open byte array pdf in browser c# : Acrobat add text to pdf application control utility azure html winforms visual studio 9789241564854_eng7-part1686

Chapter 4. Global target 4
51
21. Hoffman KJ, Tollman SM. Population health in 
South Africa; a view from the salt mines. Lancet 
Glob Health. 2013 Aug;1(2):e66-7. doi: 10.1016/
S2214-109X(13)70019-6.
22. Ministerio de Salud Argentina. Argentine initiative 
to reduce salt consumption (http://www.paho.org/
panamericanforum/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/less-
salt-more-life_PAHO-consortium_ARG.pdf, accessed 
5 November 2014).
23. Kuwait News Agency. Health Ministry praises 
Kuwait fi rm’s reduction of salt in bread and salt. 12 
January 2014 (http://www.kuna.net.kw/ArticleDetails.
aspx?id=2355046&language=en, accessed 5 November 
2014).
24. Puska P, Vartiainen E, Laatikainen T, Jousilahti P, 
Paavola M, editors.   e North Karelia project: from 
North Karelia to national action. Helsinki: Helsinki 
University Printing House; 2009 (https://www.julkari.
fi /bitstream/handle/10024/80109/731beafd-b544-
42b2-b853-baa87db6a046.pdf?sequence=1, accessed 5 
November 2014).
25. Vartiainen E, Laatikainen T, Peltonen M, Juolevi A, 
Männistö S, Sundvall J et al.   irty-fi ve-year trends in 
cardiovascular risk factors in Finland. Int J Epidemiol. 
2010;39(2):504−18. doi:10.1093/ije/dyp330.
26. Sadler K, Nicholson S, Steer T, Gill V, Bates B, 
Tipping S et al. National Diet and Nutrition Survey 
− assessment of dietary sodium in adults (aged 19 to 
64 years) in England, 2011. London: Department of 
Health; 2012 (http://webarchive.nationalarchives.
gov.uk/20130402145952/http://media.dh.gov.
uk/network/261/fi les/2012/06/sodium-survey-
england-2011_text_to-dh_final1.pdf, accessed 5 
November 2014).
27. Responsibility Deal Food Network – new salt targets: 
F9 Salt Reduction 2017 pledge & F10 Out of Home Salt 
Reduction Pledge. London: Department of Health; 2014 
(https://responsibilitydeal.dh.gov.uk/responsibility-
deal-food-network-new-salt-targets-f9-salt-reduction-
2017-pledge-f10-out-of-home-salt-reduction-pledge/
accessed 5 November 2014).
28. Cecchini M, Sassi F, Lauer JA, Lee YY, Guajardo-
Barron V, Chisholm D. Tackling of unhealthy diets, 
physical inactivity, and obesity: health e ects and 
cost-e ectiveness. Lancet. 2010;376(9754):1775−84. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61514-0.
29. World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture 
Organization  of  the  United  Nations.  Codex 
Alimentatius. International food standards (http://
www.codexalimentarius.org/standards/en/, accessed 
5 November 2014).
30. SaltSwitch: a smart(phone) strategy to support hear 
healthy food choices. Auckland: National Institute for 
Health Innovation; 2014 (http://nihi.auckland.ac.nz/
page/current-research/our-nutrition-and-physical-
activity-research/saltswitch-smartphone-strategy-su
accessed 5 November 2014).
31. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 12 December 2014).
Acrobat add text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
Acrobat add text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf form
Tobacco use remains the cause of 6 million preventable deaths per 
year globally.
Signifi cant progress has been made in implementing the most 
cost e ective tobacco-control measures but much still remains to 
be done.
  e WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provides 
the roadmap to curb the tobacco epidemic.
Tobacco-control e orts must be sustained and reinforced, to have 
any lasting impact on reducing tobacco prevalence. However, 
there appears to be some  complacency that, coupled with 
insu  cient political will and tobacco industry interference, is 
hindering e orts to move ahead.
  e attainment of this target will contribute to attainment of the 
target on reducing premature mortality from NCDs.
Key  points
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
add text to a pdf document; how to add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. If you need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to
add editable text box to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
53
Tobacco use and its impact on health 
Tobacco use is currently one of the leading causes of preventable deaths in the world. 
Risks to health result not only from direct consumption of tobacco but also from 
exposure to second-hand smoke. Tobacco use increases the risk of cardiovascular 
disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes and premature death. Six 
million people are currently estimated to die annually from tobacco use, with 
over 600 000 deaths due to exposure to second-hand smoke (with 170 000 of these 
deaths among children) (1,2). Tobacco use accounts for 7% of all female and 12% 
of all male deaths globally (2,3). Unless strong action continues to be taken by 
countries, the annual toll is projected to increase to 8 million deaths per year by 
2030, or 10% of all deaths projected to occur that year (2). As an entirely avoidable 
death toll, these fi gures are unacceptable.
Tobacco use also imposes an economic burden in the form of increased medical 
costs and from lost productivity. In most economies, the health cost burden from 
tobacco also exceeds the total tax revenue(s) collected by the governments from 
tobacco products.
Tobacco use is defi ned as current use of any tobacco product in either smoked 
or smokeless form (4). Availability and quality of data on smokeless tobacco use 
are slowly improving but are insu  cient to report globally. Further improvements 
are needed, especially in the monitoring of use of smokeless tobacco as well as of 
the novel and emerging tobacco products.   erefore information provided in this 
report refers primarily to current tobacco smoking among males and females aged 
15 years and over. 
In 2012 there were some 1.1 billion smokers worldwide, with over 8 out of 10 
tobacco smokers smoking daily. Manufactured cigarettes, the most common form 
of smoked tobacco, are used by over 90% of current smokers. In addition, tobacco is 
smoked in cigars, pipes and other forms, particularly hookahs and bidis in Africa, 
Asia and the Middle East. Data on these specifi c forms of smoked tobacco are not 
yet readily available globally. In some countries the consumption of smokeless 
tobacco is as high, or higher than smoked forms of tobacco.
  e age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco smoking in persons aged 15 
years and over, by WHO region and World Bank income group, in 2012, is shown 
in Fig. 5.1. In 2012, the global prevalence of current tobacco smoking among 
adults was estimated at around 22%, with smoking rates varying widely across 
5
Global target 5: A 30% relative reduction in 
prevalence of current tobacco use in persons 
aged 15+ years 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you create a watermark that consists of text or image users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text fields to a pdf document
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to insert text into a pdf file
Global status report on NCDs 2014
54
the six WHO regions (see Fig. 5.1). 周  e highest 
regional average rate for tobacco smoking in 2012 
was 30% (in the WHO European Region) while 
the lowest rate was 12% in the African Region, 
although it is increasing rapidly. Globally smoking 
prevalence is about  ve times higher among men 
(37%) than among women (7%) (see Fig. 5.2 and 
Fig. 5.3). Smoking prevalence in both high-income 
and upper-middle-income countries is broadly 
similar, although slightly higher in high income 
countries at 25% and middle-income countries at 
22%. Among low-income countries, the average 
prevalence is lower (18%) (see Fig. 5.4) and, while 
various forms of tobacco consumption are popular, 
cigarette smoking accounts for about 80% of all 
forms of current smoking.
In order to reduce the health threat of tobacco, 
the global target is a 30% relative reduction in 
prevalence of current tobacco use in persons aged 
15 years and over by 2025 (using 2010 as base-
line). Most governments have already engaged 
in strengthening their tobacco control measures, 
leading to the accelerated implementation of the 
WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control 
(WHO FCTC) which would enable them to reach 
this target.
Fig. 5.1  Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco smoking in persons aged 15 years and over, by WHO region 
and World Bank income group, comparable estimates, 2012
Q
Males    
Q
Females
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
% of population
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
What are the cost-eff  ective 
policies and interventions 
for reducing tobacco use?
周  e WHO FCTC (5) and its guidelines (6) repre-
sent the global instrument that enables its Parties 
to attain the tobacco reduction target (4). In fact, 
during its sixth session in October 2014, the Con-
ference of the Parties to the WHO FCTC called 
on Parties (7) to set national targets for 2025 for 
relative reduction of current tobacco use in per-
sons aged 15 years and over, taking into account the 
global target. It also called on Parties to develop or 
strengthen national multisectoral policies and plans 
to achieve national targets on reduction of current 
tobacco use by 2025, taking into account WHO’s 
Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013–2020 (8).
A comprehensive set of policy options for tobacco 
control is listed in the global NCD action plan (8), 
including the most cost-e ective interventions (“best 
buys”) for tobacco control (Box 1.1) (9). Evidence 
shows that the very cost-e ective WHO FCTC reduc-
tion measures for reducing national tobacco use are:
reducing the a ordability of tobacco products by 
increasing tobacco excise taxes;
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to insert text in pdf file; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to pdf in preview
Chapter 5. Global target 5
55
Fig. 5.2  Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco smoking in males aged 15 years and over, comparable 
estimates, 2012
Prevalence of current tobacco smoking (%)*
* Current smoking of any tobacco product such as cigarettes, cigars, pipes, etc. It includes both daily and non-daily or occasional smoking.
<20
20–29
30–39
40–49
≥50
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Fig. 5.3  Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco smoking in females aged 15 years and over, comparable 
estimates, 2012
Prevalence of current tobacco smoking (%)*
* Current smoking of any tobacco product such as cigarettes, cigars, pipes, etc. It includes both daily and non-daily or occasional smoking.
<20
20–29
30–39
40–49
≥50
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
creating by law completely smoke-free environ-
ments in all indoor workplaces, indoor public 
places and public transport;
alerting people to the dangers of tobacco and 
tobacco smoke through eff ective health warnings 
and mass media campaigns; and 
banning all forms of tobacco advertising, pro-
motion and sponsorship.
  e public health bene ts of these measures 
are far more likely to be realized if they are imple-
mented in an environment where they form part 
of a comprehensive approach, as envisaged by 
the WHO FCTC. Full implementation involves 
adopting other demand reduction measures such 
as helping tobacco users to quit and regulating 
tobacco products. Most smokers want to quit when 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe Users need to add following implementations to your
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to enter text in pdf form
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; how to insert a text box in pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
56
U
ru
g
u
a
y 26
.0
United States of Am
erica 18.6
United Kingdom 21.1
Switzerland 28.5
Sweden 22.5
Spain 31.0
Slovenia 21.3
Slovakia 28.1
Singapore 15.8
Russian Federation 38.8
Portugal 22.4
Poland 30.1
Oman 12.4
Norway 26.4
New Zealand 18.9
Netherlands 29.0
M
a
lta 26
.6
L
i
t
h
u
a
n
i
a
3
0
.
1
Latvia 35.3
I
t
a
l
y
2
4
.
0
Is
rae
l 3
0
.0
Ireland 23.2
Iceland 18.3
Greece 45.1
Germany 32.9
France 30.3
Finland 22.4
Estonia 33.6
Denmark 20.7
Czech Republic 32.3
Croatia 34.5
Chile 37.7
Canada 17.1
Brunei Darussalam 15.9
Belgium 26.1
Barbados 7.3
B
a
h
ra
in
 2
6.6
A
u
s
t
r
a
l
i
a
1
6
.
5
Andorra 33.1
0%
60%
20%
10%
30%
40%
50%
United Republic of Tanzania 16.8
Uganda 11.0
Sierra Leone 33.9
Rwanda 14.0
Niger 7.9
Myanmar 23.0
M
o
z
a
m
b
iq
u
e
 1
9
.0
M
a
l
i
1
7
.
3
Malawi 16.8
Kenya 13.8
Haiti 11.6
Ethiopia 4.5
Cambodia 23.8
Burkina Faso 18.9
B
a
n
g
l
a
d
e
sh
 2
3
.2
0%
60%
20%
10%
30%
40%
50%
High-income
Low-income
Fig. 5.4  Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco smoking in adults aged 15 years and over (%), 
by individual country and by World Bank Income group, comparable estimates, 2012
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
add text to pdf file; adding text pdf files
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text box to pdf
Chapter 5. Global target 5
57
Z
am
bia 1
5.8
Viet Nam 24.2
Uzbekistan 13.1
Ukraine 30.8
Swaziland 10.0
Sri Lanka 14.1
Sao Tome and Principe 7.5
Samoa 33.5
Republic of Moldova 23.3
Philippines 27.4
P
a
r
a
g
u
a
y
2
0
.
2
P
a
k
i
s
t
a
n
2
2
.
2
M
o
n
g
o
lia 27
.6
Mauritania 20.2
Lesotho 24.5
Kyrgyzstan 25.8
Indonesia 36.9
India 13.3
Honduras 19.9
Georgia 29.3
Egypt 21.8
Cam
eroon 16.6
B
o
l
i
v
i
a
(
P
l
u
r
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
S
t
a
t
e
o
f
)
2
7
.
2
0%
60%
20%
10%
30%
40%
50%
Tu
rk
ey 28
.1
Tonga 29.8
Suriname 32.7
Seychelles 26.4
Romania 31.7
Panama 8.1
Palau 26.3
Niue 17.3
Namibia 23.0
Mexico 15.5
Mauritius 22.3
M
a
ld
iv
es
 21
.5
Malaysia 23.3
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
3
7
.
6
K
azak
hstan
 26
.6
Jamaica 18.3
Hungary 30.8
Ecuador 9.3
Dominican Republic 15.2
Costa Rica 14.6
China 26.1
Bulgaria 37.9
Brazil 16.6
Bosnia and Herzegovina 39.7
Belarus 28.6
A
rg
en
tin
a
 2
6
.1
Albania 29.6
0%
60%
20%
10%
30%
40%
50%
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
Global status report on NCDs 2014
58
informed of the health risks. Cessation support and 
medication increase the likelihood that a smoker 
will quit successfully, and countries can establish 
programmes providing low-cost eff ective interven-
tions for tobacco users to stop. Full implementation 
of the WHO FCTC also entails supply reduction 
measures such as combating illicit trade, provid-
ing alternative livelihoods to tobacco farmers, and 
banning the sale or provision of tobacco products 
by and to minors. Full implementation involves two 
further important measures: countering tobacco 
industry interference, and establishing or reinforc-
ing a national multisectoral and interministerial 
coordinating mechanism for the implementation 
of the WHO FCTC in each country.
Monitoring tobacco use 
  e global monitoring framework indicators (see 
Annex 1), for monitoring progress towards attain-
ing this target are (4): 
1. prevalence of current tobacco use among 
adolescents; 
2. age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco 
use among persons aged 18+ years.
Progress achieved 
Signi cant progress has been made in global tobacco 
control in recent years. While much remains to be 
done, the successes show that it is possible to turn 
the tide of tobacco usage when strong national 
political will and public engagement urge the imple-
mentation of eff ective policies.
Success: one third of the world’s people 
is protected by at least one of the most 
cost eff ective tobacco-control measure
  e WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 
2011 (10) indicated that, in 2010, 70 countries had 
already implemented at least one of the four tobac-
co-control “best-buy” interventions at the highest 
level of achievement. By 2013, 95 countries had at 
least one “best-buy” measure in place at the highest 
level of achievement, and between 2010 and 2013 a 
total of 40 countries implemented for the  rst time 
one or more “best-buy” measures at the highest 
level. In 2010, no country had all four “best buys” 
implemented, yet by 2013 two countries – Turkey 
(see Box 5.1) and Madagascar – had all four “best 
buys” in place at the highest level of achievement, 
and a further six countries had implemented three 
Box 5.1 Reducing tobacco demand in Turkey 
Turkey was the fi rst country to attain the highest level of co-
verage in all of the WHO “best-buy” demand-reduction mea-
sures for reducing tobacco prevalence. In 2012, the country 
increased the size of health-warning labels to cover 65% of 
the total surface area of each tobacco or cigarette packet. To-
bacco taxes cover 80% of the total retail price, and there is 
currently a total ban on tobacco advertising, promotion and 
sponsorship  nationwide.  The  result  of  these  concerted  ef-
forts has been a signifi cant decrease (13.4% relative decline) 
in the smoking rates of a country that has a long tradition of 
tobacco use and high smoking prevalence. This progress is a 
sign of the Turkish government’s sustained political commitment to tobacco control, exemplifying collaboration 
between government, WHO and other international health organizations, and civil society.
Sources: see references (11).
Chapter 5. Global target 5
59
out of four “best buys” at the highest level. Many 
of the countries making progress in implementing 
“best-buy” measures were low- or middle-income 
countries, showing that cost is not the main barrier 
to tobacco reduction.
However: some tobacco-control 
measures have become more 
established than others
Although many countries have made a great deal of 
progress since 2010 in both introducing and imple-
menting eff ective tobacco-control measures, some 
still have made little to no headway in  ghting the 
tobacco epidemic. Additionally, some “best-buy” 
demand-reduction measures remain more widely 
implemented than others.
Protecting people from 
the harms of tobacco smoke
In 2013, 46 countries (including 35 low- and mid-
dle-income counties) had complete smoking bans 
in indoor working places, public transportation 
and indoor public places. Sixteen countries have 
adopted comprehensive smoke-free legislation since 
2010. Conversely, the number of countries with 
very weak or no smoke-free laws fell from 92 to 74 
between 2010 and 2013, although the improvement 
does not necessarily mean that they are implement-
ing at the highest level of achievement. A new trend 
is visible as countries increasingly extend their 
smoke-free policies to cover outdoor settings such 
as beaches, public parks, outdoor cafes and mar-
kets, and even some streets, as well as settings that 
Box 5.2 Standardized packaging in Australia 
Australian offi  cials announced in July 2014 that the nation’s daily 
smoking rate among people aged 14 years and over had declined 
from  15.1%  to  12.8%  between  2010  and 2013.  The  drop  in  the 
smoking rate shows that the standardized packaging law enforced 
at the end of 2012 – as well as the 25% tax increase instituted in 
2010 – works. Australian law requires tobacco products to be sold 
in drab packages with large graphic images of tobacco-related di-
seases. Inclusion of the brand name is allowed but without logos. 
Sources: see references (12).
Box 5.3 Graphic health warnings in Thailand 
In June 2014, the Supreme Administrative Court of Thai-
land allowed the implementation of a new regulation re-
quiring packs of cigarettes sold in the country to display 
graphic health-warning labels covering 85% of both sides 
of the packets. This is a major step towards implementing 
this measure, which was signed by the ministry of health 
in March 2013, but it has come under fi re from the tobac-
co industry and lobbyists. The implementation, originally 
planned for October 2013, was delayed by a court’s decision 
to suspend implementation of the new warnings until the 
legal process was over; however, in June 2014 the Supreme 
Administrative Court ruled against the temporary suspension. If successfully introduced permanently, the law 
will make Thailand’s packet warnings the largest in the world, leading the way to further reducing the tobacco 
industry’s control over advertising.
Sources: see references (13).
Global status report on NCDs 2014
60
were not traditionally covered by such regulations, 
such as prisons and private vehicles when carrying 
children.
Warning about the dangers of tobacco
By 2013, 38 countries had legislated strong warn-
ing labels occupying at least 50% of the surface of 
cigarette packages. 19 of these countries had done 
this since 2010. Middle-income countries are the 
most likely to have established strong warning-la-
bel requirements (27% of middle-income countries 
have done so). In addition, the number of countries 
with very weak or no pack health warnings dropped 
from 91 to 68 between 2010 and 2013. 周  ere has 
been a move towards very large pictorial warnings 
(occupying, in general, more than 60% of principal 
display areas) on tobacco packages, and standard-
ized (or plain) packaging in line with the obliga-
tions of the WHO FCTC (5).
Enforcing bans on tobacco advertising, 
promotion and sponsorship
While 133 countries had banned some forms of 
tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship 
(TAPS) in 2013, only 27 had completely banned 
all its forms, nine more than in 2010. Low-income 
countries have taken greater action to ban TAPS 
completely (19%) than have high- and middle-in-
come countries (6% and 16% respectively). 周  e 
number of countries with a very weak or no ban 
on TAPS fell from 77 in 2010 to 62 in 2013.
Raising taxes on tobacco
周  e most cost-e ective tobacco-control intervention 
is to increase the price of tobacco products by raising 
tobacco tax, but this measure has progressed slowly 
since 2010. In 2010, 27 countries were levying taxes 
high enough to represent at least 75% of the retail 
price of cigarettes but by 2013 this had increased only 
Box 5.4  Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, Pacifi c islands and the UK (Scotland): aiming at a 
tobacco endgame 
Some governments have outlined a strategic plan to further reduce tobacco preva-
lence to a defi ned low level – usually close to zero – within a fi xed period, using the 
“tobacco endgame approach”. Strategies that can result in an endgame involve full 
implementation of the WHO FCTC (5), with fundamental denormalization not just of 
tobacco use but of the tobacco industry, by removing profi tability and by making the 
industry liable for damages. Furthermore, the focus on disadvantaged groups and po-
licy action with tobacco control address the wider social determinants of inequalities 
and health. A commitment to a tobacco endgame has been made by Finland, Ireland, 
New Zealand, Pacifi c islands and the UK (Scotland), which have publicly announced a 
target year to end tobacco use in their populations. These countries are committed to decreasing tobacco use to 
below 5% by the target year.
Sources: see references (15).
Box 5.5 A knowledge hub for tobacco control in Africa 
As part of the Africa project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foun-
dation, WHO has set up the fi rst knowledge hub for tobacco control in 
the Centre for Tobacco Control in Africa (CTCA) in Kampala, Uganda. CTCA 
provides technical assistance to a number of countries in sub-Saharan 
Africa, on tobacco-control policies, legislation and programmes.
Sources: see references (16).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested