open password protected pdf using c# : Add text to a pdf document control SDK system web page wpf .net console abs-guide21-part1805

with argument \"$OPTARG\"   [OPTIND=${OPTIND}]";;
#  Note that option 'q' must have an associated argument,
#+ otherwise it falls through to the default.
r | s ) echo "Scenario #5: option -$Option-";;
*     ) echo "Unimplemented option chosen.";;   # Default.
esac
done
shift $(($OPTIND - 1))
 Decrements the argument pointer so it points to next argument.
 $1 now references the first non-option item supplied on the command-line
#+ if one exists.
exit $?
  As Bill Gradwohl states,
 "The getopts mechanism allows one to specify:  scriptname -mnop -mnop
#+  but there is no reliable way to differentiate what came
#+ from where by using OPTIND."
 There are, however, workarounds.
Script Behavior
source, . (dot command)
This command, when invoked from the command-line, executes a script. Within a script, a source
file-name loads the file file-name. Sourcing a file (dot-command) imports code into the script,
appending to the script (same effect as the #include directive in a C program). The net result is the
same as if the "sourced" lines of code were physically present in the body of the script. This is useful
in situations when multiple scripts use a common data file or function library.
Example 15-22. "Including" a data file
#!/bin/bash
 Note that this example must be invoked with bash, i.e., bash ex38.sh
#+ not  sh ex38.sh !
. data-file    # Load a data file.
# Same effect as "source data-file", but more portable.
 The file "data-file" must be present in current working directory,
#+ since it is referred to by its basename.
# Now, let's reference some data from that file.
echo "variable1 (from data-file) = $variable1"
echo "variable3 (from data-file) = $variable3"
let "sum = $variable2 + $variable4"
echo "Sum of variable2 + variable4 (from data-file) = $sum"
echo "message1 (from data-file) is \"$message1\""
                                 Escaped quotes
echo "message2 (from data-file) is \"$message2\""
print_message This is the message-print function in the data-file.
exit $?
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
205
Add text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to a pdf in preview
Add text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf document
File data-file for Example 15-22, above. Must be present in same directory.
# This is a data file loaded by a script.
# Files of this type may contain variables, functions, etc.
# It loads with a 'source' or '.' command from a shell script.
# Let's initialize some variables.
variable1=23
variable2=474
variable3=5
variable4=97
message1="Greetings from *** line $LINENO *** of the data file!"
message2="Enough for now. Goodbye."
print_message ()
  # Echoes any message passed to it.
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
return 1 # Error, if argument missing.
fi
echo
until [ -z "$1" ]
do             # Step through arguments passed to function.
echo -n "$1" # Echo args one at a time, suppressing line feeds.
echo -n " "  # Insert spaces between words.
shift        # Next one.
done  
echo
return 0
}
If the sourced file is itself an executable script, then it will run, then return control to the script that
called it. A sourced executable script may use a return for this purpose.
Arguments may be (optionally) passed to the sourced file as positional parameters.
source $filename $arg1 arg2
It is even possible for a script to source itself, though this does not seem to have any practical
applications.
Example 15-23. A (useless) script that sources itself
#!/bin/bash
# self-source.sh: a script sourcing itself "recursively."
# From "Stupid Script Tricks," Volume II.
MAXPASSCNT=100    # Maximum number of execution passes.
echo -n  "$pass_count  "
 At first execution pass, this just echoes two blank spaces,
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
206
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to pdf document; adding text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
how to add text to pdf file with reader; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
#+ since $pass_count still uninitialized.
let "pass_count += 1"
 Assumes the uninitialized variable $pass_count
#+ can be incremented the first time around.
 This works with Bash and pdksh, but
#+ it relies on non-portable (and possibly dangerous) behavior.
 Better would be to initialize $pass_count to 0 before incrementing.
while [ "$pass_count" -le $MAXPASSCNT ]
do
. $0   # Script "sources" itself, rather than calling itself.
# ./$0 (which would be true recursion) doesn't work here. Why?
done  
 What occurs here is not actually recursion,
#+ since the script effectively "expands" itself, i.e.,
#+ generates a new section of code
#+ with each pass through the 'while' loop',
 with each 'source' in line 20.
#
 Of course, the script interprets each newly 'sourced' "#!" line
#+ as a comment, and not as the start of a new script.
echo
exit 0   # The net effect is counting from 1 to 100.
# Very impressive.
# Exercise:
# --------
# Write a script that uses this trick to actually do something useful.
exit
Unconditionally terminates a script. [63] The exit command may optionally take an integer argument,
which is returned to the shell as the exit status of the script. It is good practice to end all but the
simplest scripts with an exit 0, indicating a successful run.
If a script terminates with an exit lacking an argument, the exit status of the script is
the exit status of the last command executed in the script, not counting the exit. This is
equivalent to an exit $?.
An exit command may also be used to terminate a subshell.
exec
This shell builtin replaces the current process with a specified command. Normally, when the shell
encounters a command, it forks off a child process to actually execute the command. Using the exec
builtin, the shell does not fork, and the command exec'ed replaces the shell. When used in a script,
therefore, it forces an exit from the script when the exec'ed command terminates. [64]
Example 15-24. Effects of exec
#!/bin/bash
exec echo "Exiting \"$0\" at line $LINENO."   # Exit from script here.
# $LINENO is an internal Bash variable set to the line number it's on.
# ----------------------------------
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
207
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to add text box to pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
# The following lines never execute.
echo "This echo fails to echo."
exit 99                       #  This script will not exit here.
 Check exit value after script terminates
#+ with an 'echo $?'.
 It will *not* be 99.
Example 15-25. A script that exec's itself
#!/bin/bash
# self-exec.sh
# Note: Set permissions on this script to 555 or 755,
      then call it with ./self-exec.sh or sh ./self-exec.sh.
echo
echo "This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing."
echo "The PID of this instance of the script is still $$."
    Demonstrates that a subshell is not forked off.
echo "==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ===================="
sleep 1
exec $0   #  Spawns another instance of this same script
#+ that replaces the previous one.
echo "This line will never echo!"  # Why not?
exit 99                            # Will not exit here!
# Exit code will not be 99!
An exec also serves to reassign file descriptors. For example, exec <zzz-file replaces stdin
with the file zzz-file.
The -exec option to find is not the same as the exec shell builtin.
shopt
This command permits changing shell options on the fly (see Example 25-1 and Example 25-2). It
often appears in the Bash startup files, but also has its uses in scripts. Needs version 2 or later of Bash.
shopt -s cdspell
# Allows minor misspelling of directory names with 'cd'
# Option -s sets, -u unsets.
cd /hpme  # Oops! Mistyped '/home'.
pwd       # /home
# The shell corrected the misspelling.
caller
Putting a caller command inside a function echoes to stdout information about the caller of that
function.
#!/bin/bash
function1 ()
{
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
208
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF document file, edit selected text content, and export extracted text with customized format. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary
add text to a pdf document; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
# Inside function1 ().
caller 0   # Tell me about it.
}
function1    # Line 9 of script.
# 9 main test.sh
# ^                 Line number that the function was called from.
  ^^^^            Invoked from "main" part of script.
       ^^^^^^^    Name of calling script.
caller 0     # Has no effect because it's not inside a function.
A caller command can also return caller information from a script sourced within another script.
Analogous to a function, this is a "subroutine call."
You may find this command useful in debugging.
Commands
true
A command that returns a successful (zero) exit status, but does nothing else.
bash$ true
bash$ echo $?
0
# Endless loop
while true   # alias for ":"
do
operation-1
operation-2
...
operation-n
# Need a way to break out of loop or script will hang.
done
false
A command that returns an unsuccessful exit status, but does nothing else.
bash$ false
bash$ echo $?
1
# Testing "false" 
if false
then
echo "false evaluates \"true\""
else
echo "false evaluates \"false\""
fi
# false evaluates "false"
# Looping while "false" (null loop)
while false
do
# The following code will not execute.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
209
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
add text to pdf; how to add text field to pdf
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
add text block to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
operation-1
operation-2
...
operation-n
# Nothing happens!
done   
type [cmd]
Similar to the which external command, type cmd identifies "cmd." Unlike which, type is a Bash
builtin. The useful -a option to type identifies keywords and builtins, and also locates system
commands with identical names.
bash$ type '['
[ is a shell builtin
bash$ type -a '['
[ is a shell builtin
[ is /usr/bin/[
bash$ type type
type is a shell builtin
The type command can be useful for testing whether a certain command exists.
hash [cmds]
Records the path name of specified commands -- in the shell hash table[65] -- so the shell or script
will not need to search the $PATH on subsequent calls to those commands. When hash is called with
no arguments, it simply lists the commands that have been hashed. The -r option resets the hash
table.
bind
The bind builtin displays or modifies readline[66] key bindings.
help
Gets a short usage summary of a shell builtin. This is the counterpart to whatis, but for builtins. The
display of help information got a much-needed update in the version 4 release of Bash.
bash$ help exit
exit: exit [n]
Exit the shell with a status of N.  If N is omitted, the exit status
is that of the last command executed.
15.1. Job Control Commands
Certain of the following job control commands take a job identifier as an argument. See the table at end of the
chapter.
jobs
Lists the jobs running in the background, giving the job number. Not as useful as ps.
It is all too easy to confuse jobs and processes. Certain builtins, such as kill, disown,
and wait accept either a job number or a process number as an argument. The fg, bg
and jobs commands accept only a job number.
bash$ sleep 100 &
[1] 1384
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
210
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text to pdf file online
bash $ jobs
[1]+  Running                 sleep 100 &
"1" is the job number (jobs are maintained by the current shell). "1384" is the PID or
process ID number (processes are maintained by the system). To kill this job/process,
either a kill %1 or a kill 1384 works.
Thanks, S.C.
disown
Remove job(s) from the shell's table of active jobs.
fg, bg
The fg command switches a job running in the background into the foreground. The bg command
restarts a suspended job, and runs it in the background. If no job number is specified, then the fg or bg
command acts upon the currently running job.
wait
Suspend script execution until all jobs running in background have terminated, or until the job number
or process ID specified as an option terminates. Returns the exit status of waited-for command.
You may use the wait command to prevent a script from exiting before a background job finishes
executing (this would create a dreaded orphan process).
Example 15-26. Waiting for a process to finish before proceeding
#!/bin/bash
ROOT_UID=0   # Only users with $UID 0 have root privileges.
E_NOTROOT=65
E_NOPARAMS=66
if [ "$UID" -ne "$ROOT_UID" ]
then
echo "Must be root to run this script."
# "Run along kid, it's past your bedtime."
exit $E_NOTROOT
fi  
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` find-string"
exit $E_NOPARAMS
fi
echo "Updating 'locate' database..."
echo "This may take a while."
updatedb /usr &     # Must be run as root.
wait
# Don't run the rest of the script until 'updatedb' finished.
# You want the the database updated before looking up the file name.
locate $1
 Without the 'wait' command, in the worse case scenario,
#+ the script would exit while 'updatedb' was still running,
#+ leaving it as an orphan process.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
211
exit 0
Optionally, wait can take a job identifier as an argument, for example, wait%1 or wait $PPID.
[67] See the job id table.
Within a script, running a command in the background with an ampersand (&) may cause the script to hang until
ENTER is hit. This seems to occur with commands that write to stdout. It can be a major annoyance.
#!/bin/bash
# test.sh                 
ls -l &
echo "Done."
bash$ ./test.sh
Done.
[bozo@localhost test-scripts]$ total 1
-rwxr-xr-x    1 bozo     bozo           34 Oct 11 15:09 test.sh
_
As Walter Brameld IV explains it:
As far as I can tell, such scripts don't actually hang. It just
seems that they do because the background command writes text to
the console after the prompt. The user gets the impression that
the prompt was never displayed. Here's the sequence of events:
1. Script launches background command.
2. Script exits.
3. Shell displays the prompt.
4. Background command continues running and writing text to the
console.
5. Background command finishes.
6. User doesn't see a prompt at the bottom of the output, thinks script
is hanging.
Placing a wait after the background command seems to remedy this.
#!/bin/bash
# test.sh                 
ls -l &
echo "Done."
wait
bash$ ./test.sh
Done.
[bozo@localhost test-scripts]$ total 1
-rwxr-xr-x    1 bozo     bozo           34 Oct 11 15:09 test.sh
Redirecting the output of the command to a file or even to /dev/null also takes care of this problem.
suspend
This has a similar effect to Control-Z, but it suspends the shell (the shell's parent process should
resume it at an appropriate time).
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
212
logout
Exit a login shell, optionally specifying an exit status.
times
Gives statistics on the system time elapsed when executing commands, in the following form:
0m0.020s 0m0.020s
This capability is of relatively limited value, since it is not common to profile and benchmark shell
scripts.
kill
Forcibly terminate a process by sending it an appropriate terminate signal (see Example 17-6).
Example 15-27. A script that kills itself
#!/bin/bash
# self-destruct.sh
kill $$  # Script kills its own process here.
# Recall that "$$" is the script's PID.
echo "This line will not echo."
# Instead, the shell sends a "Terminated" message to stdout.
exit 0   # Normal exit? No!
 After this script terminates prematurely,
#+ what exit status does it return?
#
# sh self-destruct.sh
# echo $?
# 143
#
# 143 = 128 + 15
            TERM signal
kill -l lists all the signals (as does the file /usr/include/asm/signal.h).
A kill -9 is a sure kill, which will usually terminate a process that stubbornly
refuses to die with a plain kill. Sometimes, a kill -15 works. A zombie process,
that is, a child process that has terminated, but that the parent process has not (yet)
killed, cannot be killed by a logged-on user -- you can't kill something that is already
dead -- but init will generally clean it up sooner or later.
killall
The killall command kills a running process by name, rather than by process ID. If there are multiple
instances of a particular command running, then doing a killall on that command will terminate them
all.
This refers to the killall command in /usr/bin, not the killall script in
/etc/rc.d/init.d.
command
The command directive disables aliases and functions for the command immediately following it.
bash$ command ls
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
213
This is one of three shell directives that effect script command processing. The others
are builtin and enable.
builtin
Invoking builtin BUILTIN_COMMAND runs the command BUILTIN_COMMAND as a shell
builtin, temporarily disabling both functions and external system commands with the same name.
enable
This either enables or disables a shell builtin command. As an example, enable -n kill disables
the shell builtin kill, so that when Bash subsequently encounters kill, it invokes the external command
/bin/kill.
The -a option to enable lists all the shell builtins, indicating whether or not they are enabled. The -f
filename option lets enable load a builtin as a shared library (DLL) module from a properly
compiled object file. [68].
autoload
This is a port to Bash of the ksh autoloader. With autoload in place, a function with an autoload
declaration will load from an external file at its first invocation. [69] This saves system resources.
Note that autoload is not a part of the core Bash installation. It needs to be loaded in with enable
-f (see above).
Table 15-1. Job identifiers
Notation Meaning
%N
Job number [N]
%S
Invocation (command-line) of job begins with string S
%?S
Invocation (command-line) of job contains within it string S
%%
"current" job (last job stopped in foreground or started in background)
%+
"current" job (last job stopped in foreground or started in background)
%-
Last job
$!
Last background process
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 15. Internal Commands and Builtins
214
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested