open byte array pdf in browser c# : Adding text fields to pdf control software platform web page winforms asp.net web browser 9789241564854_eng9-part1688

Chapter 6. Global target 6
71
Armenia 28.5
B
h
u
t
a
n
2
2
.
4
B
o
l
iv
ia
 (
P
lu
r
in
a
t
i
o
n
a
l S
t
a
t
e
 o
f
) 1
5
.1
Cabo Verde 2
7.1
Cameroon 21.6
Congo 23.9
Côte d’Ivoire 23.7
Djibouti 24.4
Egypt 23.5
El Salvador 19.5
Georgia 32.8
Ghana 23.0
Guatemala 18.2
Guyana 18.8
Honduras 18.7
India 23.0
Indonesia 21.3
Kiribati 20.8
Kyrgyzstan 23.8
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 18.8
Lesotho 22.8
M
auritania 27.6
M
ic
ro
n
es
ia (Fe
d
erate
d
 S
tats o
f) 19
.5
M
o
n
g
o
lia
 2
6
.4
Morocco 25.3
Nicaragua 19.4
N
i
g
e
r
ia
2
1
.
6
Pak
istan
 2
3.0
Papua New
 Guinea 18.7
Paraguay 20.5
Philippines 18.6
Republic of Moldova 34.3
Samoa 20.3
Sao Tome and Principe 22.7
Senegal 24.2
Solomon Islands 19.0
South Sudan 24.4
Sri Lanka 22.4
Sudan 24.4
Swaziland 21.5
Syrian Arab Republic 21.3
Timor-Leste 20.8
Ukraine 34.6
Uzbekistan 22.1
Vanuatu 20.5
Viet Nam 21.0
Yem
en
 23.3
Z
a
m
b
ia
 2
1
.1
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
Albania 30.5
Algeria 24.0
A
n
g
o
la
 2
3
.9
A
rg
en
tin
a
 2
3.5
A
zerbaijan 24.4
Belarus 34.1
Belize 18.2
Bosnia and Herzegovina 34.0
Botswana 23.0
Brazil 23.0
Bulgaria 36.4
China 19.8
Colombia 20.7
Cook Islands 22.2
Costa Rica 20.5
Cuba 25.4
Dominica 23.7
Dominican Republic 21.8
Ecuador 16.5
Fiji 22.5
Gabon 24.7
Grenada 20.9
Hungary 35.2
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 20.4
Iraq 21.8
jam
aica 22.1
Jo
rd
an
 1
9.3
K
a
z
a
k
h
s
t
a
n
 2
6
.5
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
2
2
.
1
Libya 21.9
Malaysia 19.6
M
a
l
d
iv
e
s
 1
7
.4
M
a
rsh
all Islan
d
s
 2
1
.8
M
auritius 27.1
Mexico 19.6
Montenegro 32.6
Namibia 23.8
nauru 22.6
Niue 22.4
Palau 23.3
Panama 20.5
Peru 13.2
Romania 32.5
Saint Lucia 24.5
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 22.3
Serbia 34.5
Seychelles 23.5
South Africa 25.2
Suriname 22.3
Thailand 23.6
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 31.0
Tonga 20.4
Tunisia 24.4
Turkey 22.4
Turkm
enistan 22.7
Tuv
alu
 22
.5
V
e
n
e
z
u
e
la
 (B
o
liv
a
r
ia
n
 R
e
p
u
b
l
ic
 o
f
)
 1
9
.4
0%
50%
20%
10%
30%
40%
Low-middle-income
Upper-middle-income
Adding text fields to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf reader; adding text box to pdf
Adding text fields to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text fields to pdf
Global status report on NCDs 2014
72
(see Box 1.1). 周  ese interventions should be imple-
mented to prevent hypertension and to shi  the 
population distribution of blood pressure to an 
optimal pro le (7).
In addition, there must be equitable access to 
individual interventions, particularly at primary 
health-care level. People with hypertension are 
o en asymptomatic until they develop end-organ 
damage (2,3). Consequently, proactive cost-e ec-
tive approaches must be adopted for early detection 
of hypertension. Evidence indicates that targeted 
screening for total cardiovascular risk with blood 
pressure measurement (and blood glucose testing) 
is more cost e ective than screening the whole pop-
ulation for a single risk factor, and is more likely 
to identify individuals at high cardiovascular risk 
for lower cost (8−10). In settings with access to 
well-developed primary health-care systems (i.e. 
where physicians can identify patients at high risk 
of developing diseases when they see them for other 
reasons, and can intervene when necessary), adding 
an organized screening programme to usual prac-
tice may not be required. Indeed, in such settings, 
systematic screening of the population has not 
resulted in a reduction in incidence of ischaemic 
heart disease compared to control groups that have 
access to usual care (11,12).
周  ere are several barriers to accurate and a ord-
able blood pressure measurement, particularly 
in low-and middle income countries (13). 周  ese 
include:
周  e absence of accurate, easily-obtainable, inex-
pensive devices for blood pressure measurement;
周  e frequent marketing of non-validated blood 
pressure measuring devices; 
周  e relatively high cost of blood pressure devices 
given the limited resources available;
Limited awareness of the problems associated 
with conventional blood pressure measurement 
techniques; 
A general lack of trained manpower and limited 
training of personnel.
The health system must be able to manage 
those detected with hypertension, using a ordable 
approaches, particularly in resource-constrained 
settings (14). A total-risk approach is needed to 
improve the e  ciency and e ectiveness of detection 
and management of hypertension (2,3,15). Deci-
sions on drug treatment should be underpinned 
by evidence and based on total cardiovascular risk 
(15,16). Evidence of bene t for lowering blood pres-
sure levels at or above 160/100 mmHg with drug 
treatment and non-pharmacological measures 
is very clear (2,3,15). Lower degrees of persistent 
hypertension  (≥140/90 mm Hg) with  moder-
ate-to-high cardiovascular risk also require drug 
treatment (2,3,15). On the other hand, there is no 
evidence to justify drug treatment of persons with 
borderline hypertension and very low cardiovas-
cular risk. People in this category, however, would 
bene t from the population-wide interventions 
alluded to above (2,3).
Monitoring the prevalence 
of raised blood pressure
In the  global  monitoring framework (17,  see 
Annex 1), the indicator for monitoring the preva-
lence of raised blood pressure is the age-standard-
ized prevalence of raised blood pressure among 
persons aged 18+ years (7). Raised blood pressure 
is de ned as systolic blood pressure ≥140mmHg 
and/or  diastolic  blood  pressure  ≥90  mmHg 
among persons aged 18+ years. For monitoring of 
progress, data should be gathered from a popula-
tion-based (preferably nationally representative) 
survey in which blood pressure was measured (not 
self-reported).
Progress achieved
High-income countries have begun to reduce 
hypertension through strong public health policies 
to reduce salt in processed food (see Chapter 4), 
improve the availability and a ordability of fruits 
and vegetables (18), and create environments that 
promote physical activity (see Chapter 3). Declin-
ing trends in blood pressure, together with declines 
in smoking, body mass index (BMI) and serum 
cholesterol, may have accounted for nearly half 
the decline in cardiovascular mortality in some 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
adding text field to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text block to pdf
Chapter 6. Global target 6
73
high-income countries (4). However, shortcom-
ings in public health policies to address intake of 
salt and fruits and vegetables, physical inactivity, 
and overweight and obesity have resulted in rising 
trends in blood pressure in low- and middle-income 
countries.
周  e country capacity assessment survey con-
ducted in 2013 indicates many gaps in the imple-
mentation of public health policies that are key to 
prevention of hypertension (see Table 6.1) (19).
High-income countries had the highest per-
centage of national policies, plans or strategies. 周  e 
percentage of countries reporting policies, plans or 
strategies on behavioural risk factors was generally 
lowest in the WHO African Region, except for pol-
icies, plans or strategies on harmful use of alcohol, 
which were reported in an even lower percentage 
of countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 
(see Fig. 6.6).
The number of people with undetected and 
uncontrolled hypertension has increased worldwide 
Fig. 6.6  Policies, plans and strategies to address behavioural risk factors of hypertension, by WHO region and World 
Bank income level 
100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Number of countries
AFR=African Region, AMR=Region of the Americas, SEAR =South-East Asia Region, EUR=European Region, EMR=Eastern Mediterranean Region, 
WPR=Western Pacific Region
HIgh-
income
Upper-
middle-
income
Lower-
middle-
income
Low-
income
WPR
SEAR
EUR
EMR
AMR
AFR
Q
Tobacco use;  strategy or action plan or  policy – operational   
Q
Unhealthy diet; strategy or action plan or policy – operational
Q
Physical inactivity; strategy or action plan or policy – operational 
Q
Overweight and obesity; strategy or action plan or  policy – operational
Q
Harmful use of alcohol; strategy or action plan or policy – operational 
because of population growth and ageing (4). Stud-
ies in high-income countries report that about one 
  h of people with hypertension are unaware of 
their condition, about one quarter do not receive 
treatment and only around half have their blood 
pressure under control (20,21). 周  e situation is 
much worse in low- and middle-income countries, 
where only about half of those with hypertension 
are aware of their status, only a fraction receive 
treatment, and the majority do not have their blood 
pressure under control (22,23). In general, aware-
ness, treatment and control are lower in people with 
lower levels of literacy and socioeconomic status.
Actions required to 
attain this target 
周  ere are signi cant health and economic gains 
in attaining this target. Worldwide, the high prev-
alence of hypertension contributes signi cantly 
to preventable cardiovascular events. As already 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
add text to pdf file online; adding text to pdf in acrobat
Global status report on NCDs 2014
74
discussed, in most countries, many people with 
raised blood pressure are unaware that they have 
hypertension, and detection and control rates are 
suboptimal.
Once hypertension develops, it may require 
lifelong treatment with medicines. Because of the 
high prevalence, drug treatment can be costly and 
is a challenge for resource-constrained settings. 
However, neglecting treatment entails interventions 
that are even more costly, such as cardiac bypass 
surgery, carotid artery surgery and renal dialysis, 
draining both individual and government budgets. 
周  e only solution is to control hypertension using 
an a ordable total-risk approach, and concurrently 
take action to reduce its incidence.
周  e actions that are needed to attain this target, 
are listed under the subheadings that follow.
Implement public health policies to 
reduce the incidence of hypertension
Top priority should be accorded to implemen-
tation of public health policies to reduce exposure 
to behavioural risk factors: harmful use of alcohol 
(see Chapter 2), physical inactivity (see Chapter 3), 
high salt intake (see Chapter 4) and tobacco use (see 
Chapter 5). Policies to address overweight and obe-
sity (see Chapter 7) also have a signi cant impact 
on the incidence of hypertension.
Establish integrated programmes 
for hypertension and diabetes 
in primary care
Integrated NCD programmes can be established 
at the primary care level, using WHO guidelines 
and tools (24). One objective of an integrated pro-
gramme is to reduce total cardiovascular risk to 
prevent heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and 
other complications of hypertension and diabe-
tes. Hypertension and diabetes o en coexist and 
they cannot be dealt with in isolation. Adopting 
this comprehensive approach ensures that limited 
resources are used for the treatment of those at 
medium and high risk. It also prevents unnec-
essary drug treatment of people with borderline 
hypertension and very low cardiovascular risk. 
Inappropriate drug treatment exposes people to 
unwarranted harmful e ects and increases the cost 
of health care. Both should be avoided.
Investments are needed to improve health-service 
infrastructure and human and  nancial resources, 
to create a health-care system that is capable of 
deploying and sustaining equitable and quality-as-
sured programmes for addressing cardiovascular 
risk (see Chapter 8). Appropriate communication 
and awareness-creation strategies are essential to 
ensure high coverage and follow-up care. Informa-
tion systems should be in place to facilitate monitor-
ing and evaluation of inputs and outcomes. E ective 
Box 6.1  Non-physician health workers implement the total-risk approach using 
hypertension as an entry point in Bhutan
In Paro and Bumthang districts of Bhutan, trained  non-physician 
health workers carried out cardiovascular risk assessment and mana-
gement in primary care, using hypertension as an entry point. In this 
project, initiated in 2009, simplifi ed protocols of the WHO package 
of  essential  noncommunicable  disease  (PEN)  interventions  were 
used to implement a total-risk approach. Regular audits checked the 
adequacy of human resources, availability of equipment and labo-
ratory reagents, adherence to clinical protocols, and maintenance of 
stock registers. A performance assessment in 2013 showed that im-
plementation of the total-risk approach in primary health care in Bhutan led to signifi cant improvement in blood 
pressure and diabetes control, and reduction in cardiovascular risk . In collaboration with ministries of health, 
WHO has initiated similar projects in primary care in some 30 resource-constrained settings. 
Sources: see references (24,25).
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add editable text box to pdf; add text to pdf reader
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to insert text into a pdf; add text pdf
Chapter 6. Global target 6
75
training and reorientation of health-care workers, 
including non-physician health workers, are criti-
cal for improving provider performance and com-
petency. With adequate training and supervision, 
non-physician health workers can play a key role in 
cardiovascular risk assessment and management, 
particularly in primary health care (see Box 6.1).
Strategies to enhance adherence
周  e control of hypertension and cardiovascular 
risk, rely on individuals being adherent to measures 
to reduce behavioural risk factors and drug treat-
ment as prescribed. Adherence requires a strategic 
policy to address the issue at the outset. Patients 
should be educated upon diagnosis and adherence 
enhancing strategies should be implemented to 
ensure ongoing control of cardiovascular risk. 
Where measurement devices are affordable, 
self-monitoring of blood pressure is recommended 
for the management of hypertension and diabe-
tes (24). As with other NCDs, evidence-based 
approaches to strengthen self-care can facilitate 
early detection of hypertension, adherence to med-
ication, and healthy behaviours, better control, and 
awareness of the importance of seeking medical 
advice when necessary. Self-care is important for 
all, but it is particularly useful for persons who have 
limited access to health services due to geograph-
ical, physical or economic reasons.
Promote workplace wellness programmes
周  e United Nations high-level meeting on NCD 
prevention and control in 2011 called on the private 
sector to “promote and create an enabling envi-
ronment for healthy behaviours among workers 
(26), including by establishing tobacco-free work-
places and safe and healthy working environments 
through occupational safety and health measures, 
including, where appropriate, through good cor-
porate practices, workplace wellness programmes 
and health insurance plans”. Workplace wellness 
programmes should focus on promoting worker 
health through the reduction of individual risk-re-
lated behaviours (e.g. tobacco use, unhealthy diet, 
harmful use of alcohol, physical inactivity and 
other health-risk behaviours). 周  ese programmes 
have the potential to reach a signi cant proportion 
of employed adults for early detection of hyperten-
sion, diabetes and other illnesses.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
adding text to pdf document; add text boxes to pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text box to pdf file
Global status report on NCDs 2014
76
References 
1. Lim SS, Vos T, Flaxman AD, Danaei G, Shibuya K, 
Adair-Rohani H et al. A comparative risk assessment 
of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk 
factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990–
2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of 
Disease Study 2010. Lancet. 2012;380(9859):2224−60. 
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61766-8.
2. A global brief on hypertension. Silent killer, 
global  public  health  crisis.  Geneva:  World 
Health  Organization;  2013  (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/79059/1/WHO_DCO_
WHD_2013.2_eng.pdf, accessed 5 November 2014).
3. Prevention of cardiovascular disease: guidelines for 
assessment and management of cardiovascular risk. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2007 (http://
www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/guidelines/
Full%20text.pdf, accessed 5 November 2014).
4. Danaei G, Finucane MM, Lin JK, Singh GM, Paciorek 
CJ, Cowan MJ et al; Global Burden of Metabolic 
Risk Factors of Chronic Diseases Collaborating 
Group (Blood Pressure). National, regional, and 
global trends in systolic blood pressure since 1980: 
systematic analysis of health examination surveys and 
epidemiological studies with 786 country-years and 5.4 
million participants. Lancet. 2011;377(9765):568−77. 
doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62036-3.
5.  Law MR, Morris JK, Wald NJ. Use of blood pressure 
lowering drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular 
disease: meta-analysis of 147 randomised trials 
in the context of expectations from prospective 
epidemiological studies.  BMJ.  2009;338:b1665. 
doi:10.1136/bmj.b1665.
6. Di Cesare M, Bennett JE, Best N, Stevens GA, Danaei 
G, Ezzati M. 周  e contributions of risk factor trends to 
cardiometabolic mortality decline in 26 industrialized 
countries. Int J  Epidemiol. 2013;42(3):838−48. 
doi:10.1093/ije/dyt063.
7. Global action plan for the prevention and control 
of noncommunicable diseases 2013−2020. Geneva: 
World Health Organization; 2013 (http://apps.who.
int/iris/bitstream/10665/94384/1/9789241506236_
eng.pdf?ua=1, accessed 3 November 2014).
8. WHO guideline for screening of cardiovascular 
risk including diabetes. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014 (in press).
9. Lawson KD, Fenwick EA, Pell AC, Pell JP. Comparison 
of  mass and targeted screening  strategies  for 
cardiovascular risk: simulation of the e ectiveness, 
cost-e ectiveness and coverage using a cross-sectional 
survey of 3921 people. Heart. 2010;96(3):208−12. 
doi:10.1136/hrt.2009.177204.
10. Baker J, Mitchell R, Lawson K, Pell J. Ethnic 
di erences in the cost-e ectiveness of targeted and 
mass screening for high cardiovascular risk in the 
UK: cross-sectional study. Heart. 2013;99(23):1766−71. 
doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-304625.
11.  Jørgensen T, Jacobsen RK, To  U, Aadahl M, Glümer 
C, Pisinger C. Effect of screening and lifestyle 
counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease 
in general population: Inter99 randomised trial. BMJ. 
20149;348:g3617. doi:10.1136/bmj.g3617.
12. Krogsbøll LT, Jørgensen KJ, Larsen CG, Gøtzsche PC. 
General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity 
and mortality from disease. Cochrane systematic 
review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2012;345:e7191. 
doi:10.1136/bmj.e7191.
13. A ordable technology. Blood pressure measuring 
devices for low resource settings. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2005.
14. Ndindjock R, Gedeon J, Mendis S, Paccaud F, Bovet 
P. Potential impact of single-risk-factor versus total 
risk management for the prevention of cardiovascular 
events in Seychelles. Bull World Health Organ. 
2011;89(4):286−95. doi:10.2471/BLT.10.082370.
15. Prevention and control of noncommunicable 
diseases: guidelines for primary health care in low-
resource settings; diagnosis and management of type 
2 diabetes and management of asthma and chronic 
obstructive  pulmonary disease. Geneva: World 
Health Organization; 2012 (http://apps.who.int/iris/
bitstream/10665/76173/1/9789241548397_eng.pdf
accessed 5 November 2014).
16. Sundström J, Arima H, Woodward M, Jackson 
R, Karmali K, Lloyd-Jones D et al; Blood Pressure 
Lowering Treatment Trialists’ Collaboration. Blood 
pressure-lowering treatment based on cardiovascular 
risk: a meta-analysis of individual patient data. 
Lancet.  2014;384(9943):591−8.  doi:10.1016/
S0140-6736(14)61212-5.
17. NCD global monitoring framework indicator 
de nitions and speci cations. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
18. Ganann R, Fitzpatrick-Lewis D, Ciliska D, Peirson LJ, 
Warren RL, Fieldhouse P et al. Enhancing nutritional 
environments through access to fruit and vegetables 
in schools and homes among children and youth: 
a systematic review. BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:422. 
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-7-422.
19. Assessing national capacity for the prevention 
and control of noncommunicable diseases; report 
of the 2013 global survey. Geneva: World Health 
Organization; 2014.
Chapter 6. Global target 6
77
20. Liddy C, Singh J, Hogg W, Dahrouge S, Deri-Armstrong 
C, Russell G et al. Quality of cardiovascular disease 
care in Ontario, Canada: missed opportunities for 
prevention − a cross sectional study. BMC Cardiovasc 
Disord. 2012;12:74. doi:10.1186/1471-2261-12-74.
21. Joff res M, Falaschetti E, Gillespie C, Robitaille C, 
Loustalot F, Poulter N et al. Hypertension prevalence, 
awareness, treatment and control in national surveys 
from England, the USA and Canada, and correlation 
with stroke and ischaemic heart disease mortality: a 
cross-sectional study. BMJ Open. 2013;3(8):e003423. 
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003423.
22. Chow CK, Teo KK, Rangarajan S, Islam S, Gupta R, 
Avezum A et al.; PURE (Prospective Urban Rural 
Epidemiology) study investigators. Prevalence, 
awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in 
rural and urban communities in high-, middle-, and 
low-income countries. JAMA. 2013;310(9):959−68. 
doi:10.1001/jama.2013.184182.
23. Iwelunmor J, Airhihenbuwa CO, Cooper R, Tayo 
B,  Plange-Rhule  J, Adanu R  et  al. Prevalence, 
determinants and systems-thinking approaches to 
optimal hypertension control in West Africa. Global 
Health. 2014;10:42. doi:10.1186/1744-8603-10-42.
24. Implementation tools: package of essential 
noncommunicable (WHO-PEN) disease interventions 
for primary health care in low-resource settings. 
Geneva: World Health Organization; 2013 (http://
www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/publications/
implementation_tools_WHO_PEN/en/, accessed 5 
November 2014).
25. Wangchuk D, Virdi NK, Garg R, Mendis S, Nair 
N, Wangchuk D, Kumar R. Package of essential 
non-communicable disease (PEN) interventions in 
primary health-care settings of Bhutan: a performance 
assessment study. WHO South-East Asia Journal of 
Public Health, 2014, 3 (2)
26. Resolution 66/2. Political Declaration of the High-level 
Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention 
and Control of Non-communicable Diseases. In: Sixty-
sixth session of the United Nations General Assembly. 
New York: United Nations; 2011 (A/67/L.36; http://
www.who.int/nmh/events/un_ncd_summit2011/
political_declaration_en.pdf, accessed 3 November 
2014).
Worldwide, obesity has more than doubled since 1980, and in 
2014, 11% of men and 15% of women aged 18 years and older 
were obese.
An estimated 42 million children under the age of 5 years were 
overweight in 2013.
周  e global prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 9% in 2014.
Obesity can be prevented through multisectoral population-based 
interventions that promote physical activity and consumption of a 
healthy diet, throughout the life-course.
Research is urgently needed to evaluate the e ectiveness of 
interventions to prevent and control obesity.
周  e attainment of this target will contribute to attainment of 
targets on reducing the prevalence of hypertension and on 
reducing premature mortality from NCDs.
Key  points
79
Overweight and obesity and their 
impact on health 
周  e link between obesity, poor health outcomes and all-cause mortality is well 
established. Obesity increases the likelihood of diabetes, hypertension, coronary 
heart disease, stroke, certain cancers, obstructive sleep apnoea and osteoarthritis. It 
also negatively a ects reproductive performance. Overweight and obesity – i.e. BMI 
≥25 kg/m
2
and ≥30 kg/m
2
respectively – were estimated to account for 3.4 million 
deaths per year and 93.6 million DALYs in 2010 (1).
To achieve optimal health, the median BMI for adult populations should be in 
the range 21–23 kg/m
2
, while the goal for individuals should be to maintain a BMI 
in the range 18.5−24.9 kg/m
2
. 周  e risk of comorbidities increases with a BMI in 
the range 25.0−29.9 kg/m
2
, and the risk is moderate to severe with a BMI greater 
than 30 kg/m
2
(2).
Prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults 
Obesity has been increasing in all countries. In 2014, 39% of adults aged 18 years and 
older (38% of men and 40% of women) were overweight. 周  e worldwide prevalence 
of obesity nearly doubled between 1980 and 2014. In 2014, 11% of men and 15% 
of women worldwide were obese. 周  us, more than half a billion adults worldwide 
are classed as obese. 
Age-standardized estimates on prevalence of obesity in males and females, aged 
18 years and over are shown in Figs. 7.1 and 7.2, respectively. 周  e prevalence of 
overweight and obesity is highest in the Region of the Americas (61% overweight or 
obese in both sexes, and 27% obese) and lowest in the South-East Asia Region (22% 
overweight in both sexes, and 5% obese) (see Fig. 7.3). In the European and Eastern 
Mediterranean Regions and Region of the Americas, over 50% of women are over-
weight, and in all three regions roughly half of overweight women are obese (25% in 
the European region, 24% in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 30% in the Region 
of the Americas). In all WHO regions, women are more likely to be obese than men. 
In the African, South-East Asia and Eastern Mediterranean regions,, women have 
roughly double the obesity prevalence of men. Fig. 7.5 shows the age-standardized 
prevalence of obesity in adults aged 18 years and over, by country, and World Bank 
income groups in 2014. 周  e prevalence of overweight and obesity increases with the 
income level of countries. 周  e prevalence of obesity in high-income and upper-mid-
dle-income countries is more than double that of low- income countries. (see Fig. 7.3 
7
Global target 7: 
Halt the rise in diabetes and obesity 
Global status report on NCDs 2014
80
and 7.5). Although the Western Pacifi c Region ranks 
low in prevalence of obesity, the Pacifi c countries 
show high rates similar to the Americas. 
Prevalence of overweight 
and obesity in children 
Overindulgence in high calorie food and indoor 
leisure activities (e.g. television viewing, internet, 
and computer games) alone or in combination with 
Fig. 7.1 Age-standardized prevalence of obesity in men aged 18 years and over (BMI ≥30 kg/m
2
), 2014 
Prevalence of obesity (%)*
* BMI ≥ 30 kg/m
2
<5
5–14.9
15–24.9
≥25
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
Fig. 7.2 Age-standardized prevalence of obesity in women aged 18 years and over (BMI ≥30 kg/m
2
), 2014 
Prevalence of obesity (%)*
* BMI ≥30 kg/m
2
<5
5–14.9
15–24.9
≥25
Data not available
Not applicable
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in 
this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 
whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning 
the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. Dotted and dashed lines on maps represent approximate 
border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
WHO 2014, All rights reserved.
Data Source: World Health Organization –
NCD RisC (NCD RISk factor Collaboration)
Map Production: Health Statistics and Information Systems (HSI)
World Health Organization
 850  1’700 
3’400 kilometers
factors that dissuade walking and other outdoor 
activities, contribute to childhood obesity.   e 
prevalence of overweight pre-school aged children 
is increasing fastest in low- and lower-middle-in-
come countries (see Figs. 7.4 and 7.6) (3). In 2013, 
an estimated 42 million children (6.3%) aged under 
5 years were overweight (3).
  e latest estimates show that the global prev-
alence of overweight and obesity in children aged 
under 5 years has increased from around 5% in 2000 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested