open byte array pdf in browser c# : Adding text to a pdf document SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn A%20Primer%20in%20Feminist%20Criticism%20and%20Theory%20preview0-part1695

A Primer in Feminist
A Primer in Feminist
A Primer in Feminist
A Primer in Feminist    
Criticism and Theory
Criticism and Theory
Criticism and Theory
Criticism and Theory 
Susan Wilson 
Zoilus Press 
in association with the Postgraduate School of Critical Theory and Cultural Studies, University of Nottingham 
London 
2004 
Adding text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to insert text in pdf file
Adding text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding a text field to a pdf; add text boxes to pdf document
Primers in Critical, Cultural and Communication Studies 2 
Series Editor: Macdonald Daly
A Primer in Feminist Criticism and Theory 
by Susan Wilson 
The right of Susan Wilson to be identified as 
author of this work has been asserted by her in 
accordance with the Copyrights, Designs and 
Patents Act, 1988. 
© Susan Wilson 2004. 
All unauthorised reproduction is hereby prohibited. 
This work is protected by law. It should not be 
duplicated or distributed, in whole or in part, in soft 
or hard copy, by any means whatsoever, without 
the prior and conditional permission of the author. 
First published in Great Britain by Zoilus Press, in 
association with the Postgraduate School of 
Critical Theory and Cultural Studies, University 
of Nottingham, 2004. 
All rights reserved. 
ISBN 1 902878 36 1 
First edition 
Printed by Antony Rowe Ltd., Chippenham, 
Wiltshire, United Kingdom.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text pdf acrobat professional; adding text pdf files
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
adding text pdf; add text to pdf online
Contents
Contents
Contents
Contents 
Preface   
Virginia Woolf: A Room of One’s Own   
Elaine Showalter on Woolf   
13 
Rejecting the Canon: Kate Millett 
versus
D.H. Lawrence  19 
Rewriting the Canon: Angela Carter, Charles Baudelaire 
and “Black Venus” 
26 
Hélène Cixous: “Sorties” 
35 
Julia Kristeva: “Postmodernism?”   
42 
Luce Irigaray: This Sex Which Is Not One 
47 
Self-Defeat in Feminist Criticism and Theory?  
53 
Camille Paglia: Libertarian Feminism?   
59 
10  Black and Third World Feminism: bell hooks, Barbara 
Smith and Chandra Mohanty  
65 
Supplementary Bibliography  
71 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to enter text in pdf; how to add text to pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to insert text box on pdf
Preface
Preface
Preface
Preface 
The work of the feminist writers, critics and theorists considered in this Primer represents only one 
version of the feminist approach to literature. Other feminist writers, critics and theorists could have 
been chosen to exemplify the practice of feminist literary criticism; similarly, other texts by those 
writers who are examined here are equally worthy of attention. This book offers only a sample of the 
work which makes up the Anglo-American tradition in feminist criticism and French feminist theory. Its 
intention is to introduce readers to some of the key issues in feminist criticism and theory in a concise, 
and therefore restricted, format. Readers should always refer to the full texts of the books and essays 
sampled here and, where possible, consider the other works of each author.  
The Primer begins by examining Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, which is itself a 
valuable introduction to many of the debates which still surround women’s writing. Chapter Two 
examines feminist criticism as it has been practiced in relation to Virginia Woolf herself. The text 
selected, Elaine Showalter’s “Virginia Woolf and the Flight into Androgyny”, comes from her study A 
Literature of Their Own, which, as Showalter knows, has been “both imitated and reviled” in feminist 
discourse.
1
Chapter Three concentrates on Kate Millett’s critique of D.H. Lawrence in one of the first 
texts of American feminist criticism, Sexual Politics. In Chapter Four, we turn to Angela Carter’s short 
story “Black Venus” which, like Millett, disputes the use of female figures in canonical literature by 
male authors, in this case in the poetry of Charles Baudelaire. 
The next three chapters shift the focus to French feminist theory. Given the greater difficulty of 
literary “theory”, as opposed to the literary “criticism” produced in the Anglo-American tradition, the 
texts for study in chapters five to seven are all short essays. Chapter Five assesses both the style and 
content of Hélène Cixous’s “Sorties” and points to parallels between her work and that of the French 
philosopher Jacques Derrida. Chapter Six attempts to exemplify the arguments of Julia Kristeva’s 
essay  “Postmodernism?”  by  reference  to  the  poetry  of  Peter  Reading.  Luce  Irigaray’s  work  is 
represented by several essays from her collection 
This Sex Which Is Not One
.  Chapter Seven follows 
her critique of psychoanalysis by assessing what she calls the “phallocentric” discourse of Sigmund 
Freud and Jacques Lacan.  
The final chapters invite readers to reflect on feminist criticism and theory as it has been 
construed thus far. Chapter Eight examines whether there is a danger of self-defeat implicit in some of 
the arguments put forward in feminist discourse. Peter Washington’s denunciation of “theory” in Fraud: 
Literary Theory and the End of English is assessed here. Chapter Nine asks whether the work of 
Camille Paglia, which is antagonistic to both Anglo-American feminist criticism and French feminist 
theory, can itself still be seen as in any way “feminist”. Finally, the work of bell hooks, Barbara Smith 
and Chandra Mohanty is surveyed in Chapter Ten. Each of these writers emphasize how feminism 
has focused its attention upon the concerns and interests of white women to the exclusion of black 
and third world female perspectives.  
This diversity of focus is necessary because there exists no founding statement of the tenets 
of feminism. As Elaine Showalter argues, this has a crucial impact on feminist criticism and theory too: 
“Feminist criticism differs from other contemporary schools of critical theory in not deriving its literary 
principles from a single authority figure or from a body of sacred texts. Unlike structuralists who hark back 
to the linguistic discoveries of Saussure, psychoanalytic critics loyal to Freud or Lacan, Marxists steeped 
in Das Kapital, or deconstructionists citing Derrida, feminist critics do not look to a Mother of Us All or a 
single system of thought to provide their fundamental ideas”.
2
What constitutes best practice in feminist criticism and theory is still open to negotiation. This is 
the rationale for the critical engagement that this book invites in relation to the “key” feminist perspectives 
it presents. Each chapter includes questions and exercises which require readers to reflect upon and 
assess the merits of the samples of writing and argument provided. Model answers are not given. It is 
hoped that debate and disputes may proceed instead. 
Susan Wilson 
Cambridge, 1 September 2004 
1
Elaine Showalter, “Twenty Years On: 
A Literature of Their Own 
Revisited”, in 
A Literature of Their Own: From 
Charlotte Brontë to Doris Lessing (1977) Revised and Expanded Edition (London: Virago, 1999), p. xv.  
2
Elaine Showalter, “Introduction: The Feminist Critical Revolution”, in The New Feminist Criticism: Essays on 
Women, Literature, and Theory, ed. Elaine Showalter (London: Virago Press, 1986), p. 4. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to
add text to pdf reader; how to insert text box in pdf file
1
11
Virginia Woolf: 
Virginia Woolf: 
Virginia Woolf: 
Virginia Woolf: A Room of One’s Own
A Room of One’s Own
A Room of One’s Own
A Room of One’s Own 
In 1928 Virginia Woolf was invited to lecture at Girton College, Cambridge on the subject of women and 
fiction. Initially leaving aside “the great problem of the true nature of women and the true nature of fiction”, 
Woolf begins with a simple, and startlingly materialist, statement: “a woman must have money and a 
room of her own if she is to write fiction”.
1
These are the minimum conditions that make writing, and even 
thinking, possible. In reality, or at least in England in 1928, Woolf argues, intellectual work is not done in a 
social vacuum by a series of solitary disembodied thinkers; rather, it is supported and developed by 
university institutions, their scholarships, endowments, fellowships and lectureships, and so, ultimately, by 
money.  And  in  1928,  scholarships,  endowments,  fellowships  and  lectureships  were  largely  male 
preserves. 
Nevertheless, the narrator of A Room of One’s Own is still free to sit “lost in thought” beside 
the banks of a river that flows through a fictionalised “Oxbridge” location. Here, we share the narrator’s 
“stream-of-consciousness” reverie; the reason for its interruption is the starting-point of her feminist 
consciousness:  
Thought – to call it by a prouder name than it deserved – had let its line down into the stream. 
It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting 
the water lift it and sink it, until – you know the little tug – the sudden conglomeration of an 
idea at the end of one’s line: and then the cautious hauling of it in, and the careful laying of it 
out? Alas, laid on the grass how small, how insignificant this thought of mine looked; the sort 
of fish that a good fisherman puts back into the water so that it may grow fatter and be one day 
worth cooking and eating. I will not trouble you with that thought now, though if you look 
carefully you may find it for yourselves in the course of what I am going to say. 
But however small it was, it had, nevertheless, the mysterious property of its kind – put 
back into the mind, it became at once very exciting, and important; and as it darted and sank, 
and flashed hither and thither, set up such a wash and tumult of ideas that it was impossible to 
sit still. It was thus that I found myself walking with extreme rapidity across a grass plot. 
Instantly  a  man’s  figure  rose  to  intercept  me.  Nor  did  I  at  first  understand  that  the 
gesticulations of a curious-looking object, in a cut-away coat and evening shirt, were aimed at 
me. His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help; he 
was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and 
Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me. Such thoughts were the work of a 
moment. As I regained the path the arms of the Beadle sank, his face assumed its usual 
repose, and though turf is better walking than gravel, no very great harm was done. The only 
charge I could bring against the Fellows and Scholars of whatever the college might happen to 
be was that in protection of their turf, which has been rolled for 300 years in succession, they 
had sent my little fish into hiding. 
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1928) (London: Penguin, 1945), pp. 7-8 
QUICK QUESTIONS 
1.  Find the precise point in the passage above when a gender-divide is activated. On whose side is 
power and authority then invested? 
2.  Examine the narrator’s language and use of metaphor before the arrival of the Beadle. Is there 
any clue to the narrator’s gender earlier in the passage? 
3.  Why should Woolf construct an apparently un-gendered narrator during the “reverie” portion of the 
passage? 
4.  Why does the narrator say “Instinct rather than reason came to my help”? What does this imply 
about the Beadle’s, and by extension the university’s, reaction to women?  
The narrator is soon soothed, however, for “if the spirit of peace dwells anywhere, it is in the 
courts and quadrangles of Oxbridge”; once more “the mind ... (unless one trespassed on the turf again), 
1
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1928) (London: Penguin, 1945), p. 6. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
This C# .NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
add text box in pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to add text fields to pdf
A P
RIMER IN 
F
EMINIST 
C
RITICISM  AND 
T
HEORY
was  at  liberty  to  settle down  upon whatever meditation  was  in  harmony  with the  moment”.
2
The 
meditation settled upon is a decidedly scholarly one, concerning Charles Lamb’s essay on the manuscript 
of Milton’s poem Lycidas, Max Beerbohm (momentarily) and the merits of Thackeray’s “eighteenth-
century style” in the novel The History of Henry Esmond. Again, apparently, the narrator’s Oxbridge 
location could not be more propitious to learned research: 
It then occurred to me that the very manuscript itself which Lamb had looked at was only a few 
hundred yards away, so that one could follow Lamb’s footsteps across the quadrangle to that 
famous library where the treasure is kept. Moreover, I recollected, as I put this plan into 
execution, it is in this famous library that the manuscript of Thackeray’s Esmond is also 
preserved. The  critics often say that Esmond is Thackeray’s most perfect novel. But the 
affectation of the style, with its imitation of the eighteenth century, hampers one, so far as I 
remember; unless indeed the eighteenth-century style was natural to Thackeray – a fact that 
one might prove by looking at the manuscript and seeing whether the alterations were for the 
benefit of the style or of the sense. But then one would have to decide what is style and what 
is meaning, a question which – but here I was actually at the door which leads into the library 
itself. I must have opened it, for instantly there issued, like a guardian angel barring the way 
with a flutter of black gown instead of white wings, a deprecating, silvery, kindly gentleman, 
who regretted in a low voice as he waved me back that ladies are only admitted to the library if 
accompanied by a Fellow of the College or furnished with a letter of introduction. 
That a famous library has been cursed by a woman is a matter of complete indifference 
to a famous library. Venerable and calm, with all its treasures safe locked within its breast, it 
sleeps complacently and will, so far as I am concerned, so sleep for ever. 
Woolf, 
A Room of One’s Own
, pp. 9-10 
Despite her animation by the spirit of critical inquiry, the narrator is denied access to the raw 
materials of the  library, primarily by reason of gender. Women are barred from certain centres of 
knowledge and, thereafter and as a consequence, certain forms of authority. This is a self-perpetuating 
situation; in these circumstances, women lack the authority to insist upon the reforms that would allow 
them access to power and authority. The seat of learning visited by the narrator does not offer a 
disinterested dispensation of knowledge to all-comers; instead it educates and trains the sons of the men 
it had educated and trained a generation before. The ages and generations succeed one another but the 
key to access remains finance, whether secured from Church, Court or commerce: 
An unending stream of gold and silver, I thought, must have flowed into this court perpetually 
to keep the stones coming and the masons working; to level, to ditch, to dig, and to drain. But 
it was then the age of faith, and money was poured liberally to set these stones on a deep 
foundation, and when the stones were raised, still more money was poured in from the coffers 
of kings and queens and great nobles to ensure that hymns should be sung here and scholars 
taught. ... And when the age of faith was over and the age of reason had come, still the same 
flow of gold and silver went on; fellowships were founded; lectureships endowed; only the 
gold and silver flowed now, not from the coffers of the king, but from the chests of merchants 
and manufacturers, from the purses of men who had made, say, a fortune from industry, and 
returned, in their wills, a bounteous share of it to endow more chairs, more lectureships, more 
fellowships in the university where they had learnt their craft. 
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, pp. 11-12 
The contemporary effect of such a backlog of riches is manifested for the narrator in a fabulous 
luncheon at one of the ancient colleges. Here, the scholars partake of “soles ... over which the college 
cook had spread a counterpane of the whitest cream”, followed by “partridges, many and various ... with 
all their retinue of sauces and salads”, “potatoes, thin as coins” and “sprouts, foliated as rosebuds but 
more succulent”; afterwards comes “a confection which rose all sugar from the waves”; all the while 
2
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 8. 
V
IRGINIA 
W
OOLF
R
OOM OF 
O
NE
O
WN
“wineglasses had flushed yellow and flushed crimson; had been emptied; had been filled”.
3
The narrator’s 
analysis of character, behaviour and opportunity stretches, only half-comically, to the effect of such a 
meal upon the soul and intellect of its devourers: 
And thus by degrees was lit, half-way down the spine, which is the seat of the soul, not that 
hard little electric light which we call brilliance, as it pops in and out upon our lips, but the 
more profound, subtle, and subterranean glow which is the rich yellow flame of rational 
intercourse. No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anybody but oneself. We are 
all going to heaven and Vandyck is of the company – in other words, how good life seemed, 
how sweet its rewards, how trivial this grudge or that grievance, how admirable friendship and 
the society of one’s kind, as lighting a good cigarette, one sank among the cushions in the 
window-seat. 
Woolf, 
A Room of One’s Own
, p. 13 
By contrast, Fernham, the fictional shadow of Cambridge’s all-women Newnham College, can 
offer only a dinner of “plain gravy soup”, beef from the “rumps of cattle in a muddy market”, served with 
“sprouts curled and yellowed at the edge”, followed by “prunes ... mitigated by custard” and accompanied 
throughout by water.
4
The whole, a product of “bargaining and cheapening”, is an index of the relative 
poverty of the female branch of the institution.
5
And likewise, this poverty is an index of the absence of 
women’s independent means throughout the generations. “What had our mothers been doing”, our now 
clearly-gendered narrator asks her friend Mary Seton, “that they had no wealth to leave us?”
6
The very 
existence of “us” has a lot to do with the matter:  
If only Mrs Seton and her mother and her mother before her had learnt the great art of making 
money and had left their money, like their fathers and their grandfathers before them, to found 
fellowships and lectureships and prizes and scholarships appropriated to the use of their own 
sex, we might have dined very tolerably up here alone off a bird and a bottle of wine; we might 
have looked forward without undue confidence to a pleasant and honourable lifetime spent in 
the shelter of one of the liberally endowed professions. We might have been exploring or 
writing; mooning about the venerable places of the earth; sitting contemplative on the steps of 
the Parthenon, or going at ten to an office and coming home comfortably at half past four to 
write a little poetry. Only, if Mrs Seton and her like had gone into business at the age of fifteen, 
there would have been – that was the snag in the argument – no Mary. 
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 23 
The narrator identifies a gendered and generational disinheritance. There is no cash-value in women’s 
work;  for women, “to  endow a college  would  necessitate  the suppression of families altogether”.
7
Furthermore, even had women worked, “the law denied them the right to possess what money they 
earned”; save for the last forty-eight years (counting back from 1928), all female wealth “would have been 
her husband’s property – a thought which, perhaps, may have had its share in keeping Mrs Seton and 
her mothers off the Stock Exchange”.
8
Consequently, generations of women up to the point in time of the 
narrator’s world, have lacked the material supports of intellectual development.  
ACTIVITY 1 (Time: 15 minutes) 
1.  Either on your own or in pairs, consider the strengths and weaknesses of Woolf’s materialist 
analysis  of  intellectual  development.  Is  the  quality  of  the  sprouts  one  is  served  a  crucial 
determinant of the value of one’s thoughts? Is the age and grandeur of one’s college any more of 
3
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, pp. 12-13. 
4
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 19. 
5
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 19. 
6
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 22. 
7
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 24. 
8
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 24. 
A P
RIMER IN 
F
EMINIST 
C
RITICISM  AND 
T
HEORY
10 
a determinant of intellectual quality? Is the social standing of educational institutions as important 
now as in 1928? 
2.  Can you fill in more of the argumentative steps which link the nineteenth-century property laws 
which assigned a wife’s wealth to her husband to the lack of educational opportunities for women? 
3.  Is this materialist argument a specifically feminist one? Does Woolf ignore the class divide that 
excluded the majority of men as well as women from a university education in 1928? 
4.  Does Woolf have anything to say to women outside the upper-middle classes? She celebrates 
“the urbanity, the geniality, the dignity which are the offspring of luxury and privacy and space”,
9
but does this presuppose the existence of a servant-class to minister to the material needs of her 
scholars? 
A materialist approach to intellectual work examines the impact of the real circumstances of life 
upon the production of art, writing and the development of the mental faculties in general. The core of this 
argument in 
A Room of One’s Own 
is stated in the following two paragraphs. Read these extracts 
carefully and assess whether they confirm your answers to the Activity Questions above or whether they 
lead you to modify your opinions about the narrator’s arguments.  
It  is  a perennial puzzle  why no  woman wrote  a word  of that  extraordinary  [Elizabethan] 
literature when every other man, it seemed, was capable of song or sonnet. What were the 
conditions in which women lived, I asked myself; for fiction, imaginative work that is, is not 
dropped like a pebble upon the ground, as science may be; fiction is like a spider’s web, 
attached  ever so lightly  perhaps,  but  still  attached  to  life at all four corners.  Often  the 
attachment is scarcely perceptible; Shakespeare’s plays, for instance, seem to hang there 
complete by themselves. But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the 
middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in mid-air by incorporeal creatures, but 
are the works of suffering human beings, and are attached to grossly material things, like 
health and money and the houses we live in. 
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 43 
Intellectual freedom depends upon material things. Poetry depends upon intellectual freedom. 
And women have always been poor, not for two hundred years merely, but from the beginning 
of time. Women have had less intellectual freedom than the sons of Athenian slaves. Women, 
then, have not had a dog’s chance of writing poetry. That is why I have laid so much stress on 
money and a room of one’s own. 
Woolf, 
A Room of One’s Own
, p. 106 
ADDITIONAL QUICK QUESTIONS 
1.  “A room of one’s own” is, the narrator confirms, part of a metaphorical framework. Likewise “five 
hundred a year stands for the power to contemplate”, “a lock on the door means the power to 
think for oneself”.
10
What do you think of the narrator’s tendency to conduct arguments through 
metaphorical devices?  
2.  Is A Room of One’s Own a fictional or factual book? Can “true” arguments be made through 
“fictional” means? 
In this argumentative movement from the material and the mental, the narrator of 
A Room of 
One’s Own
recognises that more research is required: 
What effect has poverty on fiction? What conditions are necessary for the creation of works of 
art? – a thousand questions at once suggested themselves. But one needed answers, not 
questions; and an answer was only to be had by consulting the learned and the unprejudiced, 
9
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 25. 
10
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 105. 
V
IRGINIA 
W
OOLF
R
OOM OF 
O
NE
O
WN
11 
who have removed themselves above the strife of tongue and the confusion of body and 
issued the result of their reasoning and research in books which are to be found in the British 
Museum. If truth is not to be found on the shelves of the British Museum, where, I asked 
myself, picking up a notebook and a pencil, is truth? 
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 27 
In the British Museum, the narrator is confronted by a bewildering array of ungrounded, but clearly 
gendered, opinions. “Have you any notion how many books are written about women in the course of one 
year?” asks the narrator, “Have you any notion how many are written by men?”
11
Moreover, these books 
“had been written in the red light of emotion”,
12
a flaw more usually described in the very same books as 
a female failing. There is also a fundamental flaw in the narrator’s research programme; the problem is 
set out in the questions below. 
QUICK QUESTIONS 
1.  Can any research or reasoning ever be “above the strife of tongue and the confusion of body” as 
the narrator hopes? What would it be like to be “above ... the confusion of body”? 
2.  The discussion of all gender questions necessarily takes place between gendered agents; can 
objectivity and disinterest ever be expected when disputes arise? 
3.  From the evidence of the universities, the British Museum and even a daily newspaper, the 
narrator concludes that “England is under the rule of a patriarchy”.
13
Male authority sets the 
standards of good sense and truth under such a system, including the proper opinions to hold 
concerning women. As a result of their lack of education, women can hardly be qualified to object 
to such a system – how could the uneducated know what is best? Can you see a way out of this 
circle which always seems to protect male advantages? 
Many  of the  narrator’s  arguments, and  her  most  famous exploitation  of metaphorical and 
rhetorical devices, come together in the discussion of the fate of a fictional and frustrated female writer, 
“Shakespeare’s sister”. This is “how the story would run ... if a woman in Shakespeare’s day had had 
Shakespeare’s genius”: 
It would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have written the 
plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare. Let me imagine, since facts are so hard to 
come by, what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called 
Judith, let us say. ... She was as adventurous, as imaginative, as agog to see the world as he 
was. But she was not sent to school. She had no chance of learning grammar and logic, let 
alone of reading Horace and Virgil. She picked up a book now and then, one of her brother’s 
perhaps, and read a few pages. But then her parents came in and told her to mend the 
stockings or mind the stew and not moon about with books and papers. ... Soon, ... before she 
was out of her teens, she was to be betrothed to the son of a neighbouring wool-stapler. She 
cried out that marriage was hateful to her, and for that she was severely beaten by her father. 
Then he ceased to scold her. He begged her instead not to hurt him, not to shame him in this 
matter of her marriage. He would give her a chain of beads or a fine petticoat, he said; and 
there were tears in his eyes. How could she disobey him? How could she break his heart? The 
force of her own gift alone drove her to it. She made up a small parcel of her belongings, let 
herself down by a rope one summer’s night and took the road to London. She was not 
seventeen. The birds that sang in the hedge were not more musical than she was. She had the 
quickest fancy, a gift like her brother’s, for the tune of words. Like him, she had a taste for the 
theatre. She stood at the stage door; she wanted to act, she said. Men laughed in her face. The 
manager – a fat, loose-lipped man – guffawed. He bellowed something about poodles dancing 
and women acting – no woman, he said, could possibly be an actress. He hinted – you can 
11
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 28. 
12
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 34. 
13
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 35. 
A P
RIMER IN 
F
EMINIST 
C
RITICISM  AND 
T
HEORY
12 
imagine what. She could get no training in her craft. Could she even seek her dinner in a 
tavern or roam the streets at midnight? Yet her genius was for fiction and lusted to feed 
abundantly upon the lives of men and women and the study of their ways. At last ... Nick 
Greene the actor-manager took pity on her; she found herself with child by that gentleman and 
so – who shall measure the heat and violence of the poet’s heart when caught and tangled in a 
woman’s body? – killed herself one winter’s night and lies buried at some cross-roads where 
the omnibuses now stop outside the Elephant and Castle.  
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, pp. 48-50 
The impact of material social conditions, including, of course, specific historical attitudes to the roles and 
capacities of women, is sufficient to thwart the potential of even the most talented and determined 
individual. Genius, in this scenario, may be innate but it is not sufficient; under these social and familial 
conditions, it could “never [get] itself on to paper” and prove its existence.
14
Consider finally, however, a later, and only problematically feminist, review of the “Shakespeare’s 
sister” scenario. The following extract is from Camille Paglia’s Sexual Personae: 
In the beautiful hypothesis of “Shakespeare’s sister,” Virginia Woolf imagines a girl with her 
brother’s gifts whom society would have “thwarted and hindered” to insanity and suicide. 
Women have been discouraged from genres such as sculpture that require studio training or 
expensive materials. But in philosophy, mathematics, and poetry, the only materials are pen 
and paper.  Male conspiracy cannot explain all female failures. I am convinced that, even 
without restrictions, there still would have been no female Pascal, Milton, or Kant. Genius is 
not  checked by  social  obstacles:  it  will overcome. Men’s egotism,  so disgusting  in  the 
talentless, is the source of their greatness as a sex. Women have a more accurate sense of 
reality; they are physically and spiritually more complete. Culture, I said, was invented by men, 
because it is by culture that they make themselves whole. Even now, with all vocations open, I 
marvel  at  the  rarity  of  the  woman driven  by  artistic  or  intellectual  obsession, that  self-
mutilating derangement of social relationship which, in its alternative forms of crime and 
ideation, is the disgrace and glory of the human species.  
Camille Paglia, Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti 
to Emily Dickinson (1990) (London: Penguin, 1992), pp. 653-54 
To  assess what  is  at  stake for  feminist theory in Paglia’s  disagreement  with  Woolf, consider  the 
questions set in Activity Two below: 
ACTIVITY 2 (Time: 15 minutes)
1.  Paglia contends that “Genius is not checked by social obstacles: it will overcome”. The narrator of 
A Room of One’s Own argues precisely the opposite and thereby provides an explanation for 
“female failures”. How does Paglia account for the absence of a female Pascal, Milton or Kant? 
2.  What is the role of education, training, tradition and recognition in the development of latent talent?  
3.  Paglia locates the best and worst of human behaviour in male activity. Examine some of her 
assumptions in the above passage: is she an essentialist, that is, does she describe how all men 
and all women are predisposed to behave under all conceivable material circumstances? Do you 
find this a convincing way of understanding human behaviour? 
4.  If Paglia appeals to nature, does Woolf appeal to nurture to explain the evident differences in male 
and  female  behaviour?  Could  changes  in  social  circumstances  and  expectations  alter  the 
behaviour of Paglia’s men and women? Can Woolf’s people change alongside society?  
5.  According to your answer to Question 4, is it worthwhile trying to alter social conditions in order to 
enhance the life chances of men and women? 
14
Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, p. 50. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested