open password protected pdf using c# : How to add text to pdf application software cloud html winforms windows class abs-guide44-part1830

echo "Number of elements in array1 = ${#array1[*]}"  # 1  (Surprise!)
echo "Number of elements in array2 = ${#array2[*]}"  # 0
echo "Number of elements in array3 = ${#array3[*]}"  # 0
}
# ===================================================================
ListArray
# Try extending those arrays.
# Adding an element to an array.
array0=( "${array0[@]}" "new1" )
array1=( "${array1[@]}" "new1" )
array2=( "${array2[@]}" "new1" )
array3=( "${array3[@]}" "new1" )
ListArray
# or
array0[${#array0[*]}]="new2"
array1[${#array1[*]}]="new2"
array2[${#array2[*]}]="new2"
array3[${#array3[*]}]="new2"
ListArray
# When extended as above, arrays are 'stacks' ...
# Above is the 'push' ...
# The stack 'height' is:
height=${#array2[@]}
echo
echo "Stack height for array2 = $height"
# The 'pop' is:
unset array2[${#array2[@]}-1]   #  Arrays are zero-based,
height=${#array2[@]}            #+ which means first element has index 0.
echo
echo "POP"
echo "New stack height for array2 = $height"
ListArray
# List only 2nd and 3rd elements of array0.
from=1              # Zero-based numbering.
to=2
array3=( ${array0[@]:1:2} )
echo
echo "Elements in array3:  ${array3[@]}"
# Works like a string (array of characters).
# Try some other "string" forms.
# Replacement:
array4=( ${array0[@]/second/2nd} )
echo
echo "Elements in array4:  ${array4[@]}"
# Replace all matching wildcarded string.
array5=( ${array0[@]//new?/old} )
echo
echo "Elements in array5:  ${array5[@]}"
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
435
How to add text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document; how to insert text in pdf reader
How to add text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text in pdf form; add text to pdf in acrobat
# Just when you are getting the feel for this . . .
array6=( ${array0[@]#*new} )
echo # This one might surprise you.
echo "Elements in array6:  ${array6[@]}"
array7=( ${array0[@]#new1} )
echo # After array6 this should not be a surprise.
echo "Elements in array7:  ${array7[@]}"
# Which looks a lot like . . .
array8=( ${array0[@]/new1/} )
echo
echo "Elements in array8:  ${array8[@]}"
 So what can one say about this?
 The string operations are performed on
#+ each of the elements in var[@] in succession.
 Therefore : Bash supports string vector operations.
 If the result is a zero length string,
#+ that element disappears in the resulting assignment.
 However, if the expansion is in quotes, the null elements remain.
 Michael Zick:    Question, are those strings hard or soft quotes?
 Nathan Coulter:  There is no such thing as "soft quotes."
#!    What's really happening is that
#!+   the pattern matching happens after
#!+   all the other expansions of [word]
#!+   in cases like ${parameter#word}.
zap='new*'
array9=( ${array0[@]/$zap/} )
echo
echo "Number of elements in array9:  ${#array9[@]}"
array9=( "${array0[@]/$zap/}" )
echo "Elements in array9:  ${array9[@]}"
# This time the null elements remain.
echo "Number of elements in array9:  ${#array9[@]}"
# Just when you thought you were still in Kansas . . .
array10=( ${array0[@]#$zap} )
echo
echo "Elements in array10:  ${array10[@]}"
# But, the asterisk in zap won't be interpreted if quoted.
array10=( ${array0[@]#"$zap"} )
echo
echo "Elements in array10:  ${array10[@]}"
# Well, maybe we _are_ still in Kansas . . .
# (Revisions to above code block by Nathan Coulter.)
 Compare array7 with array10.
 Compare array8 with array9.
 Reiterating: No such thing as soft quotes!
 Nathan Coulter explains:
 Pattern matching of 'word' in ${parameter#word} is done after
#+ parameter expansion and *before* quote removal.
 In the normal case, pattern matching is done *after* quote removal.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
436
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to add text fields in a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text pdf acrobat; adding text to pdf form
exit
The relationship of ${array_name[@]} and ${array_name[*]} is analogous to that between $@ and $*. This
powerful array notation has a number of uses.
# Copying an array.
array2=( "${array1[@]}" )
# or
array2="${array1[@]}"
#
 However, this fails with "sparse" arrays,
#+ arrays with holes (missing elements) in them,
#+ as Jochen DeSmet points out.
# ------------------------------------------
array1[0]=0
# array1[1] not assigned
array1[2]=2
array2=( "${array1[@]}" )       # Copy it?
echo ${array2[0]}      # 0
echo ${array2[2]}      # (null), should be 2
# ------------------------------------------
# Adding an element to an array.
array=( "${array[@]}" "new element" )
# or
array[${#array[*]}]="new element"
# Thanks, S.C.
The array=( element1 element2 ... elementN ) initialization operation, with the help of command
substitution, makes it possible to load the contents of a text file into an array.
#!/bin/bash
filename=sample_file
#            cat sample_file
#
#            1 a b c
#            2 d e fg
declare -a array1
array1=( `cat "$filename"`)                #  Loads contents
#         List file to stdout              #+ of $filename into array1.
#
#  array1=( `cat "$filename" | tr '\n' ' '`)
#                            change linefeeds in file to spaces. 
#  Not necessary because Bash does word splitting,
#+ changing linefeeds to spaces.
echo ${array1[@]}            # List the array.
#                              1 a b c 2 d e fg
#
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
437
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to pdf acrobat; adding text pdf file
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text box to pdf; how to add text to pdf
#  Each whitespace-separated "word" in the file
#+ has been assigned to an element of the array.
element_count=${#array1[*]}
echo $element_count          # 8
Clever scripting makes it possible to add array operations.
Example 27-8. Initializing arrays
#! /bin/bash
# array-assign.bash
 Array operations are Bash-specific,
#+ hence the ".bash" in the script name.
# Copyright (c) Michael S. Zick, 2003, All rights reserved.
# License: Unrestricted reuse in any form, for any purpose.
# Version: $ID$
#
# Clarification and additional comments by William Park.
 Based on an example provided by Stephane Chazelas
#+ which appeared in an earlier version of the
#+ Advanced Bash Scripting Guide.
# Output format of the 'times' command:
# User CPU <space> System CPU
# User CPU of dead children <space> System CPU of dead children
 Bash has two versions of assigning all elements of an array
#+ to a new array variable.
 Both drop 'null reference' elements
#+ in Bash versions 2.04 and later.
 An additional array assignment that maintains the relationship of
#+ [subscript]=value for arrays may be added to newer versions.
 Constructs a large array using an internal command,
#+ but anything creating an array of several thousand elements
#+ will do just fine.
declare -a bigOne=( /dev/* )  # All the files in /dev . . .
echo
echo 'Conditions: Unquoted, default IFS, All-Elements-Of'
echo "Number of elements in array is ${#bigOne[@]}"
# set -vx
echo
echo '- - testing: =( ${array[@]} ) - -'
times
declare -a bigTwo=( ${bigOne[@]} )
# Note parens:    ^              ^
times
echo
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
438
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text to a pdf file; how to add text to pdf file with reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text fields to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
echo '- - testing: =${array[@]} - -'
times
declare -a bigThree=${bigOne[@]}
# No parentheses this time.
times
 Comparing the numbers shows that the second form, pointed out
#+ by Stephane Chazelas, is faster.
#
 As William Park explains:
#+ The bigTwo array assigned element by element (because of parentheses),
#+ whereas bigThree assigned as a single string.
 So, in essence, you have:
                  bigTwo=( [0]="..." [1]="..." [2]="..." ... )
                  bigThree=( [0]="... ... ..." )
#
 Verify this by:  echo ${bigTwo[0]}
                  echo ${bigThree[0]}
 I will continue to use the first form in my example descriptions
#+ because I think it is a better illustration of what is happening.
 The reusable portions of my examples will actual contain
#+ the second form where appropriate because of the speedup.
# MSZ: Sorry about that earlier oversight folks.
 Note:
 ----
 The "declare -a" statements in lines 32 and 44
#+ are not strictly necessary, since it is implicit
#+ in the  Array=( ... )  assignment form.
 However, eliminating these declarations slows down
#+ the execution of the following sections of the script.
 Try it, and see.
exit 0
Adding a superfluous declare -a statement to an array declaration may speed up execution of subsequent
operations on the array.
Example 27-9. Copying and concatenating arrays
#! /bin/bash
# CopyArray.sh
#
# This script written by Michael Zick.
# Used here with permission.
 How-To "Pass by Name & Return by Name"
#+ or "Building your own assignment statement".
CpArray_Mac() {
# Assignment Command Statement Builder
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
439
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page. Add necessary references: This is a piece of VB.NET demo code to add text annotation to PDF page.
adding text to pdf; adding text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#. C#.NET Demo Code: Add Text to PDF Page in C#.NET.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to pdf document
echo -n 'eval '
echo -n "$2"                    # Destination name
echo -n '=( ${'
echo -n "$1"                    # Source name
echo -n '[@]} )'
# That could all be a single command.
# Matter of style only.
}
declare -f CopyArray                # Function "Pointer"
CopyArray=CpArray_Mac               # Statement Builder
Hype()
{
# Hype the array named $1.
# (Splice it together with array containing "Really Rocks".)
# Return in array named $2.
local -a TMP
local -a hype=( Really Rocks )
$($CopyArray $1 TMP)
TMP=( ${TMP[@]} ${hype[@]} )
$($CopyArray TMP $2)
}
declare -a before=( Advanced Bash Scripting )
declare -a after
echo "Array Before = ${before[@]}"
Hype before after
echo "Array After = ${after[@]}"
# Too much hype?
echo "What ${after[@]:3:2}?"
declare -a modest=( ${after[@]:2:1} ${after[@]:3:2} )
                   ---- substring extraction ----
echo "Array Modest = ${modest[@]}"
# What happened to 'before' ?
echo "Array Before = ${before[@]}"
exit 0
Example 27-10. More on concatenating arrays
#! /bin/bash
# array-append.bash
# Copyright (c) Michael S. Zick, 2003, All rights reserved.
# License: Unrestricted reuse in any form, for any purpose.
# Version: $ID$
#
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
440
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add Annotation – Add Text Box Overview. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text to pdf file; add text boxes to pdf
# Slightly modified in formatting by M.C.
# Array operations are Bash-specific.
# Legacy UNIX /bin/sh lacks equivalents.
 Pipe the output of this script to 'more'
#+ so it doesn't scroll off the terminal.
 Or, redirect output to a file.
declare -a array1=( zero1 one1 two1 )
# Subscript packed.
declare -a array2=( [0]=zero2 [2]=two2 [3]=three2 )
# Subscript sparse -- [1] is not defined.
echo
echo '- Confirm that the array is really subscript sparse. -'
echo "Number of elements: 4"        # Hard-coded for illustration.
for (( i = 0 ; i < 4 ; i++ ))
do
echo "Element [$i]: ${array2[$i]}"
done
# See also the more general code example in basics-reviewed.bash.
declare -a dest
# Combine (append) two arrays into a third array.
echo
echo 'Conditions: Unquoted, default IFS, All-Elements-Of operator'
echo '- Undefined elements not present, subscripts not maintained. -'
# # The undefined elements do not exist; they are not being dropped.
dest=( ${array1[@]} ${array2[@]} )
# dest=${array1[@]}${array2[@]}     # Strange results, possibly a bug.
# Now, list the result.
echo
echo '- - Testing Array Append - -'
cnt=${#dest[@]}
echo "Number of elements: $cnt"
for (( i = 0 ; i < cnt ; i++ ))
do
echo "Element [$i]: ${dest[$i]}"
done
# Assign an array to a single array element (twice).
dest[0]=${array1[@]}
dest[1]=${array2[@]}
# List the result.
echo
echo '- - Testing modified array - -'
cnt=${#dest[@]}
echo "Number of elements: $cnt"
for (( i = 0 ; i < cnt ; i++ ))
do
echo "Element [$i]: ${dest[$i]}"
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
441
done
# Examine the modified second element.
echo
echo '- - Reassign and list second element - -'
declare -a subArray=${dest[1]}
cnt=${#subArray[@]}
echo "Number of elements: $cnt"
for (( i = 0 ; i < cnt ; i++ ))
do
echo "Element [$i]: ${subArray[$i]}"
done
 The assignment of an entire array to a single element
#+ of another array using the '=${ ... }' array assignment
#+ has converted the array being assigned into a string,
#+ with the elements separated by a space (the first character of IFS).
# If the original elements didn't contain whitespace . . .
# If the original array isn't subscript sparse . . .
# Then we could get the original array structure back again.
# Restore from the modified second element.
echo
echo '- - Listing restored element - -'
declare -a subArray=( ${dest[1]} )
cnt=${#subArray[@]}
echo "Number of elements: $cnt"
for (( i = 0 ; i < cnt ; i++ ))
do
echo "Element [$i]: ${subArray[$i]}"
done
echo '- - Do not depend on this behavior. - -'
echo '- - This behavior is subject to change - -'
echo '- - in versions of Bash newer than version 2.05b - -'
# MSZ: Sorry about any earlier confusion folks.
exit 0
--
Arrays permit deploying old familiar algorithms as shell scripts. Whether this is necessarily a good idea is left
for the reader to decide.
Example 27-11. The Bubble Sort
#!/bin/bash
# bubble.sh: Bubble sort, of sorts.
# Recall the algorithm for a bubble sort. In this particular version...
 With each successive pass through the array to be sorted,
#+ compare two adjacent elements, and swap them if out of order.
 At the end of the first pass, the "heaviest" element has sunk to bottom.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
442
 At the end of the second pass, the next "heaviest" one has sunk next to bottom.
 And so forth.
 This means that each successive pass needs to traverse less of the array.
 You will therefore notice a speeding up in the printing of the later passes.
exchange()
{
# Swaps two members of the array.
local temp=${Countries[$1]} #  Temporary storage
#+ for element getting swapped out.
Countries[$1]=${Countries[$2]}
Countries[$2]=$temp
return
}  
declare -a Countries  #  Declare array,
#+ optional here since it's initialized below.
 Is it permissable to split an array variable over multiple lines
#+ using an escape (\)?
 Yes.
Countries=(Netherlands Ukraine Zaire Turkey Russia Yemen Syria \
Brazil Argentina Nicaragua Japan Mexico Venezuela Greece England \
Israel Peru Canada Oman Denmark Wales France Kenya \
Xanadu Qatar Liechtenstein Hungary)
# "Xanadu" is the mythical place where, according to Coleridge,
#+ Kubla Khan did a pleasure dome decree.
clear                      # Clear the screen to start with. 
echo "0: ${Countries[*]}"  # List entire array at pass 0.
number_of_elements=${#Countries[@]}
let "comparisons = $number_of_elements - 1"
count=1 # Pass number.
while [ "$comparisons" -gt 0 ]          # Beginning of outer loop
do
index=0  # Reset index to start of array after each pass.
while [ "$index" -lt "$comparisons" ] # Beginning of inner loop
do
if [ ${Countries[$index]} \> ${Countries[`expr $index + 1`]} ]
#  If out of order...
#  Recalling that \> is ASCII comparison operator
#+ within single brackets.
#  if [[ ${Countries[$index]} > ${Countries[`expr $index + 1`]} ]]
#+ also works.
then
exchange $index `expr $index + 1`  # Swap.
fi  
let "index += 1"  # Or,   index+=1   on Bash, ver. 3.1 or newer.
done # End of inner loop
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
443
# ----------------------------------------------------------------------
# Paulo Marcel Coelho Aragao suggests for-loops as a simpler altenative.
#
# for (( last = $number_of_elements - 1 ; last > 0 ; last-- ))
##                     Fix by C.Y. Hunt          ^   (Thanks!)
# do
    for (( i = 0 ; i < last ; i++ ))
    do
        [[ "${Countries[$i]}" > "${Countries[$((i+1))]}" ]] \
            && exchange $i $((i+1))
    done
# done
# ----------------------------------------------------------------------
let "comparisons -= 1" #  Since "heaviest" element bubbles to bottom,
#+ we need do one less comparison each pass.
echo
echo "$count: ${Countries[@]}"  # Print resultant array at end of each pass.
echo
let "count += 1"                # Increment pass count.
done                            # End of outer loop
# All done.
exit 0
--
Is it possible to nest arrays within arrays?
#!/bin/bash
# "Nested" array.
 Michael Zick provided this example,
#+ with corrections and clarifications by William Park.
AnArray=( $(ls --inode --ignore-backups --almost-all \
--directory --full-time --color=none --time=status \
--sort=time -l ${PWD} ) )  # Commands and options.
# Spaces are significant . . . and don't quote anything in the above.
SubArray=( ${AnArray[@]:11:1}  ${AnArray[@]:6:5} )
 This array has six elements:
#+     SubArray=( [0]=${AnArray[11]} [1]=${AnArray[6]} [2]=${AnArray[7]}
     [3]=${AnArray[8]} [4]=${AnArray[9]} [5]=${AnArray[10]} )
#
 Arrays in Bash are (circularly) linked lists
#+ of type string (char *).
 So, this isn't actually a nested array,
#+ but it's functionally similar.
echo "Current directory and date of last status change:"
echo "${SubArray[@]}"
exit 0
--
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 27. Arrays
444
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested