open password protected pdf using c# : Adding text field to pdf software Library dll winforms .net asp.net web forms abs-guide24-part1808

sleep 3 h   # Pauses 3 hours!
The watch command may be a better choice than sleep for running commands at
timed intervals.
usleep
Microsleep (the u may be read as the Greek mu, or micro- prefix). This is the same as sleep, above,
but "sleeps" in microsecond intervals. It can be used for fine-grained timing, or for polling an ongoing
process at very frequent intervals.
usleep 30     # Pauses 30 microseconds.
This command is part of the Red Hat initscripts / rc-scripts package.
The usleep command does not provide particularly accurate timing, and is therefore
unsuitable for critical timing loops.
hwclock, clock
The hwclock command accesses or adjusts the machine's hardware clock. Some options require root
privileges. The /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit startup file uses hwclock to set the system time from
the hardware clock at bootup.
The clock command is a synonym for hwclock.
16.4. Text Processing Commands
Commands affecting text and text files
sort
File sort utility, often used as a filter in a pipe. This command sorts a text stream or file forwards or
backwards, or according to various keys or character positions. Using the -m option, it merges
presorted input files. The info page lists its many capabilities and options. See Example 11-10,
Example 11-11, and Example A-8.
tsort
Topological sort, reading in pairs of whitespace-separated strings and sorting according to input
patterns. The original purpose of tsort was to sort a list of dependencies for an obsolete version of the
ld linker in an "ancient" version of UNIX.
The results of a tsort will usually differ markedly from those of the standard sort command, above.
uniq
This filter removes duplicate lines from a sorted file. It is often seen in a pipe coupled with sort.
cat list-1 list-2 list-3 | sort | uniq > final.list
# Concatenates the list files,
# sorts them,
# removes duplicate lines,
# and finally writes the result to an output file.
The useful -c option prefixes each line of the input file with its number of occurrences.
bash$ cat testfile
This line occurs only once.
This line occurs twice.
This line occurs twice.
This line occurs three times.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
235
Adding text field to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf file; how to input text in a pdf
Adding text field to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to add text box to pdf
This line occurs three times.
This line occurs three times.
bash$ uniq -c testfile
1 This line occurs only once.
2 This line occurs twice.
3 This line occurs three times.
bash$ sort testfile | uniq -c | sort -nr
3 This line occurs three times.
2 This line occurs twice.
1 This line occurs only once.
The sort INPUTFILE | uniq -c | sort -nr command string produces a frequency of
occurrence listing on the INPUTFILE file (the -nr options to sort cause a reverse numerical sort).
This template finds use in analysis of log files and dictionary lists, and wherever the lexical structure
of a document needs to be examined.
Example 16-12. Word Frequency Analysis
#!/bin/bash
# wf.sh: Crude word frequency analysis on a text file.
# This is a more efficient version of the "wf2.sh" script.
# Check for input file on command-line.
ARGS=1
E_BADARGS=85
E_NOFILE=86
if [ $# -ne "$ARGS" ]  # Correct number of arguments passed to script?
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` filename"
exit $E_BADARGS
fi
if [ ! -f "$1" ]       # Check if file exists.
then
echo "File \"$1\" does not exist."
exit $E_NOFILE
fi
########################################################
# main ()
sed -e 's/\.//g'  -e 's/\,//g' -e 's/ /\
/g' "$1" | tr 'A-Z' 'a-z' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
                          =========================
                           Frequency of occurrence
 Filter out periods and commas, and
#+ change space between words to linefeed,
#+ then shift characters to lowercase, and
#+ finally prefix occurrence count and sort numerically.
 Arun Giridhar suggests modifying the above to:
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
236
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to enter text in pdf; adding text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to add text field to pdf form; add text boxes to pdf document
 . . . | sort | uniq -c | sort +1 [-f] | sort +0 -nr
 This adds a secondary sort key, so instances of
#+ equal occurrence are sorted alphabetically.
 As he explains it:
 "This is effectively a radix sort, first on the
#+ least significant column
#+ (word or string, optionally case-insensitive)
#+ and last on the most significant column (frequency)."
#
 As Frank Wang explains, the above is equivalent to
#+       . . . | sort | uniq -c | sort +0 -nr
#+ and the following also works:
#+       . . . | sort | uniq -c | sort -k1nr -k
########################################################
exit 0
# Exercises:
# ---------
# 1) Add 'sed' commands to filter out other punctuation,
#+   such as semicolons.
# 2) Modify the script to also filter out multiple spaces and
#+   other whitespace.
bash$ cat testfile
This line occurs only once.
This line occurs twice.
This line occurs twice.
This line occurs three times.
This line occurs three times.
This line occurs three times.
bash$ ./wf.sh testfile
6 this
6 occurs
6 line
3 times
3 three
2 twice
1 only
1 once
expand, unexpand
The expand filter converts tabs to spaces. It is often used in a pipe.
The unexpand filter converts spaces to tabs. This reverses the effect of expand.
cut
A tool for extracting fields from files. It is similar to the print $N command set in awk, but more
limited. It may be simpler to use cut in a script than awk. Particularly important are the -d (delimiter)
and -f (field specifier) options.
Using cut to obtain a listing of the mounted filesystems:
cut -d ' ' -f1,2 /etc/mtab
Using cut to list the OS and kernel version:
uname -a | cut -d" " -f1,3,11,12
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
237
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text block to pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text to pdf file
Using cut to extract message headers from an e-mail folder:
bash$ grep '^Subject:' read-messages | cut -c10-80
Re: Linux suitable for mission-critical apps?
MAKE MILLIONS WORKING AT HOME!!!
Spam complaint
Re: Spam complaint
Using cut to parse a file:
# List all the users in /etc/passwd.
FILENAME=/etc/passwd
for user in $(cut -d: -f1 $FILENAME)
do
echo $user
done
# Thanks, Oleg Philon for suggesting this.
cut -d ' ' -f2,3 filename is equivalent to awk -F'[ ]' '{ print $2, $3 }'
filename
It is even possible to specify a linefeed as a delimiter. The trick is to actually embed a
linefeed (RETURN) in the command sequence.
bash$ cut -d'
' -f3,7,19 testfile
This is line 3 of testfile.
This is line 7 of testfile.
This is line 19 of testfile.
Thank you, Jaka Kranjc, for pointing this out.
See also Example 16-48.
paste
Tool for merging together different files into a single, multi-column file. In combination with cut,
useful for creating system log files.
bash$ cat items
alphabet blocks
building blocks
cables
bash$ cat prices
$1.00/dozen
$2.50 ea.
$3.75
bash$ paste items prices
alphabet blocks $1.00/dozen
building blocks $2.50 ea.
cables  $3.75
join
Consider this a special-purpose cousin of paste. This powerful utility allows merging two files in a
meaningful fashion, which essentially creates a simple version of a relational database.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
238
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text to pdf document online; adding text to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; add text box to pdf
The join command operates on exactly two files, but pastes together only those lines with a common
tagged field (usually a numerical label), and writes the result to stdout. The files to be joined
should be sorted according to the tagged field for the matchups to work properly.
File: 1.data
100 Shoes
200 Laces
300 Socks
File: 2.data
100 $40.00
200 $1.00
300 $2.00
bash$ join 1.data 2.data
File: 1.data 2.data
100 Shoes $40.00
200 Laces $1.00
300 Socks $2.00
The tagged field appears only once in the output.
head
lists the beginning of a file to stdout. The default is 10 lines, but a different number can be
specified. The command has a number of interesting options.
Example 16-13. Which files are scripts?
#!/bin/bash
# script-detector.sh: Detects scripts within a directory.
TESTCHARS=2    # Test first 2 characters.
SHABANG='#!'   # Scripts begin with a "sha-bang."
for file in *  # Traverse all the files in current directory.
do
if [[ `head -c$TESTCHARS "$file"` = "$SHABANG" ]]
#      head -c2                      #!
#  The '-c' option to "head" outputs a specified
#+ number of characters, rather than lines (the default).
then
echo "File \"$file\" is a script."
else
echo "File \"$file\" is *not* a script."
fi
done
exit 0
 Exercises:
 ---------
 1) Modify this script to take as an optional argument
#+    the directory to scan for scripts
#+    (rather than just the current working directory).
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
239
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET.
adding text to pdf form; adding text to pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
adding text to a pdf document; how to insert text into a pdf
#
 2) As it stands, this script gives "false positives" for
#+    Perl, awk, and other scripting language scripts.
    Correct this.
Example 16-14. Generating 10-digit random numbers
#!/bin/bash
# rnd.sh: Outputs a 10-digit random number
# Script by Stephane Chazelas.
head -c4 /dev/urandom | od -N4 -tu4 | sed -ne '1s/.* //p'
# =================================================================== #
# Analysis
# --------
# head:
# -c4 option takes first 4 bytes.
# od:
# -N4 option limits output to 4 bytes.
# -tu4 option selects unsigned decimal format for output.
# sed: 
# -n option, in combination with "p" flag to the "s" command,
# outputs only matched lines.
# The author of this script explains the action of 'sed', as follows.
# head -c4 /dev/urandom | od -N4 -tu4 | sed -ne '1s/.* //p'
# ----------------------------------> |
# Assume output up to "sed" --------> |
# is 0000000 1198195154\n
 sed begins reading characters: 0000000 1198195154\n.
 Here it finds a newline character,
#+ so it is ready to process the first line (0000000 1198195154).
 It looks at its <range><action>s. The first and only one is
  range     action
  1         s/.* //p
 The line number is in the range, so it executes the action:
#+ tries to substitute the longest string ending with a space in the line
 ("0000000 ") with nothing (//), and if it succeeds, prints the result
 ("p" is a flag to the "s" command here, this is different
#+ from the "p" command).
 sed is now ready to continue reading its input. (Note that before
#+ continuing, if -n option had not been passed, sed would have printed
#+ the line once again).
 Now, sed reads the remainder of the characters, and finds the
#+ end of the file.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
240
 It is now ready to process its 2nd line (which is also numbered '$' as
#+ it's the last one).
 It sees it is not matched by any <range>, so its job is done.
 In few word this sed commmand means:
 "On the first line only, remove any character up to the right-most space,
#+ then print it."
# A better way to do this would have been:
          sed -e 's/.* //;q'
# Here, two <range><action>s (could have been written
          sed -e 's/.* //' -e q):
  range                    action
  nothing (matches line)   s/.* //
  nothing (matches line)   q (quit)
 Here, sed only reads its first line of input.
 It performs both actions, and prints the line (substituted) before
#+ quitting (because of the "q" action) since the "-n" option is not passed.
# =================================================================== #
# An even simpler altenative to the above one-line script would be:
          head -c4 /dev/urandom| od -An -tu4
exit
See also Example 16-39.
tail
lists the (tail) end of a file to stdout. The default is 10 lines, but this can be changed with the -n
option. Commonly used to keep track of changes to a system logfile, using the -f option, which
outputs lines appended to the file.
Example 16-15. Using tail to monitor the system log
#!/bin/bash
filename=sys.log
cat /dev/null > $filename; echo "Creating / cleaning out file."
 Creates the file if it does not already exist,
#+ and truncates it to zero length if it does.
 : > filename   and   > filename also work.
tail /var/log/messages > $filename  
# /var/log/messages must have world read permission for this to work.
echo "$filename contains tail end of system log."
exit 0
To list a specific line of a text file, pipe the output of head to tail -n 1. For example
head -n 8 database.txt | tail -n 1 lists the 8th line of the file
database.txt.
To set a variable to a given block of a text file:
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
241
var=$(head -n $m $filename | tail -n $n)
# filename = name of file
# m = from beginning of file, number of lines to end of block
# n = number of lines to set variable to (trim from end of block)
Newer implementations of tail deprecate the older tail -$LINES filename usage. The
standard tail -n $LINES filename is correct.
See also Example 16-5, Example 16-39 and Example 32-6.
grep
A multi-purpose file search tool that uses Regular Expressions. It was originally a command/filter in
the venerable ed line editor: g/re/p -- global - regular expression - print.
greppattern [file...]
Search the target file(s) for occurrences of pattern, where pattern may be literal text or a
Regular Expression.
bash$ grep '[rst]ystem.$' osinfo.txt
The GPL governs the distribution of the Linux operating system.
If no target file(s) specified, grep works as a filter on stdout, as in a pipe.
bash$ ps ax | grep clock
765 tty1     S      0:00 xclock
901 pts/1    S      0:00 grep clock
The -i option causes a case-insensitive search.
The -w option matches only whole words.
The -l option lists only the files in which matches were found, but not the matching lines.
The -r (recursive) option searches files in the current working directory and all subdirectories below
it.
The -n option lists the matching lines, together with line numbers.
bash$ grep -n Linux osinfo.txt
2:This is a file containing information about Linux.
6:The GPL governs the distribution of the Linux operating system.
The -v (or --invert-match) option filters out matches.
grep pattern1 *.txt | grep -v pattern2
# Matches all lines in "*.txt" files containing "pattern1",
# but ***not*** "pattern2".           
The -c (--count) option gives a numerical count of matches, rather than actually listing the
matches.
grep -c txt *.sgml   # (number of occurrences of "txt" in "*.sgml" files)
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
242
  grep -cz .
           ^ dot
# means count (-c) zero-separated (-z) items matching "."
# that is, non-empty ones (containing at least 1 character).
printf 'a b\nc  d\n\n\n\n\n\000\n\000e\000\000\nf' | grep -cz .     # 3
printf 'a b\nc  d\n\n\n\n\n\000\n\000e\000\000\nf' | grep -cz '$'   # 5
printf 'a b\nc  d\n\n\n\n\n\000\n\000e\000\000\nf' | grep -cz '^'   # 5
#
printf 'a b\nc  d\n\n\n\n\n\000\n\000e\000\000\nf' | grep -c '$'    # 9
# By default, newline chars (\n) separate items to match. 
# Note that the -z option is GNU "grep" specific.
# Thanks, S.C.
The --color (or --colour) option marks the matching string in color (on the console or in an
xterm window). Since grep prints out each entire line containing the matching pattern, this lets you
see exactly what is being matched. See also the -o option, which shows only the matching portion of
the line(s).
Example 16-16. Printing out the From lines in stored e-mail messages
#!/bin/bash
# from.sh
 Emulates the useful 'from' utility in Solaris, BSD, etc.
 Echoes the "From" header line in all messages
#+ in your e-mail directory.
MAILDIR=~/mail/*               #  No quoting of variable. Why?
# Maybe check if-exists $MAILDIR:   if [ -d $MAILDIR ] . . .
GREP_OPTS="-H -A 5 --color"    #  Show file, plus extra context lines
#+ and display "From" in color.
TARGETSTR="^From"              # "From" at beginning of line.
for file in $MAILDIR           #  No quoting of variable.
do
grep $GREP_OPTS "$TARGETSTR" "$file"
#    ^^^^^^^^^^              #  Again, do not quote this variable.
echo
done
exit $?
 You might wish to pipe the output of this script to 'more'
#+ or redirect it to a file . . .
When invoked with more than one target file given, grep specifies which file contains matches.
bash$ grep Linux osinfo.txt misc.txt
osinfo.txt:This is a file containing information about Linux.
osinfo.txt:The GPL governs the distribution of the Linux operating system.
misc.txt:The Linux operating system is steadily gaining in popularity.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
243
To force grep to show the filename when searching only one target file, simply give
/dev/null as the second file.
bash$ grep Linux osinfo.txt /dev/null
osinfo.txt:This is a file containing information about Linux.
osinfo.txt:The GPL governs the distribution of the Linux operating system.
If there is a successful match, grep returns an exit status of 0, which makes it useful in a condition test
in a script, especially in combination with the -q option to suppress output.
SUCCESS=0                      # if grep lookup succeeds
word=Linux
filename=data.file
grep -q "$word" "$filename"    #  The "-q" option
#+ causes nothing to echo to stdout.
if [ $? -eq $SUCCESS ]
# if grep -q "$word" "$filename"   can replace lines 5 - 7.
then
echo "$word found in $filename"
else
echo "$word not found in $filename"
fi
Example 32-6 demonstrates how to use grep to search for a word pattern in a system logfile.
Example 16-17. Emulating grep in a script
#!/bin/bash
# grp.sh: Rudimentary reimplementation of grep.
E_BADARGS=85
if [ -z "$1" ]    # Check for argument to script.
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` pattern"
exit $E_BADARGS
fi  
echo
for file in *     # Traverse all files in $PWD.
do
output=$(sed -n /"$1"/p $file)  # Command substitution.
if [ ! -z "$output" ]           # What happens if "$output" is not quoted?
then
echo -n "$file: "
echo "$output"
fi              #  sed -ne "/$1/s|^|${file}: |p"  is equivalent to above.
echo
done  
echo
exit 0
# Exercises:
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
244
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested