open password protected pdf using c# : Adding a text field to a pdf control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser abs-guide36-part1821

Run   grep "1133*"  on this file.           # Match.
# No match.
# No match.
This line contains the number 113.          # Match.
This line contains the number 13.           # No match.
This line contains the number 133.          # No match.
This line contains the number 1133.         # Match.
This line contains the number 113312.       # Match.
This line contains the number 1112.         # No match.
This line contains the number 113312312.    # Match.
This line contains no numbers at all.       # No match.
bash$ grep "1133*" tstfile
Run   grep "1133*"  on this file.           # Match.
This line contains the number 113.          # Match.
This line contains the number 1133.         # Match.
This line contains the number 113312.       # Match.
This line contains the number 113312312.    # Match.
Extended REs. Additional metacharacters added to the basic set. Used in egrep, awk, and Perl.
• 
The question mark -- ? -- matches zero or one of the previous RE. It is generally used for matching
single characters.
• 
The plus -- + -- matches one or more of the previous RE. It serves a role similar to the *, but does not
match zero occurrences.
# GNU versions of sed and awk can use "+",
# but it needs to be escaped.
echo a111b | sed -ne '/a1\+b/p'
echo a111b | grep 'a1\+b'
echo a111b | gawk '/a1+b/'
# All of above are equivalent.
# Thanks, S.C.
• 
Escaped "curly brackets" -- \{ \} -- indicate the number of occurrences of a preceding RE to match.
It is necessary to escape the curly brackets since they have only their literal character meaning
otherwise. This usage is technically not part of the basic RE set.
"[0-9]\{5\}" matches exactly five digits (characters in the range of 0 to 9).
Curly brackets are not available as an RE in the "classic" (non-POSIX compliant)
version of awk. However, the GNU extended version of awk, gawk, has the
--re-interval option that permits them (without being escaped).
bash$ echo 2222 | gawk --re-interval '/2{3}/'
2222
Perl and some egrep versions do not require escaping the curly brackets.
• 
Parentheses -- ( ) -- enclose a group of REs. They are useful with the following "|" operator and in
substring extraction using expr.
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 18. Regular Expressions
355
Adding a text field to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to pdf document; how to add text to a pdf in reader
Adding a text field to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf document in preview; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
The -- | -- "or" RE operator matches any of a set of alternate characters.
bash$ egrep 're(a|e)d' misc.txt
People who read seem to be better informed than those who do not.
The clarinet produces sound by the vibration of its reed.
• 
Some versions of sed, ed, and ex support escaped versions of the extended Regular Expressions
described above, as do the GNU utilities.
POSIX Character Classes.[:class:]
This is an alternate method of specifying a range of characters to match.
• 
[:alnum:] matches alphabetic or numeric characters. This is equivalent to A-Za-z0-9.
• 
[:alpha:] matches alphabetic characters. This is equivalent to A-Za-z.
• 
[:blank:] matches a space or a tab.
• 
[:cntrl:] matches control characters.
• 
[:digit:] matches (decimal) digits. This is equivalent to 0-9.
• 
[:graph:] (graphic printable characters). Matches characters in the range of ASCII 33 - 126. This
is the same as [:print:], below, but excluding the space character.
• 
[:lower:] matches lowercase alphabetic characters. This is equivalent to a-z.
• 
[:print:] (printable characters). Matches characters in the range of ASCII 32 - 126. This is the
same as [:graph:], above, but adding the space character.
• 
[:space:] matches whitespace characters (space and horizontal tab).
• 
[:upper:] matches uppercase alphabetic characters. This is equivalent to A-Z.
• 
[:xdigit:] matches hexadecimal digits. This is equivalent to 0-9A-Fa-f.
POSIX character classes generally require quoting or double brackets ([[ ]]).
bash$ grep [[:digit:]] test.file
abc=723
# ...
if [[ $arow =~ [[:digit:]] ]]   #  Numerical input?
then       #  POSIX char class
if [[ $acol =~ [[:alpha:]] ]] # Number followed by a letter? Illegal!
# ...
# From ktour.sh example script.
These character classes may even be used with globbing, to a limited extent.
bash$ ls -l ?[[:digit:]][[:digit:]]?
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug 21 14:47 a33b
POSIX character classes are used in Example 16-21 and Example 16-22.
• 
Sed, awk, and Perl, used as filters in scripts, take REs as arguments when "sifting" or transforming files or I/O
streams. See Example A-12 and Example A-16 for illustrations of this.
The standard reference on this complex topic is Friedl's Mastering Regular Expressions. Sed & Awk, by
Dougherty and Robbins, also gives a very lucid treatment of REs. See the Bibliography for more information
on these books.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 18. Regular Expressions
356
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add text in pdf file online; how to add text boxes to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
adding text pdf files; how to insert text box in pdf document
18.2. Globbing
Bash itself cannot recognize Regular Expressions. Inside scripts, it is commands and utilities -- such as sed
and awk -- that interpret RE's.
Bash does carry out filename expansion[100] -- a process known as globbing -- but this does not use the
standard RE set. Instead, globbing recognizes and expands wild cards. Globbing interprets the standard wild
card characters [101] -- * and ?, character lists in square brackets, and certain other special characters (such as
^ for negating the sense of a match). There are important limitations on wild card characters in globbing,
however. Strings containing * will not match filenames that start with a dot, as, for example, .bashrc. [102]
Likewise, the ? has a different meaning in globbing than as part of an RE.
bash$ ls -l
total 2
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 a.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 b.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 c.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       466 Aug  6 17:48 t2.sh
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       758 Jul 30 09:02 test1.txt
bash$ ls -l t?.sh
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       466 Aug  6 17:48 t2.sh
bash$ ls -l [ab]*
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 a.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 b.1
bash$ ls -l [a-c]*
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 a.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 b.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 c.1
bash$ ls -l [^ab]*
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 c.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       466 Aug  6 17:48 t2.sh
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       758 Jul 30 09:02 test1.txt
bash$ ls -l {b*,c*,*est*}
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 b.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo         0 Aug  6 18:42 c.1
-rw-rw-r--    1 bozo  bozo       758 Jul 30 09:02 test1.txt
Bash performs filename expansion on unquoted command-line arguments. The echo command demonstrates
this.
bash$ echo *
a.1 b.1 c.1 t2.sh test1.txt
bash$ echo t*
t2.sh test1.txt
bash$ echo t?.sh
t2.sh
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 18. Regular Expressions
357
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET.
how to add text to a pdf document; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add editable text box to pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
It is possible to modify the way Bash interprets special characters in globbing. A set -f command
disables globbing, and the nocaseglob and nullglob options to shopt change globbing behavior.
See also Example 11-5.
Filenames with embedded whitespace can cause globbing to choke. David Wheeler shows how to avoid
many such pitfalls.
IFS="$(printf '\n\t')"   # Remove space.
#  Correct glob use:
#  Always use for-loop, prefix glob, check if exists file.
for file in ./* ; do         # Use ./* ... NEVER bare *
if [ -e "$file" ] ; then   # Check whether file exists.
COMMAND ... "$file" ...
fi
done
# This example taken from David Wheeler's site, with permission.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 18. Regular Expressions
358
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to enter text into a pdf form; add text to pdf reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding a text field to a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf file
Chapter 19. Here Documents
Here and now, boys.
--Aldous Huxley, Island
A here document is a special-purpose code block. It uses a form of I/O redirection to feed a command list to
an interactive program or a command, such as ftp, cat, or the ex text editor.
COMMAND <<InputComesFromHERE
...
...
...
InputComesFromHERE
A limit string delineates (frames) the command list. The special symbol << precedes the limit string. This has
the effect of redirecting the output of a command block into the stdin of the program or command. It is
similar to interactive-program < command-file, where command-file contains
command #1
command #2
...
The here document equivalent looks like this:
interactive-program <<LimitString
command #1
command #2
...
LimitString
Choose a limit string sufficiently unusual that it will not occur anywhere in the command list and confuse
matters.
Note that here documents may sometimes be used to good effect with non-interactive utilities and commands,
such as, for example, wall.
Example 19-1. broadcast: Sends message to everyone logged in
#!/bin/bash
wall <<zzz23EndOfMessagezzz23
E-mail your noontime orders for pizza to the system administrator.
(Add an extra dollar for anchovy or mushroom topping.)
# Additional message text goes here.
# Note: 'wall' prints comment lines.
zzz23EndOfMessagezzz23
# Could have been done more efficiently by
        wall <message-file
 However, embedding the message template in a script
#+ is a quick-and-dirty one-off solution.
exit
Chapter 19. Here Documents
359
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; adding text to a pdf file
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Search unsigned signature field in PDF document.
how to add text to pdf; how to add a text box in a pdf file
Even such unlikely candidates as the vi text editor lend themselves to here documents.
Example 19-2. dummyfile: Creates a 2-line dummy file
#!/bin/bash
# Noninteractive use of 'vi' to edit a file.
# Emulates 'sed'.
E_BADARGS=85
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` filename"
exit $E_BADARGS
fi
TARGETFILE=$1
# Insert 2 lines in file, then save.
#--------Begin here document-----------#
vi $TARGETFILE <<x23LimitStringx23
i
This is line 1 of the example file.
This is line 2 of the example file.
^[
ZZ
x23LimitStringx23
#----------End here document-----------#
 Note that ^[ above is a literal escape
#+ typed by Control-V <Esc>.
 Bram Moolenaar points out that this may not work with 'vim'
#+ because of possible problems with terminal interaction.
exit
The above script could just as effectively have been implemented with ex, rather than vi. Here documents
containing a list of ex commands are common enough to form their own category, known as ex scripts.
#!/bin/bash
 Replace all instances of "Smith" with "Jones"
#+ in files with a ".txt" filename suffix. 
ORIGINAL=Smith
REPLACEMENT=Jones
for word in $(fgrep -l $ORIGINAL *.txt)
do
# -------------------------------------
ex $word <<EOF
:%s/$ORIGINAL/$REPLACEMENT/g
:wq
EOF
# :%s is the "ex" substitution command.
# :wq is write-and-quit.
# -------------------------------------
done
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 19. Here Documents
360
Analogous to "ex scripts" are cat scripts.
Example 19-3. Multi-line message using cat
#!/bin/bash
 'echo' is fine for printing single line messages,
#+  but somewhat problematic for for message blocks.
  A 'cat' here document overcomes this limitation.
cat <<End-of-message
-------------------------------------
This is line 1 of the message.
This is line 2 of the message.
This is line 3 of the message.
This is line 4 of the message.
This is the last line of the message.
-------------------------------------
End-of-message
 Replacing line 7, above, with
#+   cat > $Newfile <<End-of-message
#+       ^^^^^^^^^^
#+ writes the output to the file $Newfile, rather than to stdout.
exit 0
#--------------------------------------------
# Code below disabled, due to "exit 0" above.
# S.C. points out that the following also works.
echo "-------------------------------------
This is line 1 of the message.
This is line 2 of the message.
This is line 3 of the message.
This is line 4 of the message.
This is the last line of the message.
-------------------------------------"
# However, text may not include double quotes unless they are escaped.
The - option to mark a here document limit string (<<-LimitString) suppresses leading tabs (but not
spaces) in the output. This may be useful in making a script more readable.
Example 19-4. Multi-line message, with tabs suppressed
#!/bin/bash
# Same as previous example, but...
 The - option to a here document <<-
#+ suppresses leading tabs in the body of the document,
#+ but *not* spaces.
cat <<-ENDOFMESSAGE
This is line 1 of the message.
This is line 2 of the message.
This is line 3 of the message.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 19. Here Documents
361
This is line 4 of the message.
This is the last line of the message.
ENDOFMESSAGE
# The output of the script will be flush left.
# Leading tab in each line will not show.
# Above 5 lines of "message" prefaced by a tab, not spaces.
# Spaces not affected by   <<-  .
# Note that this option has no effect on *embedded* tabs.
exit 0
A here document supports parameter and command substitution. It is therefore possible to pass different
parameters to the body of the here document, changing its output accordingly.
Example 19-5. Here document with replaceable parameters
#!/bin/bash
# Another 'cat' here document, using parameter substitution.
# Try it with no command-line parameters,   ./scriptname
# Try it with one command-line parameter,   ./scriptname Mortimer
# Try it with one two-word quoted command-line parameter,
                          ./scriptname "Mortimer Jones"
CMDLINEPARAM=1     #  Expect at least command-line parameter.
if [ $# -ge $CMDLINEPARAM ]
then
NAME=$1          #  If more than one command-line param,
#+ then just take the first.
else
NAME="John Doe"  #  Default, if no command-line parameter.
fi  
RESPONDENT="the author of this fine script"  
cat <<Endofmessage
Hello, there, $NAME.
Greetings to you, $NAME, from $RESPONDENT.
# This comment shows up in the output (why?).
Endofmessage
# Note that the blank lines show up in the output.
# So does the comment.
exit
This is a useful script containing a here document with parameter substitution.
Example 19-6. Upload a file pair to Sunsite incoming directory
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 19. Here Documents
362
#!/bin/bash
# upload.sh
 Upload file pair (Filename.lsm, Filename.tar.gz)
#+ to incoming directory at Sunsite/UNC (ibiblio.org).
 Filename.tar.gz is the tarball itself.
 Filename.lsm is the descriptor file.
 Sunsite requires "lsm" file, otherwise will bounce contributions.
E_ARGERROR=85
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
echo "Usage: `basename $0` Filename-to-upload"
exit $E_ARGERROR
fi  
Filename=`basename $1`           # Strips pathname out of file name.
Server="ibiblio.org"
Directory="/incoming/Linux"
 These need not be hard-coded into script,
#+ but may instead be changed to command-line argument.
Password="your.e-mail.address"   # Change above to suit.
ftp -n $Server <<End-Of-Session
# -n option disables auto-logon
user anonymous "$Password"       #  If this doesn't work, then try:
#  quote user anonymous "$Password"
binary
bell                             # Ring 'bell' after each file transfer.
cd $Directory
put "$Filename.lsm"
put "$Filename.tar.gz"
bye
End-Of-Session
exit 0
Quoting or escaping the "limit string" at the head of a here document disables parameter substitution within its
body. The reason for this is that quoting/escaping the limit string effectively escapes the $, `, and \ special
characters, and causes them to be interpreted literally. (Thank you, Allen Halsey, for pointing this out.)
Example 19-7. Parameter substitution turned off
#!/bin/bash
 A 'cat' here-document, but with parameter substitution disabled.
NAME="John Doe"
RESPONDENT="the author of this fine script"  
cat <<'Endofmessage'
Hello, there, $NAME.
Greetings to you, $NAME, from $RESPONDENT.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 19. Here Documents
363
Endofmessage
  No parameter substitution when the "limit string" is quoted or escaped.
  Either of the following at the head of the here document would have
#+  the same effect.
  cat <<"Endofmessage"
  cat <<\Endofmessage
  And, likewise:
cat <<"SpecialCharTest"
Directory listing would follow
if limit string were not quoted.
`ls -l`
Arithmetic expansion would take place
if limit string were not quoted.
$((5 + 3))
A a single backslash would echo
if limit string were not quoted.
\\
SpecialCharTest
exit
Disabling parameter substitution permits outputting literal text. Generating scripts or even program code is
one use for this.
Example 19-8. A script that generates another script
#!/bin/bash
# generate-script.sh
# Based on an idea by Albert Reiner.
OUTFILE=generated.sh         # Name of the file to generate.
# -----------------------------------------------------------
# 'Here document containing the body of the generated script.
(
cat <<'EOF'
#!/bin/bash
echo "This is a generated shell script."
 Note that since we are inside a subshell,
#+ we can't access variables in the "outside" script.
echo "Generated file will be named: $OUTFILE"
 Above line will not work as normally expected
#+ because parameter expansion has been disabled.
 Instead, the result is literal output.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 19. Here Documents
364
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested