open byte array pdf in browser c# : Add text pdf file acrobat SDK application API .net windows web page sharepoint 9789241564854_eng8-part1687

Chapter 5. Global target 5
61
to 32 countries. Low-income countries, although 
in greater need of government funding for tobac-
co-control and health programmes, are least likely to 
have suffi  ciently high tax rates; only one low-income 
country has achieved high taxes on cigarettes. In 
addition, the number of countries with a low tax 
share of the retail price (below 25%), or no tobacco 
taxes, increased from 29 in 2010 to 37 in 2013.
Progress has been notable in some countries 
(see Boxes 5.2−5.6).   e next step is to encourage 
other countries to follow suit, by highlighting the 
e ectiveness of existing examples of tobacco-con-
trol policies and by o ering additional support to 
adopt and implement such policies.
Conclusion
  ere has been great progress in global tobac-
co-control e orts in recent years, in both the num-
ber of countries protecting their people and the 
number of people worldwide protected by e ective 
tobacco-control measures. However, more work is 
needed in many countries, in order to focus e orts 
on passing and enforcing e ective tobacco-control 
measures.   is will include expanding activities to 
implement “best-buy” demand-reduction measures 
at the highest level of achievement, reinforcing and 
sustaining current programmes to incorporate a 
range of measures and, ultimately, implementing 
the full WHO FCTC (5).
Box 5.6 Mobile cessation (mCessation) in Costa Rica
Costa Rica has had a campaign to lower smoking rates for several years. To in-
crease public outreach, it was decided to use the growing mobile telephone 
user base to connect with smokers and help them quit, using mCessation 
methods. In collaboration with the WHO-ITU mHealth initiative, Costa Rica 
launched its fi rst-ever mobile-based smoking-cessation programme, «Quit 
Smoking» (Dejar de fumar), to support existing cessation services within the 
health system. The programme is based on text messaging, using standar-
dized protocols and adapted to the country context.
Further monitoring and evaluation is required to validate fi ndings, but initial results indicate that mobile-based 
smoking-cessation programmes can be used successfully to help smokers quit in Costa Rica.
Sources: see references (17).
  e successes of most countries in applying 
tobacco demand-reduction measures demonstrate 
that it is possible to tackle the tobacco epidemic 
regardless of size or income. Most progress in 
protecting people with these measures has been 
made by low- and  middle-income  countries, 
which remain at greatest risk from e orts of the 
tobacco industry to increase tobacco use. Despite 
the achievements in some countries in establishing 
e ective tobacco-control measures, no country has 
entirely succeeded in protecting its population from 
the e ects of tobacco. E orts must be accelerated 
in all countries to save even more lives.
Actions required to 
achieve this target 
Parties to the WHO FCTC (5) reported in 2014 an 
overall implementation of 54% of the substantive 
obligations of the treaty (18). Despite signi cant 
progress and global commitment to reduce tobacco 
consumption under the obligations of the conven-
tion, including the increase in countries imple-
menting tobacco-control “best buys” at the highest 
level, signi cant challenges remain for achieving 
the global target of reducing tobacco use by 30%. 
  e challenges to the successful implementation 
of tobacco-control policies range from insuffi  cient 
political will and weak intersectoral cooperation, 
to weak implementation or enforcement capacities.
Add text pdf file acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf document online; how to add text to a pdf file
Add text pdf file acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to enter text in a pdf document
Global status report on NCDs 2014
62
周  e  rst challenge to tobacco control is a direct 
result of strong political and public commitment 
at the time of the WHO FCTC negotiation and 
some early and positive responses. However, a er 
initial success with a number of the WHO FCTC 
obligations, especially in areas such as smoke-free 
policies and large pictorial health warnings, there 
appears to be some complacency which is hinder-
ing e orts to move ahead and leading to “tobac-
co-control fatigue”. Some countries have begun to 
discuss how to lower the prevalence of smoking 
below 5%, in what it is called the “tobacco endgame 
approach”. However, while discussion of the end-
game as a motivational tool for continuing reduc-
tion of the tobacco epidemic in some countries is 
of great importance in overcoming complacency, 
it should not be mistaken for an announcement 
of the end of the tobacco epidemic, because much 
remains to be done.
周  e second challenge has been the di  culty 
of ensuring that some “best-buy” policies at the 
highest level of achievement are actually adopted 
by governments. 周  e problem is typically due either 
to poor political will or to interference from the 
tobacco industry, or both. 周  ere is good evidence 
that tobacco taxation o ers the best potential for 
impact on reduction rates, yet it is one of the least 
implemented measures in national e orts, with 
only 32 of 195 countries having developed com-
plete policies on tobacco taxation, demonstrating 
the need for stronger political engagement (3,19). 
Greater priority needs to be given to developing new 
strategies to support whole-of-government action 
in adopting and implementing sound national pol-
icies in accordance with all provisions of the WHO 
FCTC (5).
周  e di erent elements a ecting these broader 
national challenges to global tobacco control can 
be broken down under the subheadings that follow.
Increasing implementation support
As progress in approval of the WHO FCTC pol-
icies (5) continues, many countries face the chal-
lenges of implementation and enforcement. 周  ese 
may include providing additional support and 
guidance to countries, building and engaging in 
multisectoral partnerships in specialized areas of 
tobacco-control policies such as international trade, 
eliminating illicit trade in tobacco products, and 
other related activities that serve to facilitate the 
ground-level adoption and enforcement of tobac-
co-control policies.
Revitalizing political and public willpower
Countries need to remain aware that tobacco con-
tinues to be a signi cant threat to public health, 
avoiding a sense that the worst is over, which, as 
mentioned above, is leading to problems of com-
placency in implementation e orts. 周  ere is also 
increasing fatigue in communication e orts, which 
risks a resurgence of tobacco use among commu-
nities and individuals, as a result of it ceasing to be 
considered a major health concern. While attain-
ment of the tobacco-reduction target is achievable, 
a more audacious strategy may be needed to revi-
talize political and public willpower to advance 
progress.
Countering tobacco industry interference
Tobacco industry interference is one of the key 
challenges to the creation and implementation of 
tobacco-reduction measures. It continues to under-
mine control e orts globally, and more needs to 
be done to counter its negative in uence. In fact, 
during the reporting cycle of the WHO FCTC, 
which ended at the beginning of 2014, the chal-
lenge mentioned most frequently by Parties to the 
convention was tobacco industry interference. 周  e 
tobacco industry continues to use legal challenges 
(o en employed without success) to national tobac-
co-control measures, including litigation or support 
for litigation under multilateral and bilateral trade 
and investment agreements, to prevent, delay or 
weaken implementation of tobacco-control mea-
sures. Both the threat and active pursuit of legal 
challenges appear to be becoming more prominent, 
as Parties continue to implement the WHO FCTC. 
Article 5.3 of the treaty (5) clearly mandates Par-
ties to the convention to prevent tobacco industry 
interference in tobacco control and public health. 
周  e tobacco industry is experienced in fostering 
partnerships with a range of sectors and interest 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. developers to conduct high fidelity PDF file conversion in
how to add text to pdf file with reader; add text to a pdf document
Chapter 5. Global target 5
63
groups, which has enabled it to put increasing pres-
sure on tobacco-control measures, by diversifying 
the angles from which they are able to encourage 
dissent. A clear area of improvement for tobac-
co-control eff orts is in redressing this imbalance 
by extending preventative action to other sectors 
such as  nance, international trade and agriculture. 
Additionally, countries should seek to implement 
clear monitoring systems for industry activities 
across all sectors, to gauge the extent of in uence 
and map potential obstructions to tobacco-control 
policies.
Approaching tobacco as a multisectoral 
problem for the whole government
A focus on tobacco as an exclusively public health 
concern limits the chance for success in attaining 
the global target.   is limited focus is causing 
implementation problems in cross-sectoral areas 
of tobacco-reduction measures, including min-
imal dialogue between  nance, trade and health 
ministries in many countries. Tobacco control is 
multisectoral, and therefore requires an increase 
in intersectoral discussions and actions. These 
may include policy focus on the relation between 
tobacco controls and international trade, or alter-
native livelihoods for tobacco farmers.
A unifocal approach to tobacco control misses 
opportunities for synergistic programmes with 
other  communicable  and  noncommunicable 
disease programmes, such as for tuberculosis or 
respiratory diseases. It also misses the conspicuous 
need to integrate tobacco-control eff orts within the 
wider health-development agenda.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following PowerPoint file conversions PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text in pdf reader; how to add text fields to a pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following Word file conversions. Word to PDF Conversion.
add text pdf professional; adding text to pdf online
Global status report on NCDs 2014
64
References 
1. Oberg M, Jaakkola MS, Woodward A, Peruga A, Prüss-
Ustün A. Worldwide burden of disease from exposure 
to second-hand smoke: a retrospective analysis of data 
from 192 countries. Lancet. 2011;377(9760):139−46. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61388-8.
2. WHO global report. Mortality attributable to tobacco. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2012 (http://
www.who.int/tobacco/publications/surveillance/
rep_mortality_attributable/en/, accessed 5 November 
2014).
3. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic 2013. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2013 (http://
www.who.int/tobacco/global_report/2013/en/
accessed 5 November 2014).
4. NCD global monitoring framework: indicator 
defi nitions and specifi cations. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
5. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2003 (http://
whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2003/9241591013.
pdf, accessed 5 November 2014).
6. Guidelines for implementation of the WHO FCTC 
Article 5.3 | Article 8 | Articles 9 and 10 | Article 11 
| Article 12 | Article 13 | Article 14. Geneva: World 
Health organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.int/
iris/bitstream/10665/80510/1/9789241505185_eng.
pdf?ua=1, accessed 5 November 2014).
7. Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework 
Convention on Tobacco Control, Sixth session decision 
“Towards a stronger contribution of the Conference of 
the Parties to achieving the noncommunicable disease 
global target on reduction of tobacco use” http://apps.
who.int/gb/fctc/E/E_cop6.htm
8. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 3 November 2014).
9. Scaling up action against noncommunicable diseases: 
how much will it cost? Geneva: World Health 
Organization;  2011  (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/
publications/2011/9789241502313_eng.pdf, accessed 
4 November 2014).
10. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011: 
warning about the dangers of tobacco. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2011 (http://www.who.int/
tobacco/global_report/2011/en/, accessed 5 November 
2014).
11. Tobacco control in Turkey: story of commitment and 
leadership. Copenhagen: World Health Organization 
Regional O  ce for Europe; 2012 (http://www.euro.
who.int/__data/assets/pdf_fi le/0009/163854/e96532.
pdf?ua=1, accessed 5 November 2014).
12. Standardised packaging of tobacco: report of 
the independent review undertaken by Sir Cyril 
Chantler http://www.kcl.ac.uk/health/10035-
TSO-2901853-Chantler-Review-ACCESSIBLE.
PDF?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_
campaign=standardised-packaging-of-tobacco-report-
of-the-independent-review-undertaken-by-sir-cyril-
chantler-pdf, accessed 6 November 2014).
13. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. 
  ailand – new regulations on graphic health warnings 
introduced (http://www.who.int/fctc/implementation/
news/news_thai/en/, accessed 6 November 2014).
14. European tobacco control status report 2013. 
Copenhagen: World Health Organization Regional 
O  ce for Europe; 2013 (http://www.euro.who.int/__
data/assets/pdf_fi le/0011/235973/European-Tobacco-
Control-Status-Report-2013-Eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 
6 November 2014).
15.  e Smokefree Coalition. Tupeka kore/Tobacco free 
Aotearoa/New Zealand by 2020 (http://www.sfc.org.
nz/thevision.php, accessed 6 November 2014).
16.  World Health Organization. Tobacco Free Initiative. 
African tobacco control (http://www.who.int/tobacco/
control/capacity_building/africa/activities/en/
accessed 6 November 2014).
17. ITU. Be he@lthy be mobile. http://www.itu.int/
en/ITU-D/ICT-Applications/eHEALTH/Pages/
mHealth_CostaRica_smoking.aspx (accessed 6 
November 2014).
18. 2014 global progress report on implementation of the 
WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014 (http://
www.who.int/fctc/reporting/2014globalprogressreport.
pdf?ua=1, accessed 5 November 2014).
19. Raising tax on tobacco: what you need to know. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2014 (http://
www.who.int/campaigns/no-tobacco-day/2014/
brochure/en/, accessed 5 November 2014).
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf in preview
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. library toolkit in C#, you can easily perform file conversion from Convert to PDF.
how to add text field to pdf; adding text to a pdf in reader
Chapter 5. Global target 5
65
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
add text boxes to a pdf; how to insert text box on pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following Excel file conversions. Excel to PDF Conversion.
add text to pdf without acrobat; adding text to a pdf
Raised blood pressure is one of the leading risk factors for global 
mortality and is estimated to have caused 9.4 million deaths and 
7% of disease burden – as measured in disability-adjusted life-
years − in 2010.
周  e global prevalence of raised blood pressure (de ned as systolic 
and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg) in adults aged 18 
years and over was around 22% in 2014.
Reducing the incidence of hypertension through implementation 
of population-wide policies to reduce behavioural risk factors, 
including harmful use of alcohol, physical inactivity, overweight, 
obesity and high salt intake, is essential to attaining this target.
Control of hypertension through a total cardiovascular risk 
approach is more cost e ective than treatment decisions based on 
individual risk factor thresholds only.
A total-risk approach needs to be adopted for early detection 
and cost-e ective management of hypertension, to prevent heart 
attacks, strokes and other complications.
周  e attainment of this target will contribute to attainment of the 
target on reducing premature mortality from NCDs.
Key  points
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
No need for Adobe Acrobat and Microsoft Word; Has built losing will occur during conversion by PDF to Word Open the output file automatically for the users; Offer
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; add text to pdf acrobat
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader; Seamlessly integrated into RasterEdge .NET Image to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion;
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to input text in a pdf
67
Raised blood pressure and its impact on health 
Raised blood pressure is one of the leading risk factors for global mortality and 
is estimated to have caused 9.4 million deaths and 7% of disease burden – as 
measured in DALYs − in 2010 (1). Raised blood pressure is a major cardiovascular 
risk factor. If le晴  uncontrolled, hypertension causes stroke, myocardial infarction, 
cardiac failure, dementia, renal failure and blindness, causing human su ering and 
imposing severe  nancial and service burdens on health systems (2,3).
Scienti c studies have consistently shown the health bene ts of lowering blood 
pressure through population-wide and individual (behavioural and pharmacolog-
ical) interventions (4−6). For instance, a reduction in systolic blood pressure of 
10 mmHg is associated with a 22% reduction in coronary heart disease and 41% 
reduction in stroke in randomized trials (5), and a 41–46% reduction in cardiomet-
abolic mortality (6) in epidemiological studies.
  e global prevalence of raised blood pressure (de ned as systolic and/or dia-
stolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg) in adults aged 18 years and over was around 
6
Global target 6: A 25% relative reduction 
in the prevalence of raised blood pressure 
or contain the prevalence of raised blood 
pressure, according to national circumstances
Fig. 6.1  Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood pressure in males aged 18 years and over (defi ned as systolic 
and/or diastolic blood pressure equal to or above 140/90 mm Hg), comparable estimates, 2014
Prevalence of raised blood pressure (%)*
* systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg.
<25
25–29.9
≥30
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Global status report on NCDs 2014
68
22% in 2014. 周  e proportion of the world’s pop-
ulation with high blood pressure or uncontrolled 
hypertension fell modestly between 1980 and 2010. 
However, because of population growth and ageing, 
the number of people with uncontrolled hyperten-
sion has risen over the years.
Fig. 6.2  Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood pressure in females aged 18 years and over (defi ned as systolic 
and/or diastolic blood pressure equal to or above 140/90 mm Hg), comparable estimates, 2014
Prevalence of raised blood pressure (%)*
*systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg
<25
25–29.9
≥30
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Fig. 6.3  Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and over (defi ned as systolic 
and/or diastolic blood pressure equal to or above 140/90 mm Hg), by WHO region and World Bank income 
group, comparable estimates, 2014 
Q
Males    
Q
Females
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
% of population
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood 
pressure in men and women is shown in Figs. 6.1 
and 6.2 respectively. Across the WHO regions, 
the prevalence of raised blood pressure was high-
est in Africa, at 30% for all adults combined. 周  e 
lowest prevalence of raised blood pressure was in 
Chapter 6. Global target 6
69
the Region of the Americas, at 18% (see Fig. 6.3). 
Men in this region had higher prevalence (21%) 
than women (16%). In all WHO regions, men have 
slightly higher prevalence of raised blood pressure 
than women. Fig. 6.5 shows the age-standardized 
prevalence of raised blood pressure in adults aged 
18 years and over by country and World Bank 
income group in 2014. In general, the prevalence 
of raised blood pressure was higher in low-income 
countries compared to middle-income and high-in-
come countries (see Fig 6.5). 
Many factors contribute to the high prevalence 
rates of hypertension(see Fig. 6.4): 
eating food containing too much salt and fat; not 
eating enough fruits and vegetables;
overweight and obesity;
harmful use of alcohol;
physical inactivity;
ageing;
genetic factors;
psychological stress;
socioeconomic determinants;
inadequate access to health care.
Hypertension is not an inevitable consequence 
of ageing. In the majority of cases, the exact cause 
of hypertension is unknown, but the presence of 
several of the above factors, increase the risk of 
developing the condition. Most of these factors are 
modifi able.
What are the cost-eff  ective 
policies and interventions 
to reduce the prevalence 
of raised blood pressure? 
In order to achieve this target, a comprehensive set 
of population-wide and individual interventions 
and policies is required to address the modifi able 
risk factors listed above. Very cost-e ective pop-
ulation-wide interventions are available to reduce 
harmful use of alcohol (see Chapter 2), physical 
inactivity (see Chapter 3), population intake of salt/
sodium (see Chapter 4), overweight and obesity 
and intake of saturated fats (see Chapter 7), and to 
increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables 
Figure 6.4 Main contributory factors to high blood pressure and its complications (3) 
Social 
determinants 
and drivers
Globalization
Urbanization
Ageing
Income
Education
Housing
Social 
determinants 
and drivers
Social 
determinants 
and drivers
Unhealthy diet
Tobacco use
Physical inactivity
Harmfull use of 
Alcohol
Behaviour
risk
factors
Social 
determinants 
and drivers
High blood 
pressure
Obesity
Diabetes
Raised blood 
lipids
Metabolic
risk
factors
Social 
determinants 
and drivers
Heart attack
Strokes
Heart failure
Cardiovascular
disease
Global status report on NCDs 2014
70
Andorra 24.4
A
n
t
ig
u
a
 a
n
d
 B
a
r
b
u
d
a
 2
2
.6
A
u
stralia
 19
.0
Austria 24.8
Bahamas 22.1
Bahrain 19.2
Barbados 26.0
Belgium 23.8
Brunei Darussalam 17.9
Canada 17.3
Chile 23.1
Croatia 35.8
Cyprus 21.9
Czech Republic 33.2
Denmark 26.3
Equatorial Guinea 25.2
Estonia 39.2
Finland 27.1
France 27.5
Germany 27.1
Greece 25.0
Iceland 23.6
Ireland 20.9
Isra
e
l 1
9
.7
It
a
ly
 2
7
.
6
Japan 25.7
Kuwait 19.9
L
a
t
v
i
a
3
7
.
1
L
ith
a
n
ia
 3
4
.7
Luxem
bourg 25.5
Malta 25.4
Netherlands 23.9
New Zealand 19.8
Norway 23.3
Oman 17.2
Poland 33.5
Portugal 29.0
Qatar 18.1
Republic of Korea 12.8
Russian Federation 33.3
Saint Kitts and Nevis 24.6
Saudi Arabia 21.8
Singapore 16.0
Slovakia 31.6
Slovenia 35.3
Spain 24.8
Sweden 25.9
Switzerland 23.2
Trinidad and Tobago 24.3
U
n
ited
 A
rab
 Em
ira
te
s 1
4.7
U
n
it
e
d
 K
in
g
d
o
m
 2
0
.3
U
n
i
t
e
d
S
t
a
t
e
s
o
f
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
1
7
.
0
Uruguay 25.8
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
Afghanistan 21.7
B
a
n
g
la
d
e
s
h
2
1
.
5
B
en
in
 23
.8
Burkina Faso 25.1
Burundi 22.9
Cambodia 21.1
Central African Republic 26.4
Chad 25.1
Comoros 23.0
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 22.1
Democratic Republic of the Congo 24.8
Eritrea 21.9
Ethiopia 24.4
Gambia 23.5
Guinea 25.3
Guinea-Bissau 26.2
H
a
iti 2
1
.8
Kenya 21.1
Liberia 25.1
M
a
d
a
g
a
sc
a
r 2
3
.3
M
alawi 22.5
Mali 25.9
Mozambique 24.3
Myanmar 21.5
Nepal 23.3
Niger 28.0
Rwanda 21.6
Sierra Leone 24.9
Somalia 26.4
Tajikistan 21.5
Togo 24.3
Uganda 20.5
United Republic of Tanzania 22.3
Zim
b
abw
e 22
.1
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
High-income
Low-income
Fig. 6.5  Age-standardized prevalence of raised blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and over (defi ned as systolic 
and/or diastolic blood pressure equal to or above 140/90 mm Hg) (%), by individual country, and by World 
Bank Income group, comparable estimates, 2014
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested