.1% of the global burden of disease –as measured in disability-adjusted life-years 
(DALYs) – is attributed to alcohol consumption. Cardiovascular diseases, cancers 
and gastrointestinal diseases (largely due to liver cirrhosis) are responsible for more 
than one third (37.7%) of this burden (1).
2
Global target 2: At least 10% relative 
reduction in the harmful use of alcohol, as 
appropriate, within the national context
Fig. 2.1 Total (recorded and unrecorded) alcohol consumption per capita (aged 15 years and over), in litres of pure 
alcohol within a calendar year, by WHO region, projected estimates for 2012 
Alcohol per capita consumption (litres per year*)
* Recorded and unrecorded litres of pure alcohol per year
<2.5
2.5–4.9
5–9.9
≥10
Data not available
Not applicable
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text pdf file; how to add text to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
adding text to a pdf form; add text in pdf file online
Global status report on NCDs 2014
24
U
r
u
g
u
a
y
 7
.2
U
n
ited
 States o
f A
m
erica 9
.1
United Kingdom 11.4
United Arab Emirates 4.7
Trinidad and Tobago 6.7
Switzerland 10.8
Sweden 9.7
Spain 9.7
Slocenia 11.1
Slovakia 12.5
Singapore 3.6
Saudi Arabia 0.2
Saint Kitts and Nevis 5.9
Russian Federation 14.8
Republic of Korea 10.5
Qatar 2.1
Portugal 12.2
Poland 11.6
Oman 1.0
Norway 7.2
New Zealand 10.6
Netherlands 9.6
M
a
lta 7.2
L
u
x
e
m
b
o
u
r
g
 1
1
.9
L
i
t
u
a
n
i
a
1
6
.
9
Latvia 12.0
K
u
w
a
i
t
0
.
1
J
a
p
a
n
 6
.6
Italy 5.7
Israel 3.1
Ireland 10.1
Iceland 5.9
Greece 9.2
Germany 11.5
France 12.3
Finland 11.7
Estonia 10.1
Equatorial Guinea 5.0
Denmark 9.9
Czech Republic 14.0
Cyprus 8.8
Croatia 13.0
Chile 10.3
Canada 10.1
Brunei Darussalam 1.0
Belgium 10.7
Barbados 7.4
Bahrain 1.5
Baham
as 6.1
A
u
stria 8.4
A
u
s
t
r
a
lia
 1
1
.9
A
n
t
i
g
u
a
a
n
d
B
a
r
b
u
d
a
4
.
7
Andorra 11.8
0 lt.
18 lts.
4 lts.
2 lts.
6 lts.
8 lts.
10 lts.
12 lts.
14 lts.
16 lts.
Z
im
b
a
b
w
e 4
.9
United Republic of Tanzania 7.7
Uganda 9.5
Togo 2.2
Tajikistan 2.7
Somalia 0.5
Sierra Leone 8.9
Rwanda 10.1
Niger 0.3
Nepal 2.2
Myanmar 0.7
Mozambique 2.0
Mali 1.2
M
alawi 1.2
M
a
d
a
g
a
sc
a
r 2
.0
Liberia 4.5
Kenya 4.3
H
a
i
ti 5
.9
Guinea-Bissau 3.3
Guinea 0.8
Gambia 3.5
Ethiopia 4.2
Eritrea 1.0
Democratic Republic of the Congo 4.3
Democratic Republic of Korea 3.8
Comoros 0.2
Chad 4.5
Central African Republic 3.7
Cambodia 5.7
Burundi 9.0
Burkina Faso 6.8
B
en
in
 2.1
B
a
n
g
la
d
e
s
h
0
.
2
Afghanistan 0.7
0 lt.
18 lts.
4 lts.
2 lts.
6 lts.
8 lts.
10 lts.
12 lts.
14 lts.
16 lts.
High-income
Low-income
Fig. 2.2 Total (recorded and unrecorded) alcohol consumption per capita (aged 15 years and over) within a calendar 
year, in litres of pure alcohol, by individual country, and World Bank income groups, projected estimates for 2012 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text to pdf acrobat
Chapter 2. Global target 2
25
Z
a
m
b
ia
 4
.3
Yem
en 0.3
Viet Nam 7.2
Vanuatu 1.2
Uzbekistan 5.9
Ukraine 14.0
Syrian Arab Republic 1.2
Timor-Leste 0.6
Swaziland 5.6
Sudan 2.8
Sri Lanka 4.0
Solomon Islands 2.0
Senegal 0.5
Sao Tomé and Principe 6.4
Republic of Moldova 16.1
Philippines 6.0
Paraguay 8.8
Papua New Guinea 3.0
Pakistan 0.0
N
ige
ria 9
.5
N
i
c
a
r
a
g
u
a
 4
.7
Morocco 0.9
Mongolia 9.9
M
I
c
r
o
n
e
s
ia
 (
F
e
d
e
r
a
t
e
d
 S
t
a
t
e
s
 o
f
)
M
au
ritan
ia
 0.1
Lesotho 6.7
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 7.7
Kyrgyzstan 4.2
Kiribati 2.8
Indonesia 0.6
India 5.2
Honduras 3.8
Guyana 8.1
Guatemala 3.7
Ghana 4.9
Georgia 8.1
El Salvador 3.2
Egypt 0.3
Djibouti 1.3
Côte d’Ivoire 5.8
Congo 4.2
Cameroon 8.6
Cab
o Verde 5.8
B
o
liv
ia
 (P
lu
rin
a
tio
n
a
l s
ta
te
 o
f) 6
.2
B
h
u
t
a
n
0
.
5
Armenia 5.3
0 lt.
18 lts.
4 lts.
2 lts.
6 lts.
8 lts.
10 lts.
12 lts.
14 lts.
16 lts.
V
e
n
e
z
u
e
la
 (
B
o
liv
a
r
ia
n
 R
e
p
u
b
lic
 o
f
)
 7
.6
Tu
va
lu 1
.5
Turkm
enistan 4.4
Turkey 2.5
Tunisia 1.4
Tonga 1.6
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 7.4
Thailand 6.5
Suriname 7.0
South Africa 11.0
Seychelles 3.3
Serbia 12.3
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 7.3
Saint Lucia 8.4
Romania 13.2
Peru 10.2
Panama 8.5
Niue 7.8
Nauru 3.6
Namibia 12.2
Mexico 7.2
Mauritius 3.7
M
aldives 1.3
M
a
la
y
sia
 1
.4
L
i
b
y
a
0
.
1
Lebanon 2.6
Kazakhstan 9.8
J
o
r
d
a
n
0
.
8
Ja
m
a
ic
a
 4
.8
Iraq 0.6
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 1.0
Hungary 12.4
Grenada 10.3
Gabon 11.3
Fiji 3.0
Ecuador 7.5
Dominican Republic 6.6
Dominica 6.3
Cuba 5.1
Costa Rica 5.0
Cook Islands 9.4
Colombia 6.2
China 8.8
Bulgaria 11.2
Brazil 8.9
Botswana 7.5
Bosnia and Herzegovina 6.8
Belize 8.2
Belarus 17.8
Azerbaijan 2.4
A
rg
en
tin
a 9.4
A
n
g
o
la
 9
.0
A
l
g
e
r
i
a
0
.
6
Albania 6.8
0 lt.
18 lts.
4 lts.
2 lts.
6 lts.
8 lts.
10 lts.
12 lts.
14 lts.
16 lts.
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
add text to pdf document online; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to add text to a pdf in reader; add text box in pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
26
周  ere is a direct link between high levels of 
alcohol consumption and the risk of cancers of the 
mouth, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx, oesoph-
agus, colon, rectum, liver and female breast (2). At 
high levels, alcohol consumption is associated with 
exponentially increasing risk of liver cirrhosis and 
pancreatitis (3,4). 
周  e relationship between alcohol consumption 
and ischaemic heart and cerebrovascular diseases is 
complex. Alcohol use is associated with the risk of 
hypertensive disease, atrial  brillation and haem-
orrhagic stroke, yet, on the other hand, lower levels, 
Fig. 2.3 Total alcohol consumption per capita, 2010 (in litres of pure alcohol) in the total population aged 15 years and 
over by WHO region and World Bank income groups
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Litres of pure alcohol per capita
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
and particular patterns, of alcohol consumption in 
some populations may lower the risk of ischaemic 
heart disease and ischaemic stroke and associated 
mortality. However, controversy remains on the 
potential bene cial e ect of low alcohol intake on 
cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, bene cial 
e ects of lower levels of alcohol consumption, if 
any, tend to disappear if the patterns of drinking 
are characterized by heavy episodic drinking (5), 
which is highly prevalent in many countries and 
population groups (1,6).
Table 2.1 Total alcohol consumption per capita (in litres of pure alcohol) and prevalence of heavy episodic drinking 
(%) in the total population aged 15 years and over, and among drinkers aged 15 years and over, by WHO region and 
the world, 2010
WHO region
Among all (15+ years)
Among drinkers only (15+ years)
Per capita 
consumption
Prevalence of heavy 
episodic drinking 
(%)
Per capita 
consumption
Prevalence of heavy 
episodic drinking 
(%)
African Region
6.0
5.7
19.5
16.4
Region of the Americas
8.4
13.7
13.6
22.0
South-East Asia Region
3.4
1.6
23.1
12.4
European Region
10.9
16.5
16.8
22.9
Eastern Mediterranean Region
0.7
0.1
11.3
1.6
Western Pacifi c Region
6.8
7.7
15.0
16.4
World
6.2
7.5
17.2
16.0
Chapter 2. Global target 2
27
Fig. 2.4. Age standardized heavy episodic drinking (aged 15 years and over) in past 30 days (%), 2010 
Heavy episodic drinking past 30 days (%)
<2.5
2.5–4.9
5–9.9
≥10
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
周  e level of alcohol consumption worldwide 
in 2010 was estimated at 6.2 litres of pure alcohol 
per person aged 15 years and over (equivalent to 
13.5 g of pure alcohol per day). Although alcohol 
consumption is deeply embedded in the cultures of 
many societies, WHO estimates for 2010 showed 
that 48% of the global adult population had never 
consumed alcoholic beverages and 62% of the pop-
ulation aged 15 years and older had not consumed 
alcohol during the previous 12 months. 周  e high-
est levels of alcohol consumption were found in 
middle- and high-income countries of the WHO 
European Region and the Region of the Americas 
(see Fig. 2.1), while the lowest levels were observed 
in the Eastern Mediterranean and South-East Asia 
Regions (see Table 2.1). Projected estimates of total 
(recorded and unrecorded) alcohol consumption 
per capita (aged 15 years and over) for 2012, by 
country is shown in Fig 2.2. 周  ere is a wide varia-
tion in total alcohol consumption between di erent 
countries. Prevalence of heavy episodic drinking in 
past 30 days, is shown in Fig. 2.4. 周  e prevalence 
of heavy episodic drinking is associated with the 
overall levels of alcohol consumption and is high-
est in the European Region and the Region of the 
Americas (see Table 2.2, Fig. 2.3) (1).
In general, the greater the economic wealth of 
a country, the more alcohol is consumed and the 
smaller the number of abstainers is (see Table 2.2).
Table 2.2 Total alcohol per capita consumption, prevalence (%) of current drinkers, and prevalence of heavy episodic 
drinking among current drinkers, in the total population aged 15 years and over, by World Bank income group and the 
world, 2010
Income group
Per capita 
consumption
Prevalence of 
current drinkers 
(%)
Prevalence of heavy 
episodic drinking among 
drinkers (%)
Low-income
3.1
18.3
11.6
Lower middle-income
4.1
19.6
12.5
Upper middle-income
7.3
45.0
17.2
High-income
9.6
69.5
22.3
World
6.2
38.3
16.0
Global status report on NCDs 2014
28
What are the cost-
eff  ective policies and 
interventions for reducing 
harmful use of alcohol?
WHO’s Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of 
alcohol highlights 10 policy areas for multisectoral 
national action to protect the health of populations 
and reduce the alcohol-attributable disease burden 
(7). 周  ey include:
leadership, awareness and commitment; 
health services response;
community action;
drink-driving policies and countermeasures;
availability of alcohol;
marketing of alcoholic beverages;
pricing policies;
reducing  the  negative  consequences  of 
drink-driving and alcohol intoxication;
reducing the public health impact of illicit alco-
hol and informally-produced alcohol;
monitoring and surveillance.
周  ese areas for action are also outlined in the 
Global NCD Action Plan (8). 
Some interventions for reducing harmful use of 
alcohol are very cost-e ective, or “best buys” (see 
Box 1.1). When implemented in health services, 
individual actions such as screening and brief 
interventions for hazardous and harmful drink-
ing, and treatment of alcohol dependence, are also 
e ective in reducing the harmful use of alcohol. 
Such interventions have a good cost-e ectiveness 
pro le, although their implementation requires 
more resources than those for population-based 
measures (6,9−12). Health professionals play an 
important role in reducing the harmful use of 
alcohol, by assessing and monitoring levels and 
patterns of alcohol consumption in patients and 
by intervening with brief interventions, counselling 
and pharmacotherapy – as appropriate – in cases 
where hazardous and harmful drinking or alcohol 
dependence are identi ed (8,13,14).
Monitoring harmful 
use of alcohol
The three indicators of the global monitoring 
framework (see Annex 1), for monitoring progress 
towards attaining this target are:
total (recorded and unrecorded) alcohol con-
sumption per capita (aged 15 years and over) 
within a calendar year, in litres of pure alcohol, 
as appropriate within the national context;
age-standardized prevalence of heavy episodic 
drinking among adolescents and adults, as appro-
priate within the national context; heavy episodic 
drinking among adults is de ned as consumption 
of at least 60 g or more of pure alcohol on at least 
one occasion in the previous 30 days;
alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among 
adolescents and adults, as appropriate within the 
national context.
Member States may choose to report against 
the indicator most appropriate to their national 
circumstances, or against all three indicators if 
possible. However, total per capita consumption is 
one of the most reliable indicators of alcohol expo-
sure and is recommended for monitoring progress 
in reducing the harmful use of alcohol at popu-
lation level. E ective monitoring of trends in the 
prevalence of heavy episodic drinking requires a 
well-developed system for surveillance of alcohol 
consumption in populations. Shortcomings seen in 
a number of surveys – such as poor representation 
of the whole population, under-representation of 
heavy drinkers in survey samples, use of di erent 
indicators and data-collection instruments, and 
underreporting of alcohol consumption, partic-
ularly in societies with stigmatization and social 
disapproval of drinking – must be minimized. 
周  ere are signi cant challenges in measuring and 
reporting alcohol-related morbidity and mortality, 
since reporting on these indicators is signi cantly 
in uenced by the organization and functioning of 
the health system. Nevertheless, these indicators 
can be used for monitoring purposes in well-devel-
oped and relatively stable health systems.
Chapter 2. Global target 2
29
Progress achieved 
Since the Global strategy to reduce the harmful use 
of alcohol (7) was endorsed by the World Health 
Assembly in 2010, growing numbers of countries 
have developed or reformulated their national alco-
hol policies and action plans. Of 76 countries with 
a written national policy on alcohol, 52 have taken 
steps to operationalize it (15). Higher minimum legal 
drinking ages, controls over alcohol sales, fewer out-
lets (including reduced density of outlets), and limited 
hours and days of sale reduce both alcohol sales and 
consumption (16). Some 160 WHO Member States 
have regulations on age limits for sale of alcoholic 
beverages, with 18 years as the most frequent age 
limit for all beverage types and 20−21 years in some 
countries (e.g. Iceland, Indonesia, Japan, Sweden, the 
United States of America (USA) (1).
A total ban on advertising alcoholic beverages 
has been considered by the Government of South 
Africa, as a necessary measure to reduce the burden 
attributable to alcohol. Eff orts of the Government 
of the Russian Federation to curb the high level of 
alcohol consumption include strengthening regu-
lations on availability and marketing of alcoholic 
beverages, including beer; enforcing drink-driving 
measures; and increasing the minimum retail price 
for the most common spirit. A new alcohol strategy 
introduced in the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
Box 2.1 Mongolia: working with civil society to reduce harmful use of alcohol 
Mongolia’s revised law on alcohol prevention and control in-
cludes essential strategies for reducing alcohol-related harm 
– such as a total ban on alcohol advertising, legislation on the 
population-density requirement for alcohol sales outlets, in-
creased liability of businesses selling alcohol, and strengthe-
ned administrative and deterrence systems for infringements 
and violations. The law aims to bridge the gaps between re-
gulation and implementation that were observed in the past 
and to improve coordination of alcohol-related strategies and 
programmes, by strengthening cooperation between diff erent 
levels of government and other stakeholders.
Mongolia set up a national network of 80 governmental and 
nongovernmental organizations, to increase public awareness, formulate policies and establish a legal environment 
to reduce the consequences of alcohol use and strengthen implementation of the law. 
Sources: see references (17).
and Northern Ireland (UK) in 2012 promotes coor-
dinated actions across diff erent government sectors 
and prioritizes measures with proven eff ectiveness 
in reducing alcohol-related harm. Mongolia has 
established a national network to strengthen the 
legal environment for prevention and control of 
alcohol (see Box 2.1) (1).
Actions required 
toattain this target 
Evidence on the eff ectiveness and cost-eff ective-
ness of policy options to reduce the harmful use 
of alcohol strongly indicates that countries should 
prioritize, according to their national contexts, the 
following action areas: 
pricing policies;
availability of alcohol;
marketing of alcoholic beverages;
the response of health services;
drink-driving policies and countermeasures. 
  e successful implementation by governments 
of population-based interventions to reduce harmful 
use of alcohol depends on sustained political com-
mitment and societal support. Eff ective communica-
tion measures are needed to support alcohol-control 
measures that may restrict individuals’ choices and 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
30
reduce the economic benefi ts for enterprises involved 
in alcohol production and sale (4−7).
Labelling on alcoholic drinks may help consum-
ers to estimate their alcohol content and potentially 
choose a drink with less alcohol. Nevertheless, a 
study in Australia supports the view that standard 
labelling of drinks, without other changes to packag-
ing and marketing, may serve to help young people 
choose the strongest drink for the lowest cost (18).
Health  warnings  have  been introduced  to 
inform consumers about the risks associated with 
drinking alcohol and to stimulate reduced con-
sumption. However, international experience shows 
that health warnings that are poorly visible or have 
generic messages have a weak impact on drinking 
behaviour (19). More recent studies recommend 
direct, more visible and pictorial health warnings, 
with due consideration of plain packaging for alco-
hol products, in order to in uence recall, percep-
tions and behaviours (20).
Models of a range of fi scal policy scenarios from 
a number of countries have indicated the high cost 
e ectiveness of taxation and pricing policies in reduc-
ing hazardous drinking and alcohol-attributable 
mortality, as well as in raising revenue (6,9,21,22). 
Setting a minimum price per unit for alcohol in retail 
sales can complement taxation measures and result 
in health benefi ts, as demonstrated in a statistical 
model for England (21), and as supported by the 
impact on alcohol consumption in one province of 
Canada (22). A total of 154 WHO Member States 
have some form of excise tax on beer, wine or spirits, 
but the e ectiveness of these measures in protecting 
population health depends on their scale and their 
impact on the demand for alcoholic beverages.
Drink-driving  measures,  such  as  random 
breath-testing and setting and enforcing low limits 
(0.02−0.05%) for blood-alcohol concentration are 
e ective in reducing not only road tra  c injuries 
but also alcohol consumption by drivers.   us, 
these measures have potential to improve popula-
tion health outcomes associated with NCDs.
References 
1. Global status report on alcohol and health 2014. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014 (http://
www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/global_
alcohol_report/msb_gsr_2014_1.pdf?ua=1, accessed 
4 November 2014).
2. IARC Monographs 100E. Consumption of alcohol. 
Lyon: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 
2012 (http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/
vol100E/mono100E-11.pdf, accessed 4 November 
2014).
3. Irving HM, Samokhvalov AV, Rehm J. Alcohol as a 
risk factor for pancreatitis. A systematic review and 
meta-analysis. JOP. 2009;10:387–92.
4. Rehm J, Baliunas D, Borges GL, Graham K, Irving 
H, Kehoe T et al. The relation between different 
dimensions of alcohol consumption and burden of 
disease – an overview. Addiction. 2010;105(5):817–43. 
doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.02899.x.
5. Roerecke M, Rehm J. Irregular heavy drinking 
occasions and risk of ischemic heart disease: a 
systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Epidemiol. 
2010;171(6):633–44. doi:10.1093/aje/kwp451.
6. WHO Expert Committee on Problems Related to 
Alcohol Consumption. Second report. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2007 (WHO Technical Report 
Series, No. 944; http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/
expert_committee_alcohol_trs944.pdf, accessed 4 
November 2014).
7.  Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2010 (http://
www.who.int/substance_abuse/activities/gsrhua/en/
accessed 4 November 2014).
8. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 3 November 2014).
9. Evidence for the e ectiveness and cost-e ectiveness 
of interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm. 
Copenhagen: World Health Organization Regional 
O  ce for Europe; 2009 (http://www.euro.who.int/
document/E92823.pdf, accessed 4 November 2014).
10. mhGAP intervention guide for mental, 
neurological and substance use disorders in non-
specialized health settings. Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2010  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2010/9789241548069_eng.pdf, accessed 
4 November 2014).
11. Chisholm D, Rehm J, Ommeren MV, Monteiro M. 
Reducing the global burden of hazardous alcohol 
use: a comparative cost-e ectiveness analysis. J Stud 
Alcohol Drugs. 2004;65(6):782−93.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested