open password protected pdf using c# : Add text to pdf without acrobat software Library dll winforms .net asp.net web forms abs-guide25-part1809

# ---------
# 1) Add newlines to output, if more than one match in any given file.
# 2) Add features.
How can grep search for two (or more) separate patterns? What if you want grep to display all lines
in a file or files that contain both "pattern1" and "pattern2"?
One method is to pipe the result of grep pattern1 to grep pattern2.
For example, given the following file:
# Filename: tstfile
This is a sample file.
This is an ordinary text file.
This file does not contain any unusual text.
This file is not unusual.
Here is some text.
Now, let's search this file for lines containing both "file" and "text" . . .
bash$ grep file tstfile
# Filename: tstfile
This is a sample file.
This is an ordinary text file.
This file does not contain any unusual text.
This file is not unusual.
bash$ grep file tstfile | grep text
This is an ordinary text file.
This file does not contain any unusual text.
Now, for an interesting recreational use of grep . . .
Example 16-18. Crossword puzzle solver
#!/bin/bash
# cw-solver.sh
# This is actually a wrapper around a one-liner (line 46).
 Crossword puzzle and anagramming word game solver.
 You know *some* of the letters in the word you're looking for,
#+ so you need a list of all valid words
#+ with the known letters in given positions.
 For example: w...i....n
              1???5????10
# w in position 1, 3 unknowns, i in the 5th, 4 unknowns, n at the end.
# (See comments at end of script.)
E_NOPATT=71
DICT=/usr/share/dict/word.lst
                   ^^^^^^^^   Looks for word list here.
 ASCII word list, one word per line.
 If you happen to need an appropriate list,
#+ download the author's "yawl" word list package.
 http://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/libs/yawl-0.3.2.tar.gz
 or
 http://bash.deta.in/yawl-0.3.2.tar.gz
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
245
Add text to pdf without acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
Add text to pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text field to pdf acrobat
if [ -z "$1" ]   #  If no word pattern specified
then             #+ as a command-line argument . . .
echo           #+ . . . then . . .
echo "Usage:"  #+ Usage message.
echo
echo ""$0" \"pattern,\""
echo "where \"pattern\" is in the form"
echo "xxx..x.x..."
echo
echo "The x's represent known letters,"
echo "and the periods are unknown letters (blanks)."
echo "Letters and periods can be in any position."
echo "For example, try:   sh cw-solver.sh w...i....n"
echo
exit $E_NOPATT
fi
echo
# ===============================================
# This is where all the work gets done.
grep ^"$1"$ "$DICT"   # Yes, only one line!
   |    |
# ^ is start-of-word regex anchor.
# $ is end-of-word regex anchor.
 From _Stupid Grep Tricks_, vol. 1,
#+ a book the ABS Guide author may yet get around
#+ to writing . . . one of these days . . .
# ===============================================
echo
exit $?  # Script terminates here.
 If there are too many words generated,
#+ redirect the output to a file.
$ sh cw-solver.sh w...i....n
wellington
workingman
workingmen
egrep -- extended grep -- is the same as grep -E. This uses a somewhat different, extended set of
Regular Expressions, which can make the search a bit more flexible. It also allows the boolean | (or)
operator.
bash $ egrep 'matches|Matches' file.txt
Line 1 matches.
Line 3 Matches.
Line 4 contains matches, but also Matches
fgrep -- fast grep -- is the same as grep -F. It does a literal string search (no Regular Expressions),
which generally speeds things up a bit.
On some Linux distros, egrep and fgrep are symbolic links to, or aliases for
grep, but invoked with the -E and -F options, respectively.
Example 16-19. Looking up definitions in Webster's 1913 Dictionary
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
246
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other
how to add text to pdf file with reader; adding text pdf files
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; adding text to pdf
#!/bin/bash
# dict-lookup.sh
 This script looks up definitions in the 1913 Webster's Dictionary.
 This Public Domain dictionary is available for download
#+ from various sites, including
#+ Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/247).
#
 Convert it from DOS to UNIX format (with only LF at end of line)
#+ before using it with this script.
 Store the file in plain, uncompressed ASCII text.
 Set DEFAULT_DICTFILE variable below to path/filename.
E_BADARGS=85
MAXCONTEXTLINES=50                        # Maximum number of lines to show.
DEFAULT_DICTFILE="/usr/share/dict/webster1913-dict.txt"
# Default dictionary file pathname.
# Change this as necessary.
 Note:
 ----
 This particular edition of the 1913 Webster's
#+ begins each entry with an uppercase letter
#+ (lowercase for the remaining characters).
 Only the *very first line* of an entry begins this way,
#+ and that's why the search algorithm below works.
if [[ -z $(echo "$1" | sed -n '/^[A-Z]/p') ]]
 Must at least specify word to look up, and
#+ it must start with an uppercase letter.
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` Word-to-define [dictionary-file]"
echo
echo "Note: Word to look up must start with capital letter,"
echo "with the rest of the word in lowercase."
echo "--------------------------------------------"
echo "Examples: Abandon, Dictionary, Marking, etc."
exit $E_BADARGS
fi
if [ -z "$2" ]                            #  May specify different dictionary
#+ as an argument to this script.
then
dictfile=$DEFAULT_DICTFILE
else
dictfile="$2"
fi
# ---------------------------------------------------------
Definition=$(fgrep -A $MAXCONTEXTLINES "$1 \\" "$dictfile")
                 Definitions in form "Word \..."
#
 And, yes, "fgrep" is fast enough
#+ to search even a very large text file.
# Now, snip out just the definition block.
echo "$Definition" |
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
247
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add text to pdf online; how to add text to a pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
add text box in pdf document; add text to a pdf document
sed -n '1,/^[A-Z]/p' |
 Print from first line of output
#+ to the first line of the next entry.
sed '$d' | sed '$d'
 Delete last two lines of output
#+ (blank line and first line of next entry).
# ---------------------------------------------------------
exit $?
# Exercises:
# ---------
# 1)  Modify the script to accept any type of alphabetic input
  + (uppercase, lowercase, mixed case), and convert it
  + to an acceptable format for processing.
#
# 2)  Convert the script to a GUI application,
  + using something like 'gdialog' or 'zenity' . . .
    The script will then no longer take its argument(s)
  + from the command-line.
#
# 3)  Modify the script to parse one of the other available
  + Public Domain Dictionaries, such as the U.S. Census Bureau Gazetteer.
See also Example A-41 for an example of speedy fgrep lookup on a large text file.
agrep (approximate grep) extends the capabilities of grep to approximate matching. The search string
may differ by a specified number of characters from the resulting matches. This utility is not part of
the core Linux distribution.
To search compressed files, use zgrep, zegrep, or zfgrep. These also work on
non-compressed files, though slower than plain grep, egrep, fgrep. They are handy
for searching through a mixed set of files, some compressed, some not.
To search bzipped files, use bzgrep.
look
The command look works like grep, but does a lookup on a "dictionary," a sorted word list. By
default, look searches for a match in /usr/dict/words, but a different dictionary file may be
specified.
Example 16-20. Checking words in a list for validity
#!/bin/bash
# lookup: Does a dictionary lookup on each word in a data file.
file=words.data  # Data file from which to read words to test.
echo
echo "Testing file $file"
echo
while [ "$word" != end ]  # Last word in data file.
do               # ^^^
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
248
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
add text box in pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to add text fields in a pdf; add text pdf acrobat professional
read word      # From data file, because of redirection at end of loop.
look $word > /dev/null  # Don't want to display lines in dictionary file.
#  Searches for words in the file /usr/share/dict/words
#+ (usually a link to linux.words).
lookup=$?      # Exit status of 'look' command.
if [ "$lookup" -eq 0 ]
then
echo "\"$word\" is valid."
else
echo "\"$word\" is invalid."
fi  
done <"$file"    # Redirects stdin to $file, so "reads" come from there.
echo
exit 0
# ----------------------------------------------------------------
# Code below line will not execute because of "exit" command above.
# Stephane Chazelas proposes the following, more concise alternative:
while read word && [[ $word != end ]]
do if look "$word" > /dev/null
then echo "\"$word\" is valid."
else echo "\"$word\" is invalid."
fi
done <"$file"
exit 0
sed, awk
Scripting languages especially suited for parsing text files and command output. May be embedded
singly or in combination in pipes and shell scripts.
sed
Non-interactive "stream editor", permits using many ex commands in batch mode. It finds many uses
in shell scripts.
awk
Programmable file extractor and formatter, good for manipulating and/or extracting fields (columns)
in structured text files. Its syntax is similar to C.
wc
wc gives a "word count" on a file or I/O stream:
bash $ wc /usr/share/doc/sed-4.1.2/README
13  70  447 README
[13 lines  70 words  447 characters]
wc -w gives only the word count.
wc -l gives only the line count.
wc -c gives only the byte count.
wc -m gives only the character count.
wc -L gives only the length of the longest line.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
249
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
to convert multi-page PDF files to multi-page TIFF files without losing any Fast conversion speed for TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF
how to enter text into a pdf form; add text to pdf document in preview
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
add text field pdf; how to add a text box to a pdf
Using wc to count how many .txt files are in current working directory:
$ ls *.txt | wc -l
 Will work as long as none of the "*.txt" files
#+ have a linefeed embedded in their name.
 Alternative ways of doing this are:
     find . -maxdepth 1 -name \*.txt -print0 | grep -cz .
     (shopt -s nullglob; set -- *.txt; echo $#)
 Thanks, S.C.
Using wc to total up the size of all the files whose names begin with letters in the range d - h
bash$ wc [d-h]* | grep total | awk '{print $3}'
71832
Using wc to count the instances of the word "Linux" in the main source file for this book.
bash$ grep Linux abs-book.sgml | wc -l
138
See also Example 16-39 and Example 20-8.
Certain commands include some of the functionality of wc as options.
... | grep foo | wc -l
# This frequently used construct can be more concisely rendered.
... | grep -c foo
# Just use the "-c" (or "--count") option of grep.
# Thanks, S.C.
tr
character translation filter.
Must use quoting and/or brackets, as appropriate. Quotes prevent the shell from
reinterpreting the special characters in tr command sequences. Brackets should be
quoted to prevent expansion by the shell.
Either tr "A-Z" "*" <filename or tr A-Z \* <filename changes all the uppercase
letters in filename to asterisks (writes to stdout). On some systems this may not work, but tr
A-Z '[**]' will.
The -d option deletes a range of characters.
echo "abcdef"                 # abcdef
echo "abcdef" | tr -d b-d     # aef
tr -d 0-9 <filename
# Deletes all digits from the file "filename".
The --squeeze-repeats (or -s) option deletes all but the first instance of a string of
consecutive characters. This option is useful for removing excess whitespace.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
250
bash$ echo "XXXXX" | tr --squeeze-repeats 'X'
X
The -c "complement" option inverts the character set to match. With this option, tr acts only upon
those characters not matching the specified set.
bash$ echo "acfdeb123" | tr -c b-d +
+c+d+b++++
Note that tr recognizes POSIX character classes. [74]
bash$ echo "abcd2ef1" | tr '[:alpha:]' -
----2--1
Example 16-21. toupper: Transforms a file to all uppercase.
#!/bin/bash
# Changes a file to all uppercase.
E_BADARGS=85
if [ -z "$1" ]  # Standard check for command-line arg.
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` filename"
exit $E_BADARGS
fi  
tr a-z A-Z <"$1"
# Same effect as above, but using POSIX character set notation:
       tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]' <"$1"
# Thanks, S.C.
    Or even . . .
    cat "$1" | tr a-z A-Z
    Or dozens of other ways . . .
exit 0
 Exercise:
 Rewrite this script to give the option of changing a file
#+ to *either* upper or lowercase.
 Hint: Use either the "case" or "select" command.
Example 16-22. lowercase: Changes all filenames in working directory to lowercase.
#!/bin/bash
#
 Changes every filename in working directory to all lowercase.
#
 Inspired by a script of John Dubois,
#+ which was translated into Bash by Chet Ramey,
#+ and considerably simplified by the author of the ABS Guide.
for filename in *                # Traverse all files in directory.
do
fname=`basename $filename`
n=`echo $fname | tr A-Z a-z`  # Change name to lowercase.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
251
if [ "$fname" != "$n" ]       # Rename only files not already lowercase.
then
mv $fname $n
fi  
done   
exit $?
# Code below this line will not execute because of "exit".
#--------------------------------------------------------#
# To run it, delete script above line.
# The above script will not work on filenames containing blanks or newlines.
# Stephane Chazelas therefore suggests the following alternative:
for filename in *    # Not necessary to use basename,
# since "*" won't return any file containing "/".
do n=`echo "$filename/" | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'`
                            POSIX char set notation.
                   Slash added so that trailing newlines are not
                   removed by command substitution.
# Variable substitution:
n=${n%/}          # Removes trailing slash, added above, from filename.
[[ $filename == $n ]] || mv "$filename" "$n"
# Checks if filename already lowercase.
done
exit $?
Example 16-23. du: DOS to UNIX text file conversion.
#!/bin/bash
# Du.sh: DOS to UNIX text file converter.
E_WRONGARGS=85
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` filename-to-convert"
exit $E_WRONGARGS
fi
NEWFILENAME=$1.unx
CR='\015'  # Carriage return.
# 015 is octal ASCII code for CR.
# Lines in a DOS text file end in CR-LF.
# Lines in a UNIX text file end in LF only.
tr -d $CR < $1 > $NEWFILENAME
# Delete CR's and write to new file.
echo "Original DOS text file is \"$1\"."
echo "Converted UNIX text file is \"$NEWFILENAME\"."
exit 0
# Exercise:
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
252
# --------
# Change the above script to convert from UNIX to DOS.
Example 16-24. rot13: ultra-weak encryption.
#!/bin/bash
# rot13.sh: Classic rot13 algorithm,
          encryption that might fool a 3-year old
          for about 10 minutes.
# Usage: ./rot13.sh filename
# or     ./rot13.sh <filename
# or     ./rot13.sh and supply keyboard input (stdin)
cat "$@" | tr 'a-zA-Z' 'n-za-mN-ZA-M'   # "a" goes to "n", "b" to "o" ...
 The   cat "$@"   construct
#+ permits input either from stdin or from files.
exit 0
Example 16-25. Generating "Crypto-Quote" Puzzles
#!/bin/bash
# crypto-quote.sh: Encrypt quotes
 Will encrypt famous quotes in a simple monoalphabetic substitution.
 The result is similar to the "Crypto Quote" puzzles
#+ seen in the Op Ed pages of the Sunday paper.
key=ETAOINSHRDLUBCFGJMQPVWZYXK
# The "key" is nothing more than a scrambled alphabet.
# Changing the "key" changes the encryption.
# The 'cat "$@"' construction gets input either from stdin or from files.
# If using stdin, terminate input with a Control-D.
# Otherwise, specify filename as command-line parameter.
cat "$@" | tr "a-z" "A-Z" | tr "A-Z" "$key"
       |  to uppercase  |     encrypt       
# Will work on lowercase, uppercase, or mixed-case quotes.
# Passes non-alphabetic characters through unchanged.
# Try this script with something like:
# "Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits."
# --Mark Twain
#
# Output is:
# "CFPHRCS QF CIIOQ MINFMBRCS EQ FPHIM GIFGUI'Q HETRPQ."
# --BEML PZERC
# To reverse the encryption:
# cat "$@" | tr "$key" "A-Z"
 This simple-minded cipher can be broken by an average 12-year old
#+ using only pencil and paper.
exit 0
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
253
 Exercise:
 --------
 Modify the script so that it will either encrypt or decrypt,
#+ depending on command-line argument(s).
Of course, tr lends itself to code obfuscation.
#!/bin/bash
# jabh.sh
x="wftedskaebjgdBstbdbsmnjgz"
echo $x | tr "a-z" 'oh, turtleneck Phrase Jar!'
# Based on the Wikipedia "Just another Perl hacker" article.
tr variants
The tr utility has two historic variants. The BSD version does not use brackets (tr a-z A-Z), but
the SysV one does (tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'). The GNU version of tr resembles the BSD one.
fold
A filter that wraps lines of input to a specified width. This is especially useful with the -s option,
which breaks lines at word spaces (see Example 16-26 and Example A-1).
fmt
Simple-minded file formatter, used as a filter in a pipe to "wrap" long lines of text output.
Example 16-26. Formatted file listing.
#!/bin/bash
WIDTH=40                    # 40 columns wide.
b=`ls /usr/local/bin`       # Get a file listing...
echo $b | fmt -w $WIDTH
# Could also have been done by
   echo $b | fold - -s -w $WIDTH
exit 0
See also Example 16-5.
A powerful alternative to fmt is Kamil Toman's par utility, available from
http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~amc/Par/.
col
This deceptively named filter removes reverse line feeds from an input stream. It also attempts to
replace whitespace with equivalent tabs. The chief use of col is in filtering the output from certain text
processing utilities, such as groff and tbl.
column
Column formatter. This filter transforms list-type text output into a "pretty-printed" table by inserting
tabs at appropriate places.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
254
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested