open password protected pdf using c# : Adding text to pdf in preview software Library project winforms .net wpf UWP abs-guide32-part1817

objdump
Displays information about an object file or binary executable in either hexadecimal form or as a
disassembled listing (with the -d option).
bash$ objdump -d /bin/ls
/bin/ls:     file format elf32-i386
Disassembly of section .init:
080490bc <.init>:
80490bc:       55                      push   %ebp
80490bd:       89 e5                   mov    %esp,%ebp
. . .
mcookie
This command generates a "magic cookie," a 128-bit (32-character) pseudorandom hexadecimal
number, normally used as an authorization "signature" by the X server. This also available for use in a
script as a "quick 'n dirty" random number.
random000=$(mcookie)
Of course, a script could use md5sum for the same purpose.
# Generate md5 checksum on the script itself.
random001=`md5sum $0 | awk '{print $1}'`
# Uses 'awk' to strip off the filename.
The mcookie command gives yet another way to generate a "unique" filename.
Example 16-62. Filename generator
#!/bin/bash
# tempfile-name.sh:  temp filename generator
BASE_STR=`mcookie`   # 32-character magic cookie.
POS=11               # Arbitrary position in magic cookie string.
LEN=5                # Get $LEN consecutive characters.
prefix=temp          #  This is, after all, a "temp" file.
 For more "uniqueness," generate the
#+ filename prefix using the same method
#+ as the suffix, below.
suffix=${BASE_STR:POS:LEN}
 Extract a 5-character string,
#+ starting at position 11.
temp_filename=$prefix.$suffix
# Construct the filename.
echo "Temp filename = "$temp_filename""
# sh tempfile-name.sh
# Temp filename = temp.e19ea
 Compare this method of generating "unique" filenames
#+ with the 'date' method in ex51.sh.
exit 0
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
315
Adding text to pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf reader; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Adding text to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf document online
units
This utility converts between different units of measure. While normally invoked in interactive mode,
units may find use in a script.
Example 16-63. Converting meters to miles
#!/bin/bash
# unit-conversion.sh
# Must have 'units' utility installed.
convert_units ()  # Takes as arguments the units to convert.
{
cf=$(units "$1" "$2" | sed --silent -e '1p' | awk '{print $2}')
# Strip off everything except the actual conversion factor.
echo "$cf"
}  
Unit1=miles
Unit2=meters
cfactor=`convert_units $Unit1 $Unit2`
quantity=3.73
result=$(echo $quantity*$cfactor | bc)
echo "There are $result $Unit2 in $quantity $Unit1."
 What happens if you pass incompatible units,
#+ such as "acres" and "miles" to the function?
exit 0
# Exercise: Edit this script to accept command-line parameters,
          with appropriate error checking, of course.
m4
A hidden treasure, m4 is a powerful macro [87] processing filter, virtually a complete language.
Although originally written as a pre-processor for RatFor, m4 turned out to be useful as a stand-alone
utility. In fact, m4 combines some of the functionality of eval, tr, and awk, in addition to its extensive
macro expansion facilities.
The April, 2002 issue of Linux Journal has a very nice article on m4 and its uses.
Example 16-64. Using m4
#!/bin/bash
# m4.sh: Using the m4 macro processor
# Strings
string=abcdA01
echo "len($string)" | m4                            #   7
echo "substr($string,4)" | m4                       # A01
echo "regexp($string,[0-1][0-1],\&Z)" | m4      # 01Z
# Arithmetic
var=99
echo "incr($var)" | m4                              #  100
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
316
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add text pdf file; adding text to pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf file
echo "eval($var / 3)" | m4                          #   33
exit
xmessage
This X-based variant of echo pops up a message/query window on the desktop.
xmessage Left click to continue -button okay
zenity
The zenity utility is adept at displaying GTK+ dialog widgets and very suitable for scripting purposes.
doexec
The doexec command enables passing an arbitrary list of arguments to a binary executable. In
particular, passing argv[0] (which corresponds to $0 in a script) lets the executable be invoked by
various names, and it can then carry out different sets of actions, according to the name by which it
was called. What this amounts to is roundabout way of passing options to an executable.
For example, the /usr/local/bin directory might contain a binary called "aaa". Invoking doexec
/usr/local/bin/aaa list would list all those files in the current working directory beginning with an "a",
while invoking (the same executable with) doexec /usr/local/bin/aaa delete would delete those files.
The various behaviors of the executable must be defined within the code of the
executable itself, analogous to something like the following in a shell script:
case `basename $0` in
"name1" ) do_something;;
"name2" ) do_something_else;;
"name3" ) do_yet_another_thing;;
*       ) bail_out;;
esac
dialog
The dialog family of tools provide a method of calling interactive "dialog" boxes from a script. The
more elaborate variations of dialog -- gdialog, Xdialog, and kdialog -- actually invoke X-Windows
widgets.
sox
The sox, or "sound exchange" command plays and performs transformations on sound files. In fact,
the /usr/bin/play executable (now deprecated) is nothing but a shell wrapper for sox.
For example, sox soundfile.wav soundfile.au changes a WAV sound file into a (Sun audio format)
AU sound file.
Shell scripts are ideally suited for batch-processing sox operations on sound files. For examples, see
the  Linux Radio Timeshift HOWTO and the MP3do Project.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 16. External Filters, Programs and Commands
317
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to pdf
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Easy to generate image thumbnail or preview for Tiff 1. Support embedding, removing, adding and updating ICCProfile. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file.
adding text to a pdf in reader; adding text fields to pdf
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
The startup and shutdown scripts in /etc/rc.d illustrate the uses (and usefulness) of many of these
comands. These are usually invoked by root and used for system maintenance or emergency filesystem
repairs. Use with caution, as some of these commands may damage your system if misused.
Users and Groups
users
Show all logged on users. This is the approximate equivalent of who -q.
groups
Lists the current user and the groups she belongs to. This corresponds to the $GROUPS internal
variable, but gives the group names, rather than the numbers.
bash$ groups
bozita cdrom cdwriter audio xgrp
bash$ echo $GROUPS
501
chown, chgrp
The chown command changes the ownership of a file or files. This command is a useful method that
root can use to shift file ownership from one user to another. An ordinary user may not change the
ownership of files, not even her own files. [88]
root# chown bozo *.txt
The chgrp command changes the group ownership of a file or files. You must be owner of the
file(s) as well as a member of the destination group (or root) to use this operation.
chgrp --recursive dunderheads *.data
 The "dunderheads" group will now own all the "*.data" files
#+ all the way down the $PWD directory tree (that's what "recursive" means).
useradd, userdel
The useradd administrative command adds a user account to the system and creates a home directory
for that particular user, if so specified. The corresponding userdel command removes a user account
from the system [89] and deletes associated files.
The adduser command is a synonym for useradd and is usually a symbolic link to it.
usermod
Modify a user account. Changes may be made to the password, group membership, expiration date,
and other attributes of a given user's account. With this command, a user's password may be locked,
which has the effect of disabling the account.
groupmod
Modify a given group. The group name and/or ID number may be changed using this command.
id
The id command lists the real and effective user IDs and the group IDs of the user associated with the
current process. This is the counterpart to the $UID, $EUID, and $GROUPS internal Bash variables.
bash$ id
uid=501(bozo) gid=501(bozo) groups=501(bozo),22(cdrom),80(cdwriter),81(audio)
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
318
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
smart and mature PDF image adding component of As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text box to pdf; adding text to pdf
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET PowerPoint document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class
add text box in pdf; add text box in pdf document
bash$ echo $UID
501
The id command shows the effective IDs only when they differ from the real ones.
Also see Example 9-5.
lid
The lid (list ID) command shows the group(s) that a given user belongs to, or alternately, the users
belonging to a given group. May be invoked only by root.
root# lid bozo
bozo(gid=500)
root# lid daemon
bin(gid=1)
daemon(gid=2)
adm(gid=4)
lp(gid=7)
who
Show all users logged on to the system.
bash$ who
bozo  tty1     Apr 27 17:45
bozo  pts/0    Apr 27 17:46
bozo  pts/1    Apr 27 17:47
bozo  pts/2    Apr 27 17:49
The -m gives detailed information about only the current user. Passing any two arguments to who is
the equivalent of who -m, as in who am i or who The Man.
bash$ who -m
localhost.localdomain!bozo  pts/2    Apr 27 17:49
whoami is similar to who -m, but only lists the user name.
bash$ whoami
bozo
w
Show all logged on users and the processes belonging to them. This is an extended version of who.
The output of w may be piped to grep to find a specific user and/or process.
bash$ w | grep startx
bozo  tty1     -                 4:22pm  6:41   4.47s  0.45s  startx
logname
Show current user's login name (as found in /var/run/utmp). This is a near-equivalent to
whoami, above.
bash$ logname
bozo
bash$ whoami
bozo
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
319
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET Word document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
adding text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf online
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods to add, insert or delete any specific PowerPoint slide, adding & burning
add text pdf acrobat professional; add text to a pdf document
However . . .
bash$ su
Password: ......
bash# whoami
root
bash# logname
bozo
While logname prints the name of the logged in user, whoami gives the name of the
user attached to the current process. As we have just seen, sometimes these are not the
same.
su
Runs a program or script as a substitute user. su rjones starts a shell as user rjones. A naked su
defaults to root. See Example A-14.
sudo
Runs a command as root (or another user). This may be used in a script, thus permitting a regular
user to run the script.
#!/bin/bash
# Some commands.
sudo cp /root/secretfile /home/bozo/secret
# Some more commands.
The file /etc/sudoers holds the names of users permitted to invoke sudo.
passwd
Sets, changes, or manages a user's password.
The passwd command can be used in a script, but probably should not be.
Example 17-1. Setting a new password
#!/bin/bash
 setnew-password.sh: For demonstration purposes only.
                     Not a good idea to actually run this script.
 This script must be run as root.
ROOT_UID=0         # Root has $UID 0.
E_WRONG_USER=65    # Not root?
E_NOSUCHUSER=70
SUCCESS=0
if [ "$UID" -ne "$ROOT_UID" ]
then
echo; echo "Only root can run this script."; echo
exit $E_WRONG_USER
else
echo
echo "You should know better than to run this script, root."
echo "Even root users get the blues... "
echo
fi  
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
320
username=bozo
NEWPASSWORD=security_violation
# Check if bozo lives here.
grep -q "$username" /etc/passwd
if [ $? -ne $SUCCESS ]
then
echo "User $username does not exist."
echo "No password changed."
exit $E_NOSUCHUSER
fi  
echo "$NEWPASSWORD" | passwd --stdin "$username"
 The '--stdin' option to 'passwd' permits
#+ getting a new password from stdin (or a pipe).
echo; echo "User $username's password changed!"
# Using the 'passwd' command in a script is dangerous.
exit 0
The passwd command's -l, -u, and -d options permit locking, unlocking, and deleting a user's
password. Only root may use these options.
ac
Show users' logged in time, as read from /var/log/wtmp. This is one of the GNU accounting
utilities.
bash$ ac
total       68.08
last
List last logged in users, as read from /var/log/wtmp. This command can also show remote
logins.
For example, to show the last few times the system rebooted:
bash$ last reboot
reboot   system boot  2.6.9-1.667      Fri Feb  4 18:18          (00:02)    
reboot   system boot  2.6.9-1.667      Fri Feb  4 15:20          (01:27)    
reboot   system boot  2.6.9-1.667      Fri Feb  4 12:56          (00:49)    
reboot   system boot  2.6.9-1.667      Thu Feb  3 21:08          (02:17)    
. . .
wtmp begins Tue Feb  1 12:50:09 2005
newgrp
Change user's group ID without logging out. This permits access to the new group's files. Since users
may be members of multiple groups simultaneously, this command finds only limited use.
Kurt Glaesemann points out that the newgrp command could prove helpful in setting
the default group permissions for files a user writes. However, the chgrp command
might be more convenient for this purpose.
Terminals
tty
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
321
Echoes the name (filename) of the current user's terminal. Note that each separate xterm window
counts as a different terminal.
bash$ tty
/dev/pts/1
stty
Shows and/or changes terminal settings. This complex command, used in a script, can control
terminal behavior and the way output displays. See the info page, and study it carefully.
Example 17-2. Setting an erase character
#!/bin/bash
# erase.sh: Using "stty" to set an erase character when reading input.
echo -n "What is your name? "
read name                      #  Try to backspace
#+ to erase characters of input.
 Problems?
echo "Your name is $name."
stty erase '#'                 #  Set "hashmark" (#) as erase character.
echo -n "What is your name? "
read name                      #  Use # to erase last character typed.
echo "Your name is $name."
exit 0
# Even after the script exits, the new key value remains set.
# Exercise: How would you reset the erase character to the default value?
Example 17-3. secret password: Turning off terminal echoing
#!/bin/bash
# secret-pw.sh: secret password
echo
echo -n "Enter password "
read passwd
echo "password is $passwd"
echo -n "If someone had been looking over your shoulder, "
echo "your password would have been compromised."
echo && echo  # Two line-feeds in an "and list."
stty -echo    # Turns off screen echo.
  May also be done with
  read -sp passwd
  A big Thank You to Leigh James for pointing this out.
echo -n "Enter password again "
read passwd
echo
echo "password is $passwd"
echo
stty echo     # Restores screen echo.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
322
exit 0
# Do an 'info stty' for more on this useful-but-tricky command.
A creative use of stty is detecting a user keypress (without hitting ENTER).
Example 17-4. Keypress detection
#!/bin/bash
# keypress.sh: Detect a user keypress ("hot keys").
echo
old_tty_settings=$(stty -g)   # Save old settings (why?).
stty -icanon
Keypress=$(head -c1)          # or $(dd bs=1 count=1 2> /dev/null)
# on non-GNU systems
echo
echo "Key pressed was \""$Keypress"\"."
echo
stty "$old_tty_settings"      # Restore old settings.
# Thanks, Stephane Chazelas.
exit 0
Also see Example 9-3 and Example A-43.
terminals and modes
Normally, a terminal works in the canonical mode. When a user hits a key, the resulting character does
not immediately go to the program actually running in this terminal. A buffer local to the terminal stores
keystrokes. When the user hits the ENTER key, this sends all the stored keystrokes to the program
running. There is even a basic line editor inside the terminal.
bash$ stty -a
speed 9600 baud; rows 36; columns 96; line = 0;
intr = ^C; quit = ^\; erase = ^H; kill = ^U; eof = ^D; eol = <undef>; eol2 = <undef>;
start = ^Q; stop = ^S; susp = ^Z; rprnt = ^R; werase = ^W; lnext = ^V; flush = ^O;
...
isig icanon iexten echo echoe echok -echonl -noflsh -xcase -tostop -echoprt
Using canonical mode, it is possible to redefine the special keys for the local terminal line editor.
bash$ cat > filexxx
wha<ctl-W>I<ctl-H>foo bar<ctl-U>hello world<ENTER>
<ctl-D>
bash$ cat filexxx
hello world
bash$ wc -c < filexxx
12
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
323
The process controlling the terminal receives only 12 characters (11 alphabetic ones, plus a newline),
although the user hit 26 keys.
In non-canonical ("raw") mode, every key hit (including special editing keys such as ctl-H) sends a
character immediately to the controlling process.
The Bash prompt disables both icanon and echo, since it replaces the basic terminal line editor with its
own more elaborate one. For example, when you hit ctl-A at the Bash prompt, there's no ^A echoed by
the terminal, but Bash gets a \1 character, interprets it, and moves the cursor to the begining of the line.
Stéphane Chazelas
setterm
Set certain terminal attributes. This command writes to its terminal's stdout a string that changes
the behavior of that terminal.
bash$ setterm -cursor off
bash$
The setterm command can be used within a script to change the appearance of text written to
stdout, although there are certainly better tools available for this purpose.
setterm -bold on
echo bold hello
setterm -bold off
echo normal hello
tset
Show or initialize terminal settings. This is a less capable version of stty.
bash$ tset -r
Terminal type is xterm-xfree86.
Kill is control-U (^U).
Interrupt is control-C (^C).
setserial
Set or display serial port parameters. This command must be run by root and is usually found in a
system setup script.
# From /etc/pcmcia/serial script:
IRQ=`setserial /dev/$DEVICE | sed -e 's/.*IRQ: //'`
setserial /dev/$DEVICE irq 0 ; setserial /dev/$DEVICE irq $IRQ
getty, agetty
The initialization process for a terminal uses getty or agetty to set it up for login by a user. These
commands are not used within user shell scripts. Their scripting counterpart is stty.
mesg
Enables or disables write access to the current user's terminal. Disabling access would prevent another
user on the network to write to the terminal.
It can be quite annoying to have a message about ordering pizza suddenly appear in
the middle of the text file you are editing. On a multi-user network, you might
therefore wish to disable write access to your terminal when you need to avoid
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 17. System and Administrative Commands
324
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested